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Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines

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Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Mar 2018, 22:57
aviejay wrote:
Conclusion: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines for their own stories.

Premise: The reason for this is that, while the headlines that reporters themselves write are often clever, what typically makes them clever is that they allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story itself.

First let me explain why I rejected E:
E says "The kind of headlines that newspaper editors want are those that anyone who has read a reporter's story in its entirety will recognize as clever". From the argument we can see that the headlines are clever when "they allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story itself." So, this option means that the readers of the newspaper will be able to understand that the reporter has little information about the story and hence consider the headline to be "clever" and this is what the editor wants. This clearly weakens the argument because the editors would like to have headlines which do not "allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story itself.". This in a way weakens the argument.


I chose B and here's why:
Choice B says "To write a headline that is clever, a person must have sufficient understanding of the story that the headline accompanies.". Now we can clearly take this as an assumption to arrive at the conclusion. Though, again "clever" has been used here as well, it is compensated by the second part of the choice "a person must have sufficient understanding of the story that the headline accompanies". I believed that this is a better choice.

Please explain where am I going wrong

aviejay, thank you for explaining your thought process! I think I see where you went wrong...

As stated in an earlier post, the headlines written by reporters are only clever because they refer to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter. If that information is little-known AND if the reporter does not mention that information in the story, then we can infer that most readers will not know that same information. Since the readers do not know that information, they will not be able to appreciate the clever headlines.

In other words, according to the author, the problem with headlines written by reporters is that most people, even after reading the story, will NOT be able to appreciate the clever headlines. But what if editors are okay with that? Maybe the editors prefer headlines whose cleverness is only appreciated by a small portion of readers. If that were the case, then the editors SHOULD allow reporters to write their own headlines.

Choice (E) assures us that this is not the case. Editors want headlines whose cleverness will be appreciated by ANYONE who has read the entire story. The cleverness of headlines written by reporters is only appreciated by a small portion of readers. So, if (E) is true, then editors would NOT want headlines to be written by the reporters. Thus, (E) strengthens the argument.

Choice (B), on the other hand, could actually be used against the author's argument. The reporter who wrote the story would surely have a sufficient understanding of his/her own story. If (B) is true, then a sufficient understanding of the story is a necessary condition for being able to write a clever headline. The reporter would meet this condition, so (B) suggests that the reporter would be qualified to write a clever headline.

At best, choice (B) does not affect the argument (surely the editors could find other people, besides the reporters, with sufficient understanding of the story). But (B) does not strengthen the argument. (E) is a better choice.

I hope that helps!
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Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Sep 2018, 12:06
Quote:
Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines for their own stories. The reason for this is that, while the headlines that reporters themselves write are often clever, what typically makes them clever is that they allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story itself.
Conclusion: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines for their own stories.
Support: The reason for this is that, while the headlines that reporters themselves write are often clever, what typically makes them clever is that they allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story
So may be it doesn't sound clever to the people who read it.
Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument?

Quote:
(A) The reporter who writes a story is usually better placed than the reporters' editor is to judge what the story's most newsworthy features are.
This is exactly opposite to what the argument suggests. Hence it goes out.
Quote:
(B) To write a headline that is clever, a person must have sufficient understanding of the story that the headline accompanies.
The reporter who owns the story is definitely has the understanding of the story, but the conclusion of the argument refrains them from writing the headline of their own story.
Quote:
(C) Most reporters rarely bother to find out how other reporters have written stories and headlines about the same events that they themselves have covered.
Out of scope. Other reporters aren't the matter of concern here in this argument.
Quote:
(D) For virtually any story that a reporter writes, there are at least a few people who know more about the story's subject matter than does the reporter.

Certainly there would be such people. But firstly thy haven't been discussed by the argument. Secondly, we don't know what information would those people allude to if they would write the headlines. If they would be able to make clever headlines. Insufficient. Goes Out.
Quote:
(E) The kind of headlines that newspaper editors want are those that anyone who has read a reporter's story in its entirety will recognize as clever.

This hits the bulls eye. They newspaper editors want those kind of headline that is considered clever by someone who has read the story in its entirety. This strengthen the claim that Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines for their own stories.
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Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Sep 2018, 12:07
Quote:
Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines for their own stories. The reason for this is that, while the headlines that reporters themselves write are often clever, what typically makes them clever is that they allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story itself.
Conclusion: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines for their own stories.
Support: The reason for this is that, while the headlines that reporters themselves write are often clever, what typically makes them clever is that they allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story
So may be it doesn't sound clever to the people who read it.
Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument?

Quote:
(A) The reporter who writes a story is usually better placed than the reporters' editor is to judge what the story's most newsworthy features are.
This is exactly opposite to what the argument suggests. Hence it goes out.
Quote:
(B) To write a headline that is clever, a person must have sufficient understanding of the story that the headline accompanies.
The reporter who owns the story is definitely has the understanding of the story, but the conclusion of the argument refrains them from writing the headline of their own story.
Quote:
(C) Most reporters rarely bother to find out how other reporters have written stories and headlines about the same events that they themselves have covered.
Out of scope. Other reporters aren't the matter of concern here in this argument.
Quote:
(D) For virtually any story that a reporter writes, there are at least a few people who know more about the story's subject matter than does the reporter.
Certainly there would be such people. But firstly thy haven't been discussed by the argument. Secondly, we don't know what information would those people allude to if they would write the headlines. If they would be able to make clever headlines. Insufficient. Goes Out.
Quote:
(E) The kind of headlines that newspaper editors want are those that anyone who has read a reporter's story in its entirety will recognize as clever.

This hits the bulls eye. They newspaper editors want those kind of headline that is considered clever by someone who has read the story in its entirety. This strengthen the claim that Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines for their own stories as they allude to little known information.
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Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines &nbs [#permalink] 07 Sep 2018, 12:07

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