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In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough

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In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough  [#permalink]

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In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough together using rolling pins and other utensils. Each father-son pair used a rolling pin that was distinctively different from those used by the other father-son pairs, and each father repeated the phrase "rolling pin" each time his son used it. But when the children were asked to identify all of the rolling pins among a group of kitchen utensils that included several rolling pins, each child picked only the one that he had used.

Which one of the following inferences is most supported by the information above?

(A) The children did not grasp the function of rolling pin
(B) No two children understood the name "rolling pin" to apply to the same object
(C) The children understood that all rolling pins have the same general shape
(D) Each child was able to identify correctly only the utensils that he had used
(E) The children were not able to distinguish the rolling pins they used from other rolling pins

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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Mar 2009, 22:37
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nitya34 wrote:
In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough together using rolling pins and other utensils. Each father-son pair used a rolling pin that was distinctively different from those used by the other father-son pairs, and each father repeated the phrase "rolling pin" each time his son used it. But when the children were asked to identify all of the rolling pins among a group of kitchen utensils that included several rolling pins, each child picked only the one that he had used.
Which one of the following inferences is most supported by the information above?

(A) The children did not grasp the function of rolling pin
The function is not relevant
(B) No two children understood the name "rolling pin" to apply to the same object
Looks good
(C) The children understood that all rolling pins have the same general shape
This is contrary to what we are told
(D) Each child was able to identify correctly only the utensils that he had used
We are only told about rolling pins, not utensils in general
E) The children were not able to distinguish the rolling pins they used from other rolling pins

This is contrary to what we are told.

Clear B
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Mar 2009, 21:57
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nitya34 wrote:
In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough together using rolling pins and other utensils. Each father-son pair used a rolling pin that was distinctively different from those used by the other father-son pairs, and each father repeated the phrase "rolling pin" each time his son used it. But when the children were asked to identify all of the rolling pins among a group of kitchen utensils that included several rolling pins, each child picked only the one that he had used.
Which one of the following inferences is most supported by the information above?

(A) The children did not grasp the function of rolling pin

You kidding me.. 2 year olds..

(B) No two children understood the name "rolling pin" to apply to the same object

Did not make sense on the first go. But this is the correct one. Because the children clearly distinguished one RP from another.For every child, there was only one RP in the group of RP's and utensils. In his mind, there is only one RP and he picked that one. If any one kid figured that at least two RP's are the same, he would pick another kids's RP.

(C) The children understood that all rolling pins have the same general shape

No they did not

(D) Each child was able to identify correctly only the utensils that he had used

(E) The children were not able to distinguish the rolling pins they used from other rolling pins


Crooked one and it is B.
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Oct 2009, 19:22
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B suggest that distinctively different rolling pins are considered different objects by each child. That explains why they can only choose the one they used
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Sep 2011, 12:43
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D is incorrect because the passage never indicated that the children could identify only the utensils that they used. rolling pins, yes; utensils, no. a rolling pin is a utensil, but there are other utensils as well, and the stimulus does not give us information about whether the children could identify those utensils.
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Apr 2015, 22:27
In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough together using rolling pins and other utensils. Each father-son pair used a rolling pin that was distinctively different from those used by the other father-son pairs, and each father repeated the phrase “rolling pin” each time his son used it. But when the children were asked to identify all of the rolling pins among a group of kitchen utensils that included several rolling pins, each child picked only the one that he had used. Which one of the following inferences is most supported by the information above?

a) The children did not grasp the function of a rolling pin.Most probably they did becuase they used the rolling pins in action. But over here the experiment tests something entirely different. It does not test the understanding of the function of the rolling pin by children but it tests whether children can identify a rolling pin.

b) No two children understood the name “rolling pin” to apply to the same object.Exactly, the children did not pick up other rolling pins but only the ones that they used for the pie dough. This shows that *all* of the children understood the name "rolling pin" to apply to one object, the object that they used.

c) The children understood that all rolling pins have the same general shape.No. On the contrary, the children understood that a rolling pin can only be 1.

d) Each child was able to identify correctly only the utensils that he had used.We do not know anything about what the children did with the other utensils during the experiment when children were asked to identify what they had used. We are only given information about rolling pins. What stands as true for one type of utensil, rolling pin, may not stand as true for the others.

e) The children were not able to distinguish the rolling pins they used from other rolling pins.The total opposite is suggested in the stem.
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2017, 09:55
In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough together using rolling pins and other utensils. Each father-son pair used a rolling pin that was distinctively different from those used by the other father-son pairs, and each father repeated the phrase "rolling pin" each time his son used it. But when the children were asked to identify all of the rolling pins among a group of kitchen utensils that included several rolling pins, each child picked only the one that he had used.

Type - inference

(A) The children did not grasp the function of rolling pin - From the text, it seems possible that the children did understand the function of a rolling pin; certainly, they were able to identify the rolling pin they used.
(B) No two children understood the name "rolling pin" to apply to the same object - Correct - The answer must be true because we know that despite being asked to identify all the rolling pins, each child selected only the rolling pin he had used. No two children picked the same rolling pin and therefore no two children understood the name “rolling pin” to
apply to the same object.
(C) The children understood that all rolling pins have the same general shape - Incorrect - If this was true , then children would have chosen other rolling pins too
(D) Each child was able to identify correctly only the utensils that he had used - ISWAT - a rolling pin is a utensil, but there are other utensils as well, and the stimulus does not give us information about whether the children could identify those utensils.
(E) The children were not able to distinguish the rolling pins they used from other rolling pins - Incorrect - 180 answer

Answer B
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In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Aug 2017, 00:48
OE : Courtesy some expert:

Answer (B). The “rolling pin” problem above is a famous question that lures many people to incorrectly select answer choice (D), a Shell Game answer. Answer choice (D) looks perfect at first glance, but the author never indicated that the children could identify only the utensils that they used. Rolling pins, yes; utensils, no. The correct answer choice is (B), which many test takers quickly pass over.

Let’s examine each answer:

Answer choice (A): From the text, it seems possible that the children did understand the function of a rolling pin; certainly, they were able to identify the rolling pin they used.

Answer choice (B): This is the correct answer choice. The answer must be true because we know that despite being asked to identify all the rolling pins, each child selected only the rolling pin he had used. No two children picked the same rolling pin and therefore no two children understood the name “rolling pin” to apply to the same object.

Answer choice (C): Apparently not, otherwise logic would say the children would pick other rolling pins aside from the one they used.

Answer choice (D): Do not be concerned if you fell into this trap, but consider it a lesson for the future. The test makers smoothly slip “utensils” into the answer choice, and most students make the mistake of equating utensils with rolling pins. Yes, a rolling pin is a utensil, but there are other utensils as well, and the stimulus does not give us information about whether the children could identify those utensils. This is the essence of the Shell Game: you expect one thing and the test makers slip something quite similar but essentially different into its place.

Answer choice (E): This is an Opposite Answer. As indicated by the final sentence of the stimulus, the children were able to distinguish the rolling pin they used from the other rolling pins. This circumstance is exactly opposite of that stated in answer choice (E), which declares, “The children were not able to distinguish...” In this case, if you miss the “not,” this answer choice is very attractive.
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Mar 2018, 19:07
Which one of the following inferences is most supported by the information above?

(A) The children did not grasp the function of rolling pin
Totally reverse...Infact they were able to grasp the function

(B) No two children understood the name "rolling pin" to apply to the same object

Because the children clearly distinguished one Rolling Pin from another.For every child, there was only one RP in the group of RP's and utensils. In his mind, there is only one RP and he picked that one.

(C) The children understood that all rolling pins have the same general shape

They did not understood that at all

(D) Each child was able to identify correctly only the utensils that he had used - They were able to identify the rolling pins also correctly which they used

(E) The children were not able to distinguish the rolling pins they used from other rolling pins- Reverse statement, Infact they were able to distinguish
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2018, 00:08
Quote:
each father repeated the phrase "rolling pin" each time his son used it


Because of the above phrase the answer must be B.we need to take every argument into consideration when dealing with Inference questions.

D is wrong because we don't know whether he had used other utensils;Only is a strong word.
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Sep 2018, 06:56
In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough together using rolling pins and other utensils. Each father-son pair used a rolling pin that was distinctively different from those used by the other father-son pairs, and each father repeated the phrase "rolling pin" each time his son used it. But when the children were asked to identify all of the rolling pins among a group of kitchen utensils that included several rolling pins, each child picked only the one that he had used.
Which one of the following inferences is most supported by the information above?

(A) The children did not grasp the function of rolling pin - I think they did and that's how they were able to pick only the one that they have used earlier.
(B) No two children understood the name "rolling pin" to apply to the same object - That's how they know which one to pick.
(C) The children understood that all rolling pins have the same general shape - This can cause confusion and possibility of picking up wrong rolling pin.
(D) Each child was able to identify correctly only the utensils that he had used
(E) The children were not able to distinguish the rolling pins they used from other rolling pins
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Sep 2018, 07:22
nitya34 wrote:
In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough together using rolling pins and other utensils. Each father-son pair used a rolling pin that was distinctively different from those used by the other father-son pairs, and each father repeated the phrase "rolling pin" each time his son used it. But when the children were asked to identify all of the rolling pins among a group of kitchen utensils that included several rolling pins, each child picked only the one that he had used.

Which one of the following inferences is most supported by the information above?

(A) The children did not grasp the function of rolling pin
(B) No two children understood the name "rolling pin" to apply to the same object
(C) The children understood that all rolling pins have the same general shape
(D) Each child was able to identify correctly only the utensils that he had used
(E) The children were not able to distinguish the rolling pins they used from other rolling pins


OFFICIAL EXPLANATION:



The upshot of this interesting experiment is that each child associated the term “rolling pin” with only the exact object he had previously encountered, not with a category of objects that all serve the same purpose. So what can we infer from this? Since each boy only identified the rolling pin he and his father had used, and since all the rolling pins are different, we can infer (B): that no two boys associated the name “rolling pin” with the same object.

(A) There’s a subtle scope shift happening here; the children are asked to identify the pins, not explain how they’re used. The mere fact that they couldn’t extend the definition of rolling pin to other pins doesn’t mean they didn’t understand the function of the pin they did identify.

(C), if anything, runs counter to the stimulus, since the children did not seem to understand that the term “rolling pin” can refer to a category of objects. If (C) were true, chances are the boys would have been able to identify the other rolling pins in the room.

(D) Mind the scope! The conclusion deals only with rolling pins, so we have no right to extend this conclusion to include all the utensils used in the experiment.

(E) contradicts the stimulus. The children certainly could distinguish their own rolling pins from the others; otherwise, how could each child pick out from the rest of the rolling pins only the one he and his father had used?

• (D) is the odd man out here; all the other choices stick to rolling pins, while (D) gets wild and speaks of utensils in general. That earns a quick rejection.

• In inference questions, keep an eye out for au-contraire choices like choice (C) and choice (E)—choices that, far from inferable, actually run counter to the information in the stimulus.
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Sep 2018, 10:32
In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough together using rolling pins and other utensils. Each father-son pair used a rolling pin that was distinctively different from those used by the other father-son pairs, and each father repeated the phrase "rolling pin" each time his son used it. But when the children were asked to identify all of the rolling pins among a group of kitchen utensils that included several rolling pins, each child picked only the one that he had used.

Which one of the following inferences is most supported by the information above?

(A) The children did not grasp the function of rolling pin The function of the rolling pin is out of scope, for the argument direction.
(B) No two children understood the name "rolling pin" to apply to the same object Correct option. lets test it, if we say two children were able to identify rolling pin to same object , then two children would pic same rolling pin and not distinct.This breaks the argument. so is correct inference.
(C) The children understood that all rolling pins have the same general shape shape is out of scope.
(D) Each child was able to identify correctly only the utensils that he had usedutensils are different than rolling pin, or atleast a separate entity in the argument.
(E) The children were not able to distinguish the rolling pins they used from other rolling pins out of scope.
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Re: In an experiment, two-year-old boys and their fathers made pie dough &nbs [#permalink] 19 Sep 2018, 10:32
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