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Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks

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Re: Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jul 2016, 09:47
Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks as the nation's third leading cause of death, surpassed only by heart disease and cancer
(a) ranks as the nation's third leading cause of death, surpassed only - Correct - Diabetes is singular/ hence ranks is correct More over Surpassed should precede only as only should be nearer to the item description.
(b) rank as the nation's third leading cause of death, only surpassed
(c) has the rank of the nation's third leading cause of death, only surpassed
(d) are the nation's third leading causes of death, surpassed only
(e) have been ranked as the nation's third leading causes of death, only surpassed
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Re: Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Sep 2016, 09:36
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Karanagrawal wrote:
can anybody explain me how supassed is correct
means verb+ed modifies the closest moun means death in this case
death is not being surpassed confused :roll: :(


The concept that a past participle modifier (or any modifier as such) MUST always follow the touch rule is not correct (there is no "nearest noun" rule whatsoever - the "touch rule" states that modifier should refer to the noun it touches). Nonetheless there are exceptions to the "touch rule" - Manhattan SC guide summaries them all.

This question falls under the following exception:
A short predicate falls between, shifting a long modifier back.
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Re: Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Sep 2016, 00:40
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Karanagrawal, it may help to think of "cause of death" as one thing. Similarly, we can say "The President of France, who visited . . . " or "The jar of peanut butter, which shattered." True, France didn't visit and the peanut butter didn't shatter. But those short prepositional modifiers just clarify who did visit and what did shatter.

Of course, another way to tell that this modifier usage isn't problematic is to note that it appears in all five answer choices, so we have to accept it.
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Re: Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Feb 2017, 17:39
Meaning Analysis : Diabetics is complicated , ranks 3rd whereas Heart Disease and Cancer rank 1 and 2
Error Analysis : Diabetics - Singular , Ranks - Singular
Surpassed only - right phrase surpass only two other diseases
POE :
B - rank
C - has the rank of nation's ( Wordy, of nation's : prepositional phrase )
D - are ( need singular diabetics )
E - have been ranked ( Passive voice, plural )
A :-D :cool
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Re: Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Feb 2017, 21:16
Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks as the nation's third leading cause of death, surpassed only by heart disease and cancer
(a) ranks as the nation's third leading cause of death, surpassed only
(b) rank as the nation's third leading cause of death, only surpassed
(c) has the rank of the nation's third leading cause of death, only surpassed
(d) are the nation's third leading causes of death, surpassed only
(e) have been ranked as the nation's third leading causes of death, only surpassed


Subject:Diabetes-Singular,verb:ranks-singular choice A seems fine
lets do POE,
Choice B is wrong because rank is plural but our subject is singular.
Choice C is wrong since its changing the intende meaning as ther is no rank of nations third leading...
Choice D is wrong as it uses 'are' and our subject is singular.
Choice E is wrong because our subject is singular and 'have been..' is plural.

A is the clear winner

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Re: Diabetes, together with its serious complications  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Mar 2017, 09:27
nandeta92

Quote:
What is the difference between as the nation’s / of the nation’s / the nation’s ?


The issue here is the pairing of "nation's" with the verb "ranks." The correct idiom is "rank + as x," e.g. diabetes ranks AS the nation's third leading cause of death.

In the context of titles or hierarchies, however, it is also acceptable to say that a person has achieved the rank OF x, e.g. After four years in the military, he was promoted to the rank OF sergeant.
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Re: Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks  [#permalink]

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New post 13 May 2017, 13:00
Merged topics. Please, search before posting questions!
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Re: Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jun 2017, 16:52
What's the level of this question? 500? 600? or 700?
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New post 06 Jun 2017, 22:00
Darth_McDaddy wrote:
Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks as the nation's third leading cause of death, surpassed only by heart disease and cancer

(a) ranks as the nation's third leading cause of death, surpassed only
(b) rank as the nation's third leading cause of death, only surpassed
(c) has the rank of the nation's third leading cause of death, only surpassed
(d) are the nation's third leading causes of death, surpassed only
(e) have been ranked as the nation's third leading causes of death, only surpassed



in choice A " surpassed ..." refers to "diabetes" and work ad adverb modifying the main clause.

is that right? pls help
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Re: Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jun 2017, 01:58
Hi can some please why E is wrong ?

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Re: Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jun 2017, 02:02
If in we use cause instead of causes will it be correct?


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Re: Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jun 2017, 02:26
victory47 wrote:
Darth_McDaddy wrote:
Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks as the nation's third leading cause of death, surpassed only by heart disease and cancer

(a) ranks as the nation's third leading cause of death, surpassed only
(b) rank as the nation's third leading cause of death, only surpassed
(c) has the rank of the nation's third leading cause of death, only surpassed
(d) are the nation's third leading causes of death, surpassed only
(e) have been ranked as the nation's third leading causes of death, only surpassed



in choice A " surpassed ..." refers to "diabetes" and work ad adverb modifying the main clause.

is that right? pls help

I think, surpassed modifies nation's third leading cause of death. surpassed is a verbed modifier that always modifies the preceding noun or the noun phrase. Here, nation's third leading cause of death is a noun phrase with a noun and prepositional phrase.

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Re: Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jun 2017, 02:51
arvind910619 wrote:
Hi can some please why E is wrong ?

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The subject "Diabetes" is singular, whereas the verb "have been ranked" is plural. Hence E is wrong. Note that the part "together with its serious complications" is only a modifier of the subject "Diabetes". It does not change the number (i.e. singular/plural) of the subject.
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Re: Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jun 2017, 00:30
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If we scan options vertically, we can see a split of ‘ranks’ vs. ‘rank’. ‘ranks’ is singular and ‘rank’ is ‘plural. When we read the sentence, subject is ‘Diabetes’ which is singular. Eliminate B, D and E.

If we compare last words of A and C,
In C, ‘only’ modifies ‘surpassed’ means ‘Diabetes’ is only surpassing and not doing anything else. Wrong usage. Also, we are stating a fact, so simple present is required.

Hence A is the correct answer
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Re: Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jun 2017, 01:13
Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks as the nation's third leading cause of death, surpassed only by heart disease and cancer

The process of elimination is the best tool for this type of questions

Meaning
Diabetes is the third leading cause of death and it is preceded by heart disease and cancer
Diabetes is a single disease. So the following verb should be singular

(a) ranks as the nation's third leading cause of death, surpassed only
(b) rank as the nation's third leading cause of death, only surpassed
(c) has the rank of the nation's third leading cause of death, only surpassed
Diabetes does not has any rank in it Meaning error
(d) are the nation's third leading causes of death, surpassed only
(e) have been ranked as the nation's third leading causes of death, only surpassed
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Re: Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jul 2017, 04:53
EducationAisle wrote:
kirtivardhan wrote:
How did you decide that " nation's third..." is a noun phrase.I often get confused while finding them.
I thought diabetes is getting modified

Let's analyze nation's third leading cause of death.

- cause is a noun.
- So, cause of death will also be a noun.
- third leading is just an adjective (an attribute/property/characteristic) of cause of death
- So, third leading cause of death is a noun (more specifically a noun phrase, because these group of words do not have a verb)
- Nation's is just making this entire noun phrase a possessive noun phrase.

Let's look at other example: India's third successive win in the tournament.

- win is a noun.
- So, win in the tournament will also be a noun.
- third successive is just an adjective (an attribute/property/characteristic) of win in the tournament
- So, third successive win in the tournament is a noun (more specifically a noun phrase, because these group of words do not have a verb)
- India's is just making this entire noun a possessive noun phrase.

Let me know if something is not clear.


EducationAisle

Is the word "rank of" idiomatic ??
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New post 19 Jul 2017, 09:04
By hiding the noun modifier we can see that only answer A correctly uses the plural from ranks
This flaw alone is enough imo.

Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks as the nation's third leading cause of death, surpassed only by heart disease and cancer
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Re: Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2017, 02:29
Darth_McDaddy wrote:
Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks as the nation's third leading cause of death, surpassed only by heart disease and cancer

(a) ranks as the nation's third leading cause of death, surpassed only
(b) rank as the nation's third leading cause of death, only surpassed
(c) has the rank of the nation's third leading cause of death, only surpassed
(d) are the nation's third leading causes of death, surpassed only
(e) have been ranked as the nation's third leading causes of death, only surpassed



Can someone please help me understand usage of AS. I was very close to A but when I saw word AS and sentence , "Diabetes ranks as " then I was compelled to rethink .
How come something/someone ranks AS?
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Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2017, 09:31
gmat4varun wrote:
Darth_McDaddy wrote:
Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks as the nation's third leading cause of death, surpassed only by heart disease and cancer

(a) ranks as the nation's third leading cause of death, surpassed only
(b) rank as the nation's third leading cause of death, only surpassed
(c) has the rank of the nation's third leading cause of death, only surpassed
(d) are the nation's third leading causes of death, surpassed only
(e) have been ranked as the nation's third leading causes of death, only surpassed



Can someone please help me understand usage of AS. I was very close to A but when I saw word AS and sentence , "Diabetes ranks as " then I was compelled to rethink .
How come something/someone ranks AS?


'Rank as' is a common idiom. However, in most GMAT questions, use 'like' when comparing nouns and 'as' when comparing verbs.
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Diabetes, together with its serious complications, ranks &nbs [#permalink] 20 Jul 2017, 09:31

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