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An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two

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An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2007, 06:20
13
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A
B
C
D
E

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An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two decades ago, has been unsuccessful despite efforts by many important groups, including the National Organization for Women.

(A) to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two decades ago,

(B) begun almost two decades ago, for ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment

(C) begun for ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment almost two decades ago

(D) at ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two decades ago,

(E) that has begun almost two decades ago to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment
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Re: An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2007, 07:37
I will go with A. The verb attempt can only take an infitive as verbal direct object. The sentence is fine as it is.
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Re: An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jul 2009, 03:56
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I think the ans is A.What is the OA?

I think attempt to is the correct idiom.
In E that has begun is wrong.Whenever a definite time is specified (like 'two decades ago' in this case) you have to use simplepast tense
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Re: An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Apr 2012, 09:41
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Idiom: is it attempt to, attempt for, or attempt at?
Here it is "Attempt to", so eliminate B, C, and D.

In E, present perfect is the wrong verb tense to use, despite its apparent consistency with "has been unsuccessful".
Present perfect is typically used for actions that began in the past and continue into the present. It can also be used to specify a past event at an indefinite point in the past.
Here, the "two decades ago" makes present perfect an incorrect tense.
Consider "I have lived in New York five years ago." -- doesn't sound right and it isn't right.

So The correct answer is A.
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Re: An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Apr 2012, 10:42
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Hi All,
An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two decades ago, has been unsuccessful despite efforts by many important groups, including the National Organization for Women.

I would like to begin this post with a word of caution. This sentence is not structured in the most appropriate manner to adhere with the GMAT standards. Many of you may ask and have actually asked that the way verb-ed modifier “begun” has been placed, it can also modify “Equal Rights Amendment”. “begun” is a noun modifier and hence this confusion is unavoidable. So just solve this question and move on.

Image

PoE

(A) to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two decades ago,: This is the correct answer choice.

(B) begun almost two decades ago, for ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment: Since the purpose of the attempt is to ratify the amendment, we must use to + verb form here. “for ratifying” is not appropriate.

(C) begun for ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment almost two decades ago: Same error as in choice B.

(D) at ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two decades ago,: Same reason as for choices B and C. “at ratifying” to the show the purpose is not appropriate.

(E) that has begun almost two decades ago to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment: This choice a verb tense issue. Notice the main verb “has been unsuccessful”. This means that the attempt started in the past and showed some result in the present. Hence, present perfect “has begun” is incorrect.

Take this sentence for example: The project that started two years ago has been successful. (Correct)
The project that has started two years ago has been successful. (Incorrect)

We know that the attempt to ratify the amendment has been unsuccessful. Here, we are talking about the attempt that started two years back and now has been unsuccessful.

Hope this helps.
Shraddha
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Re: An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Apr 2013, 06:08
Correct usage of "attempt" is attempt + to + verb

A) Grammatically and idiomatically correct.
B) "for ratifying" is incorrect.
C) "for ratifying" is incorrect.
D) "at ratifying" is incorrect.
E) "has begun" is used incorrectly making two events disjoint. The structure "An attempt that has begun two decades ago, has been unsuccessful" is incorrect. Correct form will be "An attempt that begun two decades ago, has been unsuccessful".

Correct answer is A.
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Re: An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jan 2014, 01:27
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Hi all,
I have the same issue as many others with this problem. Usage of 'begun' isn't satisfying as it should be 'began'. 'Begun' is the past participle form of 'begin'. Here, begin word acts as a verb and not as a participle, therefore either it should be preceded by 'has/have' to make it a correct verb or it should be changed to the past form of 'begin' e.e. 'began'.
Please if any expert can comment on this.
Thanks in advance..!!
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Re: An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two  [#permalink]

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New post 15 May 2014, 01:13
An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two decades ago, has been unsuccessful despite efforts by many important groups, including the National Organization for Women.
(A) to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two decades ago, --- CORRECT
(B) begun almost two decades ago, for ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment ----- For ratifying is wrong idiom
(C) begun for ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment almost two decades ago begun --- ----- For ratifying is wrong idiom
(D) at ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two decades ago, ---- --- Attempt at is wrong idiom
(E) that has begun almost two decades ago to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment ----- -- 'Has' is wrong tense, it is not continuing till present
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Re: An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jun 2014, 19:31
Sukant2010 wrote:
Hi all,
I have the same issue as many others with this problem. Usage of 'begun' isn't satisfying as it should be 'began'. 'Begun' is the past participle form of 'begin'. Here, begin word acts as a verb and not as a participle, therefore either it should be preceded by 'has/have' to make it a correct verb or it should be changed to the past form of 'begin' e.e. 'began'.
Please if any expert can comment on this.
Thanks in advance..!!



Hi experts,

Can some one explain the question posted above. I have the same doubt. Usage of begun seems wrong and it should have been 'began'. Please let me know if there is some thing i should know.

Thanks in advance
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Re: An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jun 2014, 10:00
Dear Sukant2010 and deepak824,

If you change "begun" to "has began" or "began", the sentence ends up having two verbs (has began/began, has been unsuccessful) without a conjunction in between -- not allowed.

The participle form of the verb can act as an adjective modifier qualifying the "attempt". The resulting sentence (A) has one subject (attempt) and one verb (has been unsuccessful). So you do actually need the participle form here.


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Re: An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Apr 2016, 04:53
scheol79 wrote:
I eventually picked A, but the modifier 'begun almost decades ago' made me pause and think for a bit.

It is obvious that 'begun almost decades ago' is meant to modify the attempt in the context.

But I think that the placement of 'begun almost decades ago', can suggest that the Equal Rights Amendment began almost decades ago, not the attempt.

Any thoughts?

Thanks in advance.


Dear experts

Can someone explain it??
I have same problem...
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Re: An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Apr 2016, 03:06
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vahabMBA wrote:
scheol79 wrote:
I eventually picked A, but the modifier 'begun almost decades ago' made me pause and think for a bit.

It is obvious that 'begun almost decades ago' is meant to modify the attempt in the context.

But I think that the placement of 'begun almost decades ago', can suggest that the Equal Rights Amendment began almost decades ago, not the attempt.

Any thoughts?

Thanks in advance.


Dear experts

Can someone explain it??
I have same problem...


A modifier may in some exceptional cases refer to a noun slightly far away from it. One such case is when another "mission critical" modifier comes in between the modifier and the noun it refers to. A "mission critical" modifier is frequently a prepositional phrase that cannot be placed in another position in the sentence conveniently.

In this case as well, the mission critical modifier "to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment" comes in between the modifier "begun almost two decades ago" and the noun it refers to ("attempt"). Such usage is acceptable in GMAT.
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Re: An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two  [#permalink]

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New post 21 May 2016, 18:51
Economist wrote:
An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two decades ago, has been unsuccessful despite efforts by many important groups, including the National Organization for Women.

(A) to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two decades ago,
(B) begun almost two decades ago, for ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment
(C) begun for ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment almost two decades ago
(D) at ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two decades ago,
(E) that has begun almost two decades ago to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment

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Is "Attempt for something" always incorrect? Please clarify.
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Re: An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two  [#permalink]

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New post 22 May 2016, 16:45
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nihalsaket wrote:
Economist wrote:
An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two decades ago, has been unsuccessful despite efforts by many important groups, including the National Organization for Women.

(A) to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two decades ago,
(B) begun almost two decades ago, for ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment
(C) begun for ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment almost two decades ago
(D) at ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two decades ago,
(E) that has begun almost two decades ago to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment

SCtest3-15



Is "Attempt for something" always incorrect? Please clarify.


Yes, The verb "attempt" always depicts intention and for intention we should use the infinitive form "to+verb", not the form "for+verb-ing".
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Re: An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Nov 2016, 19:09
sayantanc2k wrote:
vahabMBA wrote:
scheol79 wrote:
I eventually picked A, but the modifier 'begun almost decades ago' made me pause and think for a bit.

It is obvious that 'begun almost decades ago' is meant to modify the attempt in the context.

But I think that the placement of 'begun almost decades ago', can suggest that the Equal Rights Amendment began almost decades ago, not the attempt.

Any thoughts?

Thanks in advance.


Dear experts

Can someone explain it??
I have same problem...


A modifier may in some exceptional cases refer to a noun slightly far away from it. One such case is when another "mission critical" modifier comes in between the modifier and the noun it refers to. A "mission critical" modifier is frequently a prepositional phrase that cannot be placed in another position in the sentence conveniently.

In this case as well, the mission critical modifier "to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment" comes in between the modifier "begun almost two decades ago" and the noun it refers to ("attempt"). Such usage is acceptable in GMAT.


But what is wrong in E? It clearly explain the "attempt" and still idiomatic by using "to". I think I'm confused that when should we treat it as "mission critical modifier".
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Re: An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Nov 2016, 04:00
AnotherGmater wrote:
sayantanc2k wrote:
vahabMBA wrote:

Dear experts

Can someone explain it??
I have same problem...


A modifier may in some exceptional cases refer to a noun slightly far away from it. One such case is when another "mission critical" modifier comes in between the modifier and the noun it refers to. A "mission critical" modifier is frequently a prepositional phrase that cannot be placed in another position in the sentence conveniently.

In this case as well, the mission critical modifier "to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment" comes in between the modifier "begun almost two decades ago" and the noun it refers to ("attempt"). Such usage is acceptable in GMAT.


But what is wrong in E? It clearly explain the "attempt" and still idiomatic by using "to". I think I'm confused that when should we treat it as "mission critical modifier".


The Manhattan SC guide provides a list of the such exceptions to the modifier touch rule.
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Re: An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two  [#permalink]

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Re: An attempt to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, begun almost two &nbs [#permalink] 09 Sep 2018, 06:33
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