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Re: Verbal Question of the Day Chat Group [#permalink]
Seems A for question 1
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Re: Verbal Question of the Day Chat Group [#permalink]
winterschool wrote:
Q1. Human beings are highly destructive predators. We have devastated the conch population of the West Indian barrier reef region, brought the North American caribou to the verge of extinction, and nearly wiped out the mountain lion native to the hills of Appalachia. Legislation could be enacted to prohibit killing mountain lions, but even if the law could be enforced effectively, the mountain lions would become extinct anyway, and the blame would still be ours. Which of the following, if true, provides the most logical explanation of the apparent paradox? A. Hunters throughout the Appalachian region are resentful of what they consider to be government intrusion and will try to circumvent the law. B. The mountain lion is not really native to the Appalachian region and plays no essential role in the total environment of the area. C. The problems with the conch population and the North American caribou are quite distinct and cannot usefully be compared with the problem of the mountain lion. D. Because of increased human populations, mountain lions no longer have the large territories they need to hunt adequate numbers of their prey. E. The natural evolution of the region, rather than the intrusions of human beings, has been responsible for the decline of the mountain lion population.

I am confused between options E & D
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Re: Verbal Question of the Day Chat Group [#permalink]
poojaarora1818 wrote:
I am confused between options E & D

D is the answer. E is an easy, sure shot rejection, I’ll tell you why. The argument concludes even if law is perfectly enforced ( no killings will happen happen after this law is enacted), the mountain lions will go extinct. But still for this final extinction also the arguments blames us ( humans ) so obviously the reason for extinction cannot be natural. Option E says natural evolution of the region will be responsible for the extinction. How on earth can the argument blame us if it’s the nature causing the extinction???? So get rid of E. While D puts the blame on increased human population, so obviously because we haven’t bought 1-2 child policy etc we are getting the blame :-(
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Re: Verbal Question of the Day Chat Group [#permalink]
Sathvik02 wrote:
D is the answer. E is an easy, sure shot rejection, I’ll tell you why. The argument concludes even if law is perfectly enforced ( no killings will happen happen after this law is enacted), the mountain lions will go extinct. But still for this final extinction also the arguments blames us ( humans ) so obviously the reason for extinction cannot be natural. Option E says natural evolution of the region will be responsible for the extinction. How on earth can the argument blame us if it’s the nature causing the extinction???? So get rid of E. While D puts the blame on increased human population, so obviously because we haven’t bought 1-2 child policy etc we are getting the blame :-(

Oh! thank you so much for the clarification. You have made the things so simple & short. Thank you :)
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Re: Verbal Question of the Day Chat Group [#permalink]
poojaarora1818 wrote:
Oh! thank you so much for the clarification. You have made the things so simple & short. Thank you :)

Yep that’s me. You’re welcome :-)
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Re: Verbal Question of the Day Chat Group [#permalink]
rt.muthiah wrote:
Q1 D Q2 D Right?

Actually I don’t know :-). Also, how does the "question of the day" actually work? Will the correct answer be revealed at some point?
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Re: Verbal Question of the Day Chat Group [#permalink]
Anybody/everybody/Nobody/Somebody: All these pronouns represents singular outcome, and this is the kind of reply you can expect here :lol:
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Re: Verbal Question of the Day Chat Group [#permalink]
Hello everyone, I just started studying gmat, and I’m having difficulty with an exercise on April 7th 2023 passage 2 (Richard L Jackson’s most recent book,...) has anyone ever done this exercise? I really want to be able to ask for an explanation of the answer from everyone, I really need it, thank you
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Re: Verbal Question of the Day Chat Group [#permalink]
I haven’t done it, but if you have a specific doubt you can ask, I can look into it. That is "Humanities" Passage. It takes little more time to familiarize with humanities passages if you are from engineering, science background

Gmat Ninja has done some fantastic videos on "Humanities passages", its free on youtube.
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Re: Verbal Question of the Day Chat Group [#permalink]
Sathvik02 wrote:
I haven’t done it, but if you have a specific doubt you can ask, I can look into it. That is "Humanities" Passage. It takes little more time to familiarize with humanities passages if you are from engineering, science background

Any passages takes time irrespective of background. Coming from an avid reader who has been defeated by RC.

henxuyen wrote:
Hello everyone, I just started studying gmat, and I’m having difficulty with an exercise on April 7th 2023 passage 2 (Richard L Jackson’s most recent book,...) has anyone ever done this exercise? I really want to be able to ask for an explanation of the answer from everyone, I really need it, thank you

Can you share a sentence from the RC passage, maybe I Can help you find a FORUM discussion for it. I usually rely on it when Im in despair.

I just realized the FORUM post doesnt have any discussion for it. My apologies.
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Re: Verbal Question of the Day Chat Group [#permalink]
Malar95 wrote:
Any passages takes time irrespective of background. Coming from an avid reader who has been defeated by RC.

I said "humanities" takes more time. It doesn’t mean other topics doesn’t. It’s obvious that if subject mentioned in the passage is familiar you will understand it at a faster rate. That’s why almost all the experts recommend to read more and more, may be editorials from NY times etc
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Re: Verbal Question of the Day Chat Group [#permalink]
Malar95 wrote:
Can you share a sentence from the RC passage, maybe I Can help you find a FORUM discussion for it. I usually rely on it when Im in despair.

READINGARTICLE 2
Richard L. Jackson’s most recent book,
Black Writers in Latin America,
continues the task of his previous
project, The Black Image in Latin
American Literature. But whereas the
earlier work examined ethnic themes in
the writings of both black and non-black
authors, the new study examines only
black writers living in Latin America
(that is, African Hispanic writers).
Consequently, there is a shift in
emphasis. While the earlier book
studied various attitudes toward black
people in Latin America as revealed in a
wide range of literature, the later work
examines the black representation of
black consciousness in Spanish
American literature from the early
nineteenth century to the present.
In Black Writers in Latin America,
Jackson states that “personal
identification with blackness and
personal experience with the black
experience have a great deal to do with
a black writer’s choice of words,
symbols, and images.” He goes on to
argue that only black writers have the
necessary insight and mastery of the
appropriate techniques to depict their
situation authentically. In this regard,
Jackson joins a number of other North
American critics who tend to
conceptualize African Hispanic
literature as culturally autonomous,
with its own style and themes deriving
primarily from the experience of in
African Hispanic history. Critics
influenced by the Latin American ideal
of racial blending, on the other hand,
believe that black and non-black writers
share the same cultural context and
that, given comparable talent, both are
equally equipped to overcome their
ethnocentrism. Although Jackson clearly
embraces the North American
perspective, he does concede in his
introduction that most African Hispanic
writers espouse integration rather than
separatism.
At times Jackson’s own analysis reveals
the problems inherent in using ethnicity
as the primary basis for critical
judgment: the textual evidence he cites
sometimes subverts the intent to find
commontendencies among all writers
of a particular racial group. For example,
in his chapter on Nicolás Guillén,
Jackson attempts to dissociate the black
Cuban poet from the Negrista
movement, claiming that “rather than
associate Guillén with poetic Negrism,
weshould see his dramatic conversion
to blackness in the late 1920s and early
1930s as a reaction against this white
literary fad that was sweeping the
world.” Admittedly, several of Guillén’s
poems from the 1920s show an
awareness of social ills like poverty,
unemployment, and racial
discrimination that is absent from the
work of peers influenced by the Negrista
movement. But it is difficult to argue
that Guillén’s portraits of black people in
poems from the early 1930s such as
“Canto negro” and “Rumba” are more
authentic and less superficial than those
in Luis Palés Matos’s “Danza negra” or
Emilio Ballagas’s “Elegía de María Belén
Chacón.” This effort to distance Guillén
from his Hispanic colleagues thus fails,
given the very texts Jackson uses to
demonstrate his points
3. Which one of the following, if true,
would most seriously undermine
Jackson’s use of ethnicity as a basis for
critical judgment of African Hispanic
literature?
(A) Several nineteenth-century authors
whose novels Jackson presents as
reflecting the black experience in Latin
America have been discovered to have
lived in the United States before moving
to Central America.
(B) Luis Palés Matos, Emilio Ballagas, and
several other Hispanic poets of the
Negrista movement have been shown to
have plagiarized the work of African
Hispanic poets.
(C) It has been discovered that African
Hispanic authors in Latin America over
the last two centuries usually developed
as writers by reading and imitating the
works of other black writers.
(D) A significant number of poems and
novels in which early-twentieth-century
Hispanic writers consider racial
integration have been discovered.
(E) Several poems that are presented by
Jackson as authentic portraits of the
black experience have been discovered
to be misattributed to black poets and
can instead be traced to non-black
poets

I’m wondering this question
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Re: Verbal Question of the Day Chat Group [#permalink]
Sathvik02 wrote:
I said "humanities" takes more time. It doesn’t mean other topics doesn’t. It’s obvious that if subject mentioned in the passage is familiar you will understand it at a faster rate. That’s why almost all the experts recommend to read more and more, may be editorials from NY times etc

This is actually a fallacy cause what happens when you’re familiar with the subject is that you may overlook the important points/words in RC that misleads you into picking an answer.
I am in no way trying to create an arguement here but I do feel that the threat of familiarity can be an issue or a double edged sword.
Verbal unfortunately isnt like Quant. Past skills come pretty useless here unfortunately. Relearning how to approach it is important.

henxuyen wrote:
READINGARTICLE 2 Richard L. Jackson’s most recent book, Black Writers in Latin America, continues the task of his previous project, The Black Image in Latin American Literature. But whereas the earlier work examined ethnic themes in the writings of both black and non-black authors, the new study examines only black writers living in Latin America (that is, African Hispanic writers). Consequently, there is a shift in emphasis. While the earlier book studied various attitudes toward black people in Latin America as revealed in a wide range of literature, the later work examines the black representation of black consciousness in Spanish American literature from the early nineteenth century to the present. In Black Writers in Latin America, Jackson states that “personal identification with blackness and personal experience with the black experience have a great deal to do with a black writer’s choice of words, symbols, and images.” He goes on to argue that only black writers have the necessary insight and mastery of the appropriate techniques to depict their situation authentically. In this regard, Jackson joins a number of other North American critics who tend to conceptualize African Hispanic literature as culturally autonomous, with its own style and themes deriving primarily from the experience of in African Hispanic history. Critics influenced by the Latin American ideal of racial blending, on the other hand, believe that black and non-black writers share the same cultural context and that, given comparable talent, both are equally equipped to overcome their ethnocentrism. Although Jackson clearly embraces the North American perspective, he does concede in his introduction that most African Hispanic writers espouse integration rather than separatism. At times Jackson’s own analysis reveals the problems inherent in using ethnicity as the primary basis for critical judgment: the textual evidence he cites sometimes subverts the intent to find commontendencies among all writers of a particular racial group. For example, in his chapter on Nicolás Guillén, Jackson attempts to dissociate the black Cuban poet from the Negrista movement, claiming that “rather than associate Guillén with poetic Negrism, weshould see his dramatic conversion to blackness in the late 1920s and early 1930s as a reaction against this white literary fad that was sweeping the world.” Admittedly, several of Guillén’s poems from the 1920s show an awareness of social ills like poverty, unemployment, and racial discrimination that is absent from the work of peers influenced by the Negrista movement. But it is difficult to argue that Guillén’s portraits of black people in poems from the early 1930s such as “Canto negro” and “Rumba” are more authentic and less superficial than those in Luis Palés Matos’s “Danza negra” or Emilio Ballagas’s “Elegía de María Belén Chacón.” This effort to distance Guillén from his Hispanic colleagues thus fails, given the very texts Jackson uses to demonstrate his points 3. Which one of the following, if true, would most seriously undermine Jackson’s use of ethnicity as a basis for critical judgment of African Hispanic literature? (A) Several nineteenth-century authors whose novels Jackson presents as reflecting the black experience in Latin America have been discovered to have lived in the United States before moving to Central America. (B) Luis Palés Matos, Emilio Ballagas, and several other Hispanic poets of the Negrista movement have been shown to have plagiarized the work of African Hispanic poets. (C) It has been discovered that African Hispanic authors in Latin America over the last two centuries usually developed as writers by reading and imitating the works of other black writers. (D) A significant number of poems and novels in which early-twentieth-century Hispanic writers consider racial integration have been discovered. (E) Several poems that are presented by Jackson as authentic portraits of the black experience have been discovered to be misattributed to black poets and can instead be traced to non-black poets

Thanks but yeah, the FORUM post is pretty useless.

Malar95 wrote:
Thanks but yeah, the FORUM post is pretty useless.

Disclaimer: Useless not in a negative way. Its cause there isnt a discussion there yet so useless cause its currently not useful due to the lack of discussion.
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Re: Verbal Question of the Day Chat Group [#permalink]
henxuyen wrote:
READINGARTICLE 2 Richard L. Jackson’s most recent book, Black Writers in Latin America, continues the task of his previous project, The Black Image in Latin American Literature. But whereas the earlier work examined ethnic themes in the writings of both black and non-black authors, the new study examines only black writers living in Latin America (that is, African Hispanic writers). Consequently, there is a shift in emphasis. While the earlier book studied various attitudes toward black people in Latin America as revealed in a wide range of literature, the later work examines the black representation of black consciousness in Spanish American literature from the early nineteenth century to the present. In Black Writers in Latin America, Jackson states that “personal identification with blackness and personal experience with the black experience have a great deal to do with a black writer’s choice of words, symbols, and images.” He goes on to argue that only black writers have the necessary insight and mastery of the appropriate techniques to depict their situation authentically. In this regard, Jackson joins a number of other North American critics who tend to conceptualize African Hispanic literature as culturally autonomous, with its own style and themes deriving primarily from the experience of in African Hispanic history. Critics influenced by the Latin American ideal of racial blending, on the other hand, believe that black and non-black writers share the same cultural context and that, given comparable talent, both are equally equipped to overcome their ethnocentrism. Although Jackson clearly embraces the North American perspective, he does concede in his introduction that most African Hispanic writers espouse integration rather than separatism. At times Jackson’s own analysis reveals the problems inherent in using ethnicity as the primary basis for critical judgment: the textual evidence he cites sometimes subverts the intent to find commontendencies among all writers of a particular racial group. For example, in his chapter on Nicolás Guillén, Jackson attempts to dissociate the black Cuban poet from the Negrista movement, claiming that “rather than associate Guillén with poetic Negrism, weshould see his dramatic conversion to blackness in the late 1920s and early 1930s as a reaction against this white literary fad that was sweeping the world.” Admittedly, several of Guillén’s poems from the 1920s show an awareness of social ills like poverty, unemployment, and racial discrimination that is absent from the work of peers influenced by the Negrista movement. But it is difficult to argue that Guillén’s portraits of black people in poems from the early 1930s such as “Canto negro” and “Rumba” are more authentic and less superficial than those in Luis Palés Matos’s “Danza negra” or Emilio Ballagas’s “Elegía de María Belén Chacón.” This effort to distance Guillén from his Hispanic colleagues thus fails, given the very texts Jackson uses to demonstrate his points 3. Which one of the following, if true, would most seriously undermine Jackson’s use of ethnicity as a basis for critical judgment of African Hispanic literature? (A) Several nineteenth-century authors whose novels Jackson presents as reflecting the black experience in Latin America have been discovered to have lived in the United States before moving to Central America. (B) Luis Palés Matos, Emilio Ballagas, and several other Hispanic poets of the Negrista movement have been shown to have plagiarized the work of African Hispanic poets. (C) It has been discovered that African Hispanic authors in Latin America over the last two centuries usually developed as writers by reading and imitating the works of other black writers. (D) A significant number of poems and novels in which early-twentieth-century Hispanic writers consider racial integration have been discovered. (E) Several poems that are presented by Jackson as authentic portraits of the black experience have been discovered to be misattributed to black poets and can instead be traced to non-black poets

Okay, here you must understand Jackson’s point of view. Jackson argues that only the black writers have the capacity ( insight) to write (depict) about their condition authentically, because Jackson thinks that personal identification with blackness and experience (what they have suffered being black) is directly related to the choice of words that black authors are making. This much information you can infer from lines (15) and (20)

henxuyen wrote:
READINGARTICLE 2 Richard L. Jackson’s most recent book, Black Writers in Latin America, continues the task of his previous project, The Black Image in Latin American Literature. But whereas the earlier work examined ethnic themes in the writings of both black and non-black authors, the new study examines only black writers living in Latin America (that is, African Hispanic writers). Consequently, there is a shift in emphasis. While the earlier book studied various attitudes toward black people in Latin America as revealed in a wide range of literature, the later work examines the black representation of black consciousness in Spanish American literature from the early nineteenth century to the present. In Black Writers in Latin America, Jackson states that “personal identification with blackness and personal experience with the black experience have a great deal to do with a black writer’s choice of words, symbols, and images.” He goes on to argue that only black writers have the necessary insight and mastery of the appropriate techniques to depict their situation authentically. In this regard, Jackson joins a number of other North American critics who tend to conceptualize African Hispanic literature as culturally autonomous, with its own style and themes deriving primarily from the experience of in African Hispanic history. Critics influenced by the Latin American ideal of racial blending, on the other hand, believe that black and non-black writers share the same cultural context and that, given comparable talent, both are equally equipped to overcome their ethnocentrism. Although Jackson clearly embraces the North American perspective, he does concede in his introduction that most African Hispanic writers espouse integration rather than separatism. At times Jackson’s own analysis reveals the problems inherent in using ethnicity as the primary basis for critical judgment: the textual evidence he cites sometimes subverts the intent to find commontendencies among all writers of a particular racial group. For example, in his chapter on Nicolás Guillén, Jackson attempts to dissociate the black Cuban poet from the Negrista movement, claiming that “rather than associate Guillén with poetic Negrism, weshould see his dramatic conversion to blackness in the late 1920s and early 1930s as a reaction against this white literary fad that was sweeping the world.” Admittedly, several of Guillén’s poems from the 1920s show an awareness of social ills like poverty, unemployment, and racial discrimination that is absent from the work of peers influenced by the Negrista movement. But it is difficult to argue that Guillén’s portraits of black people in poems from the early 1930s such as “Canto negro” and “Rumba” are more authentic and less superficial than those in Luis Palés Matos’s “Danza negra” or Emilio Ballagas’s “Elegía de María Belén Chacón.” This effort to distance Guillén from his Hispanic colleagues thus fails, given the very texts Jackson uses to demonstrate his points 3. Which one of the following, if true, would most seriously undermine Jackson’s use of ethnicity as a basis for critical judgment of African Hispanic literature? (A) Several nineteenth-century authors whose novels Jackson presents as reflecting the black experience in Latin America have been discovered to have lived in the United States before moving to Central America. (B) Luis Palés Matos, Emilio Ballagas, and several other Hispanic poets of the Negrista movement have been shown to have plagiarized the work of African Hispanic poets. (C) It has been discovered that African Hispanic authors in Latin America over the last two centuries usually developed as writers by reading and imitating the works of other black writers. (D) A significant number of poems and novels in which early-twentieth-century Hispanic writers consider racial integration have been discovered. (E) Several poems that are presented by Jackson as authentic portraits of the black experience have been discovered to be misattributed to black poets and can instead be traced to non-black poets

Now all the question you have posted is asking which aspect can seriously weaken the Jackson’s stand (that I have just explained above about black writers being black to choice of words)

henxuyen wrote:
READINGARTICLE 2 Richard L. Jackson’s most recent book, Black Writers in Latin America, continues the task of his previous project, The Black Image in Latin American Literature. But whereas the earlier work examined ethnic themes in the writings of both black and non-black authors, the new study examines only black writers living in Latin America (that is, African Hispanic writers). Consequently, there is a shift in emphasis. While the earlier book studied various attitudes toward black people in Latin America as revealed in a wide range of literature, the later work examines the black representation of black consciousness in Spanish American literature from the early nineteenth century to the present. In Black Writers in Latin America, Jackson states that “personal identification with blackness and personal experience with the black experience have a great deal to do with a black writer’s choice of words, symbols, and images.” He goes on to argue that only black writers have the necessary insight and mastery of the appropriate techniques to depict their situation authentically. In this regard, Jackson joins a number of other North American critics who tend to conceptualize African Hispanic literature as culturally autonomous, with its own style and themes deriving primarily from the experience of in African Hispanic history. Critics influenced by the Latin American ideal of racial blending, on the other hand, believe that black and non-black writers share the same cultural context and that, given comparable talent, both are equally equipped to overcome their ethnocentrism. Although Jackson clearly embraces the North American perspective, he does concede in his introduction that most African Hispanic writers espouse integration rather than separatism. At times Jackson’s own analysis reveals the problems inherent in using ethnicity as the primary basis for critical judgment: the textual evidence he cites sometimes subverts the intent to find commontendencies among all writers of a particular racial group. For example, in his chapter on Nicolás Guillén, Jackson attempts to dissociate the black Cuban poet from the Negrista movement, claiming that “rather than associate Guillén with poetic Negrism, weshould see his dramatic conversion to blackness in the late 1920s and early 1930s as a reaction against this white literary fad that was sweeping the world.” Admittedly, several of Guillén’s poems from the 1920s show an awareness of social ills like poverty, unemployment, and racial discrimination that is absent from the work of peers influenced by the Negrista movement. But it is difficult to argue that Guillén’s portraits of black people in poems from the early 1930s such as “Canto negro” and “Rumba” are more authentic and less superficial than those in Luis Palés Matos’s “Danza negra” or Emilio Ballagas’s “Elegía de María Belén Chacón.” This effort to distance Guillén from his Hispanic colleagues thus fails, given the very texts Jackson uses to demonstrate his points 3. Which one of the following, if true, would most seriously undermine Jackson’s use of ethnicity as a basis for critical judgment of African Hispanic literature? (A) Several nineteenth-century authors whose novels Jackson presents as reflecting the black experience in Latin America have been discovered to have lived in the United States before moving to Central America. (B) Luis Palés Matos, Emilio Ballagas, and several other Hispanic poets of the Negrista movement have been shown to have plagiarized the work of African Hispanic poets. (C) It has been discovered that African Hispanic authors in Latin America over the last two centuries usually developed as writers by reading and imitating the works of other black writers. (D) A significant number of poems and novels in which early-twentieth-century Hispanic writers consider racial integration have been discovered. (E) Several poems that are presented by Jackson as authentic portraits of the black experience have been discovered to be misattributed to black poets and can instead be traced to non-black poets

Option E) says that poems that jack represented to be black writer’s poems are actually the poems written by non black writers. Can you understand what is happening here?

It seriously contradicts what jack has said. Now it means the non black writers can also experience what black writers have experienced. No you can make choices based purely on ethnicity

I hope you are able to get some sort of sense out of this

Sathvik02 wrote:
It seriously contradicts what jack has said. Now it means the non black writers can also experience what black writers have experienced. No you can make choices based purely on ethnicity

cannot make choices purely on ethnicity
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Re: Verbal Question of the Day Chat Group [#permalink]
Can you explain why the remaining answers are wrong?
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Re: Verbal Question of the Day Chat Group [#permalink]
I think with the above understanding you can POE yourself. It’s not a hard question. It has an accuracy rate of 80%

It will take a lot of time If start to explain each and every choice
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DAY 6: Less than 1.5 hrs left to post your explanations!- 12-days-of-christmas-2023-2024-competition-with-25-000-of-prizes-422533.html#p3310118
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