GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 11 Dec 2018, 06:29

R1 Decisions:

HBS Chat - Decisions will be released at Noon ET  |  UVA Darden Chat  |  YouTube Live with Cornell Johnson @11am ET


Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in December
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
2526272829301
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
303112345
Open Detailed Calendar
  • Free GMAT Prep Hour

     December 11, 2018

     December 11, 2018

     09:00 PM EST

     10:00 PM EST

    Strategies and techniques for approaching featured GMAT topics. December 11 at 9 PM EST.
  • The winning strategy for 700+ on the GMAT

     December 13, 2018

     December 13, 2018

     08:00 AM PST

     09:00 AM PST

    What people who reach the high 700's do differently? We're going to share insights, tips and strategies from data we collected on over 50,000 students who used examPAL.

Is x > 0? (1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3 (2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Intern
Intern
User avatar
Joined: 13 Apr 2014
Posts: 11
Re: Is x > 0? (1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3 (2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Apr 2014, 06:23
a. |x+3| = 4x -3
|x+3| = x + 3 for x + 3 >= 0 ---> x > -3.
Solving for x,
x + 3 = 4x -3 ---> 6 = 3x ---> x = 2 ( solution accepted since x > -3)

| x + 3| = -(x +3 ) for x + 3 < 0 --> x < -3.
Solving for x,
-x - 3 = 4x -3
5x = 0 ---> x = 0 ( solution discarded as x is not < -3)

A is sufficient.

b. |x -3| = |2x -3|
|x -3| = x -3 for x-3 >= 0 ---> x >= 3
|x -3| = -(x -3) for x-3 < 0 ---> x < 3

|2x -3 | = 2x -3 for 2x -3 >= 0 ----> x >=3/2
|2x -3 | = -(2x -3) for 2x -3 < 0 ----> x < 3/2

So we have 3 ranges

1) x >=3 ==> x - 3 = 2x -3 ====> x = 0 ; discard
2) 3/2 < x < 3 ===> -(x-3) = 2x -3 ====> -x + 3 = 2x -3 ===> x =2 ( accepted solution )
3) x < 3/2 ===> -(x-3) = -(2x -3) ====> x = 3 (discarded the solution)


Let me know if I have solved the question correctly. I know the process is lengthy.

One more question, if we consider the only acceptable solution in statement b i.e., x =2 (case 3/2 < x < 3), then both statements are sufficient independently and we get the answer as option (D).
_________________

http://www.gmatacademy.ir
best for iranian

Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 16 Jan 2013
Posts: 82
Location: Bangladesh
GMAT 1: 490 Q41 V18
GMAT 2: 610 Q45 V28
GPA: 2.75
Premium Member
Re: Is x > 0? (1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3 (2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 May 2015, 10:56
vikram4689 wrote:
dvinoth86 wrote:
Is x > 0?

(1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3
(2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|

Liked the question? encourage by giving kudos :wink:


Remember: When you have || on both sides of eqn you do not need to VERIFY the answer by putting them back in eqn BUT when you have || on only one side you MUST VERIFY the answer by putting them back in eqn

(1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3
a) x + 3 = 4x – 3 => x=2 .. VALID
b) -(x + 3) = 4x – 3 => x=0 .. INVALID

Hence Sufficient

(2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3| => x = 0 or 6 .. INVALID
Hence In-Sufficient



Your statement 1 has two sceneries. Then how does it become sufficient?
_________________

Heading towards perfection>>

e-GMAT Representative
User avatar
D
Joined: 04 Jan 2015
Posts: 2279
Re: Is x > 0? (1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3 (2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 May 2015, 22:57
2
ranaazad wrote:
vikram4689 wrote:
dvinoth86 wrote:
Is x > 0?

(1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3
(2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|

Liked the question? encourage by giving kudos :wink:


Remember: When you have || on both sides of eqn you do not need to VERIFY the answer by putting them back in eqn BUT when you have || on only one side you MUST VERIFY the answer by putting them back in eqn

(1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3
a) x + 3 = 4x – 3 => x=2 .. VALID
b) -(x + 3) = 4x – 3 => x=0 .. INVALID

Hence Sufficient

(2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3| => x = 0 or 6 .. INVALID
Hence In-Sufficient



Your statement 1 has two sceneries. Then how does it become sufficient?


Dear ranaazad

The solution quoted by you above has some tacit steps. I'll list them here:

St. 1 says: |x + 3| = 4x – 3 . . . (1)

Case 1: x + 3 > = 0

That is, x > = -3

In this case, |x+3| = (x+3)

So, Equation 1 becomes:

x + 3 = 4x - 3
=> 6 = 3x
=> x = 2

Does this value of x satisfy the condition of Case 1, that x > = -3?

Yes, it does. So, x = 2 is a valid value of x.

Let's now consider

Case 2: x + 3 < 0

That is, x < -3

In this case, |x+3| = -(x+3)

So, Equation 1 becomes:

-(x + 3) = 4x - 3
=> -x - 3 = 4x - 3
=> 0 = 5x
=> x = 0

Does this value of x satisfy the condition of Case 2, that x < -3?

No, it doesn't. So, x = 0 is an INVALID value of x.

Thus, we got only 1 valid value of X from Statement 1 (x = 2) and so, Statement 1 is sufficient to say that x > 0.

Hope this answered your doubt! :)

Japinder
_________________








Register for free sessions
Number Properties | Algebra |Quant Workshop

Success Stories
Guillermo's Success Story | Carrie's Success Story

Ace GMAT quant
Articles and Question to reach Q51 | Question of the week

Must Read Articles
Number Properties – Even Odd | LCM GCD | Statistics-1 | Statistics-2 | Remainders-1 | Remainders-2
Word Problems – Percentage 1 | Percentage 2 | Time and Work 1 | Time and Work 2 | Time, Speed and Distance 1 | Time, Speed and Distance 2
Advanced Topics- Permutation and Combination 1 | Permutation and Combination 2 | Permutation and Combination 3 | Probability
Geometry- Triangles 1 | Triangles 2 | Triangles 3 | Common Mistakes in Geometry
Algebra- Wavy line | Inequalities

Practice Questions
Number Properties 1 | Number Properties 2 | Algebra 1 | Geometry | Prime Numbers | Absolute value equations | Sets



| '4 out of Top 5' Instructors on gmatclub | 70 point improvement guarantee | www.e-gmat.com

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 22 Feb 2015
Posts: 7
Re: Is x > 0? (1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3 (2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 May 2015, 21:37
Bunuel wrote:
Is x > 0?

(1) \(|x+3|=4x-3\) --> LHS is an absolute value, which is always non-negative (\(|some \ expression|\geq{0}\)), so RHS must also be non-negative --> \(4x-3\geq{0}\) --> \(x\geq{\frac{3}{4}}\), hence \(x>0\). Sufficient. You can see here that you don't even need to find exact value(s) of x to answer the question.

(2) \(|x-3|=|2x-3|\). Square both sides: \((x-3)^2=(2x-3)^2\) --> \((2x-3)^2-(x-3)^2=0\). Apply \(a^2-b^2=(a-b)(a+b)\), rather than squaring: --> \(x(3x-6)=0\) --> \(x=0\) or \(x=2\). Not sufficient.

Answer: A.

Hope it helps.

I got 0,2 in both statements. Reading your responses below, I would need to substitute to get A as the answer. However, if I input( x>=3/4 ) such as x=1 in statement 1, I get 1+3=4(RHS)4(1)-3=1(LHS), any reason?
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 51098
Re: Is x > 0? (1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3 (2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 May 2015, 03:49
hak15 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Is x > 0?

(1) \(|x+3|=4x-3\) --> LHS is an absolute value, which is always non-negative (\(|some \ expression|\geq{0}\)), so RHS must also be non-negative --> \(4x-3\geq{0}\) --> \(x\geq{\frac{3}{4}}\), hence \(x>0\). Sufficient. You can see here that you don't even need to find exact value(s) of x to answer the question.

(2) \(|x-3|=|2x-3|\). Square both sides: \((x-3)^2=(2x-3)^2\) --> \((2x-3)^2-(x-3)^2=0\). Apply \(a^2-b^2=(a-b)(a+b)\), rather than squaring: --> \(x(3x-6)=0\) --> \(x=0\) or \(x=2\). Not sufficient.

Answer: A.

Hope it helps.

I got 0,2 in both statements. Reading your responses below, I would need to substitute to get A as the answer. However, if I input( x>=3/4 ) such as x=1 in statement 1, I get 1+3=4(RHS)4(1)-3=1(LHS), any reason?


First of all, x=0 is not a solution of |x+3|=4x−3. It has only one solution x=2.

Next, the question asks whether x>0 and from (1) we get that \(x\geq{\frac{3}{4}}\), so x must be greater than 0. So, the statement answers the question. \(x\geq{\frac{3}{4}}\) does NOT mean that any value greater than or equal to 3/4 will satisfy the equation, it means that the value(s) that satisfy it must be greater than or equal to 3/4.

Hope it's clear.
_________________

New to the Math Forum?
Please read this: Ultimate GMAT Quantitative Megathread | All You Need for Quant | PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

Resources:
GMAT Math Book | Triangles | Polygons | Coordinate Geometry | Factorials | Circles | Number Theory | Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets | PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders | GMAT Prep Software Analysis | SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) | Tricky questions from previous years.

Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
Extra-hard Quant Tests with Brilliant Analytics

Math Revolution GMAT Instructor
User avatar
V
Joined: 16 Aug 2015
Posts: 6619
GMAT 1: 760 Q51 V42
GPA: 3.82
Premium Member
Re: Is x > 0? (1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3 (2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Dec 2015, 22:12
Forget conventional ways of solving math questions. In DS, Variable approach is the easiest and quickest way to find the answer without actually solving the problem. Remember equal number of variables and independent equations ensures a solution

Is x > 0?
(1) |x + 3| < 4
(2) |x - 3| < 4

In case of inequality questions, it is important to note that conditions are sufficient if the range of the question includes the range of the conditions.
There is 1 variable (x) in the original condition. In order to match the number of variables and the number of equations, we need 1 equation. Since the condition 1) and 2) each has 1 equation, there is high chance that D is the answer.
In case of the condition 1), we can obtain -4<x+3<4. This yields -7<x<1. Since the range of the question does not include the range of the condition, the condition 1) is not sufficient.
In case of the condition 2), we can obtain -4<x-3<4. This also yields, -1<x<7. Since the range of the question does not include the range of the condition, the condition 2) is not sufficient.
Using both the condition 1) and 2), since -1<x<1, the range of the question does not include the range of the conditions. Therefore, the conditions are not sufficient and the correct answer is E.

For cases where we need 1 more equation, such as original conditions with “1 variable”, or “2 variables and 1 equation”, or “3 variables and 2 equations”, we have 1 equation each in both 1) and 2). Therefore, there is 59 % chance that D is the answer, while A or B has 38% chance and C or E has 3% chance. Since D is most likely to be the answer using 1) and 2) separately according to DS definition. Obviously there may be cases where the answer is A, B, C or E.
_________________

MathRevolution: Finish GMAT Quant Section with 10 minutes to spare
The one-and-only World’s First Variable Approach for DS and IVY Approach for PS with ease, speed and accuracy.
"Only $99 for 3 month Online Course"
"Free Resources-30 day online access & Diagnostic Test"
"Unlimited Access to over 120 free video lessons - try it yourself"

Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 15 Mar 2015
Posts: 111
Re: Is x > 0? (1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3 (2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Aug 2016, 04:20
Bunuel wrote:
Is x > 0?

(1) \(|x+3|=4x-3\) --> LHS is an absolute value, which is always non-negative (\(|some \ expression|\geq{0}\)), so RHS must also be non-negative --> \(4x-3\geq{0}\) --> \(x\geq{\frac{3}{4}}\), hence \(x>0\). Sufficient. You can see here that you don't even need to find exact value(s) of x to answer the question.

(2) \(|x-3|=|2x-3|\). Square both sides: \((x-3)^2=(2x-3)^2\) --> \((2x-3)^2-(x-3)^2=0\). Apply \(a^2-b^2=(a-b)(a+b)\), rather than squaring: --> \(x(3x-6)=0\) --> \(x=0\) or \(x=2\). Not sufficient.

Answer: A.

Hope it helps.


Hi Bunuel!

Can you please tell me more/guide me towards more information about squaring both sides of an equation with absolute value? I was putting up multiple scenario equations but your solution clearly is faster. When can I square an absolute value equation? What do I need to think about?

Best wishes
_________________

I love being wrong. An incorrect answer offers an extraordinary opportunity to improve.

Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 51098
Re: Is x > 0? (1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3 (2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Aug 2016, 06:31
MarkusKarl wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Is x > 0?

(1) \(|x+3|=4x-3\) --> LHS is an absolute value, which is always non-negative (\(|some \ expression|\geq{0}\)), so RHS must also be non-negative --> \(4x-3\geq{0}\) --> \(x\geq{\frac{3}{4}}\), hence \(x>0\). Sufficient. You can see here that you don't even need to find exact value(s) of x to answer the question.

(2) \(|x-3|=|2x-3|\). Square both sides: \((x-3)^2=(2x-3)^2\) --> \((2x-3)^2-(x-3)^2=0\). Apply \(a^2-b^2=(a-b)(a+b)\), rather than squaring: --> \(x(3x-6)=0\) --> \(x=0\) or \(x=2\). Not sufficient.

Answer: A.

Hope it helps.


Hi Bunuel!

Can you please tell me more/guide me towards more information about squaring both sides of an equation with absolute value? I was putting up multiple scenario equations but your solution clearly is faster. When can I square an absolute value equation? What do I need to think about?

Best wishes


When there are absolute values on both sides you can safely square. When there is an absolute value on one side and non-absolute value on another it becomes trickier - you should plug back the solutions to make sure that they are valid. You can search for similar questions here: search.php?search_id=tag&tag_id=37

Hope it helps.
_________________

New to the Math Forum?
Please read this: Ultimate GMAT Quantitative Megathread | All You Need for Quant | PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

Resources:
GMAT Math Book | Triangles | Polygons | Coordinate Geometry | Factorials | Circles | Number Theory | Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets | PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders | GMAT Prep Software Analysis | SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) | Tricky questions from previous years.

Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
Extra-hard Quant Tests with Brilliant Analytics

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 07 Mar 2017
Posts: 2
Re: Is x > 0? (1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3 (2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Dec 2017, 09:30
Bunuel wrote:
Is x > 0?

(1) \(|x+3|=4x-3\) --> LHS is an absolute value, which is always non-negative (\(|some \ expression|\geq{0}\)), so RHS must also be non-negative --> \(4x-3\geq{0}\) --> \(x\geq{\frac{3}{4}}\), hence \(x>0\). Sufficient. You can see here that you don't even need to find exact value(s) of x to answer the question.

(2) \(|x-3|=|2x-3|\). Square both sides: \((x-3)^2=(2x-3)^2\) --> \((2x-3)^2-(x-3)^2=0\). Apply \(a^2-b^2=(a-b)(a+b)\), rather than squaring: --> \(x(3x-6)=0\) --> \(x=0\) or \(x=2\). Not sufficient.

Answer: A.

Hope it helps.


Hi Bunuel,

I had a small query for this question. It will also be great if you can clarify the concept along with it.

for option B, |x-3|=|2x-3|, based on my understanding, this is the same as saying the "distance of x from 3 is same as the distance of x from 3/2". If this is true, then the value of x should fall somewhere between 3 and 1.5, i.e. 2.25 and hence should be greater than one.

Please let me know where I am wrong here :)

Thanks,
Dev
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 51098
Re: Is x > 0? (1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3 (2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Dec 2017, 09:34
bapoon1991 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Is x > 0?

(1) \(|x+3|=4x-3\) --> LHS is an absolute value, which is always non-negative (\(|some \ expression|\geq{0}\)), so RHS must also be non-negative --> \(4x-3\geq{0}\) --> \(x\geq{\frac{3}{4}}\), hence \(x>0\). Sufficient. You can see here that you don't even need to find exact value(s) of x to answer the question.

(2) \(|x-3|=|2x-3|\). Square both sides: \((x-3)^2=(2x-3)^2\) --> \((2x-3)^2-(x-3)^2=0\). Apply \(a^2-b^2=(a-b)(a+b)\), rather than squaring: --> \(x(3x-6)=0\) --> \(x=0\) or \(x=2\). Not sufficient.

Answer: A.

Hope it helps.


Hi Bunuel,

I had a small query for this question. It will also be great if you can clarify the concept along with it.

for option B, |x-3|=|2x-3|, based on my understanding, this is the same as saying the "distance of x from 3 is same as the distance of x from 3/2". If this is true, then the value of x should fall somewhere between 3 and 1.5, i.e. 2.25 and hence should be greater than one.

Please let me know where I am wrong here :)

Thanks,
Dev


You would have been right if it were \(|x-3|=|x-3/2|\) but it's \(|x-3|=2*|x-3/2|\). So, the distance from x to 3 is TWICE the distance from x to 3/2.
_________________

New to the Math Forum?
Please read this: Ultimate GMAT Quantitative Megathread | All You Need for Quant | PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

Resources:
GMAT Math Book | Triangles | Polygons | Coordinate Geometry | Factorials | Circles | Number Theory | Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets | PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders | GMAT Prep Software Analysis | SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) | Tricky questions from previous years.

Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
Extra-hard Quant Tests with Brilliant Analytics

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 03 Jul 2015
Posts: 11
Re: Is x > 0? (1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3 (2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Jul 2018, 05:37
Bunuel wrote:
kawan84 wrote:
Hi Bunnel,
I've been struggling a lot in inequalities.. I've a question pertaining to solution provided by saxenaashi ...


1) x >=3 ==> x - 3 = 2x -3 ====> x = 0 ; discard[Understood this part]2) 3/2 < x < 3 ===> -(x-3) = 2x -3 ====> -x + 3 = 2x -3 ===> x =2 ( accepted solution )[Did not understand, Why -ve sign is here as the x range is positive]3) x < 3/2 ===> -(x-3) = -(2x -3) ====> x = 3 (discarded the solution)[Understood]
Another thing is 3/2(inclusive) is not at all considered in the range in any of the three checkpoints.

What am i missing here and how to solve these questions effectively


Absolute value properties:

When \(x\leq{0}\) then \(|x|=-x\), or more generally when \(some \ expression\leq{0}\) then \(|some \ expression|={-(some \ expression)}\). For example: \(|-5|=5=-(-5)\);

When \(x\geq{0}\) then \(|x|=x\), or more generally when \(some \ expression\geq{0}\) then \(|some \ expression|={some \ expression}\). For example: \(|5|=5\).

SOLUTION:

We have two transition points for \(|x-3|=|2x-3|\): \(x=\frac{3}{2}\) and \(x=3\). Thus three ranges to check:
1. \(x<\frac{3}{2}\);
2. \(\frac{3}{2}\leq{x}\leq{3}\);
3. \(3<x\)

Note that it does not matter in which range(s) you include the transition points with "=" sign as long you include them.

1. When \(x<\frac{3}{2}\), then \(x-3\) is negative and \(2x-3\) is negative too, thus \(|x-3|=-(x-3)\) and \(|2x-3|=-(2x-3)\).

Therefore for this range \(|x-3|=|2x-3|\) transforms to \(-(x-3)=-(2x-3)\) --> \(x=0\). This solution is OK, since \(x=0\) is in the range we consider (\(x<\frac{3}{2}\)).

2. When \(\frac{3}{2}\leq{x}\leq{3}\), then \(x-3\) is negative and \(2x-3\) is positive, thus \(|x-3|=-(x-3)\) and \(|2x-3|=2x-3\).

Therefore for this range \(|x-3|=|2x-3|\) transforms to \(-(x-3)=2x-3\) --> \(x=2\). This solution is OK, since \(x=2\) is in the range we consider (\(\frac{3}{2}\leq{x}\leq{3}\)).

3. When \(3<x\), then \(x-3\) is positive and \(2x-3\) is positive too, thus \(|x-3|=x-3\) and \(|2x-3|=2x-3\).

Therefore for this range \(|x-3|=|2x-3|\) transforms to \(x-3=2x-3\) --> \(x=0\). This solution is NOT OK, since \(x=0\) is NOT in the range we consider (\(3<x\)).

Thus \(|x-3|=|2x-3|\) has two solutions \(x=0\) and \(x=2\).

Hope it's clear.

P.S. Though for this particular question I still suggest another approach shown in my post here: http://gmatclub.com/forum/is-x-0-1-x-3- ... l#p1048512



Dear Bunuel,

Would like to ask question on the part highlighted in red in your post, specifically on determining x - 3 is negative. Since the range is \(\frac{3}{2}\leq{x}\leq{3}\), then if i plug in 3/2 in x - 3, it will result in negative number, however if i plug in 3 in x - 3, it will result in 0 or non-negative, and therefore x - 3 can be negative or non-negative. In your post x - 3 must be negative, how do we eliminate the non-negative one ? Or do we simply ignore non-negative ?
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 51098
Re: Is x > 0? (1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3 (2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Jul 2018, 06:06
tixan wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
kawan84 wrote:
Hi Bunnel,
I've been struggling a lot in inequalities.. I've a question pertaining to solution provided by saxenaashi ...


1) x >=3 ==> x - 3 = 2x -3 ====> x = 0 ; discard[Understood this part]2) 3/2 < x < 3 ===> -(x-3) = 2x -3 ====> -x + 3 = 2x -3 ===> x =2 ( accepted solution )[Did not understand, Why -ve sign is here as the x range is positive]3) x < 3/2 ===> -(x-3) = -(2x -3) ====> x = 3 (discarded the solution)[Understood]
Another thing is 3/2(inclusive) is not at all considered in the range in any of the three checkpoints.

What am i missing here and how to solve these questions effectively


Absolute value properties:

When \(x\leq{0}\) then \(|x|=-x\), or more generally when \(some \ expression\leq{0}\) then \(|some \ expression|={-(some \ expression)}\). For example: \(|-5|=5=-(-5)\);

When \(x\geq{0}\) then \(|x|=x\), or more generally when \(some \ expression\geq{0}\) then \(|some \ expression|={some \ expression}\). For example: \(|5|=5\).

SOLUTION:

We have two transition points for \(|x-3|=|2x-3|\): \(x=\frac{3}{2}\) and \(x=3\). Thus three ranges to check:
1. \(x<\frac{3}{2}\);
2. \(\frac{3}{2}\leq{x}\leq{3}\);
3. \(3<x\)

Note that it does not matter in which range(s) you include the transition points with "=" sign as long you include them.

1. When \(x<\frac{3}{2}\), then \(x-3\) is negative and \(2x-3\) is negative too, thus \(|x-3|=-(x-3)\) and \(|2x-3|=-(2x-3)\).

Therefore for this range \(|x-3|=|2x-3|\) transforms to \(-(x-3)=-(2x-3)\) --> \(x=0\). This solution is OK, since \(x=0\) is in the range we consider (\(x<\frac{3}{2}\)).

2. When \(\frac{3}{2}\leq{x}\leq{3}\), then \(x-3\) is negative and \(2x-3\) is positive, thus \(|x-3|=-(x-3)\) and \(|2x-3|=2x-3\).

Therefore for this range \(|x-3|=|2x-3|\) transforms to \(-(x-3)=2x-3\) --> \(x=2\). This solution is OK, since \(x=2\) is in the range we consider (\(\frac{3}{2}\leq{x}\leq{3}\)).

3. When \(3<x\), then \(x-3\) is positive and \(2x-3\) is positive too, thus \(|x-3|=x-3\) and \(|2x-3|=2x-3\).

Therefore for this range \(|x-3|=|2x-3|\) transforms to \(x-3=2x-3\) --> \(x=0\). This solution is NOT OK, since \(x=0\) is NOT in the range we consider (\(3<x\)).

Thus \(|x-3|=|2x-3|\) has two solutions \(x=0\) and \(x=2\).

Hope it's clear.

P.S. Though for this particular question I still suggest another approach shown in my post here: http://gmatclub.com/forum/is-x-0-1-x-3- ... l#p1048512



Dear Bunuel,

Would like to ask question on the part highlighted in red in your post, specifically on determining x - 3 is negative. Since the range is \(\frac{3}{2}\leq{x}\leq{3}\), then if i plug in 3/2 in x - 3, it will result in negative number, however if i plug in 3 in x - 3, it will result in 0 or non-negative, and therefore x - 3 can be negative or non-negative. In your post x - 3 must be negative, how do we eliminate the non-negative one ? Or do we simply ignore non-negative ?



Yes, \({x}\leq{3}\), gives \(x - 3 \leq 0\) but \(|x-3|=-(x-3)\) is still true. That's because |a| = -a when a <= 0. Meaning that if a is negative or 0, then |a| = -a. For example, if say a = -1, then |a| = -a = -(-1) = 1 and if say a = 0, then |a| = -a = -0 = 0.

Does this make sense?
_________________

New to the Math Forum?
Please read this: Ultimate GMAT Quantitative Megathread | All You Need for Quant | PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

Resources:
GMAT Math Book | Triangles | Polygons | Coordinate Geometry | Factorials | Circles | Number Theory | Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets | PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders | GMAT Prep Software Analysis | SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) | Tricky questions from previous years.

Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
Extra-hard Quant Tests with Brilliant Analytics

SVP
SVP
User avatar
D
Joined: 26 Mar 2013
Posts: 1904
Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: Is x > 0? (1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3 (2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Aug 2018, 00:32
dvinoth86 wrote:
Is x > 0?

(1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3
(2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|



(1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3

RHS must be non-negative....therefore

\(4x-3\geq{0}\)............\(4x\geq{3}\)........\(x\geq{3/4}\)........Then the solution is positive

Sufficient

Dear GMATGuruNY

Is it possible to do so in statement 2 as we did in statement 1, although any side will give that x > 0? if not is it coincidence in this problem ?

Thanks in advance
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 04 Aug 2010
Posts: 310
Schools: Dartmouth College
Re: Is x > 0? (1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3 (2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Aug 2018, 09:13
Mo2men wrote:
dvinoth86 wrote:
Is x > 0?

(1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3
(2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|



(1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3

RHS must be non-negative....therefore

\(4x-3\geq{0}\)............\(4x\geq{3}\)........\(x\geq{3/4}\)........Then the solution is positive

Sufficient

Dear GMATGuruNY

Is it possible to do so in statement 2 as we did in statement 1, although any side will give that x > 0? if not is it coincidence in this problem ?

Thanks in advance


Because each side of the equation in Statement 2 is an absolute value, the expressions within the absolute values (x-3 and 2x-3) do NOT have to be nonnegative.
One solution for Statement 2 is x=0, with the result that x-3 = -3 and 2x-3 = -3.
_________________

GMAT and GRE Tutor
Over 1800 followers
Click here to learn more
GMATGuruNY@gmail.com
New York, NY
If you find one of my posts helpful, please take a moment to click on the "Kudos" icon.
Available for tutoring in NYC and long-distance.
For more information, please email me at GMATGuruNY@gmail.com.

SVP
SVP
User avatar
D
Joined: 26 Mar 2013
Posts: 1904
Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: Is x > 0? (1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3 (2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Aug 2018, 12:08
GMATGuruNY wrote:
Mo2men wrote:

(1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3

RHS must be non-negative....therefore

\(4x-3\geq{0}\)............\(4x\geq{3}\)........\(x\geq{3/4}\)........Then the solution is positive

Sufficient

Dear GMATGuruNY

Is it possible to do so in statement 2 as we did in statement 1, although any side will give that x > 0? if not is it coincidence in this problem ?

Thanks in advance


Because each side of the equation in Statement 2 is an absolute value, the expressions within the absolute values (x-3 and 2x-3) do NOT have to be nonnegative.
One solution for Statement 2 is x=0, with the result that x-3 = -3 and 2x-3 = -3.


Thanks GMATGuruNY.

In this type of questions asking for sign of x, does this mean that I can deal with such statement in same manner like statement 1? or do I need open modulus to be sure from the sign?
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 04 Aug 2010
Posts: 310
Schools: Dartmouth College
Re: Is x > 0? (1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3 (2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Aug 2018, 22:07
1
Mo2men wrote:
Thanks GMATGuruNY.

In this type of questions asking for sign of x, does this mean that I can deal with such statement in same manner like statement 1? or do I need open modulus to be sure from the sign?


Since the question stem asks whether x>0 -- and an equation with absolute value on both sides can have both a positive and a nonpositive solution -- I recommend that you solve the equation, either by opening up the modulus or by squaring both sides.
_________________

GMAT and GRE Tutor
Over 1800 followers
Click here to learn more
GMATGuruNY@gmail.com
New York, NY
If you find one of my posts helpful, please take a moment to click on the "Kudos" icon.
Available for tutoring in NYC and long-distance.
For more information, please email me at GMATGuruNY@gmail.com.

Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 10 Oct 2018
Posts: 88
Location: United States
Schools: Sloan (MIT)
GPA: 4
Re: Is x > 0? (1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3 (2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Nov 2018, 05:06
Bunuel does it mean that in all questions based on absolute values, one solution of it would be 0?

I'm clear with Stat1 but in stat 2, I used the formula by squaring both sides of absolute figures to find the inequality range. Here is what I did.

|x−3|=|2x−3|
Square both sides: (x−3)^2=(2x−3)^2
x^2-6x+9=4x^2-12x+9
3x^2=6x
Therefore, x=2. So I chose option D. Can you help me to find what is the error? I'm not getting it. All I did was use the formula.
_________________

Kudos OK Please!!

Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 51098
Re: Is x > 0? (1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3 (2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Nov 2018, 05:38
1
topper97 wrote:
Bunuel does it mean that in all questions based on absolute values, one solution of it would be 0?

I'm clear with Stat1 but in stat 2, I used the formula by squaring both sides of absolute figures to find the inequality range. Here is what I did.

|x−3|=|2x−3|
Square both sides: (x−3)^2=(2x−3)^2
x^2-6x+9=4x^2-12x+9
3x^2=6x
Therefore, x=2. So I chose option D. Can you help me to find what is the error? I'm not getting it. All I did was use the formula.


1. Of course 0 is NOT a solution of all absolute value questions. Why would it be?

2. You solved 3x^2 = 6x incorrectly. You cannot reduce 3x^2 = 6x by x because x can be 0 and we cannot divide by 0. By doing so you loose a root, namely x = 0.

Never reduce equation by variable (or expression with variable), if you are not certain that variable (or expression with variable) doesn't equal to zero. We cannot divide by zero.
_________________

New to the Math Forum?
Please read this: Ultimate GMAT Quantitative Megathread | All You Need for Quant | PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

Resources:
GMAT Math Book | Triangles | Polygons | Coordinate Geometry | Factorials | Circles | Number Theory | Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets | PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders | GMAT Prep Software Analysis | SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) | Tricky questions from previous years.

Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
Extra-hard Quant Tests with Brilliant Analytics

GMAT Club Bot
Re: Is x > 0? (1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3 (2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3| &nbs [#permalink] 28 Nov 2018, 05:38

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 38 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Is x > 0? (1) |x + 3| = 4x – 3 (2) |x – 3| = |2x – 3|

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.