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When expert witnesses give testimony, jurors often do not understand

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When expert witnesses give testimony, jurors often do not understand  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Feb 2019, 06:36
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When expert witnesses give testimony, jurors often do not understand the technical information and thereby are in no position to evaluate such testimony. Although expert witnesses on opposite sides often make conflicting claims, the expert witnesses on both sides frequently seem competent, leaving the jury unable to assess the reliability of their testimonies.

The statements above, if true, most strongly support which one of the following?

(A) There should be limits placed on how much technical information can be considered by both sides in preparing a legal case.

(B) Jury decisions in cases involving expert witness testimonies are not always determined by the reliability of those testimonies.

(C) Jurors who understand the technical information presented in a case can usually assess its legal implications accurately.

(D) Jury members should generally be selected on the basis of their technical expertise.

(E) Expert witnesses who testify on opposite sides in legal cases are likely to agree in their evaluations of technical claims
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Re: When expert witnesses give testimony, jurors often do not understand  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Feb 2019, 07:01
Answer is B .

A. Argument does not talk about the legal case .
B. It follows from the Argument.
C. Argument talks about testimonies , the option C talks about the case .

D.Out of context
E. Argument is about Jury assessing the testimonies.


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Re: When expert witnesses give testimony, jurors often do not understand  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Feb 2019, 01:38
akanshaxo wrote:
When expert witnesses give testimony, jurors often do not understand the technical information and thereby are in no position to evaluate such testimony. Although expert witnesses on opposite sides often make conflicting claims, the expert witnesses on both sides frequently seem competent, leaving the jury unable to assess the reliability of their testimonies.

The statements above, if true, most strongly support which one of the following?

(A) There should be limits placed on how much technical information can be considered by both sides in preparing a legal case.

(B) Jury decisions in cases involving expert witness testimonies are not always determined by the reliability of those testimonies.

(C) Jurors who understand the technical information presented in a case can usually assess its legal implications accurately.

(D) Jury members should generally be selected on the basis of their technical expertise.

(E) Expert witnesses who testify on opposite sides in legal cases are likely to agree in their evaluations of technical claims


From the argument, we have the following information:
1) Jurors do not understand technical info
2) Expert witnesses on either side make opposite claims and since they are competent jurors believe them.
3) Jury gets confused and is unable to asses the reliability of the testimonies.

Now we need to see which of the following will be supported by the information provided in the argument:

(A) There should be limits placed on how much technical information can be considered by both sides in preparing a legal case.
Not relevant, no discussion on how the process needs to be changed.

(B) Jury decisions in cases involving expert witness testimonies are not always determined by the reliability of those testimonies.
Correct, mentioned in the last part of the passage.

(C) Jurors who understand the technical information presented in a case can usually assess its legal implications accurately.
Some people may get confused with this one. But we are just told that people who don't have knowledge cant understand the expert witnesses. We don't know if people with technical knowledge will be able to understand the legal implications! Technical people can understand the technical part but can they understand the legal part? Not so sure. Incorrect.

(D) Jury members should generally be selected on the basis of their technical expertise.
Not relevant, no discussion on how the process needs to be changed.

(E) Expert witnesses who testify on opposite sides in legal cases are likely to agree in their evaluations of technical claims
It says the opposite in the passage (conflicting claims).

Hence the B is the correct answer.
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Re: When expert witnesses give testimony, jurors often do not understand  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Mar 2019, 23:19
How is b supporting the argument. Please explain.
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Re: When expert witnesses give testimony, jurors often do not understand  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2019, 04:10
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akanshaxo wrote:
When expert witnesses give testimony, jurors often do not understand the technical information and thereby are in no position to evaluate such testimony. Although expert witnesses on opposite sides often make conflicting claims, the expert witnesses on both sides frequently seem competent, leaving the jury unable to assess the reliability of their testimonies.

The statements above, if true, most strongly support which one of the following?

(A) There should be limits placed on how much technical information can be considered by both sides in preparing a legal case.

(B) Jury decisions in cases involving expert witness testimonies are not always determined by the reliability of those testimonies.

(C) Jurors who understand the technical information presented in a case can usually assess its legal implications accurately.

(D) Jury members should generally be selected on the basis of their technical expertise.

(E) Expert witnesses who testify on opposite sides in legal cases are likely to agree in their evaluations of technical claims


Jurors often do not understand the technical information of experts so are in no position to evaluate their testimonies.
Expert witnesses on opposite sides often make conflicting claims, but seem competent.
So the jury is unable to assess the reliability of their testimonies.

We are looking for an inference i.e. which option is supported by the argument?

(A) There should be limits placed on how much technical information can be considered by both sides in preparing a legal case.

The argument does not imply this. It just says that jurors are unable to understand technicals. It doesn't mean that there should be limits placed on technicals.

(B) Jury decisions in cases involving expert witness testimonies are not always determined by the reliability of those testimonies.

Correct. We know that jurors are not able to understand technicals and hence cannot evaluate testimonies. The argument also tells us that the jury is unable to access the reliability of their testimonies. Hence the jurors' decision would often not be determined by the reliability of expert testimonies (since they are unable to assess the reliability).

(C) Jurors who understand the technical information presented in a case can usually assess its legal implications accurately.

Not given. No mention about jurors who understand tech info and legal implications.

(D) Jury members should generally be selected on the basis of their technical expertise.

Not implied. All that the argument says is what generally happens. It doesn't say what "should" happen.

(E) Expert witnesses who testify on opposite sides in legal cases are likely to agree in their evaluations of technical claims

The argument says that they usually make conflicting claims.

Answer (B)
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Re: When expert witnesses give testimony, jurors often do not understand   [#permalink] 19 Mar 2019, 04:10
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