GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 14 Aug 2018, 06:45

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 06 Jul 2016
Posts: 415
Location: Singapore
Concentration: Strategy, Finance
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Jul 2017, 03:57
1
sidagar wrote:
still not clear with the premise why reporter not be allowed to write headlines.Can someone clarify clearly what premise is saying.Could not understand the contrast in premise.Also how option E strenthens.I wonder word " clever" makes me lost i the argument and answer choice


Hi Sidagar,
Can you share your understanding of the argument so that one of us can see what you understand, and help you better ?

Posted from my mobile device
_________________

Put in the work, and that dream score is yours!

Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Status: GMAT...one last time for good!!
Joined: 10 Jul 2012
Posts: 67
Location: India
Concentration: General Management
GMAT 1: 660 Q47 V34
GPA: 3.5
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Jul 2017, 08:41
Hi Sidagar,

This is how I understood the argument.

Say an article on GMAT (published before 11th July) in a newspaper.

1) Headline: Will the new GMAT inflate scores?
Content: No new details but say statistics of scores in last 5 years

Clever headline without revealing anything much in the article

Option (E) The kind of headlines that newspaper editors want are those that anyone who has read a reporter's story in its entirety will recognize as clever.

Headline: Will the new GMAT inflate scores?
Content: Details on the options to choose sections.

Hope it helps!



sidagar wrote:
here is my analysis

conclusion : editors should not allow reporters to write headlines

premise:even though headlines reporters write are clever , what typically makes them clever - lost as could not understand the meaning

would appreciate your analysis.Also is this from official guide 2018

_________________

Kudos for a correct solution :)

Director
Director
User avatar
P
Joined: 18 Aug 2016
Posts: 631
Concentration: Strategy, Technology
GMAT 1: 630 Q47 V29
GMAT 2: 740 Q51 V38
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Sep 2017, 23:05
GMATNinja wrote:
sidagar wrote:
here is my analysis

conclusion : editors should not allow reporters to write headlines

premise:even though headlines reporters write are clever , what typically makes them clever - lost as could not understand the meaning

would appreciate your analysis.Also is this from official guide 2018

The headlines that reporters themselves write are often clever. However, the headlines are only clever because they refer to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter. If that information is little-known AND if the reporter does not mention that information in the story, then we can infer that most readers will not know that information and thus will not appreciate the clever headlines.

Imagine that a physicist were to give a lecture to a classroom of students at a university. During the lecture, the physicist makes several jokes that would only be funny to someone working in the physicist's laboratory. Sure, the jokes might be funny, but none of the students would understand or appreciate the humor.

Similarly, the headlines written by the reporters are often clever, but most of the readers cannot understand or appreciate why they are clever even after reading the story. In other words, unless you happen to know the "little-known information" that the reporter knows, you will not recognize the headline as clever, even after reading the entire story.

Thus, if newspapers editors prefer headlines that can be recognized as clever by anyone who has read the story in its entirety (choice (E)), then newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines for their own stories.


GMATNinja
Understood why E is more appropriate than other options...but not able to reject option D.. can you throw some light...
_________________

We must try to achieve the best within us


Thanks
Luckisnoexcuse

Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 27 Mar 2014
Posts: 101
Schools: ISB '19, IIMA , IIMB
GMAT 1: 660 Q49 V30
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Sep 2017, 18:39
What makes headlines written by reporters clever is that they allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story itself.

In option E focus on the word 'entirety' .

Editors wants anyone who has read the story in full to recognize headlines as clever.

but headlines written by reporters often have missed information in the story.so,for people who read the story in full might not be able to relate the headline and the story.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 16 Feb 2017
Posts: 25
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Sep 2017, 10:46
sidagar wrote:
still not clear with the premise why reporter not be allowed to write headlines.Can someone clarify clearly what premise is saying.Could not understand the contrast in premise.Also how option E strenthens.I wonder word " clever" makes me lost i the argument and answer choice


sidagar
Author here wants to say that though the reporters think they are writing "clever" headlines, those are actually not 'quite clever' as they miss out on critical info pieces.
Option E further re-affirms this need of Editors that the headlines should be "clever".

Hence, as per E, reporters should not be allowed to write headlines.

Hope this makes sense and helps! :)
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 1896
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Sep 2017, 08:49
Luckisnoexcuse wrote:
GMATNinja
Understood why E is more appropriate than other options...but not able to reject option D.. can you throw some light...

Quote:
(D) For virtually any story that a reporter writes, there are at least a few people who know more about the story's subject matter than does the reporter.

Choice (D) does not provide any information suggesting that reporters should not be allowed to write headlines for their own stories, so it does not directly support the conclusion. Furthermore, Choice (D) does not tell us anything about the cleverness of reporters' headlines and thus does not strengthen the argument used in the passage.

Since choice (D) does not support the conclusion or the evidence cited in the passage, it can be eliminated.
_________________

GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | GMAT blog | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja and @GMATNinjaTwo in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 15 Aug 2015
Posts: 65
Location: India
Schools: LBS '18, ISB '19
GMAT 1: 610 Q48 V26
GPA: 3.21
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Sep 2017, 10:02
okay this is my reasoning .
Let's say a reporter writes an article that discusses mobile phones.
a clever title may be "" Is your mobile a smartphone or a superphone?
Now, you have bought a mid range full feature packed mobile such as MI or one-plus recently.
You know your phone has most of the features that are present in premium level phones; therefore,
you are intrigued by the heading .Clearly , since your phone compares to premium category phones
You just dive in to read a bit about your phone(( assuming that since my phone was in other good articles
, this article will add a bit to my knowledge)).
The embarrassment arrives , when the article discussed a few premium category phones maybe just
two of them such as Iphone or Samsung note series. The whole world knows they are full feature packed
phones and will be the first to be termed as superphone . Therefore , why choose this kind of headline.Clearly,
a WASTE OF TIME. The whole headline defeats its purpose .
Now here comes the role of statement E. If the article had a heading that made you read the story ,
and in the end you felt as you didn't waste your time reading the article as it truly fulfilled your inquisition
then its good and fair for all. Hence , you find the story clever and the title appropriate.
P.S. why is the title """ IS YOUR PHONE A SMARTPHONE OR SUPERPHONE """ clever
, because it clearly intends to encompass a larger audience.
HOW THE TITLE ALLUDES TO LESS KNOWLEDGE OF REPORTER , because the reporter clearly wanted to talk
to talk about premium phones not most of the phones.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 30 Mar 2017
Posts: 3
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Oct 2017, 15:08
I narrowed this question down to B and E and ended up picking B over E

I negated B -> if one did not need a sufficient understanding of the story to write a clever headline, then anyone (including editors) could write a clever headline. This would weaken the conclusion if true. Therefore, the opposite would strengthen the conclusion. Further, the premise states that the clever headlines "allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter." Therefore, if one did not have knowledge of the story, how would one be able to write a clever headline?

I saw several people mention B as a weakener, not a strengthener. Can anyone care to elaborate further? Thanks
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 1896
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Oct 2017, 21:11
jwang1191 wrote:
I narrowed this question down to B and E and ended up picking B over E

I negated B -> if one did not need a sufficient understanding of the story to write a clever headline, then anyone (including editors) could write a clever headline. This would weaken the conclusion if true. Therefore, the opposite would strengthen the conclusion. Further, the premise states that the clever headlines "allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter." Therefore, if one did not have knowledge of the story, how would one be able to write a clever headline?

I saw several people mention B as a weakener, not a strengthener. Can anyone care to elaborate further? Thanks

First of all, just because negating a statement makes it a weakener, does not necessarily make that statement a strengthener. Regardless, the conclusion here is that "newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines for their own stories". The reason is NOT that reporters write clever headlines. The reason is that very few readers would be able to appreciate and understand those headlines, so the cleverness of the reporters' headlines would be wasted.

Saying that anyone can write clever headlines does not weaken the conclusion. If anything, it suggests that editors do not have to rely on the reporters themselves to write clever headlines. Choice (B) could potentially be seen as a weakener - you could argue that a reporter is more likely to have a sufficient understanding of the story and thus perhaps more capable of writing a clever headline. But that logic only really works if we assume that the headlines SHOULD be clever. If the headlines don't have to be clever, then such a "sufficient" understanding of the story might not be necessary to write an acceptable headline.

Refer to this post for an explanation of the correct answer.

I hope that helps!
_________________

GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | GMAT blog | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja and @GMATNinjaTwo in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 04 Dec 2016
Posts: 29
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Oct 2017, 02:00
ganand wrote:
Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines for their own stories. The reason for this is that, while the headlines that reporters themselves write are often clever, what typically makes them clever is that they allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story itself.


Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument?

(A) The reporter who writes a story is usually better placed than the reporters' editor is to judge what the story's most newsworthy features are.

(B) To write a headline that is clever, a person must have sufficient understanding of the story that the headline accompanies.

(C) Most reporters rarely bother to find out how other reporters have written stories and headlines about the same events that they themselves have covered.

(D) For virtually any story that a reporter writes, there are at least a few people who know more about the story's subject matter than does the reporter.

(E) The kind of headlines that newspaper editors want are those that anyone who has read a reporter's story in its entirety will recognize as clever.


Hi,
Can anyone break this argument in simpler terms and then discuss the options in detail.

Regards
Shoum
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 19 Oct 2014
Posts: 44
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, Entrepreneurship
GMAT 1: 600 Q48 V25
GMAT 2: 670 Q49 V31
GPA: 3.26
WE: Operations (Manufacturing)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Oct 2017, 02:53
GMATNinja wrote:
If that information is little-known AND if the reporter does not mention that information in the story, then we can infer that most readers will not know that information and thus will not appreciate the clever headlines.


How will the most readers not appreciate if the reporters do mention 'little known information'as a part of headlines and not mention in the story ?

What you wrote above makes me feel as you it is contrary to the information in stimulus(in quotes below). Please help me understand.

"what typically makes them clever is that they allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story itself."
_________________

"Don't be satisfied with stories, how things have gone with others. Unfold your own myth."-Rumi

Consider hitting on kudos button for a sec, if this post helps you.

GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 1896
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Oct 2017, 18:06
gocoder wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
If that information is little-known AND if the reporter does not mention that information in the story, then we can infer that most readers will not know that information and thus will not appreciate the clever headlines.


How will the most readers not appreciate if the reporters do mention 'little known information'as a part of headlines and not mention in the story ?

What you wrote above makes me feel as you it is contrary to the information in stimulus(in quotes below). Please help me understand.

"what typically makes them clever is that they allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story itself."

Just because the headlines ALLUDE to the little known information does not mean that most readers will understand the headline.

Imagine that a physicist were to give a televised speech and make several clever jokes about string theory. In order to get the jokes, you have to understand string theory. However, most of the viewers do NOT understand string theory. So even though the jokes might be clever, the only people who get the jokes are the very few people who understand string theory. Just because the physicist ALLUDES to string theory in the speech does not mean that most people will suddenly understand string theory or the joke. And if the physicist never explains the relevant theory in the speech, then most people will listen to the speech without understanding any of the jokes.

Similarly, the headlines written by the reporters are often clever, but most of the readers cannot understand or appreciate why they are clever even after reading the story. They didn't know the necessary information before reading, and they don't know it after reading. In other words, unless you happen to already know the "little-known information" that the reporter knows, you will not recognize the headline as clever, even after reading the entire story.

I hope that helps!
_________________

GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | GMAT blog | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja and @GMATNinjaTwo in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

GMAT Tutor
User avatar
B
Joined: 15 Nov 2013
Posts: 65
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Nov 2017, 00:34
5
I received a private message about this thread.

First — as always — you should go to the problem statement: You need to strengthen an argument.

So, we need to...
...determine the point of the "argument";
...express the argument in a more accessible form ("explain to a 10-year-old");
...determine what a correct answer should do.

Find the point of the argument:
This is straightforward, since the argument consists of only two statements — the second of which is explicitly labeled as "the reason for" the first.
Accordingly, the FIRST statement must be the argument's point (conclusion).

Simplify the argument / "Explain to a 10-year-old":
"When reporters write headlines, they use stuff that they know — but that random readers won't know. (This stuff makes the headlines "clever" — but, most people won't KNOW that they are "clever" headlines, because they won't have the requisite knowledge!)
Therefore...
Reporters shouldn't be allowed to write headlines for their own stories."

Define a correct answer:
Because of the simplicity of this argument, there really isn't much that a correct answer could do — it just has to beef up the connection between the single stated reason and the conclusion.
A CORRECT ANSWER needs to SOLIDIFY THE CONNECTION between
"MOST PEOPLE WON'T UNDERSTAND headlines written by reporters"
and
"Headlines SHOULDN'T BE WRITTEN by reporters".


Use this standard to "interview" the answer choices:

Quote:
(A) The reporter who writes a story is usually better placed than the reporters' editor is to judge what the story's most newsworthy features are.

• If "newsworthy features" are related to HEADLINES... then this choice goes the WRONG WAY. (In that case, this choice would give a consideration IN FAVOR OF letting reporters write headlines.)
• If "newsworthy features" are NOT related to headlines... then this choice is irrelevant.

Bad either way.

(NO answer choice will EVER be a toss-up between CORRECT and irrelevant!)

Quote:
(B) To write a headline that is clever, a person must have sufficient understanding of the story that the headline accompanies.


This choice is irrelevant, because the argument already acknowledges that reporters' headlines ARE clever.
The issue is not that the headlines AREN'T clever; the issue is that random readers won't RECOGNIZE that they are clever.

Quote:
(C) Most reporters rarely bother to find out how other reporters have written stories and headlines about the same events that they themselves have covered.


This choice does not speak to the actual issue — i.e., that reporters tend to use obscure information in crafting headlines — and is thus irrelevant.

Quote:
(D) For virtually any story that a reporter writes, there are at least a few people who know more about the story's subject matter than does the reporter.


This choice is almost certainly true, just by common sense. (Go to a newspaper site and click on any random article. Obviously, there will be people in the world who have dedicated their lives and careers to becoming experts on the exact thing that is the topic of the article... these people will clearly know more about that thing than will the reporter.)

...But this choice is irrelevant, because there is no reason to think that these world-class experts would be available to write headlines. Therefore, we don't care whether they exist.

(Furthermore — The reporters' PROBLEM is already that they have TOO MUCH "little-known" knowledge! So, even in the incredibly farfetched scenario in which these experts could be tapped to write headlines... THEIR headlines would have the same problem as the reporters' headlines, only even WORSE!)

Quote:
(E) The kind of headlines that newspaper editors want are those that anyone who has read a reporter's story in its entirety will recognize as clever.


If this statement is true, then the typical reporter's headline — as described — will NOT be the kind of headline that newspaper editors want, since only readers who are privy to the "little-known information" will recognize the reporter's headline as clever.
This statement provides strong additional support for the notion that editors should not allow reporters to write headlines for their stories.
CORRECT ANSWER
_________________

Please visit my corners of the web:
http://www.RonPurewal.com
http://www.facebook.com/RonPurewalGMAT
__

Pueden hacerle preguntas a Ron en castellano
Potete fare domande a Ron in italiano
On peut poser des questions à Ron en français
Voit esittää kysymyksiä Ron:lle myös suomeksi
__

Un bon vêtement, c'est un passeport pour le bonheur.
—Yves Saint-Laurent

Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 11 Jun 2017
Posts: 80
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Nov 2017, 17:43
ganand wrote:
Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines for their own stories. The reason for this is that, while the headlines that reporters themselves write are often clever, what typically makes them clever is that they allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story itself.


Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument?

(A) The reporter who writes a story is usually better placed than the reporters' editor is to judge what the story's most newsworthy features are.

(B) To write a headline that is clever, a person must have sufficient understanding of the story that the headline accompanies.

(C) Most reporters rarely bother to find out how other reporters have written stories and headlines about the same events that they themselves have covered.

(D) For virtually any story that a reporter writes, there are at least a few people who know more about the story's subject matter than does the reporter.

(E) The kind of headlines that newspaper editors want are those that anyone who has read a reporter's story in its entirety will recognize as clever.



It is E.
The argument states that the headlines that reporters themselves write are clever because they resort to little known information which does not appear explicitly in the story itself. The argument concludes by stating that newspaper editors should not allow this. Why should they not allow this ? Because a headline not representing the story is not something they want. What do they want ? Option E: they want those that anyone who has read the story completely can identify with , hence since their belief or requirement is contradictory to what newspaper reporters do..they should not allow it. Strengthens the conclusion.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 05 Jun 2017
Posts: 7
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Nov 2017, 18:40
E strengthens the give argument by giving clarity of the news to the people reading it, along with the whole news

Sent from my Redmi Note 3 using GMAT Club Forum mobile app
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 27 Oct 2017
Posts: 7
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Nov 2017, 12:22
dabhishek87 wrote:
adityapareshshah wrote:
Did not quiet understand the question and hence the answer too.

Can somebody please explain.


As per CR, reporters should not write their own headlines.
Why? Because they know intricate details that are not even mentioned in article

Answer E strengthens it by adding additional reason to support that reporters should not write their own headlines.



Answer E seems to be a total 180 degrees. It says that editors prefer such headlines ( the ones given by reporters). Correct me if I am wrong.
Director
Director
User avatar
P
Joined: 09 Mar 2017
Posts: 513
Location: India
Concentration: Marketing, Organizational Behavior
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Dec 2017, 03:49
arvind910619 wrote:
Hi ,
Please provide official explanation .
My answer is wrong as per the OA given.
On second reading i got the answer.
The argument talks about headlines which can be understood by all who have read the story .
If only reporters write the headlines then , people who will read the headlines will not consider them clever or even worse will not be able to deduce them from the story.
So editors should write the headlines

Is my reasoning correct ?


This reasoning is the most correct in my opinion.

For example: A reporter covered a story where a very precious diamond of national heritage was stolen from International museum in United States. Being a reporter, he overheard the FBI agents at the crime scene talking that the diamond was stolen by N.Korea. Now imagine that the reporter writes the headline as "Can a diamond cause World War 3?" He already has raised curiosity in reader's mind with such a headline but unfortunately the story that he covered was published accurately and thus, had no mention of any such statement about world war.
Would not this allusion at the headline disappoint the readers after they have had read the entire story? As a result, the reputation of the newspaper company will be compromised. Hence the newspaper editors would want the kind of headlines that is appreciated or probably called as clever by the readers after they have had read the story.
In this case, headlines that the editors would want can probably be - "States loses a cultural heritage".
_________________

------------------------------
"Trust the timing of your life"
Hit Kudus if this has helped you get closer to your goal, and also to assist others save time. Tq :)

Intern
Intern
User avatar
B
Joined: 14 Apr 2017
Posts: 4
Location: Indonesia
GMAT 1: 680 Q48 V35
GPA: 4
WE: General Management (Internet and New Media)
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Mar 2018, 12:13
(A) The reporter who writes a story is usually better placed than the reporters' editor is to judge what the story's most newsworthy features are.
Weakens

(B) To write a headline that is clever, a person must have sufficient understanding of the story that the headline accompanies.
Does not add anything relevant to the question

(C) Most reporters rarely bother to find out how other reporters have written stories and headlines about the same events that they themselves have covered.
Out of context

(D) For virtually any story that a reporter writes, there are at least a few people who know more about the story's subject matter than does the reporter.
Out of context

(E) The kind of headlines that newspaper editors want are those that anyone who has read a reporter's story in its entirety will recognize as clever.
Correct. The one who should judge the headline are the readers.
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 19 Feb 2017
Posts: 51
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Mar 2018, 00:14
Conclusion: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines for their own stories.

Premise: The reason for this is that, while the headlines that reporters themselves write are often clever, what typically makes them clever is that they allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story itself.

First let me explain why I rejected E:
E says "The kind of headlines that newspaper editors want are those that anyone who has read a reporter's story in its entirety will recognize as clever". From the argument we can see that the headlines are clever when "they allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story itself." So, this option means that the readers of the newspaper will be able to understand that the reporter has little information about the story and hence consider the headline to be "clever" and this is what the editor wants. This clearly weakens the argument because the editors would like to have headlines which do not "allude to little-known information that is familiar to the reporter but that never appears explicitly in the story itself.". This in a way weakens the argument.


I chose B and here's why:
Choice B says "To write a headline that is clever, a person must have sufficient understanding of the story that the headline accompanies.". Now we can clearly take this as an assumption to arrive at the conclusion. Though, again "clever" has been used here as well, it is compensated by the second part of the choice "a person must have sufficient understanding of the story that the headline accompanies". I believed that this is a better choice.

Please explain where am I going wrong
Re: Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines &nbs [#permalink] 08 Mar 2018, 00:14

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3    Next  [ 41 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Newspaper editors should not allow reporters to write the headlines

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Events & Promotions

PREV
NEXT


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.