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In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made

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In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made [#permalink]

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In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough together using rolling pins and other utensils. Each father-son pair used a rolling pin that was distinctively different from those used by the other father-son pairs, and each father repeated the phrase "rolling pin" each time his son used it. But when the children were asked to identify all of the rolling pins among a group of kitchen utensils that included several rolling pins, each child picked only the one that he had used.
Which one of the following inferences is most supported by the information above?

(A) The children did not grasp the function of rolling pin
(B) No two children understood the name "rolling pin" to apply to the same object
(C) The children understood that all rolling pins have the same general shape
(D) Each child was able to identify correctly only the utensils that he had used
(E) The children were not able to distinguish the rolling pins they used from other rolling pins
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made [#permalink]

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nitya34 wrote:
In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough together using rolling pins and other utensils. Each father-son pair used a rolling pin that was distinctively different from those used by the other father-son pairs, and each father repeated the phrase "rolling pin" each time his son used it. But when the children were asked to identify all of the rolling pins among a group of kitchen utensils that included several rolling pins, each child picked only the one that he had used.
Which one of the following inferences is most supported by the information above?

(A) The children did not grasp the function of rolling pin
The function is not relevant
(B) No two children understood the name "rolling pin" to apply to the same object
Looks good
(C) The children understood that all rolling pins have the same general shape
This is contrary to what we are told
(D) Each child was able to identify correctly only the utensils that he had used
We are only told about rolling pins, not utensils in general
E) The children were not able to distinguish the rolling pins they used from other rolling pins

This is contrary to what we are told.

Clear B
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made [#permalink]

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New post 01 Mar 2009, 22:04
Read this sentence
"father repeated the phrase "rolling pin" each time his son used it."

I tht its A
clearly between A and B
yet to find OA
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made [#permalink]

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nitya34 wrote:
Read this sentence
"father repeated the phrase "rolling pin" each time his son used it."

I tht its A
clearly between A and B
yet to find OA


The meat of this stimulus has to do with identify (the function is a side note, if anything).
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made [#permalink]

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New post 02 Mar 2009, 04:57
I'll go with B
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made [#permalink]

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New post 02 Mar 2009, 10:52
I think its D.
Based on my assumption that the experiment's intention was to find out whether children could identify similar rolling pins or more generally similar utensils even as they were made to work with only one distinctive rolling pin.
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made [#permalink]

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nitya34 wrote:
In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough together using rolling pins and other utensils. Each father-son pair used a rolling pin that was distinctively different from those used by the other father-son pairs, and each father repeated the phrase "rolling pin" each time his son used it. But when the children were asked to identify all of the rolling pins among a group of kitchen utensils that included several rolling pins, each child picked only the one that he had used.
Which one of the following inferences is most supported by the information above?

(A) The children did not grasp the function of rolling pin

You kidding me.. 2 year olds..

(B) No two children understood the name "rolling pin" to apply to the same object

Did not make sense on the first go. But this is the correct one. Because the children clearly distinguished one RP from another.For every child, there was only one RP in the group of RP's and utensils. In his mind, there is only one RP and he picked that one. If any one kid figured that at least two RP's are the same, he would pick another kids's RP.

(C) The children understood that all rolling pins have the same general shape

No they did not

(D) Each child was able to identify correctly only the utensils that he had used

(E) The children were not able to distinguish the rolling pins they used from other rolling pins


Crooked one and it is B.
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made [#permalink]

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New post 03 Mar 2009, 21:50
B?
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made [#permalink]

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New post 26 Oct 2009, 18:22
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B suggest that distinctively different rolling pins are considered different objects by each child. That explains why they can only choose the one they used
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made [#permalink]

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New post 27 Oct 2009, 13:36
clear B
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made [#permalink]

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New post 27 Oct 2009, 15:07
"A" for me. What is the OA?
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made [#permalink]

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New post 27 Oct 2009, 18:03
B? Anyone can give a good explanation.
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made [#permalink]

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D is incorrect because the passage never indicated that the children could identify only the utensils that they used. rolling pins, yes; utensils, no. a rolling pin is a utensil, but there are other utensils as well, and the stimulus does not give us information about whether the children could identify those utensils.
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made [#permalink]

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New post 06 Sep 2011, 00:16
I choose B.

In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough together using rolling pins and other utensils. Each father-son pair used a rolling pin that was distinctively different from those used by the other father-son pairs, and each father repeated the phrase "rolling pin" each time his son used it. But when the children were asked to identify all of the rolling pins among a group of kitchen utensils that included several rolling pins, each child picked only the one that he had used.
Which one of the following inferences is most supported by the information above?

(A) The children did not grasp the function of rolling pin
As the kids were two years old, they could only grasp the shape/color/size (the distictiveness) of the rolling pin used by them respectively
(B) No two children understood the name "rolling pin" to apply to the same object
they chose only the rolling pin they used because they asssociate the sound rolling pin to that particular object they have experinece with.
(C) The children understood that all rolling pins have the same general shape
the statement says that the rolling pins were different from each other.
(D) Each child was able to identify correctly only the utensils that he had used
already stated
(E) The children were not able to distinguish the rolling pins they used from other rolling pins
contrary to the statement's conclusion
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jun 2014, 20:43
Someone please explain why its not D? I mean obviously the children could identify the utensil he used.
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made [#permalink]

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New post 08 Oct 2014, 05:56
nitya34 wrote:
In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough together using rolling pins and other utensils. Each father-son pair used a rolling pin that was distinctively different from those used by the other father-son pairs, and each father repeated the phrase "rolling pin" each time his son used it. But when the children were asked to identify all of the rolling pins among a group of kitchen utensils that included several rolling pins, each child picked only the one that he had used.
Which one of the following inferences is most supported by the information above?

(A) The children did not grasp the function of rolling pin
(B) No two children understood the name "rolling pin" to apply to the same object
(C) The children understood that all rolling pins have the same general shape
(D) Each child was able to identify correctly only the utensils that he had used
(E) The children were not able to distinguish the rolling pins they used from other rolling pins



Experts,

Need your help here to understand why C is not the contender. My reasoning is as below:

Since each child was asked to pick all the rolling pins but he chose to pick only one he has used. Which means that he is searching for all the pins which looks similar to the one he has used and hence he was searching for the same general shape. And it must be true that child is not aware that rolling pins are distinct. But he couldn't find any other than the one he used. hence C.

what's the flaw in this reasoning?

looking for answers.
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made [#permalink]

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New post 01 Dec 2014, 22:23
C is opposite answer Reason 1- Had the students understood "that all rolling pins have the same general shape" , they would have picked up any of the rolling pins.
Reason 2 - Stimulus clearly says " rolling pin that was distinctively different from those used by the other father-son pairs". We should not modify the stimulus in inference questions.
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*700* In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers [#permalink]

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In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough together using rolling pins and other utensils. Each father-son pair used a rolling pin that was distinctively different from those used by the other father-son pairs, and each father repeated the phrase “rolling pin” each time his son used it. But when the children were asked to identify all of the rolling pins among a group of kitchen utensils that included several rolling pins, each child picked only the one that he had used. Which one of the following inferences is most supported by the information above?

a) The children did not grasp the function of a rolling pin.

b) No two children understood the name “rolling pin” to apply to the same object.

c) The children understood that all rolling pins have the same general shape.

d) Each child was able to identify correctly only the utensils that he had used.

e) The children were not able to distinguish the rolling pins they used from other rolling pins.
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Re: *700* In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers [#permalink]

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New post 12 Apr 2015, 18:33
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The upshot of this interesting experiment is that each child associated the term “rolling pin” with only the exact object he had previously encountered, not with a category of objects that all serve the same purpose. So what can we infer from this? Since each boy only identified the rolling pin he and his father had used, and since all the rolling pins are different, we can infer (B): that no two boys associated the name “rolling pin” with the same object.
(A) There’s a subtle scope shift happening here; the children are asked to identify the pins, not explain how they’re used. The mere fact that they couldn’t extend the definition of rolling pin to other pins doesn’t mean they didn’t understand the function of the pin they did identify.
(C), if anything, runs counter to the stimulus, since the children did not seem to understand that the term “rolling pin” can refer to a category of objects. If (C) were true, chances are the boys would have been able to identify the other rolling pins in the room.
(D) Mind the scope! The conclusion deals only with rolling pins, so we have no right to extend this conclusion to include all the utensils used in the experiment.
(E) contradicts the stimulus. The children certainly could distinguish their own rolling pins from the others; otherwise, how could each child pick out from the rest of the rolling pins only the one he and his father had used?

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Re: *700* In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers   [#permalink] 12 Apr 2015, 18:33

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