GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 19 Oct 2019, 05:36

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

If m, p, s and v are positive, and m/p < s/v, which of the following

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 07 Sep 2010
Posts: 249
If m, p, s and v are positive, and m/p < s/v, which of the following  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 08 Dec 2017, 11:29
26
164
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  75% (hard)

Question Stats:

57% (02:08) correct 43% (02:11) wrong based on 1296 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

If m, p, s and v are positive, and \(\frac{m}{p} <\frac{s}{v}\), which of the following must be between \(\frac{m}{p}\) and \(\frac{s}{v}\)

I. \(\frac{m+s}{p+v}\)

II. \(\frac{ms}{pv}\)

III. \(\frac{s}{v} - \frac{m}{p}\)


A. None
B. I only
C. II only
D. III only
E. I and II both

Originally posted by imhimanshu on 22 Sep 2013, 07:29.
Last edited by Bunuel on 08 Dec 2017, 11:29, edited 3 times in total.
Renamed the topic, edited the question and moved to PS forum.
Most Helpful Expert Reply
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
V
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 9706
Location: Pune, India
Re: If m, p, s and v are positive, and m/p < s/v, which of the following  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Sep 2013, 02:53
31
24
imhimanshu wrote:
If m, p, s and v are positive, and \(\frac{m}{p} <\frac{s}{v}\), which of the following must be between \(\frac{m}{p}\) and \(\frac{s}{v}\)

I. \(\frac{m+s}{p+v}\)
II. \(\frac{ms}{pv}\)
III. \(\frac{s}{v} - \frac{m}{p}\)

A. None
B. I only
C. II only
D. III only
E. I and II both


Responding to a pm:

You can work on this question using some number line and averaging concepts.
Let's look at statement II and III first since they are very easy.

We know \(\frac{m}{p} <\frac{s}{v}\)

On the number line: .............0....................m/p ........................s/v (since m, p, s and v are all positive so m/p and s/v are to the right of 0)

II. \(\frac{ms}{pv}\)
Think of the case when m/p and s/v are both less than 1. When you multiply them, they will become even smaller. Say .2*.3 = .06. So the product may not lie between them.

III. \(\frac{s}{v} - \frac{m}{p}\)
Think of a case such as this: .............0..............................m/p .......s/v
\(\frac{s}{v} - \frac{m}{p}\) will be much smaller than both m/p and s/v and will lie somewhere here:
.............0.......Here...........................m/p .......s/v
So it needn't be between them.

Now only issue is (I). You can check some numbers for it including fractions and non fractions. Or try to understand it using number line.
Think of 4 numbers as N1, N2, D1, D2 for ease and given fractions as N1/D1 and N2/D2.

\(\frac{m+s}{p+v} = \frac{m+s/2}{p+v/2}\) = (Avg of N1 and N2)/(Avg of D1 and D2)

Now numerator of avg will lie between N1 and N2 and denominator of avg will lie between D1 and D2. So Avg N/Avg D will lie between N1/D1 and N2/D2. Try to think this through.

If N1/D1 < N2/D2, it could be because N1 < N2 and D1 = D2. So AvgN will lie between N1 and N2 and AvgD = D1 = D2. It could also be because N1 < N2 and D1 > D2. AvgN will be larger than N1 but smaller than N2. AvgD will be smaller than D1 but greater than D2 so AvgN/AvgD will be greater than N1/D1 but smaller than N2/D2. It could also be because N1 << N2 and D1 < D2 i.e. N1 is much smaller than N2 as compared to D1 to D2.
It could be because N1=N2 but D1>D2. Again, AvgD will lie between D1 and D2 and AvgN = N1 = N2.
It could also be because N1 > N2 but D1 >> D2.
Take some numbers to understand why this makes sense.
_________________
Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >
Most Helpful Community Reply
Verbal Forum Moderator
User avatar
B
Joined: 10 Oct 2012
Posts: 590
Re: If m, p, s and v are positive, and m/p < s/v, which of the following  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Sep 2013, 08:31
72
53
imhimanshu wrote:
If m, p, s and v are positive, and \(\frac{m}{p} <\frac{s}{v}\), which of the following must be between \(\frac{m}{p}\) and \(\frac{s}{v}\)

I. \(\frac{m+s}{p+v}\)
II. \(\frac{ms}{pv}\)
III. \(\frac{s}{v} - \frac{m}{p}\)

A. None
B. I only
C. II only
D. III only
E. I and II both


Given that \(\frac{m}{p}<\frac{s}{v} \to \frac{m}{s}<\frac{p}{v}\)Adding 1 on both sides we have \(\frac{m+s}{s}<\frac{p+v}{v} \to \frac{m+s}{p+v}<\frac{s}{v}\)

Again,\(\frac{m}{p}<\frac{s}{v} \to \frac{v}{p}<\frac{s}{m}\) Adding 1 on both sides, we have \(\frac{v+p}{p}<\frac{s+m}{m} \to \frac{m}{p}<\frac{s+m}{v+p}\) . Thus, I is always true. We just have to check for Option II now.

Assming it to be true, we should have\(\frac{ms}{pv}<\frac{s}{v} \to \frac{m}{p}<1\) Which is not always true. Thus the answer is B.
_________________
General Discussion
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 10 Sep 2013
Posts: 71
Concentration: Sustainability, International Business
Re: If m, p, s and v are positive, and m/p < s/v, which of the following  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Sep 2013, 11:47
How can I solve this using numbers?
_________________
Kudos if I helped :)
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 22 Jul 2009
Posts: 9
Re: If m, p, s and v are positive, and m/p < s/v, which of the following  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Sep 2013, 01:37
1
igotthis wrote:
How can I solve this using numbers?


You can take numbers such 1,2,3 and 4 as m,p,s and v
find the value between m/p and s/v
try to enter the numbers in the answer choices.
only option B will satisfy .

Thanks
Rahul
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 11 Jun 2012
Posts: 7
Re: If m, p, s and v are positive, and m/p < s/v, which of the following  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Nov 2013, 01:08
2
rahultripathi2005 wrote:
igotthis wrote:
How can I solve this using numbers?


You can take numbers such 1,2,3 and 4 as m,p,s and v
find the value between m/p and s/v
try to enter the numbers in the answer choices.
only option B will satisfy .

Thanks
Rahul


Hi,

I make the plug in as follows but it does not work: 1/2 < 3/4

1. (1+3)/(2+4) = 4/6 = 2/3 so in between
2. (1*3)/(2*4) = 3/8 less than 1/2
3. (3-1)/(4-2) = 1 > 3/4

So this problem cannot solve by using plugin?? Please help to correct me if I went wrong.

Thanks!
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
V
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 9706
Location: Pune, India
Re: If m, p, s and v are positive, and m/p < s/v, which of the following  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Nov 2013, 20:56
1
1
Cee0612 wrote:

I make the plug in as follows but it does not work: 1/2 < 3/4

1. (1+3)/(2+4) = 4/6 = 2/3 so in between
2. (1*3)/(2*4) = 3/8 less than 1/2
3. (3-1)/(4-2) = 1 > 3/4

So this problem cannot solve by using plugin?? Please help to correct me if I went wrong.

Thanks!


Statement 3 is (s/v) - (m/p)
When you take values as 1, 2, 3 and 4, it becomes (3/4) - (1/2) = 1/4 (This is not between 1/2 and 3/4 and hence you know that statement 3 may not hold always)

Plugging in numbers is not the best strategy for 'must be true' questions. You know that statement 1 holds for these particular values of m , p, s and v (1, 2, 3 and 4) but how do you know that it will be true for every set of valid values of m, p, s and v? You cannot try every set. You can certainly ignore statements II and III since you have already got values for which they are not satisfied. But you must focus more on statement I and try to figure out using logic whether it must always hold.
_________________
Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >
SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 06 Sep 2013
Posts: 1570
Concentration: Finance
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: If m, p, s and v are positive, and m/p < s/v, which of the following  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Feb 2014, 13:00
9
2
This is one of those very few problems were picking numbers is almost your only weapon

Let's say that m/p<s/v,

Let's say m=4, p=2, s=3 and v=1

So let's begin with statements

I. 4+3/3=7/3=2.3 is it between 2<x<3?

Yes, so this one is true

2. Clearly not true
3. Clearly not true

Therefore only I is our best answer choice

Hope this helps
Cheers
J
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 28 Jan 2013
Posts: 27
Re: If m, p, s and v are positive, and m/p < s/v, which of the following  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Feb 2014, 19:03
6
1
imhimanshu wrote:
If m, p, s and v are positive, and \(\frac{m}{p} <\frac{s}{v}\), which of the following must be between \(\frac{m}{p}\) and \(\frac{s}{v}\)

I. \(\frac{m+s}{p+v}\)
II. \(\frac{ms}{pv}\)
III. \(\frac{s}{v} - \frac{m}{p}\)

A. None
B. I only
C. II only
D. III only
E. I and II both


for these kind of problems, I feel it is better to keep as close as possible so that we can be confident with every option

I chose 3,4,4,5 so that 3/4<4/5 (i.e. 0.75<0.8)

I=> (3+4)/(4+5) = 7/9 = 0.77 satisfies
II=>12/20=>3/5=0.6 incorrect
III=>4/5 - 3/4 = 0.8 - 0.75= 0.05

only I is correct.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 24 Feb 2014
Posts: 4
Re: If m, p, s and v are positive, and m/p < s/v, which of the following  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Mar 2014, 06:28
which of the following 'must be' between m/p and s/v?

I didn't understand the question. What does the question mean here by 'must be'?
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 58449
Re: If m, p, s and v are positive, and m/p < s/v, which of the following  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Mar 2014, 07:16
siriusblack1106 wrote:
which of the following 'must be' between m/p and s/v?

I didn't understand the question. What does the question mean here by 'must be'?


"Must be" means for any (possible) values of m, p, s and v. So, \(\frac{m}{p}< (option) <\frac{s}{v}\), must hold true fo any positive values of m, p, s and v.

Must or Could be True Questions to practice: search.php?search_id=tag&tag_id=193

Hope it helps.
_________________
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Jan 2012
Posts: 273
Weight: 170lbs
GMAT 1: 740 Q48 V42
GMAT 2: 760 Q50 V42
WE: Analyst (Other)
Re: If m, p, s and v are positive, and m/p < s/v, which of the following  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Apr 2015, 15:25
30
8
mau5 wrote:
imhimanshu wrote:
If m, p, s and v are positive, and \(\frac{m}{p} <\frac{s}{v}\), which of the following must be between \(\frac{m}{p}\) and \(\frac{s}{v}\)

I. \(\frac{m+s}{p+v}\)
II. \(\frac{ms}{pv}\)
III. \(\frac{s}{v} - \frac{m}{p}\)

A. None
B. I only
C. II only
D. III only
E. I and II both


Given that \(\frac{m}{p}<\frac{s}{v} \to \frac{m}{s}<\frac{p}{v}\)Adding 1 on both sides we have \(\frac{m+s}{s}<\frac{p+v}{v} \to \frac{m+s}{p+v}<\frac{s}{v}\)

Again,\(\frac{m}{p}<\frac{s}{v} \to \frac{v}{p}<\frac{s}{m}\) Adding 1 on both sides, we have \(\frac{v+p}{p}<\frac{s+m}{m} \to \frac{m}{p}<\frac{s+m}{v+p}\) . Thus, I is always true. We just have to check for Option II now.

Assming it to be true, we should have\(\frac{ms}{pv}<\frac{s}{v} \to \frac{m}{p}<1\) Which is not always true. Thus the answer is B.


You have the best approach in this thread, but I would never have thought of your solution to #1. I think you made it more complicated than it needed to be.

This is actually a very easy problem once you spend a few moments understanding what you need to do.

You're told the following:
1) m, p, s and v are positive
2) \(\frac{m}{p} <\frac{s}{v}\)

So, you need to know whether each option is both less than \(\frac{s}{v}\) and greater than \(\frac{m}{p}\). That's it. Once that clicks, it's very easy.

I. \(\frac{m+s}{p+v}\)

So part A:

Is \(\frac{m+s}{p+v} < \frac{s}{v}\) ?
Is \(mv+sv < sp + sv\) ?
Is \(mv < sp\) ?
Hmmm, that looks familar. In fact, it's the second thing they gave us: \(\frac{m}{p} <\frac{s}{v}\).
So yes!

Part B:

Is \(\frac{m+s}{p+v} > \frac{m}{p}\) ?
Is \(mp+sp > mp + mv\) ?
Is \(sp > mv\) ?
Hmmm, that looks familar too. In fact, it's also the second thing they gave us: \(\frac{m}{p} <\frac{s}{v}\).
So yes!

Then you perform the same (quicker) process for II.
Current Student
User avatar
Joined: 03 Aug 2011
Posts: 277
Concentration: Strategy, Finance
GMAT 1: 640 Q44 V34
GMAT 2: 700 Q42 V44
GMAT 3: 680 Q44 V39
GMAT 4: 740 Q49 V41
GPA: 3.7
WE: Project Management (Energy and Utilities)
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: If m, p, s and v are positive, and m/p < s/v, which of the following  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Jun 2015, 11:13
Hi guys,

I got this problem on an exam pack 1 CAT and failed to solve it correctly due to a technical error (DRIVING ME CRAZY). Otherwise I picked numbers and was 99% on the right path. One question I have for you is:

Do you think testing one pari of numbers is enough? I picked 2 pairs:
- m=1, p=3, s=3 and v=4
- m=3, p=1, s=4 and v=1

These 2 options are more conservative as I wanted to test these equations for fractions and integers. Do you think this was overkill (question stem says we're talking about positive numbers and not integers)? As far as I can see, all of you tested just one pair of numbers, which of course almost certainly decreases the time needed to solve the problem.

Thanks!
_________________
Thank you very much for reading this post till the end! Kudos?
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
V
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 9706
Location: Pune, India
Re: If m, p, s and v are positive, and m/p < s/v, which of the following  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Jun 2015, 21:42
3
1
bgpower wrote:
Hi guys,

I got this problem on an exam pack 1 CAT and failed to solve it correctly due to a technical error (DRIVING ME CRAZY). Otherwise I picked numbers and was 99% on the right path. One question I have for you is:

Do you think testing one pari of numbers is enough? I picked 2 pairs:
- m=1, p=3, s=3 and v=4
- m=3, p=1, s=4 and v=1

These 2 options are more conservative as I wanted to test these equations for fractions and integers. Do you think this was overkill (question stem says we're talking about positive numbers and not integers)? As far as I can see, all of you tested just one pair of numbers, which of course almost certainly decreases the time needed to solve the problem.

Thanks!


Testing numbers for "must be true" doesn't always work. One set of values could help you establish that statements II and III do not hold. But how can you PROVE that statement I will always hold just because it holds for one set of values?
You do need to establish algebraically or logically that it will hold.

Check for algebraic solution: if-m-p-s-and-v-are-positive-and-m-p-s-v-which-of-the-fol-160298.html#p1269854
Check for logical solution: if-m-p-s-and-v-are-positive-and-m-p-s-v-which-of-the-fol-160298.html#p1270389
_________________
Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 19 Apr 2015
Posts: 2
Reviews Badge
Re: If m, p, s and v are positive, and m/p < s/v, which of the following  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Sep 2017, 05:07
Nowhere it says m,p,s and v can't be same numbers. Therefore I plugged in numbers to disprove the statements.
Shall they not mention that the numbers are distict.
Target Test Prep Representative
User avatar
D
Status: Founder & CEO
Affiliations: Target Test Prep
Joined: 14 Oct 2015
Posts: 8109
Location: United States (CA)
Re: If m, p, s and v are positive, and m/p < s/v, which of the following  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Dec 2017, 11:28
1
1
imhimanshu wrote:
If m, p, s and v are positive, and \(\frac{m}{p} <\frac{s}{v}\), which of the following must be between \(\frac{m}{p}\) and \(\frac{s}{v}\)

I. \(\frac{m+s}{p+v}\)
II. \(\frac{ms}{pv}\)
III. \(\frac{s}{v} - \frac{m}{p}\)

A. None
B. I only
C. II only
D. III only
E. I and II both


Let’s analyze each statement using specific values for the variables.

We can let m = 2, s = 3, p = 4, and v = 5. Thus:

m/p = 2/4 = 0.5 and s/v = 3/5 = 0.6.

Notice that m/p = 0.5 is less than s/v = 0.6. Now let’s analyze each statement.

I. (m+s)/(p+v)

(2 + 3)/(4 + 5) = 5/9 = 0.555… is between m/p = 0.5 and s/v = 0.6.

II. (ms)/(pv)

(2 x 3)/(4 x 5) = 6/20 = 0.3 is NOT between 0.5 and 0.6.

III. s/v - m/p

3/5 - 2/4 = 0.6 - 0.5 = 0.1 is NOT between 0.5 and 0.6.

From the above, we see that only statement I is true. However, this was illustrated by using one set of numbers (m = 2, s = 3, p = 4, and v = 5). It’s possible that it could be false when we use another set of values for m, s, p, and m.

However, we can prove that (m+s)/(p+v) is between m/p and s/v; that is, we can prove that m/p < (m+s)/(p+v) < s/v regardless of the values we use for m, s, p, and m, as long as the values are positive.

Notice that m/p < (m+s)/(p+v) < s/v means m/p < (m+s)/(p+v) and (m+s)/(p+v) < s/v. Also, keep in mind that we are given that m/p < s/v, which is equivalent to mv < ps.

Let’s prove that m/p < (m+s)/(p+v):

m/p < (m+s)/(p+v) ?

m(p+v) < p(m + s) ?

mp + mv < mp + ps?

mv < ps ? (YES)

Since mv < ps is true, m/p < (m+s)/(p+v) is true. Finally, let’s prove that (m+s)/(p+v) < s/v:

(m+s)/(p+v) < s/v ?

v(m+s) < s(p+v)?

mv + sv < sp + sv ?

mv < ps ? (YES)

Again, since mv < ps is true, (m+s)/(p+v) < s/v is true. Thus we have shown that m/p < (m+s)/(p+v) < s/v is always true.

Answer: B
_________________

Scott Woodbury-Stewart

Founder and CEO

Scott@TargetTestPrep.com
TTP - Target Test Prep Logo
122 Reviews

5-star rated online GMAT quant
self study course

See why Target Test Prep is the top rated GMAT quant course on GMAT Club. Read Our Reviews

If you find one of my posts helpful, please take a moment to click on the "Kudos" button.

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 18 Apr 2018
Posts: 2
If m, p, s and v are positive, and m/p < s/v, which of the following  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Apr 2018, 00:36
3
imhimanshu wrote:
If m, p, s and v are positive, and \(\frac{m}{p} <\frac{s}{v}\), which of the following must be between \(\frac{m}{p}\) and \(\frac{s}{v}\)

I. \(\frac{m+s}{p+v}\)

II. \(\frac{ms}{pv}\)

III. \(\frac{s}{v} - \frac{m}{p}\)


A. None
B. I only
C. II only
D. III only
E. I and II both



I. if \(\frac{m+s}{p+v}\) is to be more than \(\frac{m}{p}\),

==> \(\frac{m}{p}\)<\(\frac{m+s}{p+v}\)
==> pm+mv<pm+ps and since all numbers are positive,
==> \(\frac{m}{p}\)<\(\frac{s}{v}\) which is true as per question stem.

if \(\frac{m+s}{p+v}\) is to be less than \(\frac{s}{v}\),
==> \(\frac{s}{v}\)>\(\frac{m+s}{p+v}\)
==> sp+sv>mv+sv
==> \(\frac{m}{p}\)<\(\frac{s}{v}\) which is true as per question stem.

II. if \(\frac{ms}{pv}\) is to be more than \(\frac{m}{p}\),

==> \(\frac{s}{v}\) must be greater than 1, which is not conclusive as per stem of question.

III. if \(\frac{s}{v} - \frac{m}{p}\) is to be more than \(\frac{m}{p}\),

==> \(\frac{s}{v} must be greater than 2 X [m]\frac{m}{p}\), which is not conclusive as per stem of question.

So only (I) can be derived with 100% confidence.
Hence Answer must be B.
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 24 Sep 2018
Posts: 137
Premium Member
Re: If m, p, s and v are positive, and m/p < s/v, which of the following  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Oct 2018, 12:53
1
Amanrohra wrote:
Nowhere it says m,p,s and v can't be same numbers. Therefore I plugged in numbers to disprove the statements.
Shall they not mention that the numbers are distict.

Dear Amanrohra,

I'm happy to respond here,
the question doesn't explicitly mentions that m,p,s and v are distinct, but the question gives us a condition:
\(\frac{m}{p}< \frac{s}{v}\)
which can not be true with map,s and v being the same numbers.
Hence they need to be distinct, at least in a manner to fulfil the condition.
for e.g. \(\frac{2}{5} < \frac{5}{2}\)
I hope this helps.
_________________
Please award :thumbup: kudos, If this post helped you in someway. :student_man:
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 22 Jan 2018
Posts: 50
Re: If m, p, s and v are positive, and m/p < s/v, which of the following  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Jan 2019, 05:21
VeritasKarishma wrote:
Plugging in numbers is not the best strategy for 'must be true' questions. You know that statement 1 holds for these particular values of m , p, s and v (1, 2, 3 and 4) but how do you know that it will be true for every set of valid values of m, p, s and v? You cannot try every set.

Thanks VeritasKarishma. Wouldn't this logic also hold true for "could be true" questions.

The given statement may not be true for the particular values we consider, but how do we know that the given statement will not be true for any values?
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
V
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 9706
Location: Pune, India
Re: If m, p, s and v are positive, and m/p < s/v, which of the following  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Jan 2019, 02:30
Manukaran wrote:
VeritasKarishma wrote:
Plugging in numbers is not the best strategy for 'must be true' questions. You know that statement 1 holds for these particular values of m , p, s and v (1, 2, 3 and 4) but how do you know that it will be true for every set of valid values of m, p, s and v? You cannot try every set.

Thanks VeritasKarishma. Wouldn't this logic also hold true for "could be true" questions.

The given statement may not be true for the particular values we consider, but how do we know that the given statement will not be true for any values?


Absolutely! The logic will hold for could be true.

Must be true for all - Usually, the values you will try would be true. You might be hard pressed to find a value for which it doesn't hold. Here lies the challenge.

Could be true for some value of x - Usually, the values you will try would not be true. You will need to find a value for which it will hold. Doing that is often a bit easier by putting in 0, 1 etc. But yes, there could be a challenge here too.
_________________
Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >
GMAT Club Bot
Re: If m, p, s and v are positive, and m/p < s/v, which of the following   [#permalink] 30 Jan 2019, 02:30

Go to page    1   2    Next  [ 24 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

If m, p, s and v are positive, and m/p < s/v, which of the following

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne