GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 14 Oct 2019, 14:29

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Intern
Intern
User avatar
B
Joined: 14 Apr 2017
Posts: 4
Location: Indonesia
GMAT 1: 680 Q48 V35
GPA: 4
WE: General Management (Internet and New Media)
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Mar 2018, 12:13
(A) The reporter who writes a story is usually better placed than the reporters' editor is to judge what the story's most newsworthy features are.
Weakens

(B) To write a headline that is clever, a person must have sufficient understanding of the story that the headline accompanies.
Does not add anything relevant to the question

(C) Most reporters rarely bother to find out how other reporters have written stories and headlines about the same events that they themselves have covered.
Out of context

(D) For virtually any story that a reporter writes, there are at least a few people who know more about the story's subject matter than does the reporter.
Out of context

(E) The kind of headlines that newspaper editors want are those that anyone who has read a reporter's story in its entirety will recognize as clever.
Correct. The one who should judge the headline are the readers.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 19 Feb 2017
Posts: 42
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Mar 2018, 00:14
Conclusion: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines for their own stories.

Premise: The reason for this is that, while the headlines that reporters themselves write are often clever, what typically makes them clever is that they allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story itself.

First let me explain why I rejected E:
E says "The kind of headlines that newspaper editors want are those that anyone who has read a reporter's story in its entirety will recognize as clever". From the argument we can see that the headlines are clever when "they allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story itself." So, this option means that the readers of the newspaper will be able to understand that the reporter has little information about the story and hence consider the headline to be "clever" and this is what the editor wants. This clearly weakens the argument because the editors would like to have headlines which do not "allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story itself.". This in a way weakens the argument.


I chose B and here's why:
Choice B says "To write a headline that is clever, a person must have sufficient understanding of the story that the headline accompanies.". Now we can clearly take this as an assumption to arrive at the conclusion. Though, again "clever" has been used here as well, it is compensated by the second part of the choice "a person must have sufficient understanding of the story that the headline accompanies". I believed that this is a better choice.

Please explain where am I going wrong
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
D
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2856
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Mar 2018, 22:57
aviejay wrote:
Conclusion: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines for their own stories.

Premise: The reason for this is that, while the headlines that reporters themselves write are often clever, what typically makes them clever is that they allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story itself.

First let me explain why I rejected E:
E says "The kind of headlines that newspaper editors want are those that anyone who has read a reporter's story in its entirety will recognize as clever". From the argument we can see that the headlines are clever when "they allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story itself." So, this option means that the readers of the newspaper will be able to understand that the reporter has little information about the story and hence consider the headline to be "clever" and this is what the editor wants. This clearly weakens the argument because the editors would like to have headlines which do not "allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story itself.". This in a way weakens the argument.


I chose B and here's why:
Choice B says "To write a headline that is clever, a person must have sufficient understanding of the story that the headline accompanies.". Now we can clearly take this as an assumption to arrive at the conclusion. Though, again "clever" has been used here as well, it is compensated by the second part of the choice "a person must have sufficient understanding of the story that the headline accompanies". I believed that this is a better choice.

Please explain where am I going wrong

aviejay, thank you for explaining your thought process! I think I see where you went wrong...

As stated in an earlier post, the headlines written by reporters are only clever because they refer to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter. If that information is little-known AND if the reporter does not mention that information in the story, then we can infer that most readers will not know that same information. Since the readers do not know that information, they will not be able to appreciate the clever headlines.

In other words, according to the author, the problem with headlines written by reporters is that most people, even after reading the story, will NOT be able to appreciate the clever headlines. But what if editors are okay with that? Maybe the editors prefer headlines whose cleverness is only appreciated by a small portion of readers. If that were the case, then the editors SHOULD allow reporters to write their own headlines.

Choice (E) assures us that this is not the case. Editors want headlines whose cleverness will be appreciated by ANYONE who has read the entire story. The cleverness of headlines written by reporters is only appreciated by a small portion of readers. So, if (E) is true, then editors would NOT want headlines to be written by the reporters. Thus, (E) strengthens the argument.

Choice (B), on the other hand, could actually be used against the author's argument. The reporter who wrote the story would surely have a sufficient understanding of his/her own story. If (B) is true, then a sufficient understanding of the story is a necessary condition for being able to write a clever headline. The reporter would meet this condition, so (B) suggests that the reporter would be qualified to write a clever headline.

At best, choice (B) does not affect the argument (surely the editors could find other people, besides the reporters, with sufficient understanding of the story). But (B) does not strengthen the argument. (E) is a better choice.

I hope that helps!
_________________
GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (we're hiring!) | GMAT Club Verbal Expert | Instagram | Blog | Bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal: RC | CR | SC

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars: Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC articles & resources: How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

RC, CR, and other articles & resources: All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations: All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply? Hit the request verbal experts' reply button; be specific about your question, and tag @GMATNinja. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 14 Jul 2014
Posts: 86
Location: India
Concentration: Social Entrepreneurship, Strategy
GMAT 1: 620 Q41 V34
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Sep 2018, 12:07
Quote:
Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines for their own stories. The reason for this is that, while the headlines that reporters themselves write are often clever, what typically makes them clever is that they allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story itself.
Conclusion: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines for their own stories.
Support: The reason for this is that, while the headlines that reporters themselves write are often clever, what typically makes them clever is that they allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story
So may be it doesn't sound clever to the people who read it.
Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument?

Quote:
(A) The reporter who writes a story is usually better placed than the reporters' editor is to judge what the story's most newsworthy features are.
This is exactly opposite to what the argument suggests. Hence it goes out.
Quote:
(B) To write a headline that is clever, a person must have sufficient understanding of the story that the headline accompanies.
The reporter who owns the story is definitely has the understanding of the story, but the conclusion of the argument refrains them from writing the headline of their own story.
Quote:
(C) Most reporters rarely bother to find out how other reporters have written stories and headlines about the same events that they themselves have covered.
Out of scope. Other reporters aren't the matter of concern here in this argument.
Quote:
(D) For virtually any story that a reporter writes, there are at least a few people who know more about the story's subject matter than does the reporter.
Certainly there would be such people. But firstly thy haven't been discussed by the argument. Secondly, we don't know what information would those people allude to if they would write the headlines. If they would be able to make clever headlines. Insufficient. Goes Out.
Quote:
(E) The kind of headlines that newspaper editors want are those that anyone who has read a reporter's story in its entirety will recognize as clever.

This hits the bulls eye. They newspaper editors want those kind of headline that is considered clever by someone who has read the story in its entirety. This strengthen the claim that Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines for their own stories as they allude to little known information.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 24 Sep 2018
Posts: 99
Location: India
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Jun 2019, 07:29
Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines for their own stories. The reason for this is that, while the headlines that reporters themselves write are often clever, what typically makes them clever is that they allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story itself.

Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument?


(A) The reporter who writes a story is usually better placed than the reporters' editor is to judge what the story's most newsworthy features are.

(B) To write a headline that is clever, a person must have sufficient understanding of the story that the headline accompanies.

(C) Most reporters rarely bother to find out how other reporters have written stories and headlines about the same events that they themselves have covered.

(D) For virtually any story that a reporter writes, there are at least a few people who know more about the story's subject matter than does the reporter.

(E) The kind of headlines that newspaper editors want are those that anyone who has read a reporter's story in its entirety will recognize as clever.

After reading the question and answer we can note one thing for sure:

"REPORTERS SHOULD NOT WRITE HEADLINES AS THEY CLEVERLY PUT THE HITS WITHOUT HAVING CLEAR PICTURE OF ARTICLE"

So lets look at the answer options:

(A) The reporter who writes a story is usually better placed than the reporters' editor is to judge what the story's most newsworthy features are.

So this answer option giving more importance to the reporter but we have to strengthen the argument for that we will have to prove that the editor should write the headline: So this is a wrong

(B) To write a headline that is clever, a person must have sufficient understanding of the story that the headline accompanies.

In our question it mention that the reporters are giving headlines cleverly as they are only giving hits to the article without any complete knowledge . So this answer option telling us the opposite. So this is wrong

(C) Most reporters rarely bother to find out how other reporters have written stories and headlines about the same events that they themselves have covered.

this one is out of context. We are not comparing with other writers . So this is wrong

(D) For virtually any story that a reporter writes, there are at least a few people who know more about the story's subject matter than does the reporter.

Ok this may be true but what if other people know. this is not strengthen our argument that editors should write the headline
So this is also Wrong

(E) The kind of headlines that newspaper editors want are those that anyone who has read a reporter's story in its entirety will recognize as clever.

Last and final option. So obviously this is the correct one. here in the 1st part you will see "The kind of headlines that newspaper editors want are those" this is the single option which talk about what if editors want to write headline.

So this is the correct one.

To be frank I choose the elimination process and found one only opt E is relevant others are either out of scope or not relevant .

Please give one kudos if you like the explanation.

Thanks,
Bijay
_________________
Thanks,
Bijaya

If this post is helpful for you please press the kudos button
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 29 Jul 2017
Posts: 41
Location: India
Concentration: Operations, Finance
Schools: ISB '21 (II)
GMAT 1: 720 Q49 V39
GPA: 3.94
WE: Design (Manufacturing)
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Jun 2019, 04:53
GMATNinja wrote:
sidagar wrote:
here is my analysis

conclusion : editors should not allow reporters to write headlines

premise:even though headlines reporters write are clever , what typically makes them clever - lost as could not understand the meaning

would appreciate your analysis.Also is this from official guide 2018

The headlines that reporters themselves write are often clever. However, the headlines are only clever because they refer to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter. If that information is little-known AND if the reporter does not mention that information in the story, then we can infer that most readers will not know that information and thus will not appreciate the clever headlines.

Imagine that a physicist were to give a lecture to a classroom of students at a university. During the lecture, the physicist makes several jokes that would only be funny to someone working in the physicist's laboratory. Sure, the jokes might be funny, but none of the students would understand or appreciate the humor.

Similarly, the headlines written by the reporters are often clever, but most of the readers cannot understand or appreciate why they are clever even after reading the story. In other words, unless you happen to know the "little-known information" that the reporter knows, you will not recognize the headline as clever, even after reading the entire story.

Thus, if newspapers editors prefer headlines that can be recognized as clever by anyone who has read the story in its entirety (choice (E)), then newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines for their own stories.


Thanks for the wonderful explanation.

Could you explain to me how I can determine the logical antecedent of 'them' in "what typically makes them clever"?
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
D
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2856
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jul 2019, 06:53
rocky03 wrote:
Thanks for the wonderful explanation.

Could you explain to me how I can determine the logical antecedent of 'them' in "what typically makes them clever"?

Quote:
... while the headlines that reporters themselves write are often clever, what typically makes them clever is...

Stripping out some of the modifiers, we have, "...while the headlines are often clever, what makes them clever..."

We are explicitly told that the headlines are the things that are clever. So let's look at the two options:

    1) "...while the headlines are often clever, what makes the headlines -- something JUST described as clever -- clever..."
    2) "...while the headlines are often clever, what makes the reporters -- something that has NOT been described as clever -- clever..."

The antecedent has to be the things that are clever, since the sentence goes on to tell us WHY those things are clever (i.e. what MAKES those things clever). Sure, it's possible that the reporters could also be described as clever -- after all, they write clever headlines, right? But the sentence specifically describes the headlines themselves, not the reporters, as clever.

So if the rest of the sentence is going to tell us why something is clever, that something should be the thing that has already been described as clever: the headlines.

I hope that helps!
_________________
GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (we're hiring!) | GMAT Club Verbal Expert | Instagram | Blog | Bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal: RC | CR | SC

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars: Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC articles & resources: How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

RC, CR, and other articles & resources: All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations: All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply? Hit the request verbal experts' reply button; be specific about your question, and tag @GMATNinja. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 28 Jan 2017
Posts: 37
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 Aug 2019, 06:52
GMATNinja wrote:
jwang1191 wrote:
I narrowed this question down to B and E and ended up picking B over E

I negated B -> if one did not need a sufficient understanding of the story to write a clever headline, then anyone (including editors) could write a clever headline. This would weaken the conclusion if true. Therefore, the opposite would strengthen the conclusion. Further, the premise states that the clever headlines "allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter." Therefore, if one did not have knowledge of the story, how would one be able to write a clever headline?

I saw several people mention B as a weakener, not a strengthener. Can anyone care to elaborate further? Thanks

First of all, just because negating a statement makes it a weakener, does not necessarily make that statement a strengthener. Regardless, the conclusion here is that "newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines for their own stories". The reason is NOT that reporters write clever headlines. The reason is that very few readers would be able to appreciate and understand those headlines, so the cleverness of the reporters' headlines would be wasted.

Saying that anyone can write clever headlines does not weaken the conclusion. If anything, it suggests that editors do not have to rely on the reporters themselves to write clever headlines. Choice (B) could potentially be seen as a weakener - you could argue that a reporter is more likely to have a sufficient understanding of the story and thus perhaps more capable of writing a clever headline. But that logic only really works if we assume that the headlines SHOULD be clever. If the headlines don't have to be clever, then such a "sufficient" understanding of the story might not be necessary to write an acceptable headline.

Refer to this post for an explanation of the correct answer.

I hope that helps!


Dear GMATNinja VeritasKarishma

I have one question on this sentence that GMATNinja wrote:

"First of all, just because negating a statement makes it a weakener, does not necessarily make that statement a strengthener."

If the negation of a statement acts as a weakener, then I think that statement is probably the assumption which definitely strengthens the conclusion.

So I am confused.

Can you give me some official strengthening questions, in which the negated incorrect options are weakener?

Thank you in advance!
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines   [#permalink] 31 Aug 2019, 06:52

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 28 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne