GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 17 Nov 2018, 10:02

Gmatbusters' Weekly Quant Quiz

Join here 


Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in November
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
28293031123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
2526272829301
Open Detailed Calendar
  • FREE Quant Workshop by e-GMAT!

     November 18, 2018

     November 18, 2018

     07:00 AM PST

     09:00 AM PST

    Get personalized insights on how to achieve your Target Quant Score. November 18th, 7 AM PST
  • How to QUICKLY Solve GMAT Questions - GMAT Club Chat

     November 20, 2018

     November 20, 2018

     09:00 AM PST

     10:00 AM PST

    The reward for signing up with the registration form and attending the chat is: 6 free examPAL quizzes to practice your new skills after the chat.

Recipe testers should not simply blame the author

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Intern
Intern
User avatar
S
Joined: 25 Jul 2017
Posts: 36
Location: India
GMAT 1: 570 Q48 V20
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
GMAT ToolKit User
Recipe testers should not simply blame the author  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jul 2018, 10:59
1
8
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  95% (hard)

Question Stats:

30% (01:09) correct 70% (01:17) wrong based on 461 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Recipe testers should not simply blame the author of a recipe when the recipe does not work but find out why the recipe was unsuccessful by studying ingredients, combinations, and temperatures. Only through this sort of exhaustive analysis can the recipes be corrected and made palatable.

Which of the following is a necessary assumption in the argument above?

A. The author of a recipe is not the cause of the recipe's failure.
B. The author of a recipe should be the one who tests the recipe.
C. More thorough testing of recipes will always create recipes that are more palatable.
D. Recipe testers should contribute to the eventual palatability of the recipes they test.
E. Most recipes are unpalatable due to the combinations of their ingredients.

_________________

Please hit kudos, if you like this post
The fact that you aren't where you want to be, should be enough motivation.

ISB, NUS, NTU Moderator
User avatar
G
Joined: 11 Aug 2016
Posts: 312
Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: Recipe testers should not simply blame the author  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jul 2018, 11:34
pun91 wrote:
Recipe testers should not simply blame the author of a recipe when the recipe does not work but find out why the recipe was unsuccessful by studying ingredients, combinations, and temperatures. Only through this sort of exhaustive analysis can the recipes be corrected and made palatable.

Which of the following is a necessary assumption in the argument above?

A. The author of a recipe is not the cause of the recipe's failure.
B. The author of a recipe should be the one who tests the recipe.
C. More thorough testing of recipes will always create recipes that are more palatable.
D. Recipe testers should contribute to the eventual palatability of the recipes they test.
E. Most recipes are unpalatable due to the combinations of their ingredients.


I went for C but I believe because it uses extreme language(More thorough testing of recipes will always create recipes that are more palatable.) it can not be the ans.
can anyone confirm the same ?
_________________

~R.
If my post was of any help to you, You can thank me in the form of Kudos!!

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
P
Joined: 08 Jun 2013
Posts: 475
Location: India
Schools: INSEAD Jan '19
GMAT 1: 200 Q1 V1
GPA: 3.82
WE: Engineering (Other)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Recipe testers should not simply blame the author  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jul 2018, 17:47
1
pun91 wrote:
Recipe testers should not simply blame the author of a recipe when the recipe does not work but find out why the recipe was unsuccessful by studying ingredients, combinations, and temperatures. Only through this sort of exhaustive analysis can the recipes be corrected and made palatable.

Which of the following is a necessary assumption in the argument above?

RT should not simply blame author but they should participate in the analysis why the recipe was not a success.
So our pre-thinking is RT's can contribute in making recipes more successful/palatable.

A. The author of a recipe is not the cause of the recipe's failure.- Recipe testers should not simply blame the author- So not necessary.


B. The author of a recipe should be the one who tests the recipe.-Not necessary


C. More thorough testing of recipes will always create recipes that are more palatable.- extreme

D. Recipe testers should contribute to the eventual palatability of the recipes they test.-Matches our pre-thinking.-Correct

E. Most recipes are unpalatable due to the combinations of their ingredients.-Not necessary

_________________

It seems Kudos button not working correctly with all my posts...

Please check if it is working with this post......

is it?....

Anyways...Thanks for trying :cool:

Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 05 Feb 2016
Posts: 144
Location: India
Concentration: General Management, Marketing
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
GMAT ToolKit User CAT Tests
Re: Recipe testers should not simply blame the author  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jul 2018, 18:59
pun91 wrote:
Recipe testers should not simply blame the author of a recipe when the recipe does not work but find out why the recipe was unsuccessful by studying ingredients, combinations, and temperatures. Only through this sort of exhaustive analysis can the recipes be corrected and made palatable.

Which of the following is a necessary assumption in the argument above?

A. The author of a recipe is not the cause of the recipe's failure.
B. The author of a recipe should be the one who tests the recipe.
C. More thorough testing of recipes will always create recipes that are more palatable.
D. Recipe testers should contribute to the eventual palatability of the recipes they test.
E. Most recipes are unpalatable due to the combinations of their ingredients.


I have chosen A.

Kindly correct me
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
P
Joined: 08 Jun 2013
Posts: 475
Location: India
Schools: INSEAD Jan '19
GMAT 1: 200 Q1 V1
GPA: 3.82
WE: Engineering (Other)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Recipe testers should not simply blame the author  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Jul 2018, 08:03
2
kunalcvrce wrote:
pun91 wrote:
Recipe testers should not simply blame the author of a recipe when the recipe does not work but find out why the recipe was unsuccessful by studying ingredients, combinations, and temperatures. Only through this sort of exhaustive analysis can the recipes be corrected and made palatable.

Which of the following is a necessary assumption in the argument above?

A. The author of a recipe is not the cause of the recipe's failure.
B. The author of a recipe should be the one who tests the recipe.
C. More thorough testing of recipes will always create recipes that are more palatable.
D. Recipe testers should contribute to the eventual palatability of the recipes they test.
E. Most recipes are unpalatable due to the combinations of their ingredients.


I have chosen A.

Kindly correct me



The author of a recipe is not the cause of the recipe's failure.- Recipe testers should not simply blame the author-

Read carefully simply not blame the author ...there can be other reasons for the unsuccessful recipe. But then author can also be blamed for the unsuccessful recipe.

Hope this helps :-)
_________________

It seems Kudos button not working correctly with all my posts...

Please check if it is working with this post......

is it?....

Anyways...Thanks for trying :cool:

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
P
Joined: 08 Jun 2013
Posts: 475
Location: India
Schools: INSEAD Jan '19
GMAT 1: 200 Q1 V1
GPA: 3.82
WE: Engineering (Other)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Recipe testers should not simply blame the author  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Jul 2018, 08:05
kunalcvrce wrote:
pun91 wrote:
Recipe testers should not simply blame the author of a recipe when the recipe does not work but find out why the recipe was unsuccessful by studying ingredients, combinations, and temperatures. Only through this sort of exhaustive analysis can the recipes be corrected and made palatable.

Which of the following is a necessary assumption in the argument above?

A. The author of a recipe is not the cause of the recipe's failure.
B. The author of a recipe should be the one who tests the recipe.
C. More thorough testing of recipes will always create recipes that are more palatable.
D. Recipe testers should contribute to the eventual palatability of the recipes they test.
E. Most recipes are unpalatable due to the combinations of their ingredients.


I have chosen A.

Kindly correct me



The author of a recipe is not the cause of the recipe's failure.- Recipe testers should not simply blame the author-

Read carefully simply not blame the author ...there can be other reasons for the unsuccessful recipe. But then author can also be blamed for the unsuccessful recipe.

Hope this helps :-)
_________________

It seems Kudos button not working correctly with all my posts...

Please check if it is working with this post......

is it?....

Anyways...Thanks for trying :cool:

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
P
Joined: 08 Jun 2013
Posts: 475
Location: India
Schools: INSEAD Jan '19
GMAT 1: 200 Q1 V1
GPA: 3.82
WE: Engineering (Other)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Recipe testers should not simply blame the author  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Jul 2018, 08:14
kunalcvrce wrote:
pun91 wrote:
Recipe testers should not simply blame the author of a recipe when the recipe does not work but find out why the recipe was unsuccessful by studying ingredients, combinations, and temperatures. Only through this sort of exhaustive analysis can the recipes be corrected and made palatable.

Which of the following is a necessary assumption in the argument above?

A. The author of a recipe is not the cause of the recipe's failure.
B. The author of a recipe should be the one who tests the recipe.
C. More thorough testing of recipes will always create recipes that are more palatable.
D. Recipe testers should contribute to the eventual palatability of the recipes they test.
E. Most recipes are unpalatable due to the combinations of their ingredients.


I have chosen A.

Kindly correct me



The author of a recipe is not the cause of the recipe's failure.- Recipe testers should not simply blame the author-

Read carefully simply not blame the author ...there can be other reasons for the unsuccessful recipe. But then author can also be blamed for the unsuccessful recipe.

Hope this helps :-)
_________________

It seems Kudos button not working correctly with all my posts...

Please check if it is working with this post......

is it?....

Anyways...Thanks for trying :cool:

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
P
Joined: 08 Jun 2013
Posts: 475
Location: India
Schools: INSEAD Jan '19
GMAT 1: 200 Q1 V1
GPA: 3.82
WE: Engineering (Other)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Recipe testers should not simply blame the author  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Jul 2018, 08:36
kunalcvrce wrote:
pun91 wrote:
Recipe testers should not simply blame the author of a recipe when the recipe does not work but find out why the recipe was unsuccessful by studying ingredients, combinations, and temperatures. Only through this sort of exhaustive analysis can the recipes be corrected and made palatable.

Which of the following is a necessary assumption in the argument above?

A. The author of a recipe is not the cause of the recipe's failure.
B. The author of a recipe should be the one who tests the recipe.
C. More thorough testing of recipes will always create recipes that are more palatable.
D. Recipe testers should contribute to the eventual palatability of the recipes they test.
E. Most recipes are unpalatable due to the combinations of their ingredients.


I have chosen A.

Kindly correct me



The author of a recipe is not the cause of the recipe's failure.- Recipe testers should not simply blame the author.

Read carefully simply not blame the author ...there can be other reasons for the unsuccessful recipe. But then author can also be blamed for the unsuccessful recipe.

Hope this helps :-)

The author of a recipe is not the cause of the recipe's failure.- Recipe testers should not simply blame the author-

Read carefully simply not blame the author ...there can be other reasons for the unsuccessful recipe. But then author can also be blamed for the unsuccessful recipe.

Hope this helps :-)
_________________

It seems Kudos button not working correctly with all my posts...

Please check if it is working with this post......

is it?....

Anyways...Thanks for trying :cool:

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 13 May 2018
Posts: 6
Location: India
Schools: Darden '21 (S)
GMAT 1: 740 Q51 V39
GRE 1: Q170 V162
GPA: 3.5
Re: Recipe testers should not simply blame the author  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Jul 2018, 00:39
1
pun91 wrote:
Recipe testers should not simply blame the author of a recipe when the recipe does not work but find out why the recipe was unsuccessful by studying ingredients, combinations, and temperatures. Only through this sort of exhaustive analysis can the recipes be corrected and made palatable.

Which of the following is a necessary assumption in the argument above?

A. The author of a recipe is not the cause of the recipe's failure.
B. The author of a recipe should be the one who tests the recipe.
C. More thorough testing of recipes will always create recipes that are more palatable.
D. Recipe testers should contribute to the eventual palatability of the recipes they test.
E. Most recipes are unpalatable due to the combinations of their ingredients.


Here's my two cents. It's important to understand the argument before jumping into the options. You can use mnemonics or indicators that make life easier. especially on a time constraint that demands you solve this question in around 2 mins.

So here's the argument deconstructed:
X should not do Y but should do Z. Conclusion: only through Z can they get P. This is the least count of the argument. I'll explain what that means in point 2.
1. Repetitions not allowed.
2. Anything that breaks X, Y, Z or P further is not a sufficient assumption. for example, if I say combinations are/are not a major factor in palatability, I'm not going to blow the argument open since combinations is just one of the criteria. So keeping your cool and choosing what information can be clubbed in a variable is really important; if you can do this, the major battle is won.
Only valid assumptions: (1) Y or any other thing (not mentioned in the argument) cannot get P (2) X should do P (3) Not P means Not Z (implication contra-positive)
Anything that even hints at the above three is a winning choice.
D is an exact match.

Common wrong answers A and C
A. We can eliminate this through 1. assumption negation and 2. the fact that the option breaks the least count. It talks about the author not being the cause. Now since we selected Y to encompass "blame the author for the recipe", if the author is or isn't to be blamed doesn't support our conclusion of Analysis gives palatable (only through Z can they get P). By the first technique if you negate it again, it doesn't really weaken the argument. It actually doesn't really do anything to the argument to be honest.

C. Option C is a tricky one to eliminate, but if you have your logic (mathematical/symbolic logic) antennas up this is an easy strike out. Option C reads, in variables, If Z happens then P has to happen, which is wrong because the conclusion reads only through Z can they get P. Confused? Don't be!
Let's take Z and P as easily understood analogies. Let's call Z = Grey rainy clouds and P = rain. Let's read the conclusion. Only through grey rains clouds can they get rain. Seems legit. That means rain only comes from grey rainy clouds. Or no rain means no grey rainy clouds. Yes! that seems okay. Does the option say that though?
Now let's read option C. If grey rainy clouds occur then it has to rain. Ouch. Not necessarily. I can have grey rainy clouds and no rain. Rain needs grey rainy clouds but grey rainy clouds doesn't necessarily mean rain. There could be no rain.
AAH!!
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 10 Apr 2018
Posts: 108
Concentration: Leadership, Operations
GPA: 3.56
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
Re: Recipe testers should not simply blame the author  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Aug 2018, 09:44
Addupaddukaddu wrote:
pun91 wrote:
Recipe testers should not simply blame the author of a recipe when the recipe does not work but find out why the recipe was unsuccessful by studying ingredients, combinations, and temperatures. Only through this sort of exhaustive analysis can the recipes be corrected and made palatable.

Which of the following is a necessary assumption in the argument above?

A. The author of a recipe is not the cause of the recipe's failure.
B. The author of a recipe should be the one who tests the recipe.
C. More thorough testing of recipes will always create recipes that are more palatable.
D. Recipe testers should contribute to the eventual palatability of the recipes they test.
E. Most recipes are unpalatable due to the combinations of their ingredients.


Here's my two cents. It's important to understand the argument before jumping into the options. You can use mnemonics or indicators that make life easier. especially on a time constraint that demands you solve this question in around 2 mins.

So here's the argument deconstructed:
X should not do Y but should do Z. Conclusion: only through Z can they get P. This is the least count of the argument. I'll explain what that means in point 2.
1. Repetitions not allowed.
2. Anything that breaks X, Y, Z or P further is not a sufficient assumption. for example, if I say combinations are/are not a major factor in palatability, I'm not going to blow the argument open since combinations is just one of the criteria. So keeping your cool and choosing what information can be clubbed in a variable is really important; if you can do this, the major battle is won.
Only valid assumptions: (1) Y or any other thing (not mentioned in the argument) cannot get P (2) X should do P (3) Not P means Not Z (implication contra-positive)
Anything that even hints at the above three is a winning choice.
D is an exact match.

Common wrong answers A and C
A. We can eliminate this through 1. assumption negation and 2. the fact that the option breaks the least count. It talks about the author not being the cause. Now since we selected Y to encompass "blame the author for the recipe", if the author is or isn't to be blamed doesn't support our conclusion of Analysis gives palatable (only through Z can they get P). By the first technique if you negate it again, it doesn't really weaken the argument. It actually doesn't really do anything to the argument to be honest.

C. Option C is a tricky one to eliminate, but if you have your logic (mathematical/symbolic logic) antennas up this is an easy strike out. Option C reads, in variables, If Z happens then P has to happen, which is wrong because the conclusion reads only through Z can they get P. Confused? Don't be!
Let's take Z and P as easily understood analogies. Let's call Z = Grey rainy clouds and P = rain. Let's read the conclusion. Only through grey rains clouds can they get rain. Seems legit. That means rain only comes from grey rainy clouds. Or no rain means no grey rainy clouds. Yes! that seems okay. Does the option say that though?
Now let's read option C. If grey rainy clouds occur then it has to rain. Ouch. Not necessarily. I can have grey rainy clouds and no rain. Rain needs grey rainy clouds but grey rainy clouds doesn't necessarily mean rain. There could be no rain.
AAH!!


I too had chosen 'A' as my answer. Thanks for explanation in breif - especially for the common trap answers.
Although your example in explnation is equally confusing as the question itself is, I got the point for not getting intoo the trap.
Thank you very much.

The Graceful.
_________________



The Graceful
----------------------------------------------------------
Every EXPERT was a beginner once...
Don't look at the clock. Do what it does, keep going
..
To achieve great things, two things are needed:a plan and not quite enough time - Leonard Bernstein.

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 08 Aug 2017
Posts: 252
Re: Recipe testers should not simply blame the author  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Aug 2018, 01:38
Recently, I have seen a video lecture prepared by Jamboree Education, a renowned institute for GMAT preparation, on assumption.
It was told that you can blindly cross off a choice which contain "should" in assumption question.

Following above concept, I ignored B and D without a think.
But here D is correct choice which contain "should".
Anybody who is aware of this knowledge, please, help me to clear out this blurred understanding.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 01 Nov 2017
Posts: 95
GMAT 1: 700 Q50 V35
GMAT 2: 640 Q49 V28
GMAT 3: 680 Q47 V36
GMAT 4: 700 Q50 V35
CAT Tests
Recipe testers should not simply blame the author  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Aug 2018, 02:21
Recipe testers should not simply blame the author of a recipe when the recipe does not work but find out why the recipe was unsuccessful by studying ingredients, combinations, and temperatures. Only through this sort of exhaustive analysis can the recipes be corrected and made palatable.

Which of the following is a necessary assumption in the argument above?

A. The author of a recipe is not the cause of the recipe's failure.
-> Irrelevant. Why? Because the ingredients, combinations and temperatures were effected by the author himself. Therefore, he is partially, if not fully, responsible for the recipe failure.

B. The author of a recipe should be the one who tests the recipe.
-> I can't explain this one but it is clearly making no sense because in the stimulus we were told that the reciple testers should do more study rather than just say yes/no. If it were tested by the author of the recipe himself, then he would probably have done critical study of his failure without the need of above advice.
C. More thorough testing of recipes will always create recipes that are more palatable.
-> Tempting answer for me. However I realized that the stimulus was not about the testing of recipes, but it was about the critical analysis of what went wrong. Hence, this is not a correct answer.

D. Recipe testers should contribute to the eventual palatability of the recipes they test.
-> This is the CORRECT answer. Simply the advice in the stimulus suggests that the testers should do more work rather than just say yes/no as if they are stakeholders of the recipe. Otherwise, why should the testers bother about doing such research, wasting their time and energy?

E. Most recipes are unpalatable due to the combinations of their ingredients.
-> Out of scope
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 10 Apr 2018
Posts: 108
Concentration: Leadership, Operations
GPA: 3.56
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
Re: Recipe testers should not simply blame the author  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Aug 2018, 02:34
gvij2017 wrote:
Recently, I have seen a video lecture prepared by Jamboree Education, a renowned institute for GMAT preparation, on assumption.
It was told that you can blindly cross off a choice which contain "should" in assumption question.

Following above concept, I ignored B and D without a think.
But here D is correct choice which contain "should".
Anybody who is aware of this knowledge, please, help me to clear out this blurred understanding.


The strategy, taught by Jamboree education can be validated by applying on official questions (OG's and GMATPrep). Keep an eye if you find a glitch to this rule on those, I too am going to do that. If we find any, that means the rules is NOT valid and We will report on this forum.
Does that sound good?

Thanks
The Graceful
_________________



The Graceful
----------------------------------------------------------
Every EXPERT was a beginner once...
Don't look at the clock. Do what it does, keep going
..
To achieve great things, two things are needed:a plan and not quite enough time - Leonard Bernstein.

Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 16 Sep 2011
Posts: 92
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Recipe testers should not simply blame the author  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Sep 2018, 19:35
Not sure the conclusion here is correct.... I think conclusion is Recipe testers should not blame author when recipe does not work but find out why recipe was unsuccessful by studying ingredients, combinations and temperatures.
because it answers the question why [ they should not blame and study] because only through this sort of exhaustive analysis can the recipes be corrected and made palatable

Always conclusion should pass why test, except when this is a recommendation or suggestion.... Infact here conclusion also looks like a suggestion that they should not Y but do Z.


My take on answers is as below.

A. The author of a recipe is not the cause of the recipe's failure. --- this is a trap answer.... this seems a paraphrase of the conclusion ...testers should not blame author when recipe does not work. It does not bridge the gap between evidence (exhaustive analysis corrects recipe and makes palatable recipes) and conclusion (do not blame author but study ingredients bla bla)
Lets negate this ...author is the cause of recipe's failure but then it misses big picture that do not blame but find out why this failed because only through study we can correct and make it palatable....the conclusion still holds
B. The author of a recipe should be the one who tests the recipe.---- Not necessarily as tester are the ones who do it
C. More thorough testing of recipes will always create recipes that are more palatable. -- Argument is 100% correct as testing helps to correct and make recipe palatable but not necessarily this is how you arrive at conclusion. Conclusion is when recipe does not work you find it through exhaustive analysis. but here assumption is more focusing on how we can make recipe palatable
D. Recipe testers should contribute to the eventual palatability of the recipes they test.--this looks an assumption as recipe testers test recipes, if recipes are ok, its all good. but if recipes are not good, testers need to do exhaustive analysis and what exhaustive analysis does , it makes recipe palatable....so this bridges the gap between conclusion and evidence
E. Most recipes are unpalatable due to the combinations of their ingredients.[/quote]--need not be assumed that most are unpalatable..


Addupaddukaddu wrote:
pun91 wrote:
Recipe testers should not simply blame the author of a recipe when the recipe does not work but find out why the recipe was unsuccessful by studying ingredients, combinations, and temperatures. Only through this sort of exhaustive analysis can the recipes be corrected and made palatable.

Which of the following is a necessary assumption in the argument above?

A. The author of a recipe is not the cause of the recipe's failure.
B. The author of a recipe should be the one who tests the recipe.
C. More thorough testing of recipes will always create recipes that are more palatable.
D. Recipe testers should contribute to the eventual palatability of the recipes they test.
E. Most recipes are unpalatable due to the combinations of their ingredients.


Here's my two cents. It's important to understand the argument before jumping into the options. You can use mnemonics or indicators that make life easier. especially on a time constraint that demands you solve this question in around 2 mins.

So here's the argument deconstructed:
X should not do Y but should do Z. Conclusion: only through Z can they get P. This is the least count of the argument. I'll explain what that means in point 2.
1. Repetitions not allowed.
2. Anything that breaks X, Y, Z or P further is not a sufficient assumption. for example, if I say combinations are/are not a major factor in palatability, I'm not going to blow the argument open since combinations is just one of the criteria. So keeping your cool and choosing what information can be clubbed in a variable is really important; if you can do this, the major battle is won.
Only valid assumptions: (1) Y or any other thing (not mentioned in the argument) cannot get P (2) X should do P (3) Not P means Not Z (implication contra-positive)
Anything that even hints at the above three is a winning choice.
D is an exact match.

Common wrong answers A and C
A. We can eliminate this through 1. assumption negation and 2. the fact that the option breaks the least count. It talks about the author not being the cause. Now since we selected Y to encompass "blame the author for the recipe", if the author is or isn't to be blamed doesn't support our conclusion of Analysis gives palatable (only through Z can they get P). By the first technique if you negate it again, it doesn't really weaken the argument. It actually doesn't really do anything to the argument to be honest.

C. Option C is a tricky one to eliminate, but if you have your logic (mathematical/symbolic logic) antennas up this is an easy strike out. Option C reads, in variables, If Z happens then P has to happen, which is wrong because the conclusion reads only through Z can they get P. Confused? Don't be!
Let's take Z and P as easily understood analogies. Let's call Z = Grey rainy clouds and P = rain. Let's read the conclusion. Only through grey rains clouds can they get rain. Seems legit. That means rain only comes from grey rainy clouds. Or no rain means no grey rainy clouds. Yes! that seems okay. Does the option say that though?
Now let's read option C. If grey rainy clouds occur then it has to rain. Ouch. Not necessarily. I can have grey rainy clouds and no rain. Rain needs grey rainy clouds but grey rainy clouds doesn't necessarily mean rain. There could be no rain.
AAH!!
GMAT Club Bot
Recipe testers should not simply blame the author &nbs [#permalink] 01 Sep 2018, 19:35
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Recipe testers should not simply blame the author

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.