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6 Tips for Talking About Your Weaknesses [#permalink]

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New post 04 Oct 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 6 Tips for Talking About Your Weaknesses
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How do you react when you read/hear the weakness question? With this question, schools are assessing how well you self evaluate. Like a business problem, they want to hear your plan of action, your implementation, and your success rate.

Here are some tips to help you a) think about and evaluate your weaknesses, and b) be prepared to write about them in an essay or discuss them in an interview.

1. Prepare answers in advance.

When an interviewer asks, “So Natalie, tell me about your weaknesses and what you did to overcome them?” you don’t want to be left silent drawing a blank, or worse – caught off guard and say something crazy like, “Gosh, there are so many, I don’t even know where to begin.” Ding!

2. Be honest.

If you have been let go from a position, you need to discuss the lessons learned from this negative experience and how you overcame the situation. If you have a procrastination problem, you need to talk about ways in which you’re working on boosting your time management skills.

3. Remain professionally focused.

Don’t discuss your addiction to video games or your weakness for chocolate. It’s also certainly not the time to talk about anything inappropriate. We’re talking about work-related, professional weaknesses.

4. Focus on your own weaknesses.

Don’t talk about your cousin’s attraction to arson or your mother-in-law’s conspiratorial behavior. Don’t discuss how your boss is a jerk or how you can’t stand your coworker’s habit of nail biting or how your desk is unorganized because the guy you share your cubicle with always throws his garbage your way. This question is about YOU and your weaknesses – don’t shift the attention or blame onto someone else.

5. Proactively address the issues.

If you have a quantitative weakness, take courses that address the weakness (accounting, statistics). Don’t wait for the admissions committee to ask you to take a course. If you are uncomfortably shy, getting involved with an organization like Toastmasters can help you and show the committee that you’re taking steps to overcome that challenge.

6. Avoid clichés.

“Gee, I guess I just work too hard sometimes” is a copout – the adcom/interviewer will know that deep down you’re proud of your intense work ethic. It is the life of a student to work hard – don’t use that as your “weakness.”

If you need help drafting your essay or framing your answer for your interview, Accepted is here to help you. Contact us for assistance.

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By Natalie Grinblatt Epstein, an accomplished Accepted consultant/editor (since 2008) and entrepreneur. Natalie is a former MBA Admissions Dean and Director at Ross, Johnson, and Carey. Want Natalie to help you get accepted to business school? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

5 Fatal Flaws To Avoid In Your Grad School Statement of Purpose, a free guide

5 A’s for Your Low GPA, a podcast episode

How Personal is Too Personal?

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post 6 Tips for Talking About Your Weaknesses appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Reasons to Take the GMAT (Beyond Getting into B-School) [#permalink]

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New post 08 Oct 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Reasons to Take the GMAT (Beyond Getting into B-School)
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Let’s face it: very few people actually take the GMAT unless they’re applying to business schools that require it. The GMAT is notoriously difficult, and no other type of grad school uses it for admissions practices. If you are filling out b-school apps, you already have a pretty compelling reason to take the test! But if you’re pulling out your hair wondering why you’re spending so much time on your GMAT prep, take heart: the work you’re doing now will benefit you far into the future. In fact, there are some pretty compelling reasons to take the GMAT other than just getting into business school.

The GMAT polishes your communications skills.

Think about this: every single question on the GMAT exam is directly related to the business world. This can confuse and frustrate students working on the verbal reasoning sections of the test. While a lot of the scenarios you’re reading about are about business, they may be unrelated to any business scenario you’ll ever face (but then again, they may be…).

On the other hand, what studying for GMAT verbal reasoning helps you to do is to improve your communication. It doesn’t do this by inundating you with flowery vocabulary you need to learn; instead, GMAT verbal is testing how efficiently you communicate: how well do you absorb information? How well can you analyze an argument? And because this is what the section tests, you’ll see your skills in these areas improving as you continue your GMAT practice. This will pay big dividends, not only during your MBA, but as you go on in the business world, as well.

The GMAT prepares you to work with both details and patterns.

In other words, prepping for the GMAT trains your mind to work on both small and large scales. As you study for GMAT quant, you’ll find that you need to sharpen your skills in picking out relevant details without getting overwhelmed by extraneous information. You’ll get better at organizing information and making precise distinctions. If you’re studying well, you’ll also improve your skills in pattern recognition.

Why are these valuable skills? Think about a day in the life of the average manager. He or she encounters huge amounts of information and has to sort through it to pick out what’s germane to the issue or problem at hand. The ability to identify patterns is key to recognizing progress or lack thereof; and being able to work with information on both small and large scales is vital.

The GMAT trains you to ask the right questions.

The LSAT. The MCAT. The GRE. Not a single one of them has Data Sufficiency questions. Yet the GMAC (the test-makers of the GMAT) obviously find these questions important. Why is that? Because managers are constantly evaluating what information they need to answer a question and what information they have.

The GMAT prepares you for high-stakes experiences.

At the end of the day, taking GMAT practice testsand preparing for the exam in effect prepares you for the business world—not just in the content of its questions, but also in their form. But perhaps the most valuable aspect of the exam is that it is, in itself, a high-stakes experience. You know, the kind that managers deal with all the time: experiences where a lot rides on your performance.

It may be stressful now, but use that stress as a springboard to the world of business. By acquiring these skills during your GMAT study, you’ll be far better prepared for the working world on the other side of your MBA.

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Rachel Kapelke-Dale blogs about graduate school admissions for Magoosh. She has a BA from Brown University, and did her own graduate work at the Université de Paris VII (Master Recherche) and University College London (PhD). She has taught and written about test preparation and admissions practices for eight years.

Related Resources:

MBA Action Plan: 6 Steps for the 6 Months Before You Apply, a free guide

Affordable Online Test Prep, a podcast episode

The GMAT and Your MBA Admissions Profile

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Reasons to Take the GMAT (Beyond Getting into B-School) appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Paying for Your MBA as an International Student [#permalink]

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New post 09 Oct 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Paying for Your MBA as an International Student
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If an international MBA has crossed your mind, you’ve probably taken a minute to look at the price tag of a programme or two.

Now that you’ve picked yourself up off the floor and still can’t manage to shake your desire to pursue this amazing experience, you’ve got the difficult task of figuring out how you’ll fund your education.

It’s hardly the only challenge you’ll face as an international grad student. There are also study visas and accommodation to secure – and that’s before considering how much effort goes into every application and the dreaded GMAT exam.

But, you won’t be able to get your visa without having your finances in order first. So it’s not even worth worrying about accommodation yet. You can (and perhaps should) worry a little about GMAT preparation, but MBA financing also takes some time, and you can’t start on it too soon.

How do international MBAs finance their education?

There’s no simple answer to this question. Every student pulls together a unique financing package, and yours is going to be inherently different from everyone else’s.

Generally speaking, however, MBAs pay for their education using the same basic sources:

• Personal (and/or family) savings

• Scholarships and bursaries

• Personal sources of unsecured credit (such as credit cards)

• Family or personal loans

• Private or government loans

While it is possible for many international grad students to work in their host countries, the demands of an MBA programme are intense, and it’s not always possible to manage working and studying at the same time. Most MBA students can’t factor simultaneous employment into their budget, and it’s not advisable if you can avoid it.

Instead, it’s best to focus on funds you can obtain before leaving for your studies.

And the reality is that you’re probably going to look at all of the potential funding sources and make use of a combination of options.

Which sources should you consider first?

Scholarships and bursaries should always be your first port of call. This is free money for your education; you need never repay it (unless you do something that causes the provider to rescind the package).

Many universities, especially American ones, place you within their financial aid system as soon as you’ve accepted a seat at their institution. Some provide you with an aid package along with your acceptance letter (perhaps helping you to choose their institution over another). But there are plenty of other options, and it’s worth it to investigate as many as you can.

Then, it’s time to consider your personal savings, and depending on the cultural norms in your country – your family’s financial assets. But, you shouldn’t start trying to squeeze for the last tiny coin from your family – it’s really only a matter of noting what’s available if nothing else comes through. After all, not everyone has a small personal fortune that they’re willing to dole out.

Family loans, on the other hand, are becoming a norm in many parts of the world. Whether it’s a small amount or a large amount, it’s critical to have everything in writing. Not only are their legal frameworks for personal loans in most countries, but you’ll need to demonstrate how you received whatever money you have to receive a study visa.

If you live in a country where the government offers or subsidizes study loans, you will also want to investigate these before you approach private lenders; usually, their interest rates and repayment terms are favourable.

And then there are private study loans

As an international student, there are three different private loan sources that you should investigate:

• Private local banks

• Private banks in your host country

• Private loans from international providers, like Prodigy Finance

Your first stop is likely to be a private bank in your home country. Logic would tell you that these institutions are best placed to provide you with a loan – they have access to your financial history and your credit records. But, you may want to brace yourself for a bumpy ride.

Local banks, especially in emerging economies and developing countries, often aren’t in a position to lend to international students. They’re unable to price the risk on those that are leaving the country as soon as they receive their loan – and many can’t fathom that an education could cost that much (remember how you first felt?).

There are other challenges that you may need to tackle as well, for example, loan disbursement in local currencies which then require you to pay the transfer and exchange fees. And, depending on the level of bureaucracy, it could take months to finalize your loan and secure the proof needed for your visa application.

Believe it or not, you may have access to loans in your host country. But, don’t start jumping up and down yet, these aren’t always as easy or as straightforward as you may like.

Banks in your host country are almost always going to require a local cosigner with strong financial standing. That’s perfect if you have family in your host country that are willing to back you up – or if your university is willing to act as a cosigner for you (though, you shouldn’t expect that as a norm, only as a bonus).

It’s at this point that many accepted students throw their hands up in frustration. Some loans are unavailable, others don’t cover enough of the expenses, and then there are those with prohibitively high interest rates.

So, what’s this about Prodigy Finance?

Prodigy Finance is a lending platform that provides postgraduate loans to international students from 150 countries attending the world’s top universities, who would otherwise have no alternative access to finance. The loans are collectively funded by a community of alumni, institutional investors and qualified private investors who receive both a financial and social return. Since 2007, Prodigy Finance has provided more than US$323 million in funding to over 7,100 students with exceptionally strong repayment.

Take a moment to learn more about Prodigy Finance loans and which schools are currently supported. After all, funding shouldn’t be a barrier to education – nor should it keep you up at night; your GMAT prep will do that all by itself.

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Katie studied human rights and graduated with a Bachelor’s degree from Kent State University while working with NGOs in Geneva, Switzerland. Although she has since settled in South Africa, with work towards a Masters in Forced Migration through the University of the Witswatersrand, nothing stops her from being a proud American. Although writing is often solitary work, Katie has been part of the Prodigy Finance Team as the Content Specialist since 2013. She also loves rugby, sloppy Mexican food and Tudor history which means you could find her in any section of a bookstore.

Related Resources:

How to Fund Your MBA Abroad, a free webinar

MBA Scholarships: How do I Apply and What Should I Emphasize?

Having Trouble Securing a Loan for Your International MBA?

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Paying for Your MBA as an International Student appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Encore: Your Past Doesn’t Define You [Episode #228] [#permalink]

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New post 10 Oct 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Encore: Your Past Doesn’t Define You [Episode #228]
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This week we are airing an encore of one of the most populars shows of 2017.

Many applicants focus on the past – both the good and the bad – to the detriment of their applications. Find out the role your past plays in admissions and what you should focus on in your applications when you listen to Your Past Doesn’t Define You.

To see the original detailed show notes, click here.

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Related Links:

Resources for Law School Applicants

Resources for Medical School Applicants

Resources for Law School Applicants

Resources for Grad School Applicants

Related Shows:

• The Unbelievable Story of an Orthopedic Surgeon

• What to do About a Low GPA

• Wharton MBA Student, Single Mom, Entrepreneurhttps://blog.accepted.com/wharton-mba-student-single-mom-entrepreneur-episode-152/

Subscribe:

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Encore: Your Past Doesn’t Define You [Episode #228] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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Six Must-Know Steps for International Students [#permalink]

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New post 11 Oct 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Six Must-Know Steps for International Students
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If you’re an international applicant preparing to study in the abroad, you may be asking yourself, “How will I pay for my degree?” Well, we can’t pay for it for you, but we can help answer your questions about how to navigate the funding process.

To do just that, we’ve partnered with our friends at Prodigy Finance to bring you a webinar dedicated to the international student loan process. Prodigy Senior Relationship Manager Molly Dineen will answer your questions about international student funding and help you understand how to secure a loan as an international student. There’s still time to register for The Six Steps to Understanding International Student Loans!

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Don’t miss it!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Six Must-Know Steps for International Students appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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What are Interest Rates and APR? (And Why are They Important?) [#permalink]

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New post 15 Oct 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: What are Interest Rates and APR? (And Why are They Important?)
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Let’s face it: education is expensive. And that’s before adding in an international component.

Few students can afford the cost of attendance with the money that’s sitting in their bank accounts – their bank, their parent’s bank, and the accounts of half a dozen close friends and family members.

The chances are good that you’ll need an educational loan. (And, hey, if you manage to secure a full ride scholarship or you happen to stumble on the funds needed, we’ll happily celebrate with you.) And even though it may not appear that way at first, there are options out there.

But, you should never accept the first loan that comes your way; that’s not financially responsible.

It’s always a good idea to compare financing offers – whether you’re buying a home or pursuing a master’s education abroad. To do that, you’ll need to know what you should be comparing.

What goes into an educational loan?

At the very heart of any loan is the principal – or the amount you receive from the lender (or, in the case of Prodigy Finance loans, the amount disbursed directly to the university).

Unless you are borrowing money from personal friends and family, you should expect to pay something for the privilege of borrowing these funds – this is known as interest. (And, we should note that some countries also regulate interest rates personal loans; wherever you borrow money, be sure to stay on the right side of the law to avoid stiff penalties.)

Loans provided by banks, private lenders, or governments usually attach an interest rate to the principal amount rather than a flat fee. The interest rate is the money a lender makes for providing you with the capital you need.

Often, interest rates are applied to the outstanding principle amount. So, if you owe $10,000 currently, your interest will be calculated using that amount multiplied by the interest rate. Next month, when you owe $9,500, your interest is calculated in the same way. And it continues to compound.

And, yes, it can be as complicated as it sounds.

Most loans also have additional fees built into the structure. In most cases, these are administrative fees which are applied once off at the time of loan origination (but not always as different banking systems have different norms). These aren’t principal amounts, but they’re also not interest amounts. All the same, they need to be accounted for in the cost of the loan.

There are also grace periods and repayment periods that affect the total amount you will need to repay. And that’s before working in the effects of interest as it’s applied to the principal amounts over time.

Comparing educational loans

In an ideal world, you would look at a couple of different loans with the same principle in the same currency. (Though, if you’re considering international study, that’s probably not going to be the case.) And, if it was a simple case of principle plus interest rate, you should be able to decide which loan to take rather quickly.

But it’s not an ideal world – and there are those fees, loan terms, and compound interest to consider. That’s where APR comes into play. The annual percentage rate (APR) takes into account all components of a loan so that you can compare apples to apples.

It’s critical to consider APR rather than interest rates because many banks advertise their margins (which are interest rates on top of base rates) and going with the lowest advertised interest rate can be a false economy.

Confused?

Don’t worry; it’s easier to understand when you’ve walked through an example of APR calculations. This video from Prodigy Finance explains it clearly.

Why does it matter?

As you can see from Carlo’s example in the video, there can be massive differences in the total amount paid on a study loan – in many cases, it amounts to thousands of dollars (or pounds, or euros) and your future self will thank you for saving that money.

Post-grad education is an investment in your future; if you consider only the principal amount disbursed or interest rates alone, you may be negating your success without realising it.

Of course, as an international student, you have to find available educational financing first, and that’s not always easy. Your options are tied to the country you come from and the one you’re going to – and your credit history won’t follow you across international borders.

That’s where Prodigy Finance comes into play. Prodigy Finance is a lending platform that provides postgraduate loans to international students from 150 countries attending the world’s top universities, who would otherwise have no alternative access to finance. Loans are extended according to the company’s predictive model rather than your past. Your loan amount is reflective of the amount you can earn post-MBA based on the salaries and metrics of students previously in your situation.

At some schools, loans may cover the full cost of tuition; at others, it’s possible to borrow 80 percent of the total cost of attendance. It’s a little more complex than the formulas banks use, but then, international educational financing is all Prodigy Finance does. Now, celebrating its tenth anniversary, Prodigy Finance makes it possible for students to register and see how much they’ll qualify for before applying to MBA programmes.

The loans are collectively funded by a community of alumni, institutional investors and qualified private investors who receive both a financial and social return. Since 2007, Prodigy Finance has provided more than US$323 million in funding to over 7,100 students with exceptionally strong repayment.

Take a moment to learn more about Prodigy Finance loans and which schools are currently supported. After all, funding shouldn’t be a barrier to education – nor should it keep you up at night; your GMAT prep will do that all by itself.

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Katie studied human rights and graduated with a Bachelor’s degree from Kent State University while working with NGOs in Geneva, Switzerland. Although she has since settled in South Africa, with work towards a Masters in Forced Migration through the University of the Witswatersrand, nothing stops her from being a proud American. Although writing is often solitary work, Katie has been part of the Prodigy Finance Team as the Content Specialist since 2013. She also loves rugby, sloppy Mexican food and Tudor history which means you could find her in any section of a bookstore.

Related Resources:

The Importance of Creating a Strong MBA Budget

Having Trouble Securing a Loan for Your International MBA?

• Making International Student Loans a Prime Investment, a podcast episode

* This blog post is sponsored by our friends at Prodigy Finance

Tags: Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post What are Interest Rates and APR? (And Why are They Important?) appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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International MBA Applicants: You Can’t Afford to Miss This! [#permalink]

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New post 16 Oct 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: International MBA Applicants: You Can’t Afford to Miss This!
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There’s still time to register for The Six Steps to Understanding International Student Loans! Guided by our friends at Prodigy Finance, you’ll learn the terminology of student loans, how to compare loans, how to apply and qualify as an international student – and more. If you’re applying for an MBA or other master’s program as an international student, this is a must.

This is your chance to get a straightforward introduction to the loan process and how you can fund your international master’s degree – all in a free, one-hour webinar.

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Don’t miss it!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post International MBA Applicants: You Can’t Afford to Miss This! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
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Do You Fit With Cornell Johnson? [#permalink]

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New post 17 Oct 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Do You Fit With Cornell Johnson?
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It gives me great pleasure to have for the first time on AST, Judi Byers, the Executive Director of Admissions & Financial Aid at Johnson School of Management at Cornell University. Judi earned her bachelors degree and masters degrees from American University in Washington DC. She also worked for American University’s Kogod School of Business for a little over 10 years before moving to beautiful Ithaca New York in 2015 to become the Executive Director of Admissions & Financial Aid at Johnson School of Management at Cornell University.

Welcome, Judi!

Can you give us an overview of Cornell Johnson’s two-year MBA program? [1:30]

It starts every August. The first semester is built around a core curriculum, to give students a strong foundation in the fundamentals of business. We find that students are either seeking career advancement or changing careers.

In the second semester, students have the opportunity to pursue an Immersion area – there are eight areas of focus – bundles of electives and experiences focused around a career path. We want to prepare them for summer internships with hands-on experience and casework.

Feedback has indicated the immersions are a real differentiator.

The second year is more of an open canvas – there’s more flexibility. There are concentrations for breadth and depth, and elective coursework or the opportunity for dual degree study in hotel, engineering, labor relations, law, and medicine.

There are also 30+ international partners, so students have the opportunity to study abroad. The second year provides the opportunity to customize.

There’s also a 1-year program in Ithaca and the Cornell Tech program. How are they different? [4:40]

For Cornell Tech, we’re looking for students with a strong background in tech – often science and engineering, and often with an entrepreneurial focus.

The one-year program in Ithaca is different – there’s less of a tech focus. It’s really designed for professionals with more work experience, or who have advanced degrees or certifications.

What’s new at Johnson? [6:15]

There are a lot of exciting developments! I’ve been blown away by the growth since I joined.

Cornell Johnson is now part of our College of Business – integration has led to positive developments. There are 3,200 students across the College of Business, and the teaching faculty is one of the largest in the country, with a large operating budget. Integrating three schools helps the alignment across our teaching and recruiting functions.

We’re looking at new opportunities for areas of focus for MBA students in terms of academic specializations.

Another exciting thing: the opening of the Breazzano Family Center for Business Education. It’s important for a couple of reasons – it optimizes our facilities and it’s an early gift from one of our alumni/trustees.

Going back to the Johnson Immersion program – can you give an example of how it works? [11:45]

As I mentioned, the Immersions are a combination of elective courses and a practical component (a hands-on project or case). It allows them to apply their learning in a practical sense Some also include company site visits.

This is in the second semester of the first year. They also take two courses in data and analytics.

Cornell Johnson is located in Ithaca New York. It’s magnificently beautiful, but somewhat remote. Some potential applicants may be concerned that Johnson’s location is a disadvantage when compared to other major business centers. Can you address that concern? [14:40]

It’s geographically located such that there are a lot of positives.

One is the new connectivity with the new Cornell Tech campus.

The residential community promotes close relationships – with each other, faculty, administrators. It facilitates longer-term collegiality and communication. People stay connected long term.

That said – students are excited about sharing some of their time with the Roosevelt Island campus – they have the chance to do short term courses there (on digital marketing and fin tech). So going forward we see greater opportunities to connect Ithaca and Manhattan.

Turning to the application – do you have any advice for Johnson’s essays? [17:50]

Yes.

We have a few prompts. One is a short answer, fill-in-the-blank prompt about short and long-term goals. It’s the start of a conversation, not the end.

Then we have an essay about impact. I see it as a core value of the community. This essay prompt is designed to allow applicants to talk about how they foresee the opportunity to have impact in their careers. Another way to talk about impact is to talk about how an applicant plans to leverage their previous experience to have an impact on the MBA program.

Then we have a prompt that we’ve had for many years – our Table of Contents prompt, which is meant to be a creative opportunity for applicants to tell their story and help us get to know them. Share highlights – personal, professional, obstacles overcome. We’re a small program and who we admit matters to us. The TOC allows us to get to know applicants personally.

What if someone carries the TOC forward? [23:05]

Think about how Cornell ties into your story and helps you write the next chapter.

You get a lot more applicants than you have spots. How do you winnow it down? [24:20]

It’s a very holistic process. We look for students with a diversity of perspectives – geographic, academic, professional. A variety of backgrounds.

We look very carefully at the notion of fit. In a small community the notion of how an individual fits in is important. We look at values.

“Fit” has to do with an alignment of your values with the institution’s values and the experience they offer you.

For a candidate, assessing fit means getting to know the culture and environment – speaking to people in the community, visiting if you can, participating in recruiting events (including virtual events).

What makes fit challenging is that it is relative to your own priorities and decision criteria.

The criteria for fit may vary from candidate to candidate – what it looks like in terms of geography, areas of focus, etc, will vary based on what you need in a program. You need to know what’s important to you.

What can those invited to interview expect? [30:30]

A conversation with either a member of the admissions team of a trained student interviewer.

It’s a conversation about your experiences, your interest in the program, how you see yourself fitting into the program and community.

Do you have advice for applicants applying right now? [31:35]

Make certain you’re applying when you have your best application to put forward. We have four rounds – January tends to be the highest volume. Make sure you’re putting your best foot forward.

Coming back to the essay prompts – there’s a big focus on fit and impact. I encourage applicants to engage with our events – it’ll help your understanding of the school. Get to know members of the community – know whether this is a community that aligns with what you’re looking for.

And do you have advice for someone planning to apply next year or later? [35:15]

With the advantage of time: if you haven’t taken the GMAT or GRE yet, do that – that’s one of the areas that often gives people anxiety, so address it early.

I would encourage doing visits or recruiting events. Participating in partner or affinity groups (eg Forte, Consortium, etc) – these groups provide great support.

Think about your short- and long-term goals, and what’s important to you.

The more applicants understand what’s important to them, the more it’ll reduce the stress.

Recruiting is changing. There are more recruiters, and more opportunities, but the hiring path is more diverse and splintered than it was ten years ago. How is Johnson adapting to those changes? [37:55]

Our team is working closely to maintain an understanding of what the opportunities are. We help facilitate opportunities for grads. We help train for new and emerging career paths – for example, we have a new focus on digital marketing. So our academic side is responding to shifts in the recruiting landscape.

What’s an example of something entrepreneurial and really cool that a Johnson student or alum is doing? [40:20]

Two grads who finished this year created Pure Spinach – hydroponic spinach grown here on campus. They wanted to provide access to fresh organic spinach to people who didn’t have as much access due to climate issues on the east coast. Their product is sold locally, and they’re talking to national chains.

Another cool experience, one of our students had experience working for the Tata Group, and he recently built Mumbai’s largest animal hospital.

What’s coming up at Johnson? [43:23]

The school’s been through a fair amount of growth. We’re looking ahead to more areas of academic focus capitalizing on the Roosevelt Island campus and the integration with the College of Business.

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Related Links:

• Cornell Johnson MBA Programs

• Cornell Johnson College of Business MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

Leadership Immersion at Cornell Johnson

Related Shows:

• Cornell Johnson Straight Out of College: A Young Entrepreneur’s Story

• The Consortium Can Help You Get Your MBA

• UCLA Anderson MBA Admissions According to Dean Alex Lawrence

• What’s New at NYU Stern? A Lot!

• Make a Difference at Michigan Ross: An Interview with Soojin Kwon

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, MBA Admissions

The post Do You Fit With Cornell Johnson? [Episode 229] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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15 Reasons MBA Applicants are Rejected [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: 15 Reasons MBA Applicants are Rejected
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If you are reading this, you are most likely considering applying or in the midst of applying to business school. Your goal is to be admitted, of course, and eliminate any obvious reasons to be rejected. What follows are several of the common reasons people are not offered admission:

1. Low Undergrad GPA

The bad news is there is no way to hide this. You have to submit your transcript, and it will be scrutinized by the admissions office. If you haven’t taken the time to write the optional essay and explain why your GPA is low, and/or you have nothing that shows your academic ability is sufficient to handle the rigor of the MBA curriculum to come (through a high GMAT score or some additional quantitative coursework with strong grades – an algebra or stats course, for example, at a local community college), then you can pretty much guarantee you won’t get an interview, much less be offered admission.

2. Low GMAT Score

Every school has a range for the GMAT, and while the score is taken in combination with the other merits of the application, you must be cognizant that you need to strive to be in the range for your demographic. If you have a relatively low score and there is no evidence of an attempted retake, that shows lack of commitment. If you took it several times and the results stayed low, you should have managed your expectations for admission, and taken advantage of the optional essay to own up to the low score and show other evidence as to why you would still be an excellent candidate and can handle the work.

3. Weak or Insufficient Work Experience

With the average of only three-six years of work experience at the time of matriculation for the bulk of applicants, it is impossible to judge future potential or lack thereof with absolute certainty. While there is no expectation for a candidate to be in a true leadership role, there should at least be some signals of leadership potential, either coming from the employer via promotions or through initiative shown by the applicant when he/she works in teams, starts new projects, or takes responsibility for events and results.

There are also some obvious signs that a candidate is struggling. If you have bounced around to many jobs in a short period of time, that could be perceived as instability/incompetence, especially if the admissions reader is left with no context (hint: use the optional essay). If you have not had any promotions, or been given a significant uptick in responsibilities over time at a company, that also could be a potential red flag.

At the end of the day these schools want to get you hired into good jobs, and you will directly reflect on the school with your performance. If you haven’t had sufficient experience to judge, or the experience does not reflect that you are “going places,” that’s an easy reason to ding.

4. Poor Writing

There are a lot of reasons that essays could be perceived as bad. The most obvious: the use of poor grammar, misspelling, and failure to answer the questions asked. If you haven’t had anyone review your essays prior to admission (preferably someone you trust to be thorough with macro feedback and micro editing), you are relying on yourself to be omniscient. Trust me – no one is (I review and edit resumes and essays all day long, and I did not post this without someone else reviewing and providing feedback first!). By the way, poor writing as a reason for rejection does not just relate to the essays – if the resume and/or short answer questions are written badly, that sloppiness will hurt you as well.

5. Failure to Show Fit

Essays are critical in showing fit, but not exclusively to blame when you don’t. If your essays don’t express true interest in the school being applied to and instead say something along the lines of, “I want to go to [this top MBA program] because of the award-winning faculty and huge network,” you can count on being rejected. Schools want to admit people who are likely to accept their offer, and if you haven’t done your research on which specifics about the program attract you beyond reputation, your superficial thinking will be very obvious, off-putting, and possibly perceived as arrogance.

6. Vague or Unrealistic Goals

If you can’t express your goals in such a way that indicates how an MBA will help you to achieve them, and in particular from the school you are applying to, this omission is another surefire way to get dinged. If you want an MBA just for the prestige, or come across as a serial degree-seeker, you have a problem.

7. Shallow, Generic Responses

If the essays read like you think you are telling the admissions committee what they want to hear, this can also cause rejection. Many schools have open-ended questions, such as, “What are you most passionate about?” I have run into so many clients that in their first drafts have technically answered the question, but only in a business context. These types of questions are intentionally broad to give you the opportunity to really show your uniqueness, which almost universally goes beyond who you are as an employee of a company.

One of my clients in recent years came to me with a draft of an essay answering the question, “Describe a time when you faced a challenge and how you responded.” The draft discussed my client’s role in the development of the first ever app at her company – completely reasonable; total snooze fest. I took the time to brainstorm with her on other challenging situations in her life, and what she ended up writing about was a remote hiking trip where she broke her ankle, with no support for miles around. The story was gripping, and she was admitted!

Think about this kind of question from the perspective of the admissions committee – they read hundreds if not thousands of essays each year. Do you want to put them to sleep with what you write, or have them leap out of their chair to say, “I want to talk to THIS one!!!”

8. Not Answering the Question

I can’t tell you how many essays I have read over the years that fail to answer the question(s). A client has seen “what are your goals” and doesn’t read any more, thinking they’ve got the gist. Every school’s goals essay is worded a little bit differently, so don’t think you can just recycle your essay from one school and use it as is for another school. Many schools also ask multi-part essay questions. A common mistake I see with these types of questions is a failure to distribute the content on a more equal basis – for example, a three-part question which should be about 1/3 for each of the sections is more like 2/3 for one and 1/3 for the other two combined.

If you are in the midst of writing your essays and don’t have the essay question itself at the top of your draft, put it there immediately and refer back to it OFTEN. You’d be surprised how easy it is to get off topic.

[Click here for school-specific application essay tips!]

9. Bad Letters of Recommendation or Poor Judgment on Selection of Recommenders

In my time serving on the Cornell Executive MBA admissions committee, I never saw a letter of recommendation that completely badmouthed a candidate, but I certainly read several tepid letters. If you can’t find people who will sing your praises, or you think they will sing your praises and in fact they don’t, you‘re in trouble.

Closely related to, and perhaps the cause of tepid recommendations is poor judgment in choice of recommenders – for example:

• Your recommendation comes from someone high up in the organization, and she barely knows you.

• You submit a recommendation from a college professor who hasn’t seen you in four years and can’t speak to your ability as a working professional.

Neither recommender will have much of substance to say. In this case, it’s less about their opinion of you than your judgement that puts you in a bad light. There is a plethora of information on Accepted about how to go about selecting recommenders. Ignoring this important decision imperils your admission.

10. Bad Interview

Nothing can sink your chances for admission faster than a poor interview. If you have made it to the interview round, that means the admissions committee believes your candidacy warrants a second look, and you have 30-45 minutes to prove it. If you can’t answer the most basic questions effectively, can’t convince the interviewer the school is your top choice (even if it isn’t), or come across as too nervous (or possibly even worse, too cocky), you’re not going to get in.

11. Lying in your application

Background checks are becoming mainstream at top business schools, and while sometimes they don’t happen until after an offer of admission has been made, you can count on the fact that those checks will be able to discover discrepancies in your application. Don’t lie!

12. Social Media Profiles

If you haven’t had the presence of mind to review your social media accounts (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Snapchat for sure), that could be an issue. In addition to traditional background checks, schools are also increasingly reviewing social media accounts to ensure applicants are not posting or responding to defamatory content.

13. Not Differentiated

Some applicants face stiffer competition for admission than others (looking at you, Indian IT males!). Regardless of your profile, if you haven’t taken the time to really consider your uniqueness and how it will truly benefit your classmates as well as the school, there is little chance of being offered admission. While the temptation may be to just consider your uniqueness from a work/business perspective, the more meaningful way to differentiate yourself is on a personal level. Failure to share anything about yourself beyond your work experience reflects poorly on you.

14. Discrepancies in Writing Quality

If a candidate’s essays are pristine but elements of the online application are barely readable, that looks fishy and raises questions about how much of the essays are the applicant’s writing or about attention to detail. It is understandably tempting to breeze through the online portions of the application without much of a second thought. However, if you haven’t taken sufficient care with that aspect of the application, you could have created a real obstacle to acceptance.

15. No Extracurricular or Community Involvement

If a candidate has no activities other than work, an application reader will wonder how much the person will actively participate in the school community, as well as how that lack of participation might reflect on the school in the future. Understandably, schools want people who are connected to each other and the community at large. At the same time, if an applicant stacks his or her resume with activities just prior to applying, that looks disingenuous and comes across as trying to create a false impression.

In most cases it is not just one thing that sinks an application, but a combination. That said, any one of the reasons I have listed could be the deciding factor against admission. The good news is, most of these reasons for rejection are completely within your control. Make sure none of the above cause you to be dinged!

Eliminate the obstacles to your MBA acceptance when you get your application reviewed by an experienced admissions pro who will make sure you aren’t on the road to rejection! 

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[/b]Jen Weld worked as an admissions consultant and Former Asst. Dir. of Admissions at Cornell’s EMBA program (4 years) prior to joining Accepted. She has an additional 10 years of experience in higher ed and corporate marketing. Want Jen to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

How to Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats, a free webinar

Do Low Stats Sink Your App?

Rejection Review Services

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post 15 Reasons MBA Applicants are Rejected appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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MIT Sloan Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 19 Oct 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: MIT Sloan Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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These essay questions show that MIT seeks applicants who have the judgment and practical skills to take on the challenges that will fly at them as they re-define industries and functions. Applicants who push the boundary of what’s possible and provide “principled leadership” amidst a torrent of change. The essays (including Statement of Purpose) are your main means to show that you possess, as MIT’s website states, “strong leadership performance, global perspective, functional expertise, and innovation.” While the statement of purpose challenges you to succinctly create your applicant portrait, the two essay questions probe how your perspective, ideas, and thinking lead to specific impacts and outcomes. As always, MIT Sloan is interested in what you’ve done – actions you’ve taken and impacts you’ve created – based on your reading of a situation.

Notably, in two out of the three required essays, the question refers to the program’s culture and values. There is no one formula for these elements (I’ve seen people with vastly differing views of what an “improved world” would look like be admitted); the key is that you have such a dimension in your goals and life. Ensure your essays portray your fit in this regard.

In an overall plan for the essays, the statement of purpose works as a positioner, an opening pitch, a frame. In each of the two essays, strategically select experiences that show different facets of you to give a comprehensive view. Also, if possible, discuss a recent experience in at least 1 of the essays, to allow the adcom to see you working at a high level and to show what you’ll bring to the table.

Statement of Purpose:

The MIT Executive MBA Students and Community are: Open, Collaborative and Inventive. Please tell us why you are pursuing the MIT Executive MBA, and what you will contribute to your classmates and the community at MIT. Include examples of success working with organizations, groups, and individuals. For those reapplying, please highlight developments since your last submission. (Limited to one page)

This is your portrait – your candidacy at a glance. It should convey a vivid, immediate sense of you as a person and as a candidate for this program. It should go beyond just facts to present a point of view and a message (theme). Determine your message first, before drafting the essay, and let it guide you in selecting and elaborating the content details.

Beware of a potential pitfall: in discussing the requested examples of success working with organizations, groups, and people, do not repeat your resume in prose format. Select your examples thoughtfully, focusing on those that (a) are truly distinctive and relevant to the EMBA and/or (b) support your goals directly or indirectly, and (c) reflect your message. Make a short, meaningful point about each, such as the insight it lends or its influence on you.

For why you are pursuing the EMBA, of course you’ll discuss your professional goals and objectives. Focus not only on what you want to do, but also why — what you want to accomplish for the organization and/or its customers/market (your “vision”).

The contributions should reference your experience from work or outside work; think of what about you would be most meaningful and interesting to prospective classmates. This element of your response is an opportunity to show that you understand the program.

Essays:

Question 1. The educational mission of the MIT Sloan School of Management is “to develop principled, innovative leaders who improve the world.” Please discuss how you will contribute toward advancing this mission based on examples of past work and activities. (Limited to one page)

In answering this question, clarify what “principled, innovative leader” and “improving the world” mean to you. These points represent your point of view, your perspective – they should be short (sometimes even a phrase suffices), but without them this essay lacks focus. The bulk of the essay will focus on action – your examples of past work and activities that make the case for how you have been, and will continue to be, a principled, innovative leader who improves the world. The key to making this a gripping, memorable essay is strong experiences and examples combined with your reflection on them pertaining to the essay’s theme. End by briefly discussing how you will build on these experiences to be such a leader in the future.

Question 2. Please tell us about a time when you introduced an idea that changed the way in which your organization approached a business challenge or opportunity. Comment on the factors considered, and the barriers/obstacles faced. (Limited to one page)

This question requires you to combine two realms: thought (idea) and action (you introduced…). MIT Sloan seeks people who have strength in both areas – who have vision and can execute that vision.

A suggested approach is to draft it straightforwardly, as a story: start with your idea and what prompted it, and then narrate your action – how you introduced the idea, and how you implemented it. Conclude with the results, clarifying the change in approach to the opportunity or challenge.

There are 2 ways to make this approach work. Option A: As you narrate, include and “zoom in” on factors you considered and the barriers you encountered in the process; make them part of the story. Option B: narrate the story, and then in a concluding paragraph discuss the factors you considered and the barriers/obstacles faced.

Additional Information (Optional). Please use this section to share information that you would like the MIT Executive MBA Admissions Committee to know, but could not share elsewhere in the application. Examples of such information are explanations of missing information (such as poor grades or resume gaps), inventions, hobbies, awards, or publications.

• Limit the number of pages; less is more.

• We cannot follow links to watch videos. All necessary information should be written in text.

• If you add multiple documents to this section, the most important should be added last (so it will be on the top).

There are two types of information this essay may include: the “must have” and the “enhance.” Must-have includes the type of information and explanations alluded to in the question – points that address issues and/or gaps. Discuss them succinctly and straightforwardly. Enhancements are everything else, and you’ll use sound judgment in deciding what is worth a busy adcom reader’s time. Don’t chat about a casual hobby that you happen to do – remember this is optional (you really don’t want the adcom to think, “Why am I reading this?”); do discuss meaningful items that shed relevant light on your candidacy.

If you would like professional guidance with your MIT Sloan EMBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the MIT Sloan EMBA application.

Deadlines:

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***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Ace the EMBA: Expert Advice for Rising Executives, a free guide

Executive MBA Applicants: 4 Immediate Action Items

3 Tips for Writing a Winning EMBA Essay

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post MIT Sloan Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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How This Leader Knew MIT’s Sloan Fellows Program Was Right for Her [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: How This Leader Knew MIT’s Sloan Fellows Program Was Right for Her
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Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad?

Asha: I pursued my Bachelor’s in Business Administration (BBA) in Finance at The George Washington University in Washington, DC. Following graduation, I developed a career leading strategic, financial and operational initiatives in the private, governmental and philanthropic sectors. I saw the value of applying innovative solutions across sectors and their ability to strengthen governance, improve education, and transform lives.

Accepted: Where did you attend business school? When did you graduate?

Asha: I enrolled in and completed the MIT Sloan School of Management’s Sloan Fellows Master’s in Business Administration (MBA) Program for 2016-17. This full-time, in-residence, 12-month MBA program prepares global mid-career executives with the management skills to magnify their impact as leaders. My cohort of 110 students hailed from 35 countries (76% from outside of the US), with an average of 14 years of work experience. Our core classes and seminars focused on global perspectives, innovation and leadership.

Accepted: What have you been doing since graduation?

Asha: In the final weeks of school, I was honored to be nominated for the three-year volunteer role of Class Communicator, along with three other Sloan Fellow classmates. Also, I was unanimously elected as a Member-At-Large on the Board of Directors for the MIT Sloan Club of DC.

Since graduating in June, I relocated to Buenos Aires, Argentina to continue on the entrepreneurial journey to better understand the Latin American market. With my sharpened toolkit from the Sloan Fellows Program, I am ready to explore my leadership skills in this new setting through the implementation of new strategies, integration of company responsibilities and elevating brand recognition worldwide.

Accepted: How did you learn about MIT Sloan? When did you know it was the right “fit” for you?

Asha: I learned about MIT Sloan from Linda Abraham, Founder and President of Accepted. When she heard of my career trajectory and potential school choices, she recommended the Sloan Fellows Program. I am so glad that she did! From reading about their mission of “developing principled, innovative leaders who improve the world and to generate ideas that advance management practice” to their action learning labs, I realized that MIT Sloan was the “right fit” for me. The program duration of one year, the ability to cross-register for courses across MIT and Harvard as well as the location in Cambridge, MA added to the decision. Furthermore, I was awarded a partial Forté Fellow scholarship, which was a great bonus to the whole package.

Accepted: Tell me about the application process! Did you experience any hiccups or challenges along the way? How did you overcome them?

Asha: One week before I submitted the application, I attended a dinner with the program director and a few alumni. It was a great way to learn about the program, ask candid questions and see the dynamic between Sloan Fellows. One of the alumni in attendance offered to review my essays, which was very helpful. I also purchased the Application Final Check package from Accepted to ensure that my entire MIT Sloan application was perfect. A couple of months later, I attended an open house to see the campus, meet other candidates and ensure that MIT Sloan was indeed the right choice for me. Finally, I had my interviews via Skype with the admissions director and program director.

Accepted: Looking back, how did you prepare for the GMAT? Did you feel the best prepared on test day?

Asha: I was able to take advantage of a GMAT waiver as part of the MIT Sloan Fellows Program application process. However, I understand that the program no longer accepts waivers. Applicants now have to take the GMAT or the Executive Assessment.

Accepted: What was your favorite part about MIT Sloan’s MBA program?

Asha: The best part of the MIT Sloan experience are the people. The students are going to have impact on our world – you see this behavior in their daily actions. I found the environment at MIT Sloan to foster leadership opportunities. For example, within my program, I was elected by 40% of the class to represent them on the Sloan Senate (student government). Then, with another Sloan Fellow, I co-founded and presided over the MIT Sloan Infrastructure and Project Finance Club, which hosted a dozen events for its 250+ members (it grew to be one of the top 10 MIT Sloan clubs by membership). Finally, I worked on two early stage tech startups with my Sloan Fellow classmates, solving education (BuscaTuClase.com) and transportation (Pirca) issues in Latin America. We conducted primary and secondary market research, participated in contests/pitch events in the MIT entrepreneurial ecosystem and launched pilots in local communities.

Accepted: Lastly, can you share a few tips for those students who are just starting out on their business school journey?

Asha: If you are a woman, please consider participating in the Forté Foundation MBA Launch Program. It is a well-planned 10-month journey through the MBA application process with like-minded women.

Also, based on the MBA Launch Program advice, you may find it easier to prioritize 1) taking the GMAT, 2) focusing on the application, then 3) scheduling the school visits.

Want to learn more about Asha? You can follow her on Twitter or connect on LinkedIn. Thank you for Asha for sharing your story and advice – we wish you much success! 

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school applications, check out our catalog of MBA admissions services.

Do you want to be featured in Accepted’s blog? If you want to share your b-school journey with the world (or at least with our readers), email us at bloggers@accepted.com.

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Related Resources:

• MIT Sloan Fellows Essay Tips & Deadlines

Too Old for an MBA? Check Out 3 Outstanding MBA and EMBA Alternatives, a podcast episode

• How Forté Helps Women Get into Business and Stay in Business, a podcast episode

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Are You Prepared for Your EMBA Application Essay Questions? [#permalink]

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New post 22 Oct 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Are You Prepared for Your EMBA Application Essay Questions?
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The essay: the part of the EMBA application where you have the chance to speak directly to the adcom and show them who you are – and why an EMBA from their school is crucial for the next phase of your career. That’s a lot of work for an essay to do, and it’s natural to feel a little anxious.

We’ve got you covered. Our exclusive guide to the Top Executive MBA Questions: How to Answer Them Right walks you through all of the essay questions asked by top EMBA programs, providing expert analysis and specific strategies you can apply to each one. We’ve revised and updated the guide for this year’s questions, to help you prepare effectively.

Ideally, you only want to apply to business school once. We’ve been through the application process thousands of times, guiding applicants like you to success at elite programs. That breadth and depth of experience has helped us create the strategies in Top Executive MBA Questions: How to Answer Them Right.

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Download your copy today, and start writing!

* The guide will be continuously updated with more school-specific essay tips, so check back soon for more expert advice!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

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Are You Ready to Apply to Chicago Booth? [#permalink]

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New post 23 Oct 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Are You Ready to Apply to Chicago Booth?
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It’s time to get serious about your MBA application plans. Will you be at your ideal school next fall? Or will you be wishing you’d worked harder on your applications – and preparing for another attempt?

Applying to an elite program like Chicago Booth requires thoughtful preparation – you need to show that you’re a great fit, and you also need to stand out in a crowded applicant pool.

To help you learn how to do just that, we’ve created our webinar, Get Accepted to Chicago Booth.

Accepted’s founder and president, Linda Abraham, will walk you through each piece of the Chicago Booth MBA application, giving you the keys to application success. You’ll learn a proven four-part strategy for approaching your application – and you’ll understand what the adcom is really looking for. All in one hour – and it’s free!

Don’t miss Get Accepted to Chicago Booth – reserve your spot today.

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Tags: MBA Admissions

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The Chicago Booth Approach – and You [#permalink]

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New post 24 Oct 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: The Chicago Booth Approach – and You
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Booth wants its graduates to “shape the future,” nothing less – that quote is right on its website. And this aim drives its unique approach that rests on 3 core components:

• Analytic inquiry

• Intellectual freedom

• Collaborative community

Well, some of these words we see a lot these days in MBA land: analytic, collaborative, community. The other words – inquiry, intellectual, freedom – not so much. Those less common words get at Booth’s distinctive aspects. Let’s parse these 3 phrases.

Analytic Inquiry: Sounds kind of dry. Of course, it’s about rigorous methodologies and willingness (for some passionate souls, compulsion) to probe, explore, find the root meaning or cause. Yet, Booth also asserts that this process “can move you from discovery to impact [emphasis added].” Impact involves action. So, in the Booth perspective, not really so dry. In fact, exciting. Going from the ether to real, concrete.

Intellectual Freedom: Impact is important in b-school and in Booth. But Booth also reflects the culture of the University of Chicago, renowned as an intellectual powerhouse. So, Booth isn’t just high-level vocational training; it wants students who thrill to explore new topics, challenge their own assumptions, push the boundaries of their capabilities, play with ideas, engage with contrarian views. Not just to kill time, but ultimately because it’s productive, it informs analytic inquiry. It helps you form or identify the question you need to be answering. And intellectual freedom means you can do this without looking over your shoulder or finger wags. Intellectual freedom is essential for true analytic inquiry, because the latter must not be hindered by presuppositions.

Collaborative Community: It’s worth quoting the website here because almost every word is potent: “A global community of diverse backgrounds and perspectives bonded by a shared sense of curiosity leads to deeper understanding.” Many top b-schools are global and diverse, but at Booth, the quality of curiosity is the common bond among the multifaceted groups. At Booth, curiosity drives collaboration, because collaboration enhances learning through the aggregated knowledge and the diverse perspectives it entails.

Of course, curiosity also drives analytic inquiry that is energized by intellectual freedom. Hence, these three elements create a Mobius strip of sorts: each fuels, and is fueled by, the others continuously.

Given this “Chicago Approach,” how do you show fit with the program?

Don’t explain how you exercise analytic inquiry, value intellectual freedom, and contribute to collaborative communities.

Do show how you exercise analytic inquiry, value intellectual freedom, and contribute to collaborative communities.

Anybody can say they do these things. Showing that you do them makes your story credible. And, because showing necessarily involves detail and anecdote, it will also make your application interesting. Finally, because only you will have that specific experience, showing will also differentiate and distinguish you from other applicants, even those from similar geographic, industry, and functional backgrounds.

Keep in mind, your application should show your fit with this Chicago Approach holistically. You don’t have to – indeed shouldn’t – apply it mechanically like a formula.

Here are some practical tips for integrating the Chicago Approach into your application naturally:

• Your resume should identify results, a synonym for impacts, which in Booth worldview is where analytic inquiry ideally leads.

• In your main essay, in selecting and conceptualizing your topic, look for something that centers on and illuminates experiences reflecting the “Chicago Approach.” Build your case with anecdote and example.

• If your recommenders welcome input, discuss with them this Chicago Approach so that they can select points that will align with it.

In your interview, discuss your understanding of and appreciation for the Chicago Approach directly if/when asked why you want to attend Booth. If you are asked about your goals, you might also explain how they necessitate the approach that Chicago employs. Also, find opportunities to weave in examples and stories that reflect elements of the Chicago Approach.

Good luck with Chicago Booth! Having worked with many successful Chicago Booth MBA applicants, I would be glad to help you craft an application that brings out your unique fit with this great program.

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Fitting In & Standing Out: The Paradox at the Heart of Admissions, a free guide

Chicago Booth MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

Chicago Booth Student on Finding the Right Fit, Achieving His Goals

Tags: MBA Admissions

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1 Doctor, 2 Entrepreneurs: Eliza Morrison & Andrew Nimmich [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: 1 Doctor, 2 Entrepreneurs: Eliza Morrison & Andrew Nimmich
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Meet Eliza Morrison and M4 Andrew Nimmich, the CEOs of Tutor the People and Nerdly.

Both of today’s guests attended the College of Charleston in South Carolina where Eliza Morrison majored in French, Russian and Comparative Literature. Andrew Nimmich also attended the College of Charleston and CUNY Brooklyn College and majored in Pre-Medical Studies. He is currently an M4 at BU’s School of Medicine. They are both the co-founders and CEOs of Tutor the People (founded in 2012) and nerdly (founded in 2016).

Can you tell us a little about yourself? [1:33]

Eliza: I grew up in Charleston. I was always passionate about language and literature.

I started out at a small liberal arts school, Goucher College (in Baltimore) for one year, then transferred to the College of Charleston where I studied French and literature. I decided to add Russian since I’d studied French my whole life.

I also tutored French and Russian, which set the stage to pursue tutoring and education.

Andrew: I grew up in Charleston as well – we actually knew each other in high school. I started out at the University of Miami in Florida, then decided to transfer back home to the College of Charleston. I studied accounting. I’d considered medicine but I wasn’t entirely sure what I wanted to do.

After graduating with a degree in accounting, I moved to New York City where I worked as a billing clerk in a legal office. I decided I wanted to go back to Charleston and study premed prereqs – that’s when Eliza and I started dating. We later went back to NY, where I took advanced science classes at CUNY while applying to med school. And I ended up at BU.

What’s the backstory to Tutor the People and Nerdly? [5:20]

Eliza: We moved to New York – I’d graduated and he’d just finished his postbac. He had experience studying for the MCAT and I had experience tutoring. We were both a little frustrated by the job opportunities. So we combined our experiences and started Tutor the People.

At the time we were living in Chinatown over a fish market – we were really inspired by our surroundings every day.

Andrew: I’d taken the MCAT and I’d done some of the more corporate courses, but I wasn’t a huge fan of the experience I’d had – it wasn’t individualized and felt very corporate. Our idea was to have really smart tutors and make it one-on-one that was comparable to the price of classroom. We also had this idea that for every hour that a student bought we did an hour of volunteer work – tutoring homework for kids with incarcerated parents. (As we’ve started to scale up that’s been hard to scale.)

What’s the difference between TTP and Nerdly? [10:10]

With TTP, there’s more administration – we do general academic advising, personal statement help, application guidance; we work with a lot of premed applicants.

Nerdly is a marketplace where students can connect directly with tutors.

There are a lot of tutoring platforms. What differentiates Nerdly? [11:25]

Andrew: You’re right, it’s a crowded market. What I like about Nerdly is that we put a lot of emphasis on user experience.

Our tagline is you can find and meet with a credible tutor in less than a minute. You can scan through 15 tutors in less than a minute and see the subjects they’re verified it – then go to an instant session in less than a minute.

I think once we roll out the final version in the next few months you’ll see it’s easy to use.

Starting a tutoring platform is a long way from tutoring on the side as a college student – how did that evolve? [14:05]

Eliza: It’s very much a collaborative effort – I’m constantly learning. I’ve been lucky to meet some talented people.

I’ve considered going back to earn an MBA or a MS in computer science.

Andrew, how did you decide to pursue medicine? [16:00]

Medicine is the face of my life. It influences everything I do. Even how we run our business – I’m influenced by how hospital teams our run.

I like solving problems. In medicine, you’re solving complex problems and making someone better. For me, business is interesting, but medicine is what grounds me.

There are aspects of business you can apply to medicine and aspects of medicine you can apply to business. Medicine makes me more efficient in business.

Looking back to when you applied to med school, what was the hardest part of the application process? [20:09]

I was having a talk with one of our students the other day about his personal statement – he had great experiences but was having trouble deciding what to write about. I told him, you have an amazing story here! I think when you’re applying it can be hard to know what’s the best part of you to put forward to a committee – or to have the confidence to do it.

I think the most challenging part of being a premed is knowing how much of yourself to bring into medicine.

Looking back at your med school interviews, what was the most memorable interview question you were asked? [24:36]

There weren’t really any specific questions that stood out. The ethics questions are always interesting. And there’s always the “tell me about yourself” question.

One of my interviews was with a faculty member who was originally from Italy, and we just talked about his experience in Europe and my recent travels.

What do you like best about BU? [25:47]

BU does a great job preparing its students to be really good clinicians. You have great residents and attendings – really dedicated to teaching and mentorship. I just met with one of my mentors today.

They challenge you but give you the support you need to rise to the challenge.

What would you like to see changed? [27:00]

That’s a good question. I do really like the school! I’d have to think about it.

The only thing I’d change – and I think they’re working on it – is getting earlier clinical exposure. And I think that’s where med school is headed.

How do you see yourself balancing medicine and your business ventures? [30:00]

I’m applying to residency now – in surgery, which requires a lot of time.

So I’m taking a step back. At the beginning Eliza and I did a lot of the work ourselves before we hired a staff. As I’ve gone through med school I’ve scaled it back, though I’m still involved.

Eliza, what’s in your crystal ball for Nerdly and TTP? [31:47]

A lot of things! We’re constantly looking for ways to customize our approach to tutoring and student learning. As we go we’ll learn more about how we can integrate new technologies.

Any last wisdom for premeds, entrepreneurs, med students? [33:40]

Eliza: Don’t give up – it’s a long road. When you’re building something it doesn’t happen overnight. Build a strong team where everyone can contribute.

Andrew: I think the not giving up thing is really important in business and medicine. Medicine is a tracked road where you know the number of years. Business is more open. You just have to stay the course and keep a positive attitude.

With medicine or entrepreneurship, never go it alone. Rely on the brilliant people you work with.

It only stops when you quit.

How do you keep balance? [36:40]

Eliza: Make sure to maintain the things in life that make you happy. I’ve gotten myself on a regular exercise routine. It’s important to eat healthy, sleep properly.

Since we live in Boston we try to go to the mountains in New Hampshire, the coast in Maine – get out in nature.

Andrew: I’m a big believer in having something you do for fun.

Also, I really love what I do!

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Related Links:

Nerdly

Tutor the People

Related Shows:

Be a Happy Doc!

Medicinal Magic and Magical Medicine: An Interview with M3 David Elkin

• M3 and Entrepreneur: An Interview with David Eisenberg, Co-Founder of PreMD Tracker

MD/MPH Tulane Student Tells Her Story

• The Man Behind Active Learning at UVM’s Medical School

• Get Accepted to Hofstra Medical

• A New Approach to Training Doctors: The University of Connecticut’s M Delta Curriculum

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post 1 Doctor, 2 Entrepreneurs: Eliza Morrison & Andrew Nimmich [Episode 230] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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5 Steps to Follow After You Receive Your MBA Interview Invite [#permalink]

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New post 25 Oct 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 5 Steps to Follow After You Receive Your MBA Interview Invite
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Congratulations! You have made it through one colossal hurdle. Follow these 5 steps to best prepare for the next stage of the MBA admissions process:

1. Relax!

Take a deep breath. Anxiety will not help you in the interview or for your next step in the process: interview preparation.

2. Review your application and resume.

Get to know your application inside and out. Review each detail and ask yourself: “What would not have happened, had I not been a member of (fill in the blank) organization?” Ask it again and again and quantify your results. Did you increase revenue? Decrease costs? Be ready to address key decision points in your life and add context to facts provided in the application.

3. Read up on interview advice.

Review our website for MBA interview tips and read our admissions guide, MBA Interview Prep: How to Ace Your Interviews. Check Beat the GMAT and GMAT Club for school-specific feedback from those who interviewed R1.

4. Research the school.

Comb through the school’s website and speak with students, alumni, and faculty. Think about your desire to attend that school and why you would be a proud alum of that program. Be prepared to show how you meet the school’s criteria for admission.

5. Schedule your interview.

The admissions committee will never get to know how truly wonderful you are unless you schedule that interview! Get it on your calendar and their calendar. If you will be flying or driving a long distance, plan to arrive the day before. Leave time for commuting, getting lost, and parking. Be early.

Congrats again, and good luck at your interview!

Let’s get started! Check out Accepted’s Mock Interview Packages for your best chance of impressing those b-school interviewers!

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Related Resources:

Perfect Answers to MBA Interview Questions, a free guide

Prepare for Interviews with Positive Imagery

3 Day-Of Tips for Acing Your MBA Interview

Tags: MBA Admissions

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University of Washington Foster School of Business MBA Essay Tips & De [#permalink]

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New post 26 Oct 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: University of Washington Foster School of Business MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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Are you seeking an MBA program with a strong record of job placement in the technology industry or consulting? Then the University of Washington Foster School of Business may make an excellent choice for you. A full 52% of the class of 2016 joined the Technology industry after graduation, and 23% joined consulting firms such as McKinsey, Accenture, and BCG. For those joining industry, they are functionally concentrated in roles in marketing – 32% of the class – and finance/accounting – 21% of the class. Yes, Foster is a somewhat regional school as 86% of graduates stay in Washington State after graduation, but that also means that there is a strong local alumni network in Washington’s startup and technology ecosystem – think Amazon, Microsoft, and EMC – where many of its 54,000 alumni are concentrated.

Foster has two required and one optional essay. My tips are below in blue.

Essays:

Essay 1. Post-MBA Plans (750 words maximum)

Tell us your ideas about what lies ahead for you in your career. What are the gaps or deficiencies currently preventing you from pursuing these potential career paths? How do you plan to use your time in the Foster MBA program to fill these gaps and advance your career?

This is a nice amount of space to explain what you’ve gained so far in your career and what you need to learn to reach your career goals. As with any goals essay, make sure to show the connection between your future goals and the career you have established thus far. At least half of this essay should discuss the gaps/deficiencies in your knowledge and skills and how Foster’s curriculum and activities will fill them.

Essay 2. Inspiring Experience Essay (500 words maximum)

Tell us about an experience that inspired or confirmed your decision to pursue the MBA.

The experience that you share in this essay not only has to have inspired you to pursue the MBA, it needs to inspire the admissions committee to want to meet you! Experiences in which you have stepped out of your comfort zone to lead new initiativesand make exciting impacts will demonstrate that you have the potential to thrive at Foster and in your future career.

Essay 3. Optional essay (500 words maximum)

Include this essay if you have additional information you believe would be helpful to the admissions committee in considering your application.

Most people cannot be summarized in two essays. If that is the case for you, then you should consider submitting this additional, optional essay. Obviously, you can use this space to explain a gap or GMAT/GPA weakness, but if you do so, I recommend sharing some additional information to assuage any of the Admissions Committee’s concerns. For example, if your Verbal GMAT score is lower than you would have liked, you might consider sharing an example of your strong communication and presentation skills to counterbalance that weakness.

Resume:

Outline your work experience in reverse chronological order. Be sure to include company name, a brief description of the organization (or a web address), your job title, and detailed information about your responsibilities and achievements.

Feel free to use up to three pages for your resume, and include all significant work experience since graduating from high school. Include educational background as well as your activities and community involvement.

This is one of my favorite parts of the Foster application. You cannot fit all of your achievements into your application essays or the little text boxes in the application, so go ahead and share details of your accomplishments in your resume. The three-page limit allows you to describe the challenges you overcame and impacts you made in each professional role and in the community.

Video Interview:

All applicants will be asked to submit a video interview, and will receive an email within 3-4 business days after the application deadline to which they applied with instructions on recording the video interview. The video interview allows us to get to know you better and to assess your communication skills and your ability to think on your feet as we review your application and consider your candidacy.

Once applicants receive the video interview invitation via e-mail, they will have approximately one week to complete this requirement. The email will provide instructions on recording the video interview. Applicants can test their video and sound before recording their video interview, answer practice video interview questions, and ask for technical support if needed within the video interview system. The email instructions will include the deadline to submit the video interview, and applicants must complete this requirement in order for their application to remain under review.

The video interview must be submitted in order for the application to be reviewed. Applicants will be contacted if they are selected for an admissions interview later in the application review process.

A growing trend in MBA admissions is this addition of online automated video interviews to complement the picture an applicant presents of himself in his written application. Questions are randomly generated from hundreds in a database and are not in any way linked to the content of your application. You may be asked to describe your strengths and weaknesses, for example, or tell about a recent project you initiated at work or even what you do in your free time. You will have 90 seconds to respond and can even press the space bar to stop recording if you finish your response in advance of that limit.

The purpose of the video exercise is, as Foster says, to see how you “think on your feet.” However, it also gives the Foster admissions committee a chance to assess your presence and delivery. The admissions office will be judging your ease of speech and personality more than they will be seeking signs of your drive or measuring your ambition during the video exercise. Since more employers are using video as a screening tool, Foster also wants to see how you will appear to a potential employer.

If you would like professional guidance with your Foster School of Business MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit  for the FSOB MBA application. 

University of Washington Foster School of Business 2017 -18 MBA Application Deadlines:

The Foster Full-time MBA Program offers one intake per year—each fall. You may apply to any of the below deadlines, however, you may only submit one application per academic year.

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* Round 2 is the final deadline for international applicants.

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Jennifer Bloom has been a consultant with Accepted for 19 years and is a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW). She is an expert at crafting application materials that truly differentiate you from the rest of the driven applicant pool. If you would like help with your application, Jennifer can suggest a number of options that work with any budget. Want Jennifer to help you get accepted? Click here!
 

Related Resources:

Why do You Need an MBA? 

What is an Accomplishment?

• 7 Signs An Experience Belongs In Your Application Essay

Tags: MBA Admissions

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MBA Funding for International Students: On Demand Webinar! [#permalink]

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New post 27 Oct 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: MBA Funding for International Students: On Demand Webinar!
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If you missed our special webinar on The Six Steps to Understanding International Student Loans, don’t worry – you can now view it free, on-demand!

International students face a special set of challenges when it comes to financing business school abroad. To help you through this process, we partnered with our friends at Prodigy Finance for this webinar. This advice is all yours – free, any time.

Watch it now!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

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Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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With the “Chicago Approach,” Who Gets into Booth? [#permalink]

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New post 29 Oct 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: With the “Chicago Approach,” Who Gets into Booth?
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This is part 2 in a series about the “Chicago Approach.” If you missed part 1, check it out here.

Introducing 4 Chicago Booth Students:

Qi: A female Chinese investment banker (who is also a fashion blogger).

Goals: A leadership role in Chinese PE or VC focusing on consumer goods following a stint in private equity in the US.

Jay: An American male clean energy entrepreneur/independent consultant.

Goals: Join a young clean-energy venture still in growth phase, leading its business development.

Sandeep: An Indian male working in global supply chain IT.

Goals: Strategy consulting, with focus on pharma manufacturing.

Marya: A Russian female high school assistant principal.

Goals: Start up an Internet-based language-instruction venture.

As you can see, despite Booth’s reputation as a finance school, it seeks and admits people from a wide range of industries and sectors. From my perspective shaped by 18+ years of experience, these four examples (to preserve confidentiality, these profiles are fictional composites of successful Booth applicants I have worked with, not actual clients) together represent the exciting and impressive scope of admitted Booth students.

They’re not all even quant geeks! So, what do they have in common?

They all demonstrated in their applications an affinity for rigorous analytic exploration of issues, problems, challenges, and opportunities, for two reasons: they are curious to learn the truth, and they find the analytic process itself exciting. E.g., Jay discussed in his essay how his consulting led him to feel dissatisfied with existing business models for wind and solar power, and since he deeply believed in the need for these technologies, he started to analyze the situation. These qualities relate to the ANALYTIC INQUIRY component of the Chicago Approach (see preceding post).

<< Register for our webinar, Get Accepted to Chicago Booth! >>

They all conveyed their willingness and ability to grapple with the reality that they find – and it was clear that they are energized by doing so, even when it’s difficult. E.g., while Sandeep was delivering efficiencies in global pharmaceutical supply chains, he learned that a plant in Romania was consistently encountering quality failures. Although product quality failure was not his responsibility, he decided to review the plant’s supply process to verify its integrity, and discovered a sourcing inconsistency due to an ingredient shortage. Along with alerting the senior managers immediately, he talked individually and confidentially with parties involved to learn as much as he could qualitatively about the failure. His reaction relates to the INTELLECTUAL FREEDOM component of the Chicago Approach. While concerned about practical implications and impacts, Sandeep was also driven to understand the actual problem deeply and thoroughly and knew that it wasn’t just formulaic; he pursued different perspectives to flesh out the context. (Aware of the risk of going beyond his own job parameters, in exercising intellectual freedom he applied social IQ so as not to step on toes or raise turf concerns.)

All these successful applicants presented in their applications (essay, resume, interviews, etc.) positive outcomes they have achieved and constructive differences they have made that were the result of group effort. E.g., while leading a stream of due diligence for a prospective transaction, Qi discovered possible environmental lapses in the African subsidiary of an otherwise attractive company. She convened an informal group of people with relevant experience and knowledge to analyze and provide perspective on the situation and its ramifications for the prospective deal. While the group did not reach consensus on the actual risk, they did agree with her encapsulation of their contrasting findings, which she presented with her recommendation to pursue the deal and factor in cost for environmental remediation – and they agreed to be available should further questions arise. Qi in turn offered to give a “third eye” review of her colleague’s evaluation of the Chinese cleantech sector about which she knew a good deal. This story, portraying the “flow” of group effort as Qi’s modus operandi represents COLLABORATIVE COMMUNITY in the “Chicago Approach.”

While I’ve emphasized one element of the Chicago Approach triad in each of these stories, it’s clear that all these people (and Marya too!) reflect all these elements. Equally important, they have effectively presented that fact in their Booth applications. And given the outcome of those applications, the adcom clearly saw their fit with and understanding of the Chicago Booth MBA program.

I would welcome the chance to help you do likewise in your Booth applications.

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Fitting In & Standing Out: The Paradox at the Heart of Admissions, a free guide

Chicago Booth MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

Focus on Fit, a podcast episode

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post With the “Chicago Approach,” Who Gets into Booth? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Chicago Booth’s Class of 2019 Profile [#permalink]

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New post 30 Oct 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Chicago Booth’s Class of 2019 Profile
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Here’s a look at who makes up Chicago Booth’s class of 2019, taken from the Booth website:

• Class size: 582

• Average GPA: 3.6

• GPA range: 2.72-4.0

• Average student age: 28

• Countries represented: 59

• U.S. minority students: 27%

• International students: 36%

• Gender: 40% female, 60% male

• Average GMAT: 730

• GMAT range: 620-790

• GRE: 7%

• Average work experience: 5 years

Breakdown of Undergraduate Majors:

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Are you competing for a spot in Booth’s next class? Find out what you need to be accepted into Booth and what you can do to enhance your chances of getting in by joining our webinar, Get Accepted to Chicago Booth!

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Related Resources:

Best MBA Programs, a guide to selecting the right one

Chicago Booth 2017-18 MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines

Chicago Booth Student on Finding the Right Fit, Achieving His Goals

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Chicago Booth’s Class of 2019 Profile appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Chicago Booth’s Class of 2019 Profile   [#permalink] 30 Oct 2017, 09:01

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