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MBA Admissions Consultant
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
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MBA Admissions Consultant
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 6452
Own Kudos [?]: 846 [0]
Given Kudos: 92
Location: Los Angeles CA
Send PM
MBA Admissions Consultant
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 6452
Own Kudos [?]: 846 [0]
Given Kudos: 92
Location: Los Angeles CA
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MBA Admissions Consultant
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MIT Sloan Class of 2022 Profile [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: MIT Sloan Class of 2022 Profile



Here’s a look at the Sloan Class of 2022, taken from the MIT website:

Size of Class 2022: 484

Average Years Work Experience: 5

Women: 38%

International: 33%

WATCH: Ask Me Anything with MIT Sloan Assistant Director of Admissions, Dawna Levenson >>

Countries Represented: 51

Median Undergraduate GPA: 3.54

Median GMAT: 720

GMAT Range (middle 80%): 680–760

GRE Quant Range (middle 80%): 156–168

GRE Verbal Range (middle 80%): 155–167

PRE-MBA Industry:

  • Consulting: 22%

  • Financial Services: 17%

  • Technology: 15%

  • Government, Education, Nonprofit: 13%

  • Pharmaceutical, Healthcare, Biotechnology: 9%

  • Other: 7%

  • Energy: 5%

  • Manufacturing: 4%

  • Consumer Products, Retail: 4%

  • Automotive, Transportation, Defense: 4%

  • Media, Entertainment, Sports: 1%

Undergraduate Majors:

  • Engineering: 33%

  • Economics: 19%

  • Business: 16%

  • Math and Science: 10%

  • Social Science: 8%

  • Other: 7%

  • Humanities: 4%

  • Computer Science: 2%

  • Law: 1%

Do you see yourself as a future graduate of MIT Sloan? Accepted has the resources to help you decide which program is right for you:


If MIT Sloan is your top choice, we have the inside information to help you tailor your application:


Getting into Sloan, or any of the top MBA programs, is very competitive. Check out our MBA Services Packages to give yourself the edge and GET ACCEPTED!


For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!



Tags: MBA Admissions

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Do Stanford GSB Grads REALLY “Change Lives. Change Organizations. Chan [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Do Stanford GSB Grads REALLY “Change Lives. Change Organizations. Change the World.”?
Who wouldn’t want to change lives, change organizations, and change the world? Right? In this blog post, I set out to prove that Stanford GSB admits, transforms and graduates students who accomplish great feats. I wanted to demonstrate that [url=https://blog.accepted.com/stanford-gbb-mba-class-profile/]Stanford GSB students[/url], faculty and graduates lived GSB’s brand.

I’ve always been a big proponent of Stanford GSB (even when they had classrooms and desks that reminded me of my high school). Regardless of their old environs, the Knight Center makes their facility live up to their students and their program.

I love the vibe when I walk onto Stanford’s campus. I love the fact that their students have infinite access to Silicon Valley. I love that the faculty turns their electives over so frequently that the course catalogue reads like a fresh new book each year. I love the questions in [url=https://blog.accepted.com/stanford-gsb-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/]the Stanford application[/url]. I do believe the adcom has done a great job in selecting some of the smartest people I know. My clients who have gained admission to Stanford surprise me with their intelligence, talent, accomplishments and ideas. They are futurists who can see beyond the horizon, but they still need me to plant the seed for their ideas to grow into great essays and interviews.

Stanford GSB alumni: Famous and infamous
However, when I looked at Stanford GSB’s list of “notable” alumni, I only saw a handful of game changers. The list is similar to those I see at other schools with notable founders, CEOs and investors like GM’s first female CEO, Mary Barra, Acumen Founder Jacqueline Novogratz, Charles Schwab of Charles Schwab, Nike’s Phil Knight, Ultra-investor Vinod Kosla, Atari’s Nolan Bushnell, KPB’s Brook Byers, Mariam Naficy, founder and CEO of Minted; and notable authors like Tom Peters and Jim Collins.

[b]Watch: [/b][url=https://reports.accepted.com/mba/webinar/stanford-graduate-school-of-business?hsLang=en][b]GET ACCEPTED TO [/b]Stanford GSB[b] >>[/b][/url]

Go deep and authentic for what matters to you most
So how can you present the fact that you will change the world for the better? Stanford asks two questions that I know the admissions team really take to heart. My clients typically struggle with “What matters most to you and why?” The latter part of this question being equally, if not more important that the former. This question requires a tremendous amount of introspection and if done well should show that you have the heart to change the world.

It requires you to know yourself at a very personal level and share that self-awareness with an admissions committee. It’s not easy, and the best essays I’ve seen on this topic have knocked the wind out of me. Several have made me cry. It is a dig deep into your soul question. The Stanford GSB adcom wants to get to know what drives you.

I begin brainstorming this question with clients by asking them for what they would give their life. At that point, you already know it will be an intense brainstorm. Often I hear, “family” or “helping others,” which can fall into the trap of discussing work. I ask my clients to frame this into a one- word value, and then I begin to peel away the layers until we find something deep and raw and revealing. After this digging, my clients also understand why they feel this value is most important to them.

Most of those clients have gained admission to Stanford GSB. Some have not. [url=https://blog.accepted.com/stanford-gsb-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/]The application[/url] is a complete picture and while you have revealed something raw to the committee, you may have other flaws in your application.

Why Stanford: Reveal the capacity to effect change
Or you may not demonstrate in your “Why Stanford?” essay that you have already or have the capacity to change lives, change organizations, and yes, change the world. If the first question is about heart, the second question is about intent and ability. [url=https://blog.accepted.com/understanding-stanford-graduate-business-school-interest-personal-qualities-contributions/]Do you intend to initiate change[/url] and have the talent to make it happen?

You really do need to think beyond the horizon for Stanford and make certain that you know why you need the Stanford MBA for you to create change: Jacqueline Novogratz did it; Vinod Kosla did it; and of course, Phil Knight did it. You just need to “just do it” like them. Swoosh.

[img]https://blog.accepted.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Natalie-Grinblatt-Accepted-Consultant.jpg[/img]
By Natalie Grinblatt Epstein, former admissions dean/director at three top business schools. Natalie has reviewed over 70,000 applications, interviewed over 2,500 candidates, and has trained nearly 700 admissions directors and alumni volunteers to select outstanding candidates for admission. Her clients gain admission to top programs including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, MIT, Cornell, Columbia, Berkeley, and NYU. Natalie holds an MBA from Michigan Ross. [url=https://www.accepted.com/service-request-natalie?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=blog_bio_natalie&utm_source=blog][b]Want Natalie to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch![/b][/url]



[url=https://cta-redirect.hubspot.com/cta/redirect/58291/69354270-0979-45a7-930d-70630c157725][img]https://no-cache.hubspot.com/cta/default/58291/69354270-0979-45a7-930d-70630c157725.png[/img][/url]

[b]Related Resources:[/b]

• [url=https://blog.accepted.com/which-mba-program-is-right-for-me-the-ultimate-guide-to-choosing-an-mba-program/]Which MBA Program is Right for Me? The Ultimate Guide to Choosing an MBA Program[/url]
• [url=https://blog.accepted.com/stanford-gsb-seeks-demonstrated-leadership-potential/]Understanding Stanford GSB’s Take on Demonstrated Leadership Potential[/url]
• [url=https://blog.accepted.com/m7-mba-programs-everything-you-need-to-know-in-2020/]M7 MBA Programs: Everything You Need to Know in 2020-21[/url]

Tags: [url=https://blog.accepted.com/category/mba-admissions/]MBA Admissions[/url]

The post [url=https://blog.accepted.com/do-stanford-gsb-grads-really-change-lives-change-organizations-change-the-world/]Do Stanford GSB Grads REALLY “Change Lives. Change Organizations. Change the World.”?[/url] appeared first on [url=https://blog.accepted.com]Accepted Admissions Blog[/url].
This Blog post was imported into the forum automatically. We hope you found it helpful. Please use the Kudos button if you did, or please PM/DM me if you found it disruptive and I will take care of it. -BB
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Got Your Heart Set on Columbia Business School? Don’t Miss This! [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Got Your Heart Set on Columbia Business School? Don’t Miss This!



Set against the iconic backdrop of New York City and offering a wide array of prestigious programs, it’s no wonder Columbia is one of the most sought-after business schools in the world. Being accepted to Columbia could very well be the launching pad for a highly lucrative and rewarding career. 

But that popularity and reputation comes with a catch: Competition. Competition for a spot at CBS is fierce. To stay in the running, you’ll need to set yourself apart from the thousands of highly qualified applicants submitting apps for the adcom to review. Our upcoming webinar, Get Accepted to Columbia Business School, will help you unlock the secret to standing out. 

Hosted by Accepted founder and CEO Linda Abraham, this session will take place on Thursday, November 12th at 10am PT/1pm ET. Linda will reveal the key to tailoring your application to make the biggest impact with the adcom. It’s completely free to attend, but you must register to claim your seat. Don’t delay—register today

Register now:


For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Tags: MBA Admissions

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An Insider’s Look at MBA Admissions [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: An Insider’s Look at MBA Admissions



How can MBA hopefuls- especially those who are members of special applicant groups- best position themselves for acceptance? [Show summary]

A valued and recent addition to Accepted’s staff, Dr. Christie St-John reveals what her career as an admissions director taught her about applying to business school (particularly for veterans, international students, and those from underrepresented groups), plus what’s ahead for the future of MBA programs.

MBA admissions advice from an admissions insider [Show notes]

Previously, Dr. Christie St-John was a guest on our chats as Associate Director of Admissions for Tuck, and more recently on Admissions Straight Talk as director of Vanderbilt Owen’s MBA Recruiting and Admissions. Now, this MBA admissions veteran just joined Accepted as an MBA and Graduate Admissions Consultant. Today, I’m going to speak with her about MBA admissions and graduate admissions in general, as well as specific subgroups, including veterans, international students, and underrepresented groups. I’m also going to get her insight into the impact of COVID and business schools going test-optional.

How did you get into Admissions? [2:10]

It was one of those peculiar things about who you know and being at the right place at the right time. I was doing my PhD at Vanderbilt and a friend of mine in the Spanish department had been recruited to the business school to run their program that they were doing in Latin America. When she was promoted to do that, she called me and said, “They’re looking for somebody to fill my former job with exchange programs, and they want somebody with international experience, and you’d be perfect.” And I thought, the business school, really? I was on my way to becoming a university professor of languages.

So I went over and talked with them. I convinced them that I knew the difference between Saks Fifth Avenue and Goldman Sachs. I had worked in the business world before I went back to school and in the U.S. and in Europe. It was not like business was a strange thing to me, but I’d never really known this kind of job was available. Had I known, I would’ve started it years ago because I had only been in the position at Vanderbilt about a week, and the Dean came down to me and said, “Okay, you’re going to go to Miami with Lori on Friday, and then you’re going to South America for a month.” I said, “Okay, let me just dust off my passport and I’ll be ready to go.”

That was the start of it. It’s been the most fun job I’ve ever had. It’s almost like not really working, although it is; it’s tiring, going through all the time zones. There’s a lot of work to do, but it’s been great because I love getting to know all the students and seeing where they’re from and being able to talk to them about, “Yes, I’ve been to Delhi.” “Yes, I’ve been to Seoul” or wherever it might be. That helps, I think, create a rapport with them.

You have a wealth of experience in MBA and grad admissions. How do you feel about moving to the other side of the admissions desk? [4:30]

As you know, when I was at Tuck, I invited a lot of the MBA admissions counselors up to visit us, and I got a lot of flack from schools about that: “Oh, how can you invite those people? You can’t do business with them.” And I said, “You know what? They’re providing a service. And if we want them to talk about our schools to people, they need to know about our schools. And that’s why I invited them.” And I think it was really good, not only for the consultants who came, but it was certainly good for me to understand more about what you were doing out there. It was all a bit vague. “Why do people need help getting their applications done? It’s so simple.” But it really isn’t. 

It’s a terribly competitive area, more so now than it used to be when I first was applying to graduate school. It is something I think that’s necessary. People don’t realize that you really have to stop and think about what you’re doing and why you’re doing it. I’m excited about being on this side of it because I still get to work with the students, but certainly on a deeper and more personal basis than I did when I was on the other side.

Just to give listeners a little bit more context, Christie started the conference that led to the founding of the Association of International Graduate Admissions Consultants and an era of increased dialogue between the schools and the admissions consulting industry. But let’s get back to your role today as an Admissions Consultant as it was informed and colored by your experience for so many years as an Admissions Director.

What do you wish applicants did before they would come to you for assistance with their applications? [6:53]

Know why you are doing this and know what you know now. Because a lot of people, their resume is full of interesting things, but it could be so much more interesting once you start talking to them. “Tell me about this, and tell me about that.” On this side of the fence, I get to really go into detail with them. When I was working for a university, I did do some career counseling, mostly with international students, but that’s how I first found out there’s so much more here. “Why don’t you talk about this wonderful thing that you did? It may look small to you, but it really sets you apart from other people.” And when I start talking with somebody, I always say, “Think back. What do you know how to do? And what do you think you have to learn how to do to go to your next step?” And then find the right school. Because that’s really important.

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Let’s move on to another special interest of yours: military. What are the most common challenges that people coming from the military face when they apply to business school, and how can they handle it most effectively? [20:21]

Most of them are worried about not having a business background. They think, “Oh, I probably shouldn’t even apply because I don’t know anything about business.” I say, “You’ve done inventory. You’ve managed $5 million worth of heavy equipment. You’ve managed hundreds of people. That’s all you have to know. You’ve got more qualifications than people who’ve been consultants for 15 years probably. You just have to understand how to translate your military resume into civilian language.” That’s the first hurdle.

And then the second one is, of course, understanding the business lingo and abbreviations. Of course, they’re all familiar with abbreviations because all the armed forces have their own special abbreviations for various things. So they understand that part of it, they just don’t know what people are talking about. Something as simple as ROI or SOP. They get it, but they’re first looking at you a little bit. I remember one of the funniest things: One of my early admits from the military was saying, “Everybody’s going around and talking about class packs, class packs.” He said, “I thought this was something I was going to have to carry around with me like on my back. And then I realized it’s just a notebook of cases.” Every field has its own jargon, and I didn’t realize that. So we went over a lot of that, and I started doing an orientation for the veterans in the program, just to make sure they understood this is how things work and this is what you’re supposed to do.

Another thing they were not used to is the fact that you actually have to get out and look for a job, and you have to prepare, and you have to interview. When you’re in the service, it’s just a hierarchical procedure. If you get to a certain rank and you do everything right, then you’re promoted to the next one. They had to learn to interview and how to do research on companies and figure out what’s out there. They just weren’t used to doing it. A lot of them were intimidated about that. “I have to interview for this job. What do I do?” And of course the career office is going to take care of you. Don’t worry. Most schools do have Armed Forces clubs, so they help each other out. And they’re stars. They’re usually stars, absolutely in service. That’s another thing: A lot of times they weren’t really sure what direction they should go in. You suggest to them, “I’ve never done that.” “Well, that’s okay. That’s why you’re here.”

You served on the Consortium for Graduate Studies and Management’s board of directors and as a liaison to the Management Leadership for Tomorrow. Both groups serve African-Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Native Americans. What advice do you have for those underrepresented groups in management, in particular in business schools, and also in graduate schools? [23:28]

Apply. We need you. We need your thoughts. We need your perspectives. And don’t be afraid. A lot of times because of the test scores and things, I’ve talked to some candidates with fabulous work experience and heard, “I don’t do well in standardized tests.” And a lot of times they would be denied by schools because of their test scores. And I just always found that horrible because as you know, the test score will tell you a certain amount and whether you’ll pass the first year of the program. It doesn’t say whether you’re going to be a great business person or not. It doesn’t say whether you’ve got a strategic vision or not. It just says, can you do the quant stuff? If you’re worried about that, go take a class at your community college or something online, even a free class. Don’t let your fear keep you from applying and from trying to go to the best school possible.

And don’t be afraid to ask questions. Admissions counselors and admissions staff are there to help. In most cases, and this goes for everyone, we’re all looking for a reason to get you in, not to keep you out. And that’s very true even for schools that get 40,000 applications. They’re looking for the best people to bring in. And also financial concerns are a big issue for a lot of the underrepresented minority population and for women as well. Don’t worry about that. Finances, they’ll work themselves out. If you get into a good school, don’t let that stop you. There are lots and lots of opportunities out there for funding at low interest rates. And for the most part, if you’re going to a renowned, accredited university, you’re going to make that money back. You’re going to be able to pay off your loans in probably 10 years. And that may sound like a long time, but you’re going to be doubling your salary in a lot of cases. So take out a loan; go for it. You’re worth it.

In your opinion, how is the coronavirus affecting and going to affect MBA admissions and business schools? [26:22]

I think it is having a very definite impact on admissions because suddenly, the schools that were requiring people, “You’ve got to come here to do your interview,” can’t do that anymore. “Oh, we want to meet you.” And they can’t. Luckily, we have the technology to at least see people via Skype or Zoom or some sort of online recruiting event and that sort of thing. But I think it is going to make us think, hmm, there’s got to be a different way to evaluate people. What can we find out about people? I think you’re going to see more schools doing some video essays. That’s becoming a trend in a lot of schools in the past five years, but I think you’ll see more schools doing that so they can get a feel for you.

On the other hand, the candidates really have to make an effort. Go to these webinars. Reach out to students. And that’s one thing that I always tell anybody I’m working with. Every single school out there has a bevy of students who are ambassadors, or whatever they may call it, peer counselors. You can find them on the website. These are the people who have the inside information. Reach out to them. They can give you so much more information than an admissions officer about the day-to-day life. About what’s going on. About, “Do you like the classes that you’re taking? What’s life like there daily? What do you think about your classmates? What kind of clubs could I get involved with?” Granted, the admissions officers know this, but it’s different getting it from a student.

If you make that effort to get to know a student and to ask them questions, when you do your essays, you’re going to have a lot more depth to your essays. We’re going to understand you are interested in our school. Something that’s not on the website, and the only way you could have found that out is through a student. And that’s good. We like that. And it’s good for you too, because you may find out details that, say, an admissions officer might never tell you.

More schools are going to go test-optional. What will be the impact of going test-optional? [28:59]

It’s certainly going to hurt all the rankings magazines and their fake rankings. I think trying to rank a business school solely on the basis of what your incoming GMAT score is… Some do theirs based on various statistical inputs. There’s a lot of that too, but that seems to play a bigger part than the job market or the career placement part of it, which is really the important thing. That’s why you’re there, is to get a new job, right? That should be what that’s based, on or what employers say.

I do think that the GMAT and GRE can tell us a certain amount about if the person can do the work. Because on the candidate side, by studying for the GMAT or the GRE, you’re going to be refreshing your knowledge, let’s say, of quantitative problems that you will see when you get to an MBA program. And this is good for you. But I also think that I’m happy to see a lot of schools now accepting the executive assessment, especially for military candidates who have been in the service for 10 to 15 years. They want to do any MBA program because they want the immersive experience. They don’t want to do an exec program. They’ve been out of school for so long. Are they going to remember high school geometry? No. So I think the executive assessment might be the right tool to use for some candidates, and I’m glad to see that more and more schools are accepting that.

I’ve worked with somebody who had a 3.8 in finance, and he couldn’t get above a 550 on the GMAT because of test anxiety or whatever it might’ve been. It wasn’t because he didn’t know how to do the work. I certainly think the work experience will count more. Not just the quantity, but the quality of that experience. That’s a question you get a lot at these MBA fairs, you know? “I’ve got five years of experience. Is that enough?” Well, it may be, but were you making photocopies and nothing else? What were you doing?

Do you think more schools are going to go test-optional? [32:23]

I think they will, especially if COVID continues so that they can’t get into the test sites. Last week, I think, GMAT made the announcement that okay, if you’ve done the online test before, you couldn’t take it again. And now you can, but only once. No idea why. I think it’s because they don’t know how to set it up. I think they’re just very, very worried about fraud. They should be. If that’s the case, then let’s throw it out. (NOTE: At the time this show airs, applicants can take the online GMAT up to two times. Check with GMAC for updates. )

What about MBA re-applicants? We’ve talked about some different groups in the MBA applicant pool. What advice do you have for MBA re-applicants? [33:13]

I love re-applicants because it shows me that they are persevering in their desire to do whatever it is they want to do. What I don’t love is somebody who gives the same application they gave the year before without any changes. That just tells me you’re not terribly self-aware. I’ve had those, and I know other admissions directors have too. You get the same application year after year after year. You tell the person until you’re blue in the face, “You really have to retake this. You really have to rewrite your essay,” or whatever it might be. And they just don’t do it. 

Take a hard look at it. You know what’s wrong. You know where your weaknesses lie. If you’re honest with yourself, you can say, “Oh yeah, maybe I shouldn’t tell them I want to go into private equity since I have never done anything in finance. I’ve only been human resource director. Maybe I should think that over.”

An admissions consultant can look at it and say, “You know what? You don’t have the background for this yet, but doesn’t mean you can’t ever do it. But you don’t have the background yet, so let’s start off here.” Oftentimes, at an early point in your career, you don’t know what’s out there. Everybody applies to an MBA program. “I want to do management consulting.” They don’t know what it is, but, “That’s what MBAs do, I’m going to do that too.” So there’s so many things that you will discover.

That’s why I’ve always told people, the MBA is the most useful degree that you can ever, ever get out of everything out there, all professional degrees, because it prepares you to do anything. You develop a network. You learn about how each part of a company works with the other parts and what they do. Some people don’t know that. They could work in the same company for 50 years and still not know what the marketing department does. That’s why I think it’s the best degree that anybody could get. Everybody go out and get an MBA now and come and work with us.

What do you wish I would have asked you? [35:35]

Why do I keep doing this? Because I really love working with the candidates, and although I haven’t had as much experience on this side of it as on the other side, that’s one of the things that makes me really happy at the end of the day: working with someone, and they come and say, “I got in. I can’t believe it. I got in. Thank you.” And I say, “You know, I didn’t really do anything. You had it all there. We just had to direct you in the right way.” And then I’m still in touch with a lot of the alumni from my very first class that I recruited and seeing what they have become now, watching them grow, watching them with their families, they progress, they move around, it makes me feel like, okay, in some small way I’ve had a tiny little effect on somebody.

I also learn a lot from all the candidates, and I’m a big proponent of learning something every day, even if it seems totally useless at the time. You never know. I love to listen to their stories and listen to what they’ve done and find out why they did something or how they got into something. I think it’s fascinating. I think human nature is intriguing.



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The post An Insider’s Look at MBA Admissions [Episode 389] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Re: Accepted MBA Updates [#permalink]
Hi,
I would love to hear your opinion on my brief profile.

Targeting INSEAD Jan intake R1, Kellogg 1yr MBA R2 and MBB consulting after that.

GMAT score: 730 (Q50, V40, IR 7)

Demography: 32 years, Male Indian

Undergraduation: Computer Science Engineer from NIT-Trichy (Ranked consistently in Top 10 engineering institutes in India)
CGPA: 8.62/10 (First class with Distinction)

Postgraduation: MBA (2 year full time flagship PGP course) from IIM-Ahmedabad (Harvard MBA-equivalent & consistently ranked #1 MBA in India)
CGPA: 2.777/3

Work experience (in brief):
Current total work experience of 8.5 years:
• Last 4.5 years of work experience in technology (SaaS-based software) sales roles (business development & account management) in mid & leadership levels across 2 emerging companies (each with an annual revenue of ~20 million USD). Led teams sized 12 account managers in one of the organizations where I got promoted twice.
• 1.5 years in Product Marketing in a Fortune 500 software MNC. Awarded the best new joiner of the year across 40 B-school recruits. Won the best marketing campaign award by US-based HQ office, organized across 13 geographies. Won Quarterly Spot award – conceived & executed marketing strategies to sell Cloud at 140 universities
• 2-month summer internship during my MBA in Strategy & BD at a Fortune 500 company
• 2.5 years in technology consulting (pre-MBA) in a niche boutique consulting firm where I worked closely with US-based tech law firms & US-based Fortune 500 tech companies. Got promoted once. Helped a client receive settlement of USD 20 million in damages against seven Fortune 500 retail banks
• Will be joining a Fortune 500 technology company in a Sales role next month
• All above work locations in India

International exposure details:
• During my work experience at the niche boutique consulting firm, I worked with US-based tech law firms & US-based Fortune 500 tech companies to deliver ROI on tech intellectual property & perform due diligence. Worked in the US for about 3 months in 2011. Travelled to meet & work closely with clients in 6 cities across east coast and west coast in the US.
• During my MBA at IIM-Ahmedabad, as a part of the student exchange program, I did one term (3 months) at France Business School in 2013. Did a backpacking tour to 14 countries in Europe during the exchange program.
• During my product marketing role with the Fortune 500 software MNC, I worked closely with teams across geographies to orchestrate global marketing campaigns. Travelled to the USA for marketing training workshop & events.
• Personal immersion trips with family (not sure if these count): A 2-week holiday trip across multiple cities in Japan in 2016, a 2-week holiday trip across Thailand in 2017 and a 10-day holiday trip to Dubai in 2019
• Currently learning Spanish and targeting to clear the SIELE global exam A1 within the next 2 months

Extracurriculars:
• Trained in Indian Classical vocal music for 15 years. Performed across venues during school & college days, with concert reviews in leading newspapers. Winner of multiple awards in school & college
• Performed in English plays, attended by 300-people & reviewed in leading newspapers
• Cleared Mensa worldwide test – Top 2%. Member of Mensa international
• Active NSS volunteer, organized community service camps and tree-planting schemes at college

Other academic achievements:
CAT 2011 (Common Admission Test - India)
Taken on Oct 2011: 99.65 Percentile
Number of test takers - 189,000

AIEEE 2005 (All India Engineering Entrance Exam)
Taken on May 2005: 98.81 Percentile
Number of test takers - 800,000

Do you think I stand a chance of INSEAD interview & admit, or am I being too ambitious (given my lack of direct international work ex & above average 8.5 years current work ex)?

Can you also please suggest other B-schools as well (both Europe & US), given my profile & aspirations of MBB consulting?

Open to doing a brief pre-MBA internship or stint in a consulting/strategy/EA to CXO role once I get an MBA admit, to increase my chances of a shortlist with MBB consulting.

Given a choice, I would prefer a 1-year MBA (since I’ve already done a 2-year MBA), but open to a 2-year MBA if the internship helps pivot from sales into consulting/strategy.

Looking forward to hearing your feedback,

Thanks much!
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How to Prove You Belong at Columbia Business School [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: How to Prove You Belong at Columbia Business School



Demonstrating fit is one of the most important elements of a successful MBA application. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to earning your acceptance letter. If Columbia is at the top of your list, your application will need to accurately reflect why you’re a perfect fit for their program.

Our webinar, Get Accepted to Columbia Business School, is designed to help you discover the keys to creating a unique and compelling application that will communicate to the adcom why you truly belong at CBS. Accepted founder and CEO Linda Abraham will break down what the adcom is looking for, the steps you should be taking now to maximize your chances of acceptance, the key for to approaching the main elements of the CBS application, and ways to show the adcom how you’ll contribute to the school community if accepted. Join us on Thursday, November 12th at 10am PT/1pm ET and walk away prepared to crush your CBS application. All this valuable insight is at your fingertips free of charge, but registration is required. Reserve your spot today!

Register now:


For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

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Test-Optional MBA Programs: Everything You Need to Know in 2020 – 2021 [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Test-Optional MBA Programs: Everything You Need to Know in 2020 – 2021



As COVID-19 shows no sign of abating, more and more prominent business schools are announcing either more test choices or test-optional policies for the 2020–2021 MBA admissions cycle. There is more widespread recognition that MBA applicants may not require GMAT/GRE scores to be successful in business school. At other programs, the shorter Executive Assessment is now used as an alternative to the GMAT or GRE, and some schools are accepting other tests like the MCAT or LSAT.

Potential for success is predictable without GMAT/GRE

Most business schools use a holistic approach to admissions and view standardized test scores as just one part of a bigger picture. According to Katie Lloyd, associate dean of full-time and evening MBA programs at Georgia Tech Scheller College of Business, “We can predict a candidate’s potential for success in and beyond the MBA program without reliance on the GMAT or GRE. Basing a decision on previous academic experience, work history, and interview evaluations has been an effective admissions approach for our Evening MBA program, which began accepting candidates without a test score in 2018.”

Full-time MBA programs that don’t require the GMAT

SchoolAre Waiver Requests Reviewed?Accepts

GMATAccepts

GREAccepts

EAAccepts

LSATAccepts

MCAT

BU QuestromYesYesYes

Georgia Tech SchellerYes, under certain circumstances. Your reasons for applying without a test score should be noted in the optional application essay.YesYesScore may be submitted as supplemental information.Score may be submitted as supplemental information.Score may be submitted as supplemental information.

MIT SloanWill waive test requirement w/o a waiver request. Yes, even if the score has expired.Yes, even if the score has expired.Yes

New York Institute of TechnologyYes, for applicants with strong academic records.Yes

Northwestern KelloggNo. GMAT/GRE is required for admission; in some cases, applicants may test after submitting their applications.YesYes

Pace LubinYesYesYes

UCLA AndersonNoYesYes Yes, for students currently enrolled at the UCLA School of Law.Yes, for students currently enrolled at the Geffen School of Medicine.

UNC Kenan-FlaglerYes, under certain circumstances.YesYesStrong EA scores may help applicants build a case for a GMAT/GRE waiver. Strong LSAT scores may help applicants build a case for a GMAT/GRE waiver.Strong MCAT scores may help applicants build a case for a GMAT/GRE waiver.

University of Delaware LernerYes, for applicants who already hold a terminal degree (MD, JD, PhD, etc) or who meet certain other criteria.GMAT is the preferred test.GRE is accepted, though not preferredYes, for applicants who hold a law degree.Yes, for applicants who hold a medical degree.

University of Maryland SmithYes, under certain circumstances.YesYesApplicants may qualify for a GMAT/GRE waiver if their LSAT scores are in the 70th percentile or greater.Applicants may qualify for a GMAT/GRE waiver if their MCAT scores are in the 70th percentile or greater.

USC MarshallNo. However, you may submit test scores up to two weeks after the application round deadline. Note: USC Marshall may make an admissions decision based on the application as submitted.YesYes

UVA DardenYes, under certain circumstances.YesYesYesYesYes

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify.***

If you know of other MBA programs that are accepting tests other than the GMAT or the GRE, let us know! Please email the information to blog@accepted.com with a source that we can confirm.

One implication of reduced reliance on test scores is increased reliance on other elements of your application including your essays, resume, short answer responses, and interview.

With or without test scores, your top-choice MBA is within your reach. Just as we have helped hundreds of applicants get into the MBA program of their dreams, Accepted can help you, too, through professional assessment of your profile, expert honing of your application, and confidence-boosting, targeted interview prep. Check out our MBA Services Packages to get the personalized, one-on-one attention you need to GET ACCEPTED!


For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!



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Seven Tips for MBA Interview Prep [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Seven Tips for MBA Interview Prep



An invitation to an MBA interview is an achievement and cause for celebration, but the interview itself can be a daunting prospect – if you are not properly prepared. Make the most of this opportunity by following our tips for a successful interview.

1. Preparation is everything

While you may not have control over the questions you’re asked, you can prepare a set of flexible responses that you can apply to commonly asked questions. You should be able to discuss the following:

  • A walk through your resume (focus on what you accomplished and learned at each job, and why you transitioned to the next position)

  • The reasons you chose your undergraduate school

  • An example of an extraordinary achievement in the context of your job

  • An example of how you influenced stakeholders to bring an idea to fruition

  • An example of when you led a team to produce quantifiable results

  • An example of when you failed and what you learned from that failure

  • Your career goals and future ambitions

  • The top reasons you want an MBA (make it school specific, explaining why the school is ideal for you, and what unique qualities you would bring to the school)

2. Structure your stories

Frame your answers to tell a story. If you follow a clear structure you can ensure you don’t leave out vital information while simultaneously displaying an organized mind and confident communication. I suggest loosely following the S-O-A-R framework: Situation-Objective-Action-Result. (I also suggest adding one more letter to the acronym: L for “Learned”.)

  • SITUATION: Give background and context to the situation such as where you were working, what your role was, and who were the stakeholders involved. Be succinct, yet specific.

  • OBJECTIVE: Describe what your goal was, and any obstacles that complicated the situation.

  • ACTION: Discuss how you proceeded toward your goal, and how you overcame an obstacles.

  • RESULT: Quantify the impact that you had on the situation.

  • LEARNED: Tell the interviewer what you learned about yourself, leadership, or business from the experience.

Your response should take no more than about 2–3 minutes. You don’t want to bore the interviewer with a lot of unnecessary information. Once you’ve got your top stories down, when you’re on the spot you’ll have a reservoir from which to draw that will be easily adaptable to the interviewer’s questions.

3. Practice, Practice, Practice

Practice is the key to successful preparation. Make sure you find at least two people with whom you can sound out your answers. A close friend or family member is often more willing to put in the time but may be less objective when it comes to constructive criticism. An acquaintance, colleague, or teacher can give you good feedback on your first impression or body language without the hindrance of knowing you too well but may be less inclined to be negative than someone who loves you faults and all. Because of this it’s important to find a variety of practice partners to work with. More practice means you are better prepared, and you do want to practice – a lot – however, you don’t want to end up sounding over-rehearsed and unnatural. No memorized, robotic answers allowed!

We recommend setting up a mock interview or interview coaching from an Accepted professional to help you strike the right balance.

4. Stay relevant

Let’s say they ask you what accomplishment you are most proud of. In your heart of hearts, it might have been working two jobs to put yourself through university. Now that is quite an accomplishment. But if it was more than say, three years ago, you need to pull from something more recent. You don’t want the interviewer to think your best days are far behind you.

If it truly was a significant achievement from your past, you can use it. But bring that accomplishment into the present by explaining how it influences your values or interests right now. Show progress from past to present and how you are building on it for the future.

Keep your answers relevant to place as well as time. Customising your examples to show connection to a particular school will help you connect to the adcom on a personal level and show them why you are an ideal candidate for their program. Pick up on any relatable aspects of the course curriculum, school values, or alumni community and showcase them in your answers.

5. Hit the right tone

Remember the adcom is trying to imagine you fitting in with future alumni. You want to communicate your fit in the way you present yourself, including body language, the way you speak, and even what you wear.

This is a conversation between humans so be natural and at ease. Don’t list off your academic results like a machine– all that information is on your transcript. The interview is your chance to show who you are as a human being, not a set of grades or publications. Focus instead on your accomplishments in the real world, collaborating with others, and working as a team.

Don’t be argumentative or object to a line of questioning. Stay friendly, open, and communicative – the sort of person one would want to have a conversation with again in the future. Try to match your interview style to the culture and tone of the school and your chosen course. Some schools are more informal, some more conservative. Researching your school is part of good preparation and can help you decide which is the right program for you. Once you know that you can show the adcom why you are right for them.

6. Roll with it

Some schools like MIT and Harvard grant non-blind interviews. That means the interviewers have full access to your resume, essays, and letters of recommendation, though to what extent they’ve reviewed them is variable. Your interviewer could be an experienced senior member of the admission committee or a new member of the team. Many schools rely on alumni or current students to gauge the compatibility of applicants, and they typically only see your resume. For this reason it is extremely helpful to prepare for different styles of interviews so you can feel comfortable and self assured in each situation. 

Sometimes an interviewer may throw a surprise question into the mix, just to see how you handle pressure. That curve-ball question is a great opportunity for you to prove your worth under fire. Keep calm and draw on that reservoir of prepared examples – the right preparation means you will have something relevant in the bank.

They will also want to know how you deal with problems and failures. Take the time to go over your resume (or have an objective person check it) for any discrepancies, holes in your work history, or problematic areas that the interviewer may pick up on so that you don’t feel blindsided. And if they do ask, embrace it! This is your chance to demonstrate your resilience in the face of obstacles, your ability to learn from mistakes, and your talent in converting adversity to accomplishment.

Be honest – don’t try to fudge things to make yourself look better. You can admit when something went wrong but make sure you show how you grew from the experience and what you were motivated to do as a result.

7. Group interviews

Some business schools, such as Whartonand Ross, require group interviews so they can easily identify the leaders and team-players. This is a framework that merits its own preparation as the dynamics can be more unpredictable. You don’t know what sort of people will make up the group or what task you will be asked to perform. Signing up with an interview prep service is the perfect way to make sure you are ready to think on your feet and deal with a high-pressure situation. How do you show natural leadership qualities without steamrolling the other applicants? Allow space for a team effort without being a pushover or shrinking violet? Can you collaborate easily within a team, making your voice heard but not alienating your teammates? Compete with other alpha candidates without becoming dictatorial? These are all skills that can be developed, practiced, and achieved with the right preparation.

The interview process gives you the scope to express who you really are, to jump off the page of your application and present yourself as a three-dimensional future MBA graduate. A successful interview is within your grasp if you put in the groundwork and take advantage of the fantastic resources available.

Our expert admissions consultants will work with you one-on-one to help you prepare for your interview. Check out ourMBA Services Packages, including mock interviews, interview prep, and admission guides and get on the road to being ACCEPTED!


Michelle Stockman is a professional journalist, former Columbia Business School admissions insider, and experienced MBA admissions consultant. Want Michelle to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!



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MBA Life at UC Berkeley Haas, From Its New Executive Director of Admis [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: MBA Life at UC Berkeley Haas, From Its New Executive Director of Admissions



Learn what’s new at Berkeley Haas, as well as tips for crafting admissions-worthy applications. [Show summary]

Eric Askins, the newly appointed Executive Director of Admissions at UC Berkeley Haas, explores the school’s full-time MBA program and its admissions policies, as well as how it’s adapting the MBA experience to COVID-19.

Interested in applying to Berkeley Haas? Read on for info about special programs and application advice. [Show notes]

UC Berkeley Haas has a new Executive Director of Admissions: Eric Askins, formerly Haas’s Senior Associate Director of Admissions. He’s here today to explore Haas’s full-time MBA program, as well as how the school is adapting to COVID-19.

Can you give an overview of the Berkeley Haas full-time MBA program for those listeners who aren’t that familiar with it and focus on its more distinctive elements? [2:37]

The first place to start is our location. Based in the San Francisco Bay area, our program is incredibly close to the center of innovation that exists out here. I think some of that is probably evident if you look at our outcomes. Berkeley Haas has graduates in tech. About 15 to 20% of our students each year are going into startups. But if you were to ask us for the most defining feature of our program, it’s likely our defining leadership principles (Question the status quo. Confidence without attitude. Students always. Beyond yourself.). It’s a set of culture-forward initiatives that we have here, about 10 years old now, that really hold our core values up-front. You’ll find, I think, very few programs that lead with values, and we’re certainly one of them.

What’s new at Berkeley Haas (other than lockdown, the pandemic, and smoky air)? [4:08]

Certainly, all of those things are new, and they are challenges. But there’s a silver lining in there too. Let’s talk about some of our academic programs first. Chief among the things that we launched in pilot mode last year that are truly new this year are a joint degree with our school of engineering, an MBA/MEng program. This program is two years, so no additional time. It is a cohort model that is part of the MBA cohort, so it doesn’t operate separately, which is really a great opportunity to continue to stay connected with the broader community here at Haas. Additionally, the students select from among seven different engineering programs to really give you that niche opportunity that you might be seeking and give you the skills that you need to take advantage of some of the great opportunities that exist in the career world.

You can go, let’s say, into electrical engineering/MBA, artificial intelligence/MBA, all kinds of different engineering specialties, including nuclear engineering, if that’s what you’re looking for. Chemical engineering. We took a nuclear engineer this year. This program launched in pilot mode last year. We didn’t recruit heavily for it. We simply listed it on our website. We are beginning to look at expanding it. We now have a cohort of about 30 students, 15 in each class here. There is a community. Although it’s new, it’s new with a community, which we think is really essential. Again, we’re very community-focused here at Haas, and we want you to be learning alongside others and learning from others as well as from our faculty.

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What is the most common mistake that you see in the applications that you review? [17:06]

I would say it comes down to that same narrative journey, but I’ll put it in the reverse. Candidates will look at our essays and they will wonder what we are looking for. If you don’t do that first step of self-reflection, “What story do I want to tell?”… You have to do some self-curation as well because all of us hold multiple identities and we seek to accomplish multiple goals. But we want to tell one story in this application. If you’re seeking what you think we’re looking for, already you’re starting in a false place. It’s almost impossible to construct a narrative that’s complete if you’re not starting from that first space of self-reflection and curation.

That curation shouldn’t bring you down to the elevator pitch. We’re not looking for the one-liner. There are over 300 words that you can give us in each of our two essays, 600 words in total. That doesn’t even account for all the free spaces within our application. There is space for you to tell us the multiple dimensions of who you are. But what we ask is that you provide a unified story across those dimensions.

In light of the pandemic and the crazy end to last year’s admission cycle (that never ended), are you going to read applications with a slightly different perspective, looking or weighing certain qualities more or less than in previous application cycles? [19:13]

Each year, we review our essay questions. This year, we spent a lot of time with our leadership essay, trying to decide whether or not we were going to explicitly aim towards asking a question about what people did during this particular period in time. We chose not to do that because not every story is for telling. Some stories are personal. Some stories are not appropriate for business school, and not everybody may feel that they have the same type of experience during this time. What we do know is that this is one of the few times where there has been a globally shared experience, where every person who is interacting with others in the universe is experiencing some effect of this experience.

We’re hopeful that in that process of self-reflection, our candidates will look at the leadership attributes and those defining leadership principles that we’ve got them written all over our application on our website, and carved into the cement outside of our campus, that they’ll look at those frames and look at this personal experience and see opportunities to reflect on some of those leadership principles. Whether or not they were in a leadership role or not, everyone has been called upon to be resilient in some way, shape, or form during this period of time. We’re going to be looking for that in the application. We’re going to be looking for people to tell us true and honest stories about their experiences. It would be surprising for us if folks don’t incorporate some component of what this experience has been for them.

What about applicants who can’t take the GMAT or GRE, in China or Iran? Do you have any plans to go test-optional? Or if you don’t, what should they do? [21:11]

I appreciate this question. We have certainly thought about it often at Haas. What does access mean, and how do we provide an opportunity for others? In the short-term, what we’ve done is extend our submission deadline for testing in our round one. Our round one deadline was September the 24th. We allowed students until October 15th to submit a test as we closely monitored the testing availability around the world. Through the data that we’ve looked at, it seems that many of the regions of the world do have some access to testing, although limited, although there are certain other complications there. And so at this time we are considering a test waiver.

Can you touch on the accelerated access admissions program at Haas? Who is it for, and how can one get in? [22:11]

How can one get in? That is the million-dollar question. I’ll start with who it’s for. As I’ve mentioned earlier, we ran some pilots last year. Odd year to run a pilot, to be honest with you, with everything else going on. But what I will tell you is we offered the deferred admission program, the accelerated access program, simply within the Berkeley community. If you went to UC Berkeley and you were in a graduating position, you’re either undergraduate or in a graduate school and had less than one year with work experience, you were an eligible candidate for this program. We wanted to see who’s out there, and we also wanted to teach ourselves how to read those applications. It’s a different story. We’re not looking at work experience in quite the same way. We’re offering the same essays, but the rubrics are different. 

We want to understand the different pathways for these individuals. I will call that pilot a success. We identified some amazing candidates, and it’s time to expand. As of now, the program is offered throughout the entire UC program, the entire UC system. Any undergraduate program here in the UC system is eligible. We are in discussion about that expansion. That expansion may in fact happen this cycle, or it can happen next cycle as we begin to figure out where our resources are available and how we can deploy them.

I do want to answer this other part of your question, which is, how does one present themselves to get into a program like this? What I love about this program is instead of reading the story of what you did, we’re finding that we’re reading the story of what you want to accomplish, what you hope to do. Being as an admissions officer and reading something like that brings you so much energy. Big people have lofty goals, certainly, but achievable goals, and the way candidates present that becomes very important to us. A successful candidate to this type of program, at least within our frame, is someone who has a clear sense of what they’re hoping to accomplish and can tie that back to what is present in their application. Their academics chiefly are going to be a larger portion, just based on what we have to work with. But also what else they’ve done during their time in undergraduate. What extracurriculars have they done? Have they begun taking steps towards this future goal? That all becomes part of the analysis for us.

In terms of the deferred admit program, when you’re talking about goals, are you talking mostly about the period before they go for the MBA? Or the period after they get their MBA? [25:24]

The question that we ask is about the period after the MBA. We do an interview for all candidates for that program. In those interviews, we go into a little more in depth about what they’re hoping to do in the time in between or what jobs they may have secured during that period of time, what they’re hoping to accomplish. They tend to, again, build a narrative for us, and it should be cohesive.

We lean into storytelling heavily within our academics, within our career management group. Storytelling is client relations. Storytelling is interviewing. Storytelling is selling yourself and getting yourself in the best position. 

What would you say to potential applicants who want to apply this year who might feel they’re ready but are concerned about graduating into a weak economy or applying when deferrals have shrunk the number of available seats? [27:13]

That’s a challenging position for folks to be in: to decide, is this the time? I’m going to counter that and say that if the concern is a challenging economy two years from now, there’s an increased benefit to retooling and re-skilling and putting yourself in the best position to succeed. If the economy is in a challenging position, I think that’s going to affect folks differently based on the tools that they have and the skills that they have. And certainly here at Haas, we’ve put a lot of work towards ensuring that we are educating folks with that in mind, to navigate that new economy.

As far as the chances of being admitted in a timeframe in which there’s an increased number of applicants, I think that’s certainly the case. Applications to business school run counter-cyclical to the economy, so we do see a ton of that, an increase in the number of applications. We’ve seen it in our first round. But qualified candidates will always be under consideration. We make sure that we’re looking at opportunities, and if applicants are coming with strong candidacy, they’re going to have an opportunity here at Haas. In terms of the deferred program, those who deferred, we did a case-by-case basis this year. We didn’t do a blanket deferral. While we do have a larger number of deferrals than we’ve had in prior years, we don’t have a huge number to absorb as some other programs might.

What advice would you give to someone thinking ahead to a fall 2021 application, those that don’t feel they’re ready now? [29:56]

I think if you’re looking ahead towards business school, you have the benefit of understanding what business schools are looking for and how you might strengthen your opportunities when you do decide to apply. Within the professional sphere, I encourage folks to look at where progression and job growth can exist. Again, there’s some limitations based on the way the economy looks today. The other space that I encourage folks to look at is, if they’re thinking of a career pivot, this is the opportunity to test the hypothesis. Either through volunteer work, through small projects, maybe through communities and networks that they have, take a close look at what you might think about pivoting into and ensure that you’re aligned, that there is not just a return on investment but a return on fulfillment for those types of opportunities because we do seek clarity of purpose in our review process. We hope that you’ve done that work, and sometimes it takes some time. You may not get it right on the first time, and this is a great opportunity to test it.

What would you have liked me to ask you? [31:14]

I would love to be able to share a little bit about what our community has done during the time of this pandemic with Haas faculty academics. We started a speaker series, New Thinking in the Pandemic. We’ve run this about monthly for a few months now. It’s an opportunity for academics within our community, both our faculty and members of our alumni network, to share ideas on how we’re navigating this new world. Leadership in times of crisis. Taking advantage of our executive programs. Unfortunately, we’re not able to deliver some of their executive education due to the constraints of coming to campus, but we’re offering some of them within the free speaker series. You have the opportunity to think about how you lead teams that are dispersed or remote. We think that’s an incredible opportunity to begin to unpack what the future is going to look like and how we might leverage that. Members of our alumni network and members of our student community are actively engaged in supporting others during the time of this pandemic as well.

A recent grad from our program, Elisse Douglass, started a business, originally started as a GoFundMe for relief for Black-owned businesses in Oakland. It has now shifted to an investment vehicle to grow entrepreneurship within Black-owned businesses in Oakland. This is a reflection of the challenges that face small businesses during this time of pandemic when things are closed. Many of our current students are engaged in volunteer activity for communities outside that are challenged. I was really moved by this. Our admitted students who were not able to come to campus were able to create a sense of community during this summer, before they joined campus, including building out Haas swag Instagram filters, the opportunity to put a hat on or a glove on or a scarf on that you wouldn’t otherwise have been able to do because you can’t come to campus. The vendors are all closed, and we can’t produce these items the way we would have and to send them out to folks. It was student-driven, entirely admitted students who felt pride in the institution and wanted to share that with their community and their peers. I love the innovation that this has brought about and the sense of reinvesting in our communities.

Where can listeners and potential applicants learn more about Haas’s full-time MBA program or some of the other programs that we discussed? [34:34]

If you’d like to learn more, you’re welcome to visit us at Hass: haas.berkeley.edu.



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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

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Don’t Dream of Applying to Columbia Without This Information! [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Don’t Dream of Applying to Columbia Without This Information!



Our free one-hour webinar, Get Accepted to Columbia Business School, is coming up on Thursday, November 12th, but it’s not too late to register and join us!

Getting into CBS isn’t easy, but with the right preparation and approach, you can gain an edge over the competition and catch the adcom’s eye. With more than 25+ years of MBA admissions experience under her belt, Accepted founder and CEO Linda Abraham is uniquely qualified to equip you with the tools you need to do that. She has helped scores of MBA hopefuls secure acceptance letters from elite programs, and she can help you too! Don’t miss out on the opportunity to benefit from her expert insight and guidance totally cost-free. Register now before all the spots fill up!

Register now:


For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Tags: MBA Admissions

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MBA Admissions: Application Advice for Younger Applicants [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: MBA Admissions: Application Advice for Younger Applicants
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Accepting the offer from the small niche-consulting firm after college over the offer from the big-name consulting company proved to be a smart decision. In spite of the lower starting salary, in less than two years you are managing projects and staff, bringing in new business, and contributing to company strategy. In addition, the experience, through a pivotal client engagement, has shaped your goal: joining a company in the rapidly growing bioinformatics industry and over time improving healthcare delivery and outcomes. You’re ready to move toward that goal, but you need a thorough business foundation and in-depth knowledge of finance and strategy, which neither your undergrad education nor your experience has provided. [url=https://reports.accepted.com/mba/guide/why-mba]You need an MBA.[/url]

Should you apply now?

You have excellent grades in a rigorous undergrad program, a strong test score, and an impressive post-grad position – but only 1.75 years of work experience (still under 3 years by matriculation). That’s less than the average at all MBA programs (and less than required at some). The answer is yes – if you target the right schools and vividly demonstrate the following five factors in your application essays (primarily) and your resume. Ideally, your recommendations also will reflect these factors.

5 factors that younger MBA applicants need to demonstrate

[list][*][url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/younger.aspx#l1]Affirmative, practical reasons for applying at this specific time.[/url]

[/*][*][url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/younger.aspx#l2]Outstanding professional growth.[/url]

[/*][*][url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/younger.aspx#l3]Exceptional impact, leadership, achievement.[/url]

[/*][*][url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/younger.aspx#l4]Maturity.[/url]

[/*][*][url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/younger.aspx#l5]Ability to contribute socially and academically to the program.[/url][/*][/list]

Factor 1: Affirmative, practical reasons for applying at this time.

The economy is shaky; prospects for growth in your company or industry have diminished – so you might as well pursue an MBA now, instead of waiting to gain more experience. No! Especially if you are younger than average, your reasons for applying now must be affirmative, not reactive — based on positive plans and opportunities, not on lack of plans or scant opportunities.

Equally important, those reasons must be practical, i.e., based on concrete goals. In essence, your goals should drive your rationale for applying now. It is essential to delineate in your goals essay how your goals make it necessary for you to obtain an MBA education now. It may be that the market or industry is just ripening and you want to get in early. It may be that your skill set is particularly valuable to a changing sector, industry, or niche. It may be that your company has placed you on a “fast track” and to effectively shoulder the management responsibilities of the next promotion, you need formal business training. Whatever the case, “work back” from your goals to identify on the reason you must earn your MBA now.

Factor 2: Outstanding professional growth.

Your relatively short professional experience should reflect outstanding growth if you are to be a viable MBA candidate. While the same burden applies to more experienced applicants, if you can show that you pack into one or two years the quality that most other applicants stretch out over four, it can make a very exciting impression – you want the adcom to conclude, “If she can do this in one year, imagine what she can do in four!” 

What constitutes [url=https://blog.accepted.com/how-an-admissions-committee-views-mba-work-experience/]quality experience[/url]? Hands-on participation in a broad range of functions. Managing staff. Promotions that skip levels. Leading high-profile projects. Assignments that are typically given to MBAs. When you discuss such growth in your essays, be sure to clarify its unusual nature (i.e., don’t just say you were quickly promoted to marketing manager; add that no one before you has ever been given that position without first serving as marketing coordinator). Reinforce this factor in [url=https://blog.accepted.com/13-rules-for-resumes-that-rock/]your resume[/url], and ask your recommenders to do so as well.

If you are applying to MBA programs right out of college or as a recent graduate, look to your jobs, internships, and volunteer activities during college for outstanding professional-level growth or responsibility. For example, you were waiting tables and were asked to manage the restaurant in the owner’s absence. Or you were interning at an investment firm over the summer and were asked to coordinate communications for a transaction.

Factor 3: Exceptional impact, leadership, achievement.

The more impact, leadership, and achievement any MBA applicant shows, the better. “Exceptional” means beyond what would typically be shown by an actively involved college student or a good-to-strong performer on the job. If you are applying to top MBA programs especially, most applicants will be in the “good to strong performer” category and will have had more time in which to demonstrate this excellence. To be competitive, you must at least equal them in impact, leadership, and/or achievement, but in less time, whether on the job or elsewhere (community service, college activities).

[list][*][url=https://blog.accepted.com/4-ways-show-you-will-contribute-future/]Impact involves the effect you have on the organization[/url]. Reorganizing functions to facilitate effective cross-functional operations is worthwhile and smart – but what effect did it have on the organization? Did it save money? Eliminate redundancy? Improve customer satisfaction? That’s impact. Initiating a drive to recruit volunteers for the local school district that has recently faced severe budget cuts is worthwhile and smart. Signing up enough volunteers for the school to keep its after-care program, sports, and arts activities – that’s impact.

[/*][*]Leadership is more than being named “leader.” Say you lead the consulting team for an important client project. That is significant responsibility, but it is not necessarily leadership. Your team discovers the perfect solution to the company’s problem, but the company resists and your senior management wants you to water down your recommendations to appease the client. You discuss the matter with your team; all are passionately convinced that the solution is ideal. You decide to stand by the team. You gain “champions” in your and the client’s management, and work with them to persuade the rest. Eventually everyone comes around, and the client now praises your team’s persistence. That’s leadership. Or say you are elected president of the student government – that’s responsibility. Then you start an initiative to improve the school’s process for handling honor code violations, to the initial dismay but eventual appreciation of the administration – that’s leadership.

[/*][*]Achievement relates to impact, but it stands alone in its importance. For example, your company has only had accounts up to $500K, but you bring in a new account worth over $1M. That alone is an achievement. You’re captain of the lightweight crew team and drive the team to division victory, the first time ever for the school. That’s achievement.[/*][/list]

When you discuss leadership, impact, and achievement in your essays, don’t just cite them as flat facts. Describe them in context – [url=https://blog.accepted.com/5-elements-telling-attention-grabbing-story/]tell a story[/url]. If you do, they will not only be impressive; they will be memorable.

Factor 4: Maturity.

Adcoms look for personal maturity in all applicants, but will look especially closely at younger applicants. (According to [url=https://www.usnews.com/education/best-graduate-schools/top-business-schools/articles/how-much-work-experience-do-i-need-for-mba-programs]U.S. News[/url], the average age of MBA entrants in was just under 27 for schools that reported this data.) Thus, it is important for younger applicants to demonstrate personal maturity in three areas: (1) skill in handling interpersonal communications and interactions; (2) sound judgment; (3) ability to self-reflect and self-critique. Your essays and your recommendations are the key vehicles for conveying your maturity in these areas. In each case, use examples and anecdotes to illustrate the point, and detail your actions and thought processes.

Factor 5: Ability to contribute to the program.

The above four factors show the adcom that pursuing an MBA is the right step for you to take now. In evaluating your application, the adcom also will weigh whether, and to what extent, you will benefit its program socially and academically. Admissions committees seek applicants who will be vital members of their communities, during the two-year period of study and subsequently as alumni. Thus, show you that can contribute at a level equal to that of “average age” applicants at least. There are two key areas of potential contribution, and you should show how you will add value in both: (1) in the classroom and (2) in the social milieu. Your resume, essays, and recommendations all should convey this contribution, though the latter two will do so more specifically and in more depth.

Your application strategy has another key element: [url=https://blog.accepted.com/which-mba-program-is-right-for-me-the-ultimate-guide-to-choosing-an-mba-program/]the list of schools to which you apply[/url]. Seek schools that will meet your learning needs and that welcome relatively young applicants. That means research – slogging through website statistics on student profiles. The average age is not really helpful because you need to know the range, i.e., has a school admitted people with under 3 years of experience? Also, numerous MBA programs have a specific application for early-career applicants (usually college seniors or recent grads).

As a younger than average MBA applicant, you can outpace your older competitors by creating a compelling portrayal of your ability to achieve, contribute, and learn so much in a short time. Indeed, you may make the older applicants appear rather sluggish!

[b]Get the guidance and support of an experienced admissions consultant as you devise your strategy to apply as a younger applicant. We offer [url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/services?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=MBA_admissions_younger_applicants&utm_source=blog]a range of services[/url] that can be tailored exactly to your needs. Our singular goal is to help you gain admittance to the MBA program of your choice![/b]

[img]https://blog.accepted.com/cindy-tokumitsu-accepted-consultant/[/img]
Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. [url=https://www.accepted.com/service-request-cindy?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=blog_bio_cindy&utm_source=blog][b]Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch![/b][/url]

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[b]Related Resources:[/b]

[list][*][url=https://reports.accepted.com/mba/guide/five-fatal-flaws]5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your MBA application Essays[/url], a free guide[/*][*][url=https://blog.accepted.com/how-to-project-professionalism-positivity-and-confidence-in-your-statement-of-purpose/]How to Project Professionalism, Positivity, and Confidence in Your Statement of Purpose[/url][/*][*][url=https://blog.accepted.com/showing-strengths-in-application-essays/]4 Tips for Highlighting Your Strengths in Your Application Essays[/url][/*][/list]

Tags: [url=https://blog.accepted.com/category/mba-admissions/]MBA Admissions[/url]

The post [url=https://blog.accepted.com/mba-admissions-younger-applicants/]MBA Admissions: Application Advice for Younger Applicants[/url] appeared first on [url=https://blog.accepted.com]Accepted Admissions Blog[/url].
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Oh No! A Typo!! [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Oh No! A Typo!!



Will that lonely typo doom your otherwise perfect application to the great round file in cyberspace, putting the kibosh on years of effort and nixing your attempt to walk through the hallowed halls of your favored institution?

No.

A single, minor typo will do nothing. So don’t sweat one minor spelling mistake, a missed comma, or a couple of transposed letters.

When should you worry?

You do have cause for worry if you find any of the following after you have hit SUBMIT:

  • You find several typos or mistakes. Now you have a problem. If the readers see a lot of mistakes, they will assume you are careless and sloppy. Not exactly the impression you are aiming for, and one that will definitely hurt you.

  • Your typo changes the meaning. For example, a client years ago submitted a draft to me in which he wrote, “Through research I exorcised my mind… ” I have never forgotten this one because I almost fell off my chair laughing. He meant “exercised.” If this only happens once, I don’t think it would necessarily be fatal, but you don’t want to be remembered for rib-splitting typos either. In his case, I just had a good laugh, and it was never submitted. Needless to say, the money he invested in Accepted’s review paid off with that one correction.

  • You forget to change the school’s name somewhere in the essay. Ouch. Adcoms universally hate that. It isn’t really a typo either, and it usually results in rejection. If you are adapting an essay from one school’s application to another school’s application, do a “Find and Replace” for any form of the first school’s name before you even begin any other revising. For example, if you are applying to Harvard Business School, search for Harvard, Harvard Business School, and HBS and replace them with the name of the new school. Then adapt and revise the essay for School #2.

What should you do?

What should you do if you find any of 1-3 in your application after submitting? It’s a tough spot. If you find the error(s) – especially if you find 1 or 3 – soon after hitting SUBMIT, you can contact the school and say that you accidentally submitted the wrong draft of your essay(s). Maybe, just maybe, someone will have mercy on you and let you submit the corrected draft.

What happens, though, if the school won’t let you resubmit? What if it really is too late? Talk to us. Reach out to Accepted and we can help you figure out your next steps. If you haven’t submitted, lucky you – you can still use the Final Review service to make sure you don’t end up in this sticky predicament!


For 25 years, Accepted has helped applicants gain acceptance to top undergraduate and graduate programs. Our expert team of admissions consultants features former admissions directors, PhDs, and professional writers who have advised clients to acceptance at top programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Yale, Princeton, Penn, Columbia, Oxford, Cambridge, INSEAD, MIT, Caltech, UC Berkeley, and Northwestern.
Want an admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!



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Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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MBA Recommendation Letters: 10 Tips for Writing them Right [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: MBA Recommendation Letters: 10 Tips for Writing them Right
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Well-crafted, impressive, and persuasive letters of recommendation are a core part of your MBA application. Whilst you can carefully select who writes them, what and how they write is somewhat out of your control. One thing you can do, however, is pass on these essential tips – the collective wisdom of our [url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/services/letter-of-recommendation?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=mba_rec_letters&utm_source=article]experienced admissions consultants[/url] – to your recommenders to ensure they cover all the key elements of an outstanding LOR and express themselves compellingly enough to snag you that acceptance letter.

10 tips for writing MBA letters of recommendation

[list][*][b]Review a copy of the applicant’s personal statement[/b] or application essays so that your letter of recommendation can dovetail with–not conflict with or duplicate–the rest of the application.

[/*][*][b]Ask the applicant to supply you with additional information[/b] like a resume. These additional sources of information can help you to paint a more thorough picture of the applicant and their strengths beyond your immediate knowledge of said applicant.

[/*][*][b]Whenever possible, explain how the applicant compares to others [/b]you’ve worked with/supervised/taught. And, describe your qualifications for comparing the applicant to other applicants. For example:

[list][*]“I have been teaching for twenty years and have advised approximately 450 students on independent research projects over the last five years.”

[/*][/list][/*][*]“I have personally supervised ten interns every summer for the last five years; I have also worked with over two hundred college graduates in my capacity as trainer for Big Bank Corp.”

[b]LISTEN: [url=https://blog.accepted.com/optimize-your-grad-school-application/]Optimize Your Graduate School Application: Grades, Scores, Essays, Resume, Activity History, and More >>[/url][/b]

[/*][*][b]Discuss how well you know the applicant[/b]. For example:

[list][*]“I was able to get to know Mr. Doe because he made it a point to attend two of my sections every week when only one was required.”

[/*][*]“Ms. Smith reported directly to me for two years prior to her well-deserved promotion to the position of Senior in our Big Four Accounting Firm.”

[/*][/list][/*][*][b]Choose two to three positive qualities[/b] that you have observed in the applicant. For example:

[list][*]“Jane’s writing and interpersonal skills are both very strong.”

[/*][*]“The combination of tenacity, analytical abilities, and good communications skills truly make Mr. Doe unique.”
[/*][/list][/*][*][b]In discussing those qualities, support your statements with specific instances[/b] in which he or she demonstrated those attributes. Be as concrete and specific as possible. For example:

[list][*]“He is the only student I ever had who came to all my office hours as part of a relentless, and ultimately successful, drive to master financial theory. He was one of just ten percent of the students in the class to receive an A.”

[/*][*]“Because of Jane’s writing skills, I didn’t hesitate to ask her to write a report which was used by our PAC as the basis for a major policy statement. Congressman X eventually used the statement, based on Jane’s sophisticated 20-page analysis of Middle East politics, in lobbying for increased funding.”
[/*][/list][/*][*][b]Try to quantify the student’s strengths[/b] or rank him or her vis-a-vis other applicants that you have observed. For example:

[list][*]“He was in the top 10% of his class.”

[/*][*]“She has the best analytical skills of any person her age that I have ever supervised.”
[/*][/list][/*][*][b][url=https://blog.accepted.com/generic-itis-prevention/]Avoid generalities and platitudes.[/url] [/b]

[/*][*][b]Include some mild criticism, [/b]typically the flip-side of a strength. For example:

[list][*]“The only fault I have encountered in him is his retiring nature. His modesty sometimes hides a young man of remarkable strength and broad interests.”

[/*][*]“Occasionally, her fortitude and persistence can turn into stubbornness, but usually her good nature and level-headedness prevail.”
[/*][/list][/*][*][b]Discuss the applicant’s potential in his or her chosen field.[/b] For example:

[list][*]“I enthusiastically recommend Mr. Doe to your business school. This well-rounded student will be a fine businessperson.”

[/*][*]“With her exceptional leadership, writing, and quantitative skills, Ms. Smith will be an outstanding strategic consultant and a credit to the business school she attends.”[/*][/list][/*][/list]

[b]Are you a recommender looking for more advice on how to write a strong, honest, and helpful recommendation? Please see our [/b][url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/services/letter-of-recommendation?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=mba_rec_letters&utm_source=blog][b]business school letter of recommendation consulting & editing services[/b][/url][b] for more information.[/b]

[url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/services?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=blog_bio_mba&utm_source=blog][img]https://blog.accepted.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/accepted_admissions_consulting.jpg[/img][/url]
For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. [url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/services?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=blog_bio_mba&utm_source=blog][b]Want an MBA admissions expert [/b][b]to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch![/b][/url]

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[b]Related Resources:[/b]

[list][*][url=https://reports.accepted.com/mba/guide/mba-admissions-report]Navigate the MBA Maze[/url], a free guide[/*][*][url=https://blog.accepted.com/ingredients-of-a-great-letter-of-recommendation/]Ingredients of a Great MBA Letter of Recommendation[/url][/*][*][url=https://blog.accepted.com/mba-letters-of-recommendation-2/]MBA Letters Of Recommendation: Who, When, What, Where & How[/url][/*][/list]

Tags: [url=https://blog.accepted.com/category/mba-admissions/]MBA Admissions[/url]

The post [url=https://blog.accepted.com/mba-recommendation-letters-10-tips-for-writing-them-right/]MBA Recommendation Letters: 10 Tips for Writing them Right[/url] appeared first on [url=https://blog.accepted.com]Accepted Admissions Blog[/url].
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No Work Experience. Want MBA. What Should You Do? [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: No Work Experience. Want MBA. What Should You Do?
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When I used to travel to applicant fairs to represent [url=https://blog.accepted.com/london-business-school-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/]London Business School[/url], I’d commonly be approached by candidates asking, “I want an MBA but don’t have any full-time work experience. Can I study at your school?” While the answer in that instance was “no”, the conversation never ended there. The discussion would then turn to the options for those who [url=https://blog.accepted.com/mba-admissions-younger-applicants/]don’t meet the work experience requirement[/url] of most MBA programs, but who have the desire to pursue graduate management study and start making their mark in the business world. Two of the most commonly pursued paths for candidates in this situation include pre-experience masters programs and deferred MBAs:

Pre-experience / early career programs

These terms are used interchangeably, but they both refer to those programs that cater to recent graduates (‘recent’ meaning 0-3 years out of undergraduate). While this category started with the general management MiM ([url=https://blog.accepted.com/tag/masters-in-management/]masters in/of management[/url]), the portfolio of programs now includes masters in finance, innovation and entrepreneurship, and data analytics, to name but a few of the courses you might find available at business schools today. 

Applicants fitting into this category are commonly referred to as pre-experience or early-career candidates, and this market continues to grow; according to [url=https://www.gmac.com/-/media/files/gmac/research/gmat-test-taker-data/gmat-geographic-trend-report-ty2018_pdf.pdf#:~:text=The%20GMAT%E2%84%A2%20Geographic%20Trend%20Report%3A%20Testing%20Year%202018,to%202018%20form%20the%20basis%20of%20this%20report.]The GMAT™ Geographic Trend Report: Testing Year 2018[/url], while most GMAT scores continue to be sent to MBA programs (62%), business masters are now outnumbering MBA programs for the first time in the history of the exam. While pursuing a program like a MiM doesn’t negate the need for the MBA later down the road (indeed you will find individuals who have both a MiM and MBA), these programs are excellent options for recent graduates looking to explore their options in the business world with the confidence of knowing their MBA future is secured. 

There are a myriad of reasons as to why a graduate may want to pursue their studies now versus waiting to pursue an MBA – they may be looking to specialise in a specific area, such as finance or marketing early on in order to enter a specific function. Or they might be looking to “convert” their liberal arts or science degree into a business career. Whatever the reason, these degrees provide graduates with an excellent foundation and help students build the skills, knowledge, careers support, and network to get a head start in their career.

Deferred MBA admissions

This may be slightly confusing considering the mention of MBA. What deferred admissions means is that you apply while you are in your final year of study (or just after, if pursuing a masters without full-time work experience). If accepted, you receive a reserved seat to join an MBA program after spending a couple of years in the working world. 

These programs are a great option as they offer security (yay, no having worry about studying for the GMAT and writing your applications alongside your busy work schedule!) and add some clout to your resume (wow, already accepted to an MBA before even graduating? Impressive!). Of course as with anything there are pros and cons, so it’s important to think about whether committing yourself to a deferred program makes sense with your career aims, or whether you will need some flexibility and the ability to change path in those first couple of years after graduating. 

Most deferred admit programs are open to students coming from any university. There are also scholarship programs, such as NYU’s William R. Berkley Scholarship Program, which not only provides early entry to their MBA, Tech MBA, or Fashion & Luxury MBA, but also full funding. Regardless of entry criteria or offering, these programs are incredibly competitive, so you’ll need to prepare your best application. Here’s further information to help you better understand what these programs are all about:

[list][*][url=https://blog.accepted.com/tag/hbs-22/][b]2+2 Program ([/b][/url][b][url=https://blog.accepted.com/harvard-business-school-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/]H[/url][/b][url=https://blog.accepted.com/tag/hbs-22/][b]BS)[/b][/url]: Harvard’s 2+2 program does what the name implies – two years of work experience followed by two years of MBA study (though, technically, admitted students are allowed up to four years of professional experience, so this might be a 3+2 or 4+2, for some). Harvard is looking for “innovative thinkers who have demonstrated leadership and analytical skills and want to develop their knowledge and passion to make a difference in the world.” And this difference doesn’t have to be in a “traditional” business area. In fact, the 2+2 places some preference on those pursuing paths “that aren’t as well established in leading to graduate business school”; this could include candidates planning to work in an operating company, coming from a lower socio-economic background, aiming to pursue a technically demanding role, or with entrepreneurial ambitions. So, if you’re not MBB focused, don’t let that stop you from applying. You might just be what the 2+2 is looking for.

[/*][*][url=https://blog.accepted.com/nyu-stern-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/][b]Berkley Scholarship Program (NYU)[/b][/url]: The William R. Berkley Scholarship Program supports exceptional college seniors who wish to pursue their full-time MBA at NYU Stern directly following graduation. Full-fee scholarships, which cover tuition and fees, along with a housing stipend and educational expenses, are offered for the Full-time and Tech MBA and Fashion & Luxury programs. With only a handful of applicants selected each year since its 2013 inception, acceptance is highly competitive. Candidates are selected based on the combination of stellar academic performance and exceptional potential to contribute to business and society. Interested college seniors apply using the full-time MBA online application (Consortium and NYU dual degree applicants are not eligible).

[/*][*][url=https://blog.accepted.com/columbia-business-school-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/][b]Deferred Enrollment Program (Columbia)[/b][/url]: CBS’ Deferred Enrollment Program is one that offers flexibility – admitted students can explore the professional world for two to five years before beginning their MBA studies at a time that works best for them. This is a great opportunity for those looking to try out their options and get an understanding of their business interests and passions. The flexibility continues once students start their studies as they’re able to specify in a letter of intent (when ready to begin) whether they’re interested in enrolling in the 16 month (January) or 20 month (August) program, the latter of which includes a summer internship. Having spent time in industry or entrepreneurship up until this point will help direct students as to which journey will offer the tuition and experience to meet their professional and personal development needs.

[/*][*][url=https://blog.accepted.com/wharton-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/][b]Moelis Advance Action Program (Wharton)[/b][/url]: Similar to Columbia, Wharton’s deferred admissions program offers recent undergraduate or masters degree students the chance to work for two to four years before joining the MBA as a Moelis Fellow. With the flexible start option, Wharton acknowledges that early career trajectory can change. It encourages students “to take professional risks during the deferment period”, risks that will not only help to define post-MBA career goals, but that will allow students to contribute to classroom discussion and peer-to-peer learning. The program “seeks students who are innovative, intellectually curious, and ready to take professional risks while impacting the world”. Along with the notion of risk, diversity is also important, and Moelis Fellows come from a range of academic backgrounds. The majority of the 2020 class come from STEM undergraduate degrees (43%), followed by business/economics (31%), and humanities/social sciences (26%).[/*][/list]

Here are some other options currently on the market (as of November 2020) that you may want to take a closer look at:

[url=https://www.accepted.com/quiz/mba-deferred-admissions-calculator-quiz?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=no_work_experience_want_mba&utm_source=blog]Is deferring the right choice for you?[/url]

[list][*][b][url=https://blog.accepted.com/stanford-gsb-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/]Stanford GSB[/url][/b]: The Deferred Enrollment program is aimed at students in either the final year of their bachelors or joint bachelor/graduate program, or those currently in a graduate program started immediately following undergrad/postgrad study. 

Stanford cites deferred enrolment as a good option for those unsure of their long-term professional path and who feel they would benefit from full-time work experience before enrolling. And they indicate some industries – such as private equity, biotech, and management consulting – recruit only MBA candidates with pre-MBA experience in that field or with specialized knowledge, so conducting some due diligence into the recruitment practices of possible target industries is wise.

As for applicants, they expect students (during the deferral period) to be “productively engaged…to pursue opportunities that enable you to build expertise, enhance your skills and knowledge, expand your perspective, and develop professional judgment and self-confidence.” So you need to reflect on what activities will allow you to develop and how you should be spending your time.

[/*][*][b][url=https://blog.accepted.com/kellogg-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/]Northwestern Kellogg[/url][/b]: One of the newer programs to market, Kellogg’s Future Leaders program opened admissions in February 2020. This deferred program allows students to work for two to five years before beginning their MBA journey. Master’s and undergraduate students (excluding law, medical and PhD students/grads, who apply through the standard admissions process) can come from any undergraduate study discipline and have either graduated in the past year, be in their final year, or have gone straight into graduate study post-bachelors.

The usual admissions requirements exist – test scores, essays, letters of recommendation, interviews – for some, but not all candidates. Those already attending Northwestern will be exempt from taking either the GMAT or GRE, so that’s one application requirement that can be ticked off the list for those already wearing the purple N.

[/*][*][b][url=https://blog.accepted.com/yale-som-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/]Yale SOM[/url][/b]: The Silver Scholar’s Program works slightly differently to some of the other deferred admission programs on this list. College seniors earn their MBA in a fast-tracked three-year format immediately following their undergraduate years. The program structure is as follows: Year 1 – core curriculum. Year 2 – full-time internship(s). Year 3 – electives. The opportunity to develop academic skills alongside professional experience is a unique one. Perhaps even more unique is the fact that Silver Scholars learn alongside students from the regular MBA track. Access to knowledge and experience? Check!

On Yale’s part, they say their Silver Scholars “are chosen for their combination of intelligence and common sense, maturity and curiosity, passion and compassion. Each has made a difference and distinguished him- or herself in a particular field of interest.” You’ll need to really make yourself stand out through the application process (which, by the way, is the same as the regular MBA track, just with a few differences). Remember, you’ll be studying alongside students with five years of experience. The ad com will need assurance that you have what it takes to contribute, and you’ll need to prove you do through your application.

[/*][*][b][url=https://blog.accepted.com/chicago-booth-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/]Chicago Booth[/url][/b]: Initially open to only University of Chicago undergraduates, in 2018, Booth opened admissions to its Chicago Booth Scholars deferred admissions program to students from any university. The program allows candidates to apply before they graduate from college, defer and gain professional experience for two to five years before joining for their MBA.

Booth cites “flexibility [as] one of the major differentiators.” In addition to the length of time accepted students are allowed in post-graduate employment, if students want to continue in employment instead of joining school full-time past five years, they’re able to consider Booth’s Evening MBA or Weekend MBA Program instead.

Booth say candidates for the Scholars Program are “intellectually curious with personal maturity, competitive scores, and demonstrated leadership throughout college…and display a track record of quality internships, part-time jobs, and/or an entrepreneurial spirit.” In addition to demonstrating these qualities, Booth expects applicants to “articulate a potential career path and why an MBA is necessary in the near future…and show the ability to question the status quo, engage in the process of learning, and thrive in an academically rigorous environment.” Booth is looking for intelligent, independent thinkers with a considered career map. While of course career aims can change during the course of deferment, the adcom will want to see that candidates have taken the time to consider their career path, and how Booth fits in.

[/*][*][b][url=https://blog.accepted.com/uva-darden-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/]UVA Darden[/url][/b]: Darden’s Future Year Scholars Program is open to final year college students, or those pursuing a 5th year master’s degree, who can work for two to four years before starting their MBA studies. Darden entices candidates with possible merit awards at the time of admission, and additional opportunities for scholarship consideration when the admitted student matriculates.

Darden evaluates applications based on academics, extracurricular involvement, and personal characteristics. While the latter of these criteria is vague, they do say they are looking for students who “aspire to be future ethical leaders and managers in a global world.” Thought into why you have the potential to be this future leader, and whether your values align to theirs, wouldn’t go amiss.

[/*][*][b][url=https://blog.accepted.com/mit-sloan-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/]MIT Sloan[/url][/b]: If you are an “ambitious and forward-thinking student”, Sloan’s MBA Early Admission Program might be right for you. Open to final year or recently (current academic year) graduated students, or those in graduate study without work experience (started immediately following bachelors), students are able to work for two to five years before joining the MBA.

The admissions process is slightly different for Early Admission candidates, and with a different application calendar for non-MIT undergrads. Candidates are required to submit a 300-word cover letter demonstrating their fit. MIT is quite specific who they’re looking for. They want “thoughtful leaders with exceptional intellectual abilities and the drive and determination to put their stamp on the world…people who are independent, authentic, and fearlessly creative… who can redefine solutions to conventional problems, and strive to pre-empt unconventional dilemmas with cutting-edge ideas.” A lot to think about and a lot to squeeze into a one-page cover letter, so do carefully consider how you fit these criteria. Additionally, candidates must submit a resume and 60 second video introducing themselves to the class. The video is a great opportunity to show your personality and bring the person introduced in the cover letter to life.

And applicants who are current MIT students with a cumulative GPA of 4.2 or above are in luck, as GMAT/GRE will be waived for them.

[/*][*][url=https://blog.accepted.com/uc-berkeley-haas-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/][b]Berkeley Haas Accelerated Access[/b][/url]: The newest deferred pathways to join this list is Hass’ Accelerated Access program. Launched January 2020, the option is currently open only to students with an undergraduate or graduate degree from one of the ten UC campuses (though it plans to expand to students outside of this system in the future). Admitted students not only have access to the full-time MBA but will also be eligible for consideration for dual degree programs.

Students are required to work for a minimum of two years before beginning their MBA studies, but have a maximum of five years to explore their career interests. While Berkeley does not require its deferred students to pursue particular career paths, it encourages “employment that enhances your leadership profile and prepares you to contribute to [its] mission-driven business community.” This advice isn’t just given, it’s followed-up on during the employment period. As offers are conditional: students are required to attend check-ins with a Haas advisor or career coach and a review may be conducted prior to the intended enrolment date to ensure terms have been met.  [/*][/list]

If these options sound interesting, but you’re still unsure of whether it makes sense to study for a masters now or wait to pursue an MBA, [url=https://blog.accepted.com/early-career-management-and-european-mba-programs-with-jamie-wright-episode-249/]check out this podcast episode[/url] where we discuss the differences in the degrees and points for consideration. You might also like to [url=https://www.thecrimson.com/sponsored/article/accepted-deferred-mba/]read more about the benefits of deferred admissions[/url] and whether this might be the right step for you.

While an MBA is the ultimate education goal for many, if you’re not yet eligible due to your lack of work experience, but know you want to pursue a business masters, you have options. Start researching and contacting schools to see what options are out there for you, and what can bring you closer to your dream of making an impact in business.

[b]The important thing here to remember is that you CAN apply for an MBA with no work experience, but it’s not without its challenges. And Accepted can help! Explore our [url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/services/consulting?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=No_work_experience_want_mba&utm_source=blog]MBA Admissions Consulting Services[/url] and work one-on-one an experienced advisor who will help you create an application strategy that will get you accepted![/b]

[url=https://www.accepted.com/aboutus/jamiewright][img]https://www.accepted.com/hs-fs/hubfs/Consultant%20Images/Jamie-Wright-Accepted-Consultant.png?width=75&name=Jamie-Wright-Accepted-Consultant.png[/img][/url]
Jamie Wright has more than eight years of recruitment and admissions experience at London Business School, and is the former Admissions Director for Early Career Programmes at LBS. Originally from the U.S., Jamie is now based in London. [b]Want Jamie to help you get accepted?[/b] [url=https://www.accepted.com/service-request-jamie?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=blog_bio_jamie&utm_source=blog][b]Click here to get in touch with Jamie Wright[/b][/url][b].[/b]

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[b]Related Resources:[/b]

[list][*][url=https://reports.accepted.com/mba/guide/importance-of-work-experience-when-applying-for-your-mba]MBA Applicants: Make Your Work Experience Work for You[/url], a free guide [/*][*][url=https://blog.accepted.com/how-an-admissions-committee-views-mba-work-experience/]How an Admissions Committee Views MBA Work Experience[/url][/*][*][url=https://blog.accepted.com/mba-admissions-younger-applicants/]MBA Admissions: Application Advice for Younger Applicants[/url][/*][/list]

Tags: [url=https://blog.accepted.com/category/mba-admissions/]MBA Admissions[/url]

The post [url=https://blog.accepted.com/applying-for-an-mba-with-no-work-experience-what-you-need-to-know/]No Work Experience. Want MBA. What Should You Do?[/url] appeared first on [url=https://blog.accepted.com]Accepted Admissions Blog[/url].
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For 25 years, Accepted has helped applicants gain acceptance to top undergraduate and graduate programs. Our expert team of admissions consultants features former admissions directors, PhDs, and professional writers who have advised clients to acceptance at top programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Yale, Princeton, Penn, Columbia, Oxford, Cambridge, INSEAD, MIT, Caltech, UC Berkeley, and Northwestern.
[url=https://www.accepted.com/services?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=blog_bio_gen&utm_source=blog][b]Want an admissions expert [/b][b]to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch![/b][/url]

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Here is a look at the Kellogg MBA Class of 2022, taken from the [url=https://www.kellogg.northwestern.edu/programs/full-time-mba/class-profile.aspx]Kellogg website[/url].

[b]Class Size:[/b] 559

[b]Female:[/b] 224 (40%)

[b]International:[/b] 146 (26%)

[b]U.S. Race/Ethnicity (reported under Federal Reporting Guidelines as advised by GMAC, and Multi-Dimensional Reporting, which allows students to select multiple categories of race and ethnicity):[/b]

[list][*][b]American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, Other Pacific Islander:
[/b]
Federal: 0 

Multi-Dimensional: 3 (1%)

[/*][*][b]Asian American:[/b]

Federal: 70 (17%)

Multi-Dimensional: 82 (20%)

[/*][*][b]Black/African-American:[/b]

Federal: 24 (6%)

Multi-Dimensional: 25 (6%)

[/*][*][b]Hispanic/Latinx[/b]

Federal: 35 (8%)

Multi-Dimensional: 35 (8%)

[/*][*][b]White:[/b]

Federal: 266 (64%)

Multi-Dimensional: 308 (75%)

[/*][*][b]Multi-Race:[/b]

Federal: 13 (3%)

Multi-Dimensional: 0

[/*][*][b]Did Not Report:[/b]

Federal: 5 (1%)

Multi-Dimensional: 5 (1%)[/*][/list]

[b][url=https://youtu.be/XPuJaRAU_J8]WATCH: What types of applicants does Kellogg value? >>[/url][/b]

[b]Mean GPA (based on US schools using a 4.0 grading scale):[/b] 3.6

[list][*][b]GPA Range:[/b] 2.5–4.0[/*][/list]

[b]Mean GMAT:[/b] 727

[list][*][b]GMAT Range:[/b] 640–770[/*][/list]

[b]Median GRE Verbal:[/b] 163

[list][*][b]GRE Verbal Range:[/b] 150–169[/*][/list]

[b]Median GRE Quant:[/b] 163

[list][*][b]GRE Quant Range:[/b] 151–170[/*][/list]

[b][url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/selectivity-index]Are you a competitive applicant at your dream school? Check out the B-School Selectivity Index! >>[/url][/b]

[b]Average Work Experience:[/b] 5 years

[b]Industry Background[/b]:

[list][*]Consulting: 26%

[/*][*]Financial Services: 22%

[/*][*]Technology: 15%

[/*][*]Other: 10%

[/*][*]Government/Education/Nonprofit: 6%

[/*][*]Media and Entertainment: 6%

[/*][*]Consumer Products: 5%

[/*][*]Health/Bio: 4%

[/*][*]Manufacturing: 3%

[/*][*]Military: 3%

[/*][*]Energy: 2%[/*][/list]

Which MBA program is right for you? Want to know which schools to target for your best chance of admission? Check out these resources to help you in your decision:

[list][*][url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/selectivity-index]GMAT, GPA, and MBA Acceptance Rates: The B-School Selectivity Index[/url]

[/*][*][url=https://blog.accepted.com/m7-mba-programs-everything-you-need-to-know-in-2020/]M7 MBA Programs: Everything You Need to Know in 2020 – 21[/url][/*][/list]

Already got your sights set on Kellogg? We have crucial inside information that can help you snag that acceptance letter:

[list][*][url=https://blog.accepted.com/kellogg-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/]Kellogg MBA Essay: Tips & Deadlines (2020 – 2021)[/url]

[/*][*][url=https://blog.accepted.com/get-a-kellogg-mba-an-interview-with-dean-of-admissions-kate-smith/]Get a Kellogg MBA: An Interview with Dean of Admissions Kate Smith (Episode 324)[/url][/*][/list]

[b]Getting into Kellogg, or any of the top-tier MBA programs, is very competitive. Our [url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/services/application-packages?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=kellogg_2022_class_profile&utm_source=blog]MBA Services Packages[/url] have all you need to get you there. We’ll match you with an experienced admissions consultant who will work with you one-on-one to create an outstanding application and prepare you to ace your interview. So give yourself the edge and get ACCEPTED![/b]

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. [url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/services?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=blog_bio_mba&utm_source=blog][b]Want an MBA admissions expert [/b][b]to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch![/b][/url]

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Tags: [url=https://blog.accepted.com/category/mba-admissions/]MBA Admissions[/url]

The post [url=https://blog.accepted.com/kellogg-mba-class-of-2021-profile/]Kellogg MBA Class of 2022 Profile[/url] appeared first on [url=https://blog.accepted.com]Accepted Admissions Blog[/url].
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Kellogg MBA Class of 2022 Profile



Here is a look at the Kellogg MBA Class of 2022, taken from the Kellogg website.

Class Size: 559

Female: 224 (40%)

International: 146 (26%)

U.S. Race/Ethnicity (reported under Federal Reporting Guidelines as advised by GMAC, and Multi-Dimensional Reporting, which allows students to select multiple categories of race and ethnicity):

  • American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, Other Pacific Islander:

    Federal: 0  

    Multi-Dimensional: 3 (1%)

    
  • Asian American:

    Federal: 70 (17%)

    Multi-Dimensional: 82 (20%)

    
  • Black/African-American:

    Federal: 24 (6%)

    Multi-Dimensional: 25 (6%)

    
  • Hispanic/Latinx

    Federal: 35 (8%)

    Multi-Dimensional: 35 (8%)

    
  • White:

    Federal: 266 (64%)

    Multi-Dimensional: 308 (75%)

    
  • Multi-Race:

    Federal: 13 (3%)

    Multi-Dimensional: 0

    
  • Did Not Report:

    Federal: 5 (1%)

    Multi-Dimensional: 5 (1%)

WATCH: What types of applicants does Kellogg value? >>

Mean GPA (based on US schools using a 4.0 grading scale): 3.6

  • GPA Range: 2.5–4.0

Mean GMAT: 727

  • GMAT Range: 640–770

Median GRE Verbal: 163

  • GRE Verbal Range: 150–169

Median GRE Quant: 163

  • GRE Quant Range: 151–170

Are you a competitive applicant at your dream school? Check out the B-School Selectivity Index! >>

Average Work Experience: 5 years

Industry Background:

  • Consulting: 26%

    
  • Financial Services: 22%

    
  • Technology: 15%

    
  • Other: 10%

    
  • Government/Education/Nonprofit: 6%

    
  • Media and Entertainment: 6%

    
  • Consumer Products: 5%

    
  • Health/Bio: 4%

    
  • Manufacturing: 3%

    
  • Military: 3%

    
  • Energy: 2%

Which MBA program is right for you? Want to know which schools to target for your best chance of admission? Check out these resources to help you in your decision:


Already got your sights set on Kellogg? We have crucial inside information that can help you snag that acceptance letter:


Getting into Kellogg, or any of the top-tier MBA programs, is very competitive. Our MBA Services Packages have all you need to get you there. We’ll match you with an experienced admissions consultant who will work with you one-on-one to create an outstanding application and prepare you to ace your interview. So give yourself the edge and get ACCEPTED!


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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Kellogg MBA Class of 2022 Profile appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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