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If 10^50 – 74 is written as an integer in base 10 notation what is the

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If 10^50 – 74 is written as an integer in base 10 notation what is the  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2007, 08:04
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If \(10^{50} – 74\) is written as an integer in base 10 notation, what is the sum of the digits in that integer?

A. 424
B. 433
C. 440
D. 449
E. 467
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If 10^50 – 74 is written as an integer in base 10 notation what is the  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jan 2012, 10:41
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If (10^50) – 74 is written as an integer in base 10 notation, what is the sum of the digits in that integer?

A. 424
B. 433
C. 440
D. 449
E. 467

Based 10 notation, or decimal notation, is just a way of writing a number using 10 digits: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 0 (usual way), in contrast, for example, to binary numeral system (base-2 number system) notation.

\(10^{50}\) has 51 digits: 1 followed by 50 zeros;
\(10^{50}-74\) has 50 digits: 48 9's and 26 in the end;

So, the sum of the digits of \(10^{50}-74\) equals to 48*9+2+6=440.

Answer: C.

Hope it helps.
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Re: If 10^50 – 74 is written as an integer in base 10 notation what is the  [#permalink]

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New post 18 May 2010, 23:38
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C. 440

10^x - 74 --> last 2 digits are always 2, 6.

10^2 - 74 = 26

10^3 - 74 = 926

10^4 - 74 = 9926 and so on....

If x > 1,
the sum of the digits --> (x-2) * 9 + 2 + 6. hence, (50-2) * 9 + 8 --> 440.
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Re: If 10^50 – 74 is written as an integer in base 10 notation what is the  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2007, 09:06
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solving for easier numbers ---> 10^3 and 74

(10^4) - 74 =

(10^4) - 10*7.4 =

10*[(10^3) - 7.4] =

10*[10^3 - 7.4] = 992.6*10 = 9926 = 9*2+2+6 = 26

Note that 10^4 will yield two nines a six and a two.

so solving for 10^50 and 74 will give 48 nines a six and a two:

10*[10^49 - 7.4] = 9*48+2+6 = 440

the answer is (C)

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Re: If 10^50 – 74 is written as an integer in base 10 notation what is the  [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2010, 01:06
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dimitri92 wrote:
If 10^50 - 74 is written as an integer in a base 10 notation.What is the sum of the digits in that integer?

a. 424
b. 433
c. 440
d. 449
e. 467


C. 440
another approach is:
We know that 10^50 is ending 00, so 10^50-74=9....9926
total number of digits in 10^50-74 is 50, or 48 digits of 9 and two digits 2 and 6.
answer choice is 48*9+8=440

plugging numbers:
let represent the sum of the digits in that integer as Y, with the reminder 8, we can represent it in form Y=X*9+8, where X number of digits in 10^50-74 and 8=2+6.

Start with C and than move to B or D.

B. 433=X*9+1, X=48
C. 440=X*9+8, X=48 - correct as we have the reminder 8 and 48 number of digits (50-2), 2 digits are 26.
D. 449=X*9+8, X=49



Personally, I like NSP007's approach. My approaches are easy to comprehend.
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Re: If 10^50 – 74 is written as an integer in base 10 notation what is the  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Aug 2010, 08:25
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udaymathapati wrote:
If 10^{50}-74 is written as an integer in base 10 notation, what is the sum of the digits in
that integer?
A. 424
B. 433
C. 440
D. 449
E. 467



\(10^{50}\) has 51 digits (1 followed by 50 zeros). \(10^{50}-74\) has 50 digits: last 2 digits are 2 and 6 (26) and first 48 digits are 9's.

Like 1,000-74=926.

So the sum of the digits is \(9*48+2+6=440\).

Answer: C.
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Re: If 10^50 – 74 is written as an integer in base 10 notation what is the  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Sep 2013, 20:05
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10^1 = 10
10^2 - 74 = 026
10^3 - 74 = 926
10^4 - 74 = 9926

Basically for 10^n , its 9999....(n-2)26.

So for 10^50-74, it is 99999....4826

48times9 + 2+6 = 440.
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Re: If 10^50 – 74 is written as an integer in base 10 notation what is the  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Nov 2013, 12:05
I don't understand why in the question it is mentioned "in base 10 notation"

Maybe its because English is not my mother tongue but that instruction really confused me. I thought I was looking for a number like "ten to the power of something".
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Re: If 10^50 – 74 is written as an integer in base 10 notation what is the  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Nov 2013, 13:07
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Lobro wrote:
I don't understand why in the question it is mentioned "in base 10 notation"

Maybe its because English is not my mother tongue but that instruction really confused me. I thought I was looking for a number like "ten to the power of something".


Based 10 notation, or decimal notation, is just a way of writing a number using 10 digits: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 0 (usual way), in contrast, for example, to binary numeral system (base-2 number system) notation.

Similar questions to practice:
the-sum-of-the-digits-of-64-279-what-is-the-141460.html
the-sum-of-all-the-digits-of-the-positive-integer-q-is-equal-126388.html
10-25-560-is-divisible-by-all-of-the-following-except-126300.html
if-10-50-74-is-written-as-an-integer-in-base-10-notation-51062.html

Hope this helps.
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Re: If 10^50 – 74 is written as an integer in base 10 notation what is the  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Apr 2014, 01:26
100 - 74 = 26

The last 2 digits of the term would be 26; all else would be 9

99999999......26

Important rule:

Sum of ANY NUMBER added to 9 would give the SAME value of itself

For example; Consider number = 13

Sum of digits = 1+3 = 4

Adding 9 to 13 = 22 = 2+2 = 4

So the sum would always remain the same;


Back to our problem

99999999......26 = The sum of this number will add up to 2+6 = 8

From the options available, A & B can be discarded

9x1 = 9
9x2= 18
9x3= 27
9x4= 36
9x5= 45
9x6= 54
9x7= 63
9x8= 72 ........................................ 48th time
9x9= 81
9x10=90


99999999......26

\(10^{50}- 74\) means 9 would be repeated 48 times; so last digit would be 2

Now we have 2+2+6 = 10 (Last digit is 0)

Only option C best fits = 440

Answer = C
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Re: If 10^50 – 74 is written as an integer in base 10 notation what is the  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Apr 2018, 05:18
Bunuel wrote:
udaymathapati wrote:
If 10^{50}-74 is written as an integer in base 10 notation, what is the sum of the digits in
that integer?
A. 424
B. 433
C. 440
D. 449
E. 467



\(10^{50}\) has 51 digits (1 followed by 50 zeros). \(10^{50}-74\) has 50 digits: last 2 digits are 2 and 6 (26) and first 48 digits are 9's.

Like 1,000-74=926.

So the sum of the digits is \(9*48+2+6=440\).

Answer: C.


generis can you please explain ? :-)

i dont understand how after \(10^{50}-74\) we have 50 digits :?

And how we get "last 2 digits are 2 and 6 (26) and first 48 digits are 9's" :?
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If 10^50 – 74 is written as an integer in base 10 notation what is the  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Apr 2018, 12:57
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dave13 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
udaymathapati wrote:
If 10^{50}-74 is written as an integer in base 10 notation, what is the sum of the digits in
that integer?
A. 424
B. 433
C. 440
D. 449
E. 467

\(10^{50}\) has 51 digits (1 followed by 50 zeros). \(10^{50}-74\) has 50 digits: last 2 digits are 2 and 6 (26) and first 48 digits are 9's.

Like 1,000-74=926.

So the sum of the digits is \(9*48+2+6=440\).

Answer: C.

generis can you please explain ? :-)

i dont understand how after \(10^{50}-74\) we have 50 digits :?

And how we get "last 2 digits are 2 and 6 (26) and first 48 digits are 9's" :?

dave13 , I've seen you use patterns. Good instinct. Use a pattern. (I think you missed the "1,000" pattern above.)

In other words, when exponents are huge, we can replicate the question with exponents that are manageable.
Make the powers of 10 smaller and test a few.

First we have to figure out what the digits ARE. That's just subtraction. Start with 100. (You could start with 1,000, which would be a little more accurate. 1,000 - 74 = 926. There is a 9. But, see below, 26 is always there.)

Given (100-74), what is the sum of the digits?*
100-74 = 26. Sum of the digits? (2+6)=8

How many digits in the answer? TWO. You wrote: "i dont understand how after \(10^{50}-74\) we have 50 digits"

The exponent, 50, gives us a clue. Back to the earlier pattern.
100 = 10\(^2\). How many digits in \(10^2 -74?\) TWO digits in the answer, 26

But we have to be careful. If subtracting a positive integer (less than 100) from 10\(^2\), the possible number of digits in the answer is two OR one.
Two digits: (100-74) = 26
One digit: (100-94) = 6

The exponent is a clue only. Simple subtraction, with a few examples, will tell us how many digits. So let's go higher by powers of 10:
10\(^3\) = 1,000
10\(^4\) = 10,000
10\(^5\) = 100,000

Subtract 74 from each one. (Writing on paper really shows the pattern. Formatting here is hard):
(1,000 - 76) = 926
(10,000-76) = 9,926
100,000-76 = 99,926

\((10^3 - 74)\) has THREE digits. One 9, and 26
\((10^4 - 74)\) has FOUR digits. Two 9s, and 26
\((10^5 - 74)\) has FIVE digits. Three 9s, and 26

1) We are getting the same number of digits as the exponent on 10
2) The last two digits will always be 26
3) We have to borrow to move the initial 1 to the hundreds place. So there are repeated 9s. And only 9s until 26.
4) How many 9s? Exactly TWO fewer than 10's exponent (because 2 and 6 "use up" two of the digits)

Finally, SUM of the digits?
Back to the pattern:
After 100, increasing powers of 10 minus 74
produces an answer that has exactly the same number of digits as the exponent on the 10 has.
[Those digits will consist of varying quantities of the number 9, plus one numeral 2 and one numeral 6).

(1,000 - 76) = 926
(10,000-76) = 9,926
100,000-76 = 99,926
\(10^3 - 74 = ((1*9)+26)=(9+26)=35\)
\(10^4-74 = ((2*9)+26)) =(18+26)=44\)
\(10^5-74= ((3*9)+26))=(27+26)=53\)


Try extrapolating from the pattern above to answer this question:
What is the sum of the digits of \(10^{50} - 74\)?

We get:
1) the number of 9s will be exactly two fewer than the exponent on the 10, so:
10\(^{50}\) = (50 - 2) = 48 instances of the number 9
2) there will also be one 2 and one 6
3) the sum of the digits is
(48 * 9) = 432 (that part takes care of summing the 9s). Then add the 2:
(432 + 2) = 434. Then add the 6 and we are done.
(434 + 6) = 440

Hope that helps. :)


*A fancy way to ask that question: If \(10^{2} - 74\) is written as an integer in base 10 notation, what is the sum of the digits in that integer?

Does that help? :-)
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Re: If 10^50 – 74 is written as an integer in base 10 notation what is the  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Mar 2019, 14:54
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Bunuel wrote:
If (10^50) – 74 is written as an integer in base 10 notation, what is the sum of the digits in that integer?

A. 424
B. 433
C. 440
D. 449
E. 467

Based 10 notation, or decimal notation, is just a way of writing a number using 10 digits: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 0 (usual way), in contrast, for example, to binary numeral system (base-2 number system) notation.

\(10^{50}\) has 51 digits: 1 followed by 50 zeros;
\(10^{50}-74\) has 50 digits: 48 9's and 26 in the end;

So, the sum of the digits of \(10^{50}-74\) equals to 48*9+2+6=440.

Answer: C.

Hope it helps.


For once I did it exactly the way Bunuel did it. I came up here to check if what I did was the right way and not only did I get it right but it's exactly the way Bunuel explained it. This is the first time in my almost a year's time on Gmatclub!



I guess this calls for an ice-cream :inlove:
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Re: If 10^50 – 74 is written as an integer in base 10 notation what is the   [#permalink] 30 Mar 2019, 14:54
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