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The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treas

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The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treas [#permalink]

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New post 08 Apr 2004, 03:35
4
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A
B
C
D
E

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The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treasury Department could have even a greater significance for the economy than the particulars of the plan.

(A) even a greater significance for the economy than
(B) a significance that is even greater for the economy than
(C) even greater significance for the economy than have
(D) even greater significance for the economy than do
(E) a significance even greater for the economy than have
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Re: The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treas [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jan 2012, 14:57
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Good work, folks! It seems that people are (correctly) aligned on D now, but I was asked to comment, so here's my take:

I think what makes this problem confusing is that the words "have" and "do" have so many possible roles in a sentence. Let's clarify things with an example:

I like pie more than my brothers.

What does this sentence mean? Do I prefer pie to my brothers, or do I enjoy eating pie more than my brothers do?

Now, we could clear up this ambiguity by saying “I like pie more than my brothers like pie.” This wouldn’t be grammatically incorrect, but there’s a shorter, more stylish, and more GMAT-like way to say this:

I like pie more than my brothers do.

Here, the word “do” stands in for the idea “like pie.”

Now, what about the following?

I have more love for pies than my brothers do.

Here, we are still using “do” to stand in for the preceding verb phrase: in this case, “have love for pies.” (We can substitute the verb phrase without including the comparative word “more.”) We don’t want to use the word “have”—it would not sound great to say “I have more love for pies than my brothers have.”

So we can already see how the word “do” can stand in for the word “have.” This is NOT the case if “have” is used to indicate the present perfect, as in the following:

I have been going to the gym lately.

Now, if I want to compare myself to my brothers, I will need to use the present perfect for both my verb and theirs. I do this by saying “have” twice.

I have been going to the gym more than my brothers have.

The second “have” (at the end of the sentence) functions just like “do” in the present tense does. It stands for the verb phrase “have been going to the gym.”

As a side note, I should point out that the GMAT often places the second verb BEFORE its subject, like this:

I have more pies than do my brothers.
I have been going to the gym more often than have my brothers.


This is fine, and entails no change in meaning.

Now, back to the original sentence. Here, “have” is NOT being used to indicate present perfect. It is part of the phrase “could have . . . significance.” So let’s write a simple sentence to parallel this one:

I might have more of an impact on the election than do my brothers.

If, instead, I say “I might have more of an impact on the election than have my brothers,” it sounds like I am speaking about them in the present perfect. I’d be saying that I might have more of an impact (in the future) than my brothers have had (so far). That’s the same mistake we’d be making if we chose C or E on this problem. We don't want to say that the principles could (in the future) have more significance than the particulars have (up to now).

Hopefully now, those with concerns can see why D works. The word “do” is actually filling in for the verb phrase “have significance.”

By the way, we need “do”--rather than nothing--to avoid ambiguity. A & B pose this problem in different ways.

B: “The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treasury Department could have a significance that is even greater for the economy than the particulars of the plan.” There are a few ways to read this sentence (and that's the problem), but to me it seems like we’re saying that the significance of the principles could be better for the economy than the particulars are. We should be saying that the principles are more significant (or “greater in significance”) than the particulars.

In A, we have two problems. First, the word order is wrong—“could have even a greater” just doesn’t work, because “even” seems to be modifying the verb “have” instead of the adjective “greater,” as it should. Second, without our helper “do,” we still have some ambiguity. A could be read as “The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treasury Department could have an even greater significance for the economy than FOR the particulars of the plan.” In other words, without a clarifying word (either the “for” that I just added, or the “do” that we add in D), we aren’t sure which interpretation to go with.

I hope this helps! Let me know if I can clarify anything.
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Re: The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treas [#permalink]

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New post 23 Jun 2004, 22:48
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The proper comparison would be:

The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treasury Department COULD have even a greater significance for the economy than COULD the particulars of the plan.

I think C and D distort the picture.
A says that the Treasury Department could have the particulars of the plan. Wrong again.

Finally, I opt for D.
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Re: The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treas [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jun 2004, 06:32
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I also opt for D
"do" is necessary here to compare same actions

could have<< even greater significance for the economy than do >> the particulars of the plan

equivalent to:

could have even greater significance for the economy than the particulars of the plan do [have]
"have" is ellipsed here and "do" ensures that we are not comparing "economy" to "the particulars of the plan".
"do" properly compares
the "significance" of the "guiding principles of the tax plan"
to
the "significance" of the "particulars of the plan"

Let's see how this fits D

The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treasury Department could have even greater significance for the economy than do the particulars of the plan
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Re: The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treas [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2007, 11:13
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D it is.
This is the explanation given in the SC tips by anandnk:

The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treasury Department could have even a greater significance for the economy than the particulars of the plan.

(A) even a greater significance for the economy than
(B) a significance that is even greater for the economy than
(C) even greater significance for the economy than have
(D) even greater significance for the economy than do
(E) a significance even greater for the economy than have

D is indeed best in SAE.

In SAE, we generally use do to replace regular verbs, i.e., verbs that are not linking verbs, verbs that use modals, etc.

For example:

Megumi speaks Japanese better than I do.

But you already knew that, I'm sure.

Look at the following examples for something (perhaps) new:

Megumi has visited more countries than I have.

We can use have again because have is an auxiliary verb here.

Megumi has more skirts than I do.

Here, has is NOT an auxiliary verb, and in SAE, we cannot use the verb have in the second bit.
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Re: The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treas [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2010, 07:15
Any moderators who can weigh in??

Why is "could have" parallel to "do"?

WHich one of the following is correct?
1. I can do this better than you can
2. I can do this better than you do

Isn't it 1 and 2 are different in meanings?
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Re: The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treas [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2010, 07:21
1
calvin,

You may want to take a look at the link
doubt-from-manhattan-sc-93768.html

I have given some explaination for such issues. Refer the example # 2.


calvinhobbes wrote:
Any moderators who can weigh in??

Why is "could have" parallel to "do"?

WHich one of the following is correct?
1. I can do this better than you can
2. I can do this better than you do

Isn't it 1 and 2 are different in meanings?

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Re: The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treas [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2010, 08:30
Let me try to give a shot.

CAN is used when you need to modify the meaning of the main verb (I can do) in a sentence. Remember, CAN is used to indicate possibility/potential while at the same time, it doesn't mean an action.

As per your question:
1. I can do this better than you can
What I understood is that - I have the better potential to perform this task than you can (your potential).
I don't think this sounds well to me. We are not comparing the potential/possibility to perform some actions. Moreover, I never saw a case in which can was the last word. I think CAN is always followed by some verb.

2. I can do this better than you do
Similarly, what I understood is that - I have the potential to perform this better than the way you perform. I think this sounds well now.

calvinhobbes wrote:
Any moderators who can weigh in??

Why is "could have" parallel to "do"?

WHich one of the following is correct?
1. I can do this better than you can
2. I can do this better than you do

Isn't it 1 and 2 are different in meanings?

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Re: The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treas [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2010, 08:37
Check this link on Helping Verbs.
http://www.englishclub.com/grammar/verb ... elping.htm

do
to make negatives (I do not like you.)
to ask questions (Do you want some coffee?)
to show emphasis (I do want you to pass your exam.)
to stand for a main verb in some constructions (He speaks faster than she does.)
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Re: The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treas [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 24 Mar 2011, 03:27
The essential point is to note that the comparison is between two actions of what the 'guiding principles' of the plan have for the economy and what the particulars have. We must maintain the parallelism of action in both arms of the comparison.

Hence choices A and B, which compare ‘the action of the principles’ with just ‘the particulars’ are required to be ignored.

Secondly while ‘have’ and ‘do’ both indicate actions as in C, D and E, the verb ‘do’ is preferable over ‘have’ in the second arm for the sake of avoiding repetition. D thus remains the best.
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Originally posted by daagh on 24 Mar 2011, 02:21.
Last edited by daagh on 24 Mar 2011, 03:27, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treas [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jan 2012, 16:25
cici wrote:
The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treasury Department could have even a greater significance for the economy than the particulars of the plan.

(A) even a greater significance for the economy than
(B) a significance that is even greater for the economy than
(C) even greater significance for the economy than have
(D) even greater significance for the economy than do
(E) a significance even greater for the economy than have

I got it wrong :cry:


Here are my 2 cents!
Scenario: The sentence says that the tax plan released by the Treasury department has-- guiding principles and particulars. Here the author is trying to compare between 'significance of the guiding principles' and 'significance of the particulars' . Since he compares between 2 things he uses the comparative degree [lesser than / greater than].He speculates for the future X (could have) a greater ----than Y (does ) now.

POE:-- [A] Wrongly compares significance to particulars [B] same error of wrong comparison + verbose [C] meaning changes here : x's could have {in the future} greater significance than y's do {now} NOT y's have [D] Preserves the meaning and comparison--The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treasury Department could have even greater significance for the economy than do the particulars of the plan.[E] It shifts the intended comparison from significance to economy. Its similar to saying that 'X' has significance even greater for economy than 'Y' has for the society , the locus of comparison shifts.

So I think it is D. Btw what is the source of the problem?
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Re: The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treas [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jun 2012, 10:29
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A test of parallel comparison

(A) even a greater significance for the economy than--- the second arm namely the particulars should be verbed to match the verb on the first arm

(B) a significance that is even greater for the economy than--- same error as in A

(C) even greater significance for the economy than have – the fronting of the verb before the verb have leaves the sentence din a muddle, changing the meaning. What it actually may mean is that the guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treasury Department could have even a greater significance for the economy than the guiding principles have the particulars of the plan, thus nudging the particulars to a position of object from the subject. Therefore the need for differential verb rather than the repetition of have

(D) Even greater significance for the economy than do –good choice

(E) a significance even greater for the economy than have --- The changed word order renders the modifier adjective greater without a modified noun immediately after it, while repeating the verb error as seen in C
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Re: The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treas [#permalink]

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New post 19 Dec 2012, 08:36
(A) even a greater significance for the economy than --- The comparison is between what principles could have with what the particulars could have; The chocie wrongly compares what the principles could have with the particular themselves – wrong; we must have an action verb for the second part too.

(B) a significance that is even greater for the economy than --- same as in A


(C) even greater significance for the economy than have --- Of course, this has a verb for the second part, but the verb have is inferior to - do -


(D) even greater significance for the economy than do --- better choice than –have—hence preferable,

(E) a significance even greater for the economy than have ----- ‘A significance’ is problematic, significance is a non countable noun. When we say –a significance, it renders the meaning that significance is countable as one significance, two significances etc. Hence wron

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Re: The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treas [#permalink]

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New post 12 May 2013, 04:12
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In this type of questions, meaning of the sentence plays a crucial role.

In this question, first we need to find which parts are compared:
Is the comparison between “guiding principles of the tax plan” and “particulars of the plan”
OR
Is the comparison between “significance of guiding principles on the economy” and “significance of particulars on the economy”?

After judging the meaning, it can be seen that the comparison should be between “significance of guiding principles on the economy” and “significance of particulars on the economy”.

To make the comparison proper, we need have the construction as “… economy than do the particulars of the plan.”
Point to note: “have” in non-underlined part is not used as present perfect. So, if “do” is replaced by “have”, the sentence will have distorted meaning.

A) “Significance for the economy” is compared to “particulars of the plan”. Incorrect option.
B) “Significance” is compared to “particulars of the plan”. Also, “significance” is non-countable and hence “a significance” in ungrammatical. Incorrect option.
C) Introduction of second “have” is distorting the meaning. The construction “X could have greater Y than have Z” is grammatically incorrect and it does not convey the desired comparison. Incorrect option.
D) Correct. Here then sentence is meaningful and contains right comparison.
E) Introduction of second “have” is distorting the meaning. The construction “X could have Y greater than have Z” is grammatically incorrect and it does not convey the desired comparison. Also, “significance” is non-countable and hence “a significance” in ungrammatical. Incorrect option.

Correct option is D.
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Re: The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treas [#permalink]

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Re: The guiding principles of the tax plan released by the Treas   [#permalink] 16 Jun 2018, 02:33
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