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Georgetown McDonough MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 13 Sep 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Georgetown McDonough MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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One major change to Georgetown McDonough’s application this year: A new essay prompt with a little more focus, but with the same word limit as last year’s question. The video question is basically the same as last year.

About a year ago I interviewed Georgetown McDonough’s Dean of Admissions, Shari Hubert, for our Admission Straight Talk podcast. While the main topic of the podcast is the evolving nature of the MBA job search, Dean Hubert did discuss the application changes and the reasons for them in the podcast. I highly recommend you listen to the entire interview. However, if you don’t have time for the 40-minute interview, make time for the portion discussing last year’s application, which starts at 28:30.

My comments are in blue below.

Essays:

We want to hear your story. When responding to our required essays, be authentic and take time to reflect on your goals and past experiences. Craft a response that explains how these experiences led you to pursue an MBA.

Essay 1:

Please answer the following essay question in 500 words or less: “Describe a defining moment when you were challenged and exceeded expectations.” The moment can be a professional or personal one. If personal, then please also include how it had an impact on your professional development.

This question is looking for an experience where you show resilience and strength of character and where the experience was profoundly influential. Give them what they’re looking for.

Here’s a possible approach to answering this question: Start with the challenge and then describe how you dealt with it and how the results of your actions exceeded expectations. Finally, relate how this experience influenced you in a defining, meaningful way. I’m not talking about a momentary celebration, award, or bonus. If it’s “defining” it had to have long-term and significant impact. Ideally show how you are still learning the lessons you learned as a result of this experience today. And if you chose a personal experience, make sure you describe the experience’s impact on you as a professional.

<< For expert guidance with your Georgetown essays, check out our MBA Application Package!>>

Video Essay:

We ask that you introduce yourself to your cohort in one minute or less. The Admissions Committee would like for you to appear in person during part of your video, and we strongly encourage you to speak outside of the experiences we can read on your resume. Use this video as an opportunity to bring life to your application. Please upload it to an accessible website (such as Youtube, Vimeo, Youku, or Tudou), and submit the direct video URL into your online application. Please note that we cannot accept private or password-protected videos. For more instructions, view our Video Essay Guide.

This is one of those questions when you are not supposed to think about the fact that your essay is being read by admissions people. Address your peers, your professional network to-be, and your future friends i.e. your classmates. And you’re supposed to assume that your peers have read your resume. You certainly don’t want to bore them by telling them what they just read.

What would you want them to know about you?

Your future friends (and the adcom) are looking for more than just spreadsheet skills or professional mojo here, although they might creep in. Balance personal and professional. As Georgetown says, “bring life to your application” with this video. If you used Essay 1 to discuss a professional experience, use the video essay to reveal something that is not work-related. If you used Essay 1 for a personal example of resilience, then I still wouldn’t focus exclusively on work here, because you are addressing your peers and classmates here.

Take the time to sketch out what you want to say in these 60 seconds. I don’t recommend that you write it out and memorize it, but definitely have a plan. And then practice. It’s really strange to speak to a camera. The camera gives no feedback, has no affect, and is completely wooden in responsiveness. You may be tempted to behave similarly. Bad idea. Either practice by yourself and view the videos of your practices so that you improve, or ask an encouraging friend to film you so that at least you have your friend’s reactions to respond to.

What is the Georgetown admissions committee looking for in this video? They are trying to imagine you as a member of their community. They also want to see how you present yourself without going to the trouble and expense of an interview. They want to assess your presence: how will you appear to a potential employer?

Optional Essays:

1. If you are not currently employed full-time, use this essay to provide information about your current activities. (250 words or fewer)

Show them that you are using this period of unemployment to acquire new skills, contribute to your community, or grow in some way.

2. Please provide any information that you would like to add to your application that you have not otherwise included. (500 words or fewer)

Please see “Optional Essays: When and How to Write Them.”

Re-Applicant Essay: Required for re-applicants.

How have you strengthened your candidacy since your last application? We are particularly interested in hearing about how you have grown professionally and personally. (500 words or fewer)

This is a key question (whether asked explicitly or not) for all reapplicants to any MBA program. What has changed? How are you “new and improved” since last year – when you were rejected? Georgetown does you the favor of providing this explicit prompt so you can address this question while retaining the ability to address the main essay.

If you would like professional guidance with your Georgetown McDonough School MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Georgetown McDonough MBA application.

Georgetown McDonough 2017-18 MBA Application Deadlines:

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***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsLearn How to Demonstrate Leadership in Your Application, free guide

What You Need to Know About Finding a Job Post-MBA [Episode 164]

School-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Georgetown McDonough MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Why Do I Need a Letter of Recommendation? [#permalink]

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New post 14 Sep 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Why Do I Need a Letter of Recommendation?
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Letters of recommendation (LORs) may seem like one last nagging and even redundant part of your MBA application process. After all, haven’t you already devoted weeks, and possibly more, to writing and editing your essays? Haven’t you already proven beyond a doubt to the adcom your outstanding qualifications through your polished essays, impressive admissions resume and GMAT scores?

Yes, by this time you may feel you have a hard-earned case of Application Season Fatigue Syndrome (not yet listed in the annals of medical literature), but take a deep breath and give your LORs your full attention, because they are read carefully and carry weight with adcoms. Strong LORs accomplish several important things all at once:

1. They affirm that what you have claimed about yourself in your essays is true because they are written by a third-party.

2. They provide a valuable opportunity to showcase additional managerial or leadership experiences or exemplary characteristics that you didn’t have room to discuss in your essays. Therefore, they also showcase new and distinct qualifications.

3. They can combat a weakness in your profile. For example, if you’re a quant jock, you can and should look for someone who can talk up your communication skills. Conversely, if you are an MBA applicant from a non-traditional professional background, you can and should find a recommender who can talk up your quantitative and analytical skills.

4. Since they offer a complementary (and complimentary) perspective about your leadership, integrity, and other characteristics, LORs also help the adcom develop a fuller picture of who you are, not only as an academic profile, but as a well-rounded person of good character who can fit well with the school and its environment.

For these reasons, when the adcom wrestles with the decision of choosing between two otherwise equally qualified candidates, a stellar LOR can tip those precariously balanced scales in your favor. Conversely, LORs that seem to be written without enthusiasm or are filled with superficial, unsubstantiated generalities can be the kiss of death to your application.

To ensure a stellar LOR, suggest that your recommenders check out our Letter of Recommendation Services. They’ll be matched with an advisor who will coach them through the LOR writing process or help them edit and polish their letters.

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsLeadership in Admissions, a free guide

MBA Letters Of Recommendation: Who, When, What, Where & How

All You Need to Know About Recommenders & Recommendations

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Why Do I Need a Letter of Recommendation? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Prepare for Interviews with Positive Imagery [#permalink]

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New post 14 Sep 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Prepare for Interviews with Positive Imagery
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Imagine yourself standing on a tennis court: Picture yourself tossing the ball into the air and then smashed an ace serve right past your opponent.

Then, walk into your interview and nail that too.

Why should you think about tennis when you could be spending your last pre-interview moments recalling formative leadership experiences and key elements from your resume?

For one, last-minute cramming – and anything done frantically – rarely adds value.

More importantly, thinking about tennis (which is simply an example of using positive imagery) will boost your confidence, making it a much more important pre-interview exercise than a last-minute skills cram.

Much research has documented the effectiveness of positive imagery, and it’s used for a variety of purposes: excelling in sports, quitting bad habits such as smoking, even experiencing a less painful childbirth process. Many studies have demonstrated the ability of positive imagery, or “guided imagery,” to help patients deal with medical conditions ranging from allergies to heart disease.

So how can you use imagery to prepare for your interview, whether it’s for college, graduate school, or a job?

1. Visualize yourself doing something you excel at: Think of something you’re really good at, whether a sport, an academic subject, cooking, or whatever, then visualize yourself doing it. Use very specific details: imagine the setting, the equipment you’re using, the result, even the positive reactions of others.

2. Visualize yourself excelling in the interview itself: If you’ve been through successful interviews, use your memory of those to help create positive imagery about the upcoming interview. Imagine yourself shaking hands with the interviewer and providing poised and compelling answers to their questions. Imagine the interviewer nodding in response and giving you positive feedback at the end. Focus more on what this will look like than the content of the questions and answers.

3. Use positive affirmations: People have mixed feelings about saying positive things to themselves – it can feel forced, corny, or ridiculous to talk to yourself in this way. But you may find it helpful to say things to yourself (out loud or in your head) like, “I’m going to do well today” or “I deserve a place in this class.” There’s strong evidence that it works: in controlled experiments, people using positive affirmations were able to lift more weight or break boards more easily than those who weren’t. Hopefully you won’t have to break boards as part of your interview, but consider experimenting with positive affirmations, with or without any imagery.

Imagining yourself doing something in which you are proficient (tennis or anything else), will endow you with a greater sense of capability as you approach a less familiar and typically anxiety-provoking situation (yes, like an interview). But make sure you practice the technique before you really need to use it! Start by finding a quiet space in your day, clearing your mind, and using one of the above techniques. The more you practice, the more easily you’ll be able to summon imagery when needed. Then, ideally starting a day or two before the interview, practice using imagery to relax yourself and boost your confidence. When interview day comes, you’ll be ready to smash that ace!

The best way to feel confident going into your interview is to be absolutely sure you’ve taken the right steps to prepare. A mock interview and feedback from an Accepted admissions expert can help you put your best foot forward on the day of your interview. Contact us today!

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Related Resources:

Perfect Answers to MBA Interview Questions, a free guide

The Ultimate Guide to Medical School Interview Success, a free guide

• The Art Of Interviewing—Are You A “Can” Or A “Cannot”?

• Do I Really Need a Mock Admissions Interview? [Short Video]

Tags: College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Prepare for Interviews with Positive Imagery appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Toronto Rotman MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 15 Sep 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Toronto Rotman MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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The University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management is one of the leading business schools in Canada. Known for its design approach to MBA education and strong emphasis on problem solving, Rotman’s program has grown in renown.

This year’s essay questions will enable you to show that you have the self-knowledge and personal insight to make the most of the Rotman MBA and will benefit from and contribute within its “creative methodology.”

Essay Question: Our Full-Time MBA Program at the University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management is best defined as a transformational experience. We believe that your journey begins with ‘why.’ 
Please describe why you are pursuing an MBA? Why Rotman? Why now? (500 words)

This is a goals question, and more. The appearance of the words “transformational,” “journey,” and “why” all point to fundamental change and deep exploration of your motivation for pursuing the MBA. So, your goals should reflect the change you want to make through your career, and your “why Rotman” discussion should reflect your openness to – even desire for – your own change that will occur through attendance in the program. The question indicates a culture encompassing willingness to probe, engage in frank self-examination, and challenge internal and external assumptions.

While the structure for this essay may be relatively conventional and straightforward – one tried-and-true approach is to describe your career vision and/or goals, and possibly personal goals, followed by how the program will support the needed growth and development – the discussion should incorporate the qualities and character contained in the question.

<< For expert guidance with your Rotman application, check out our MBA Application Package!>>

Reflection Question: List 3-5 attributes or characteristics that best describe you. (5 words)

With these scant words, you should both reinforce your main application and essay message(s) and, also, add a little something extra and new – but that doesn’t contradict those other points. So, if your main message revolves around excellent soft skills and persuasion, look for another complementary point, e.g., risk-taker, that may not be emphasized but that is still reflective of you – and that will also be consistent with your profile and application even if not the most prominent point.

Required video interview (2 questions) with a new timed written response component (10 minutes in length). Check out our blog posts for more details on the video essay and the timed written component.

Without knowing what the questions are, it’s best to approach the video interview with both your own application and the Rotman program fresh in your mind. This will help you to simultaneously avoid both (a) being redundant and (b) being contradictory or inconsistent. I suggest viewing and approaching it as a continuation of the dialogue. It presents special challenges, particularly for non-native English speakers and writers who may typically take more time to polish their writing in English. While it’s natural for a follow-up piece like this essay to be less polished and thought through than essays on which you reasonably spend much more time, it also shouldn’t sound like a different person or present such a gap in English writing fluency that it raises doubts about your authorship of the other written portions of the application. If you are worried about these elements – practice. Give yourself sample topics and a 5-10 minute response window. Use tough questions, to make the actual one (hopefully) seem easier! (NOTE: The Rotman website gives an example – not an actual sample – question.)

Here are some additional resources for the video question:

Tips for Video MBA Essay Questions

MBA Video Essays: A Conversation with Rotman’s Niki da Silva

• What’s Really Important in MBA Admissions? Interview With Rotman’s Niki da Silva

If you would like professional guidance with your Toronto Rotman MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and  MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit  for the Toronto Rotman application.

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***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Why MBA?, a guide to acing the MBA goals essay question

Optional Essays: When and How to Write Them

• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your MBA Application Essays

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Toronto Rotman MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Kellogg Dean Announces Resignation [#permalink]

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New post 15 Sep 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Kellogg Dean Announces Resignation
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Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management’s Dean Sally Blount has announced that she will step down at the end of the 2017-2018 academic year.

Blount is entering her seventh year as dean. The decision to take a one-year sabbatical to travel, write, and ponder her “final chapter in education” has come as a surprise to most. It was apparently made during one of the multi-day retreats of silent reflection that Blount has taken in Rhode Island over the past decade.

She is the first and only woman to lead one of the prominent M7 business schools. Last month Blount successfully wrapped up Kellogg’s first-ever major capital campaign which raised $365 million, including a doubling of contributions to the school’s annual fund which surpassed more than $10 million for the first time. She was involved in every aspect of Kellogg’s new $250 million Global Hub which officially opened in mid-March.

Blount’s impressive list of academic achievements include welcoming the most gifted incoming class of MBAs ever, with the highest GMAT score ever recorded at the school and the highest average of any of the world’s most well-known MBA programs with the exception of Stanford GSB. She also brought Kellogg to fourth place in the Poets & Quants’ composite ranking, tying with UPenn Wharton and barely behind Chicago Booth, Stanford, and Harvard Business School.

According to a video message to Kellogg’s community, Blount has an almost 30-year history with the school, which began when “Kellogg took a chance on a pregnant doctoral student.” Recently she was asked by the board to imagine that she was a new dean walking into the new Global Hub – what would she do next? While in Rhode Island, she realized that this question created “an opportunity for me to start thinking bravely about my own life in the ways that I have about the institutions I have led.” She hopes that thinking about these subjects will show her “what the person I want to become would do.”

When Blount steps down, there will only be three female deans of Top 25 U.S. business schools: Judy Olian of UCLA Anderson; Erika James of Emory Goizueta; and Idalene F. Kesner of Indiana Kelley. None of the Top 20 business schools outside the U.S. has a woman as its dean.

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Related Resources:

Best MBA Programs, a guide to selecting the right one for you

Kellogg MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

Want a Kellogg MBA?, a podcast episode

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Kellogg Dean Announces Resignation appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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3 Day-Of Tips for Acing Your MBA Interview [#permalink]

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New post 17 Sep 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 3 Day-Of Tips for Acing Your MBA Interview
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It’s your job to demonstrate to the adcom that you stand out from the applicant pool and are exactly the person they want in their next MBA class. In this series, you’ll learn how to dig deep to unearth your unique character traits, experiences, skills, and talents and bring them to the forefront of your application, so that when the adcom pick up your file, they’re hooked from the very first moment.

So many articles focus on how to prepare for your business school interview (and you should read those articles!), but here I’m going to talk about things you should do DURING the actual interview. Not what you should say, but how you should say it. How should you answer the interview questions? How should you act towards the interviewer? How can you make the best impression?

And most importantly, what can you do to highlight your competitive advantage and show the adcom that you are an incredibly unique individual that will contribute to their next class in terms of talent, career potential, and diversity?

Use these 3 tips to help you showcase your competitive value:

1. Visualize an outline when structuring your answers.

You want to answer the questions as clearly as possible, providing all necessary information in an engaging fashion without rambling or boring the interviewer. Being prepared with key stories and experiences will certainly help reduce your “ers” and “ums,” but staying focused and organized during the interview itself will really help you answer the interview questions in full without veering off topic. Visualize an outline as you formulate your answer to ensure that you go from point to point. If asked “What are your post-MBA goals?” don’t begin your answer with “I was born on an army base in Guatemala,” but with “I have three short-term goals and one long-term goal.” Then proceed to elaborate on each of those goals.

This is particularly important if English is not your first language or if you have key distinguishing stories or ideas you want to share – you don’t want to miss an opportunity to highlight your uniqueness simply because you got lost in your answer.

2. Be confident.

Confidence is essential for b-school and real-world business success, and your interviewer will want to know that you possess the confidence necessary to excel in both. Plus, if you’re confident, you’ll most likely do a better job saying what needs to be said in the most effective manner possible.

Nerves are often responsible for tripping you up or causing temporary interview answer amnesia. It’s hard to fake confidence – note how I said “Be Confident” rather than “Act Confidently.” Easier said than done? Yes. But it’s not impossible to convince yourself that you’re confident.

A few tricks:

• Breathe. Take some deep breaths while waiting for your interview and remember to continue breathing once your interview begins.

• Begin and end your interview with a firm handshake.

• Smile.

• Dress the part of a professional business person, and you’ll have an easier time stepping into that role.

Use positive imagery. Thinking happy, confident thoughts and visualizing yourself in a comfortable place or accomplishing or experiencing impressive achievements will help your body relax, enabling you to convey a true confidence.

Remember, if you believe you’re confident, so will your interviewer.

3. Follow your interviewer’s cues.

If your interviewer is talkative and bubbly, then he or she will probably appreciate if you work up your chattiness and humor. If, on the other hand, you end up with a slow-talking, no-nonsense interviewer, then you may want to skip the small talk and jump right into a focused no-frills interview.

Being organized, intuitive, and confident are skills that some people are born with and that others work a lifetime to achieve – but no matter who you are, these essential interview skills require practice. Accepted’s experienced advisors can guide you through the interview processwith our Mock Interview Packages. Prep with the best and ace those interviews!

Read the complete 9 Secrets to Standing Out in Your MBA Application series for more tips on how to create a compelling application that highlights your unique strengths, character traits, and talents.

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Related Resources:

MBA Interview Prep: How to Ace Your Interviews, a free guide

Do I Really Need a Mock Admissions Interview?

The Art of Interviewing—Are You a “Can” or a “Cannot”?

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post 3 Day-Of Tips for Acing Your MBA Interview appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Cornell Tech Launches Campus on Roosevelt Island [#permalink]

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New post 18 Sep 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Cornell Tech Launches Campus on Roosevelt Island
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Cornell Tech recently celebrated the official opening of its Roosevelt Island campus with a dedication ceremony attended by New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio, former mayor Mike Bloomberg, Cornell University President Martha Pollack, Technion President Peretz Lavie, and Cornell Tech Dean Daniel Huttenlocher. Cornell Tech, the first campus built for the digital age, brings together faculty, business leaders, tech entrepreneurs, and students to produce far-reaching results that will change the way we live in the digital age.

Academic Programs & Research

Cornell Tech, which started in a temporary space provided by Google, has already graduated over 300 masters and doctoral students. Most of the grads entered the New York City tech sector by joining local companies or starting their own. Masters students in all programs — computer science, law, business, electrical engineering, operations research, connective media and health tech — spend time learning and working together in a Studio curriculum with broad engagement with the tech industry. Studio projects encourage students to practice entrepreneurship, product design, tech, and public policy, management and other skills, enabling them to graduate with concrete, marketable experience and a collection of completed work that will help launch their careers.

The Jacobson Technion-Cornell Institute at Cornell Tech is a one-of-a-kind academic collaboration of two top global universities, the Technion Israel Institute of Technology and Cornell. The Institute is home of the Health Tech and Connective Media programs, where students receive dual degrees from Cornell and the Technion, and the Jacobs Runway Startup Postdoc program for recent tech PhDs.

According to Ron Brachman, Director of the Jacobs Technion-Cornell Institute, “The Jacobs Technion-Cornell Institute is a cornerstone of Cornell Tech, combining Cornell’s commitment to discovery with Technion’s global leadership in applied research and entrepreneurship. From our dual master’s degree programs, to our groundbreaking faculty research, to the innovative companies spinning out of the Jacobson Runway Startup Postdoc program, our partnership and impact will grow on our new campus. Through the Jacobs Institute, Cornell Tech and New York City as a whole will always be on the leading edge, experimenting with novel ways to educate, discover, and innovate.”

Campus

Cornell Tech’s objective of collaboration and innovations is manifested in the physical design of the campus. It is a new type of urban campus that provides space, but is also integrated, in both mission and design, with the city. Cornell Tech has some of the most environmentally friendly and energy efficient buildings in the world. When completed within the next few decades, the 12-acre campus will serve more than 2,000 grad students and hundreds of faculty and staff.

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Related Resources:

The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes

Why Cornell Tech was the Perfect Fit for This Londoner

Can a Grad Consultant Help You Succeed?

Tags: Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

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Wharton Lauder: An MBA/MA that Prepares your for Global Business [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Wharton Lauder: An MBA/MA that Prepares your for Global Business
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Let’s learn about Wharton Lauder, and its joint MA/MBA and MA/JD programs for people who are passionate about international business.

Today’s guest is Kara Keenan Sweeney, Director of Admissions Marketing and Communications at the Lauder Institute at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School and Penn Law School. Kara has an extensive background in graduate admissions, starting with her masters in higher ed administration at Columbia and moving on to admissions positions at INSEAD, U Penn, Penn State, and now at the Lauder Institute. Welcome!

Can you give us an overview of UPenn’s Lauder program? [1:25]

The Lauder Institute was founded by the family of Estee Lauder back in 1983. We had our first graduating class two years later. The institute offers a joint degree in International Studies with Wharton and Penn Law – Lauder students earn a MA in International Studies along with either an MBA or JD.

Each year we admit 70-75 students. The program starts in May. The majority of our students are MBA/MA students.

For Wharton Lauder students, how does it work? Do they take additional coursework? [2:55]

Yes – on average, they take two additional courses through Lauder each semester. If you’re doing Wharton Lauder, Lauder generally takes up most of your electives. There’s some research work as well.

But it’s not a double course load – generally about two extra courses a semester.

What’s new at Lauder? [4:20]

We adapted the curriculum to the changing landscape of business and international studies over the last decade or so. We moved the structure to a more regional focus instead of a language focus. We have six programs of concentration – five are regionally focused (the sixth is global). Students choose one of these areas of concentration and then choose a language (for example if you’re in the Latin America track you can choose Spanish or Portuguese).

We used to ask students for fluency in two languages other than English – now we ask for one language.

We’ve added a new core course on intercultural communication, for students to improve their communication skills in an international leadership context.

And there are now two required intercultural venture trips: these are one-week trips where students focus on a specific topic in a specific country. It’s a stretch experience for the students.

Do you find students focus on their home region? [9:00]

It depends. We have some students who plan to work in their home region, but choose a different language so they can work in other countries in the region (for example, a student from Brazil who wants to be able to work across Latin America).

We have heritage speakers in the program. We have students who grew up speaking English. There’s no typical profile, other than an international orientation.

Where do most Lauder alumni get jobs? [10:50]

We see a variety. Last year our students went to over 20 countries after graduation (the class was around 75 students). Most have international career objectives – for some, “international” means working in the US, since a lot of our students are from overseas.

Because our students are also MBA students, they also follow a typical MBA path – though that’s evolving itself. A lot of people are interested in entrepreneurship, social impact, microfinance.

Can you describe the critical elements of the Wharton Lauder or UPenn Lauder application? [12:55]

You need to have advanced proficiency in a second language when you apply. We determine that by a language proficiency exam – the Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI). Over the course of the program, you’ll increase your proficiency to a “superior” level.

The language courses at Lauder are taught within a business context.

You should test in the language you’re pursuing in the program.

Can you describe the critical elements of the Lauder application? [15:20]

If you’re applying to Wharton and Lauder, we make it a seamless process – the Lauder application is built into the Wharton application.

You check off that you’re applying for Lauder and then provide the additional materials we require: the OPI exam; a description of your international experience; and an essay. In the essay, we want you to tell us why you’re applying to Lauder, why the program is a fit for your goals.

The application is considered as a joint application for both programs – we work in collaboration with the Wharton team. Each year there are a handful of applicants who are admitted to Wharton but don’t meet

Lauder’s requirements – so they are admitted just to Wharton but not to the joint degree program.

Is it the same application process for the JD/MA joint degree program? [17:25]

It’s actually separate. You apply to Penn Law, then contact Lauder for the supplement (the language exam, essay, etc). You must be admitted to Penn Law first to be considered.

Students who do the JD-Lauder start Lauder after the first year of the JD program.

Is it possible to apply during the first year of law school? [18:22]

Yes.

And actually, you can also apply to Lauder supplementally after you’ve submitted your Wharton application.  There are some people who don’t find out about us until after they’ve submitted their application.

You gave some excellent advice in terms of addressing “Why Lauder.” Can you summarize that advice for us now? [19:25]

I think the benefits of Lauder are the language, international experience, and intercultural communication. Our students gain substantive international experience: the average student goes to six countries.

I encourage students to do their research. We sometimes see applicants who’ve done superficial research. We want to see that you’ve done research on the program, what makes it a good fit for you, and how you can contribute.

See how the program is a fit for you. If you can, visit – sit in on a class.

What gets you excited (in a positive way) about an applicant? [23:00]

That they’ve done the research! That they’ve reached out to alums. That they have a clear set of reasons why the program makes sense for them, and the experience to back that up.

We love to see substantive international experience (working or studying abroad). Leverage your international experience.

Reach out to the admissions office.

What is a Lauder interview like? [24:55]

If you’re invited, you’ll also do the Wharton TBD.

You’ll be interviewed by a current Lauder student – it’s a half hour interview. The most important question we’ll ask is: “Why not just Wharton alone? Why Lauder?”

We can do interviews here on campus – if you’re overseas, we’ll set you up with an alum.

What is the 8-week Summer Immersion Program? [26:26]

It’s been a component of the program since we started in the ‘80s. Students will go to their region of concentration. Five of the eight weeks will be in language. The remaining three weeks will be spent with language speakers, developing regional expertise.

The program includes company visits, cultural excursions, etc.

For students in the Global focus, they’ll visit eight to 10 countries and focus on issues of global relevance (such as immigration and tech).

There’s also a research project.

Lauder students complete a research project, called a Global Knowledge Lab (GKL). What is it? [29:40]

GKL essentially has replaced the masters thesis. It’s a research project that students complete with a team.

Students have done a wide variety of projects – a couple examples: one focused on culinary differences, and one on women entrepreneurs. The Institute provides funding for students to conduct their research. They have to create a proposal, and the research should involve a region outside their own focus.

The GKL results in two papers – one is individually written (and should be publishable quality), and the other is a group project.

What about the second summer of the program – do Lauder students do internships? [34:10]

Yes – no different than if you were a law student alone or an MBA student alone. Often our students will try to do those internships internationally.

We also have funding for students to start their own ventures, so some students will spend that summer doing research to get their ventures off the ground.

We have our own career adviser at Lauder.

What are some of the coolest things recent grads are doing? [36:05]

We’ve seen a lot of students pursuing entrepreneurship. We had a student get funding from Lauder and Wharton – she’s developing a sanitation startup in India (RevoLOOtion).

We’ve had a lot of students start businesses. Our alums have amazing roles all over the world – one was head of Conde Nast in China. We have profiles of some recent grads on our site and on our social media streams.

What final words of wisdom do you have for applicants – either people applying this year, or those preparing to apply in the future? [38:50]

Go online – sign up for information, follow us on social media. It’s a great way to learn more.

IF you can’t visit, come to a webinar. Reach out to alums, students, and the admissions office. We’re willing and able to talk with you. If you can come to visit, that’s ideal.

In terms of building a strong application – we want to see evidence of a global mindset. We look for international experience and evidence that you thrive in that environment, as well as cultural experiences that make you a compelling applicant.

Share your objectives – how will Lauder help you get where you’d like to go?

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Relevant Links:

Wharton Lauder Admissions

Wharton Lauder Language Requirements and Clips

Wharton MBA Essay Tips 2017-18

Get Accepted to Wharton Webinar

Related Shows:

Wharton’s Commitment Project

From Rwanda to Wharton to West Coast Start-Up: MP Davis’ Story

The Lauder Institute Changes to Reflect the World

The Schwarzman Scholars Program: Leaders of the Future Unite

The CEMS MIM: A Truly International Masters in Management

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post Wharton Lauder: An MBA/MA that Prepares You for Global Business [Episode 225] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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William G. McGowan Charitable Fund Announces Fellows [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: William G. McGowan Charitable Fund Announces Fellows
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The William G. McGowan Charitable Fund recently announced its eighth class of McGowan Fellows. The Chicago-based family foundation recognizes students from top business schools across the U.S. who are dedicated to societal issues and ethical practices.

The McGowan Fellows Program, established in 2010, honors the legacy of William G. McGowan, the pioneering entrepreneur who embodied the ethical values business leadership. The Fund collaborates with its ten business school partners to choose ten second-year MBA students who demonstrate academic excellence as well as a commitment to ethical leadership. These students receive full tuition for their second year of business school.

Over the next year, the eighth class will work together on a social impact project taking on a challenge relating to insurance coverage for a preventive health program. Through this and other experiences, the Fellows Program intends to provide the resources and guidance to young professionals to become accountable, ethical leaders and role models for future generations.

The McGowan Fellows Class of 2018 includes students from the following business schools:

• CMU Tepper

• Columbia Business School

• Dartmouth Tuck

• Duke Fuqua

• Georgetown McDonough

• MIT Sloan

• Northwestern Kellogg

• Chicago Booth

• Michigan Ross

• UPenn Wharton

For more information on the McGowan Fellows Program, visit williamgmcgowanfund.org.

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Related Resources:

School-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips

Stand Out! A Critical Goal for Your Application, a podcast episode

Proving Character Traits in Your Application Essays

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Get Accepted to Columbia – On-Demand Webinar! [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Get Accepted to Columbia – On-Demand Webinar!
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If you missed Get Accepted to Columbia, don’t worry! It’s now available on-demand.

With Accepted’s founder Linda Abraham as your guide, you’ll learn what your CBS application needs to accomplish – and how to impress the adcom. She’ll walk you through each element of the application, and give you tips that show you how you can demonstrate your “fit” with Columbia’s values while also standing out within a very crowded applicant pool.

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View it on-demand now!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Get Accepted to Columbia – On-Demand Webinar! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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5 Tips for Creating Your Stand-Out MBA Resume [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: 5 Tips for Creating Your Stand-Out MBA Resume
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It’s your job to demonstrate to the adcom that you stand out from the applicant pool and are exactly the person they want in their next MBA class. In this series, you’ll learn how to dig deep to unearth your unique character traits, experiences, skills, and talents and bring them to the forefront of your application, so that when the adcom pick up your file, they’re hooked from the very first moment.

Your MBA resume essentially serves as your career’s “greatest hits.” On one to two pages, you’re given the opportunity to highlight your most impressive academic and professional experiences. For overrepresented applicants, older applicants, or applicants with other extenuating circumstances (like a criminal record), this is your first shot at grabbing the attention of top b-school adcom and eliminating their hesitations.

Answer these five questions to create a stunning resume that will highlight your competitive advantage and boost your chances of getting accepted:

1. Who are you?

Interview yourself and examine the jobs you’ve had, the skills you’ve acquired, and your “greatest hits” as a professional.

What are some of your most impressive skills or talents? What accomplishments are you most proud of? What have you achieved that gained you the most recognition? How have you impacted your organization or influenced coworkers? What are some of your key successes?

Look through old emails that may jog your memory, read performance reviews or LI recommendations, and jot down some notes chronicling your career achievements.

2. Where are you applying?

The best way to convince the adcom that you’re best for their school is to understand the school’s mission, strengths, and ideals.

When putting together your resume, you’ll need to learn as much as possible about the program you’re applying to. Then, customize your resume to reflect the aspects of your background that are most relevant to your target school.

Note: You want the language of your resume to match the school’s mission/strength/ideals, but be sure that you’re not just parroting back what’s on their site. Your goal is to internalize their vision and present your complementary ideals, not to cut and paste or directly mimic their language.

3. What are some of your specific accomplishments?

Saying that you “led your team to success” just won’t cut it. Impact is measured in numbers, so you want to make sure that your resume’s numbers are high.

Details matter. Look how much more impressive something like this sounds: “Designed $3 million IT strategy that increased revenue by 11% and attracted 7 new clients” compared to “Developed IT plan that was selected for implementation.” If you work for a private company and can’t disclose revenue figures, refer to percentage increases or improvements or cite the improved industry ranking of the organization’s product or performance as a result of your contribution. Think of numbers and other hard details as proof that you can deliver.

4. Are you being honest?

If you dropped out of your CPA course just before finals, don’t say that you completed the course. If you were one of eight equally ranked members of a team, don’t say you were team leader. If you worked for four months at a company, don’t say you were there for a year.

You get the point.

Making up degrees, accomplishments, and other personal and professional facts is just a bad idea. Don’t do it – it’s unethical and potentially self-destructive. Schools won’t hesitate to show students the door when they learn that their resume, or any other parts of their application for that matter, are more fiction than fact.

5. Does your resume look good?

Yes, it’s important that your resume sounds good. But how does it look?

A slapdash job will portray you as a sloppy, careless person. A featureless, plain display will make you look uninteresting or boring. The solution here isn’t to create a hot pink background bordered by birds and flowers; but adding a few design elements will do wonders to spruce up your resume and show that you put some thought into your presentation.

A few suggestions:

• Instead of the traditional circle bullet or dash, use the less common diamond- and arrow-shaped bullet.

• Use expanded text (kerning) to highlight a key term.

• Enclose certain sections of your resume in shaded boxes.

No matter what, keep in mind that less is more – you don’t want a cluttered resume that will be difficult to read. And if your target school specifies format rules (particularly regarding margins, page number, and font), be sure to follow theirs to a T. This may mean toning down your creative flair for design to fit their standard.

Read the complete 9 Secrets to Standing Out in Your MBA Application series for more tips on how to create a compelling application that highlights your unique strengths, character traits, and talents.

For personalized advice tailored just for you, check out our MBA admissions consulting and editing services and work one-on-one with a pro who will help you discover your competitive advantage and use it to get ACCEPTED.

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Related Resources:

The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes

Admissions Resumes: Putting it All Together

One Size Does NOT Fit All – Resume Writing Tips

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post 5 Tips for Creating Your Stand-Out MBA Resume appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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3 Things to Watch for When Doing Rotations [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: 3 Things to Watch for When Doing Rotations
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In the past, I’ve blogged about keeping a journal during your rotations. Here are three things you can watch for during your rotations that will get you in great shape for later:

1. Watch your attendings.

What did your attending do today that struck you? This can be anything, from observing how they reacted to a patient’s nonverbal cues or defused an upset family member’s anger to noting how they communicated relevant information to other health professionals. Describe the details so you can recall them later. If what you saw today differed from what you’ve seen in other rotations, think about whether it’s due to the specialty or just this individual’s style. And make critical judgments – did anything you saw about this physician or today’s tasks make you think about the kind of doctor you want to be?

2. Watch your patients.

Observe how patients and their family members respond – do they ever surprise you? Which cases really piqued your interest? You may already be keeping a case log; if so, that will help supply the medical side when you want to write about specific patients. But your personal statement will be richer when seasoned with personal details that aren’t recorded in case logs.

3. Watch yourself.

Since what you write is private, use this space courageously. What did you do well? What did you do not so well? What were the things that interested you and what bored you silly? Not only can this help you to critically evaluate your educational progress, but it can also give you some insights into your future. What is pushing you towards certain specialties and away from others? How are your actions today helping you to envision the kind of doctor that you hope to be?

Three things to watch for now, ensuring that you’ll have less clock-watching to do as deadlines approach.

Do you need help with your residency or fellowship application? Work one-on-one with an admissions expert who will assist you with every aspect of the residency/fellowship admissions process – from conceptualization to actualization. Check out our complete Residency/Fellowship Application Packages now!

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By Cydney Foote, former administrator at the University of Washington School of Medicine and author of three ebooks about medical education. Cyd has successfully advised medical school and residency applicants since 2001. Want Cyd to help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• MD, OBGYN, MPH Talks Med School and Residency Admissions, a podcast episode

How Keeping a Journal as an M3 Can Save Your Residency Applications

What’s the Best Way to Prep for Your Residency Interview & How Can Accepted Help?

Tags: Medical School Admissions

The post 3 Things to Watch for When Doing Rotations appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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GMAC: Largest B-Schools Worldwide Experience Growth in Applications [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: GMAC: Largest B-Schools Worldwide Experience Growth in Applications
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According to a new Applications Trend Survey by the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC), 73% of graduate business programs with 201 or more class seats report increased application volume this year. This is compared to 30% of the smallest programs, those with 50 or fewer class seats. The growth in the larger U.S. programs is caused by a jump in domestic applications, which offset declines in international applicants.

GMAC ran its eighteenth annual Applications Trend Survey between early June and mid-July 2017. A record 361 business schools and faculties from 40 countries representing 965 graduate management programs, including MBA, non-MBA business masters, and doctoral-level programs responded to the survey. A total of 466,176 applications were received by the participating programs during the 2017 application cycle.

Following are some findings from the survey:

• Regardless of class size, a majority of programs in Europe, Canada, East and Southeast Asia, and India report volume growth in 2017. With the exception of part-time lockstep MBA and Master in Data Analytics programs, less than half of the U.S. programs are growing.

• Recent U.S. political events seem to have impacted applications from international students in 2017. European and Canadian programs are about twice as likely to report growth in international applications compared with 32% of U.S. programs. Despite the Brexit vote, about two-thirds of UK programs have seen growth in international demand.

• Overall, 67% of U.S. application volume, 70% of Canadian volume, 89% of European volume, 20% of East and Southeast Asian volume, and less than 1% of Indian volume were international students.

• Women represent 42% of total applications received by survey participants, an increase from 37% in 2013.

• 54% of part-time lockstep programs – in which students progress through a classroom-based program as a group – report increased volume this year. Just 34% of part-time self-paced programs – where students set their own schedule in a flexible format – reported increased volume.

• Employer sponsorship remains important. 52% of part-time, self-paced students, 40% of executive MBA students, and 39% of part-time lockstep students are expecting to receive employer support.

• The majority of full-time MBA applicants have between three and ten years of experience; most of the executive MBA applicants had 10+ years of experience; and the majority of online MBA applicants had 6+ years of experience.

• Business masters applicants generally have less than one year of experience, with the exception of Master in Data Analytics applicants, who usually have more experience.

See the GMAC report for more details.

Analysis

The news here is how the bigger, higher-ranked programs seem to be bucking the declining international application trend that has been widely anticipated in the wake of Donald Trump’s election and that really hit smaller and lower-ranked programs. Some of the top programs, notably Harvard’s Class of 2019, have even maintained their international enrollment. At the same time, increasing domestic application numbers have caused an actual increase in overall application volume at several schools – Chicago Booth and CMU Tepper are up by 13.5% , Yale SOM is up by 12.3%, and CBS is up by 11.8% per P&Q, with other programs reporting smaller increases and some reporting declines, notably Emory (-14.6%), Cornell Johnson (-15.1%), and Indiana Kelley (-18.6%).

Anticipate more and stiffer competition for spots at the leading U.S. MBA programs among domestic applicants and perhaps a slightly easier time getting in for international students who still prefer U.S. b-schools over European, UK, and Canadian programs.

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsMBA Action Plan: 6 Steps for the 6 Months Before You Apply

U.S. News & World Report’s 2018 Best Business Schools (MBA & EMBA) Rankings

3 Ways to Determine Which B-Schools are a Good Fit for You

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Ask Away at Your Admissions Interview! [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Ask Away at Your Admissions Interview!
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An interview works in two directions: The interviewer asks you questions to see if you’d be a good fit for the school in question, and you ask the interviewer questions to help you determine if this program is right for you.

In order to come up with some good questions, you’ll want to make sure that you:

1. Review the program’s website thoroughly.

Asking questions is a good thing. Asking questions that are answered on the homepage of the school’s site? Not so good.

2. Review the details of your application.

Go over every aspect of your application (resume, essays, etc.) to help you come up with questions that relate specifically to your interests, experience, and goals.

As you review the school’s literature and your application, jot down whatever questions come to mind. The best questions are those that show you attempting to connect the dots between the features of the program and your individual goals, needs, and interests. Because these questions are so highly individualized, it’s hard to give specific examples, but below you’ll find a few general questions that will trigger your more personal queries:

• How difficult is it to get a seat in popular classes like International Business Relations (or Medical Ethics or Psych 101…or any other class that interests you and is popular)?

• Does the program have any clubs or extracurricular activities for Spanish-speaking entrepreneurs (or juggling acrobats, or whatever particular interests you have)? What steps are involved in starting a group on campus? Before asking this question, see if you can find the group on the school’s website and check if it is active.

• What are the criteria for competing in a business plan competition? (Again, fill in the blank to cater this question towards your personal goals, and check online to see if the question isn’t answered there.)

• What role does the career services department play in helping students network and secure interviews?

If your admissions interview is with a recent alumnus or a current student, then you can ask about their experience at Program X. This is a good way to make conversation and show your interest in the interviewer and the program. It may also serve as a jumping off point for coming up with more personalized questions. Some basic ones to start with may be:

• What are/were your favorite classes? Professors?

• Are there any activities, clubs, or competitions that simply should not be missed?

• Do you wish you had done anything differently before attending or while at School X?

You can do it! Ace those interviews now!

The best way to feel confident going into your interview is to be absolutely sure you’ve taken the right steps to prepare. A mock interview and feedback from an Accepted admissions expert can help you put your best foot forward on the day of your interview. Contact us today!

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Related Resources:

MBA Interview Prep: How to Ace Your Interview

The Art of Interviewing—Are You a “Can” or a “Cannot”?

Prepare for Interviews with Positive Imagery

Tags: College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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NUS MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: NUS MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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National University of Singapore offers a 17-month MBA program offering specializations in 5 distinct areas (Finance, Marketing, Healthcare Management, Strategy & Organization, and the recently added Innovation & Entrepreneurship). If you are looking for an Asian-focused program with strong placement in the Technology (29%), Financial services (23%), and Consulting (21%) industries in Singapore (50%), China (13%) or other Asia-Pacific countries, then NUS may be a great program for you. This is a small program of fewer than 100 students, but 93% of those students hail from over 30 countries outside of Singapore.

My tips for completing the NUS MBA application are below in blue.

Essays:

1. Please answer ONE of the following short essay prompts. (300 words)

a. I am passionate about…

b. My greatest challenge has been…

c. My biggest failure was ….

All three of these questions are opportunities to share an interesting experience from your life. Passion comes through with differentiating details (did you compete in 10Ks every weekend? Did you turn $500 in high school summer earnings into an investment portfolio worth thousands?). Challenges are overcome with drive, tenacity, and commitment. Failures are learning experiences and launch pads for subsequent successes. Share an example here that will help the admission committee see your individuality come alive.

2. Briefly describe your immediate post-MBA career goal including your industry, function and country of choice and how have your prior experiences motivated and prepared you to pursue these goals? (300 words)

All MBA programs want their students to be pleased with the employment they find and the career trajectory ahead of them after graduation. Applicants must demonstrate in this essay that they know what they can expect to achieve within five years of graduating so that the admissions office will believe you are realistically driven.

If you do not know any NUS MBAs personally, you may find LinkedIn searches for NUS alumni very useful to see what a wide range of MBA alumni have succeeded in doing within around five years of graduating. Go to NUS’s LinkedIn page and then use the Search Alumni button, then restrict your search to alumni who graduated around 2012 or 2013 to get a sense of their five-year progress. This isn’t foolproof: you must check that you are looking at MBA graduates (and not undergraduate degree holders or exchange students), but this will offer you wider insight than your own small circle of acquaintances. Go ahead and reach out to alumni through LinkedIn and through your personal network to discuss how they reached the advancement that they did to add depth to your own plans for this essay.

3. If there is anything else you would like to share with the Admissions Committee that was not covered in your application, please include here. (300 words)

The first two essays were short, so there is almost certainly more in your background: additional areas of leadership, influence, and impact, for example. While this optional space may certainly be used to explain a weakness or flaw in your background, I highly recommend shining the spotlight on an area of strength in the process: poor grades do not have to stand on their own when you can demonstrate that you spent your undergraduate education in significant extracurricular leadership roles, for example.

4. (Only applicable to re-applicants) Please provide an update on any new aspects of your professional, international, academic or personal profile that would not have been included in your previous application. Please also explain your motivation for re-applying to NUS. (Maximum: 300 words)

Reapplying demonstrates your sincere interest in this program, so don’t assume that the admissions committee is biased against you. Instead, use this space to show that you have used the time since you applied to take on new challenges, expand your leadership experience, and build insight in areas that will interest your NUS classmates and future recruiters. The final aspect of the essay prompt – about your motivation for re-applying to NUS – also offers you the opportunity to show that you’ve done your research about the NUS MBA: what students have you spoken to and what have you learned about how this program will help you on your path? What makes NUS special? Those details will further demonstrate your readiness for the program.

If you would like professional guidance with your NUS MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the NUS application.  

Full-Time NUS MBA Application Dates:

The application window: Now – 31 March 2018

Admissions is rolling: applicants will be notified of their admissions decision within between 6 and 10 weeks of submitting the completed application.

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Jennifer Bloom has been a consultant with Accepted for 19 years and is a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW). She is an expert at crafting application materials that truly differentiate you from the rest of the driven applicant pool. If you would like help with your application, Jennifer can suggest a number of options that work with any budget. Want Jennifer to help you get accepted? Click here!

Related Resources:

Why MBA?, free guide to writing about your post-MBA goals

• Stand Out! A Critical Goal for Your Application [Episode 181]

• How to Stay Within Essay Word Limits by Reducing Verbal Verbosity

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post NUS MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Forbes Releases 2017 Ranking of Best Business Schools [#permalink]

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New post 01 Oct 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Forbes Releases 2017 Ranking of Best Business Schools
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Is it worth it to pursue an MBA, especially when the cost of tuition and lost wages can be more than $300,000? Most prospective MBAs apply to school planning to make a career change and/or obtain a higher salary. Forbes’ tenth biennial rankings of the best U.S. and international business schools are based exclusively on the median returns on investment seen by grads of the class of 2012. More than 100 schools and 17,500 alumni responded to questions about their pre- and post-MBA compensation, career choice, and location. 25% of the grads responded. Schools where less than 15% of their alumni responded were excluded from the survey as were schools where alumni had a negative ROI after five years.

Schools were ranked only on their five-year MBA gain – the net cumulative amount the average alumni would have earned after five years by getting their MBA versus staying in their pre-MBA career. Wharton took first place in the U.S. schools for the first time. London School of Business was the best two-year international program, and IMD is the best one-year program.

Here are Forbes’ Best Domestic MBA, Two-Year International MBA, and One-Year International MBA programs:

Domestic MBA Programs

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International 2-Year Programs

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International 1-Year Programs

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The most notable change in this year’s Forbes’ ranking is Wharton’s jump from seventh place to first, moving up a significant six places in the rankings and unseating Stanford, which had been #1 in the previous Forbes’ ranking from 2015. This is the first time that Forbes has crowned Wharton as #1 and the second time this year that a major ranking has done so – U.S. News named Wharton #1 in its 2018 rankings released last March.

The Forbes ranking is to me one of the more valuable of the rankings. It doesn’t rely on opinions, although it does rely on self-reported data from students. It also doesn’t even attempt to measure “educational quality,” which may not be quantifiable or measurable, and definitely means different things to different people. It looks at one thing: Return on Investment.

For Forbes’ methodology and assumptions, please see “Behind the Numbers.”

And as Forbes’ rankings guru, Kurt Badenhausen writes “Even with increased financial aid, an MBA is a huge investment, topping $300,000 in tuition and forgone salary at an elite school like Harvard, Stanford or Wharton. But our numbers show that a degree from a top school invariably pays off.”

International programs were fairly stable in the Forbes’ ranking of one-year and two-year international programs. Naturally ROI for one-year programs is higher and the payback period is shorter.

Two interesting developments outside the U.S.:

• Tiny IMD unseated INSEAD for the #1 position in Forbes’ Global Ranking. INSEAD dropped to #2. IMD experienced significant personnel changes a few years ago, but seems to have bounced back in fine form.

• ESADE jumped five spots to #5 in the two-year International MBA rankings, which was topped again by London Business School.

Need help choosing — and then applying to — the best MBA program for you? Get matched with one of our expert advisors for one-on-one consulting that will help you get accepted!

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsNavigate the MBA Application Maze: 9 Tips to Acceptance, a free guide

Business School Selectivity Index [Can I Get Into My Dream School?]

3 Ways to Determine Which B-Schools are a Good Fit for You

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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International Student? How Will You Pay for Your Degree? [#permalink]

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New post 02 Oct 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: International Student? How Will You Pay for Your Degree?
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If you’re an international student considering graduate study in the US, it’s easy to be daunted by the financial side of things. You’re bound to have questions – what types of financial aid are you eligible for? Will you need a cosigner for private loans? How can you apply, and what is the process involved?

We understand that international applicants and students have special needs – that’s why we’ve partnered with our friends at Prodigy Finance to bring you our special webinar, The Six Steps to Understanding International Student Loans. Prodigy Senior Relationship Manager Molly Dineen will join us to demystify the international student loan process. In this free, one-hour webinar, you’ll learn how to fund your international master’s degree and how to understand the loan process (including how to compare loans and what rates/fees are involved with getting a loan). Don’t miss it!

The webinar is free, but you must reserve your spot.

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Tags: MBA Admissions

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Indian School of Business MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 02 Oct 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Indian School of Business MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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For MBA aspirants who want to build or advance their careers in India, the Indian School of Business PGP program offers excellent preparation. While there was a significant drop in the class of 2017’s rate of international job offers (down from 101 to just 12 despite the 11% increase in the size of the class), graduates entered a vast range of industries: 21% in non-IT Consulting, 20% in IT, 8% each in Financial Services and E-Commerce, for example. That diversity prevails functionally as well, as 20% of the class entered Sales and Marketing, 10% of the class entered Product Management, and 11% entered General Management/Strategy roles after graduating.

ISB students learn from visiting professors from the top MBA programs around the world including Entrepreneurship with London Business School’s Rupert Merson, Negotiation with Chicago Booth’s Radhika Puri, Customer-Focused Product Planning with Stanford GSB’s Seenu Srinivasan, and Marketing Analytics with UCLA Anderson’s Anand Bodapati among others. ISB is clearly the ROI winner when compared with its peer programs in the US for Indian students: instead of two years out of the work force for a US program at a tuition cost of over $100,000, ISB students are out of the workforce for only one year, paying tuition of only $35,000, with post-MBA weighted salaries only slightly lower than their American counterparts.

ISB has kept its application essay questions the same this year with only slight adjustments: essay 1 is allowed to be 25% longer and there is no longer any optional essay space. Note that ISB’s online application will not accept even one word over the limit of either of its essays.

Here are ISB’s questions with my advice in blue:

Essay 1.

If we were to admit just one more candidate to the Postgraduate Programme (PGP) at the ISB, why should it be you? (500 words maximum)

Applicants must decide what evidence will best persuade the admissions committee of their worthiness. In my experience, the most compelling essays will share anecdotes that illustrate your leadership and impact, not simply a list of roles that mirror the application form’s details about your responsibilities, initiatives, and achievements. This is your opportunity to explain the “why” (what motivates and drives you) and the “how” (what creativity and interpersonal skills do you apply to make an impact).

Essay 2.

Describe your short and long term career plans. How does the PGP fit in with those? (300 words maximum)

MBA programs ask this question to make sure that your goals are reasonable: can their program prepare you for them and has your career so far positioned you to achieve them? If the answer to either of these questions is no, then they cannot accept you –  you will simply be unhappy when you graduate – so speak with recent graduates about their recruiting experiences and take the initiative to speak with post-MBA professionals with 10 or more years of experience about longer-term career options.

ISB eliminated its optional essay space this year. However, applicants have space on the Education page of the application to explain any gaps during their education.

The only comfort in such a short application is that your fellow applicants are just as limited in how much they can share!

 

If you would like professional guidance with your ISB PGP application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing or our MBA Application Package which includes advising and editing of all of the application materials plus interview coaching for the ISB application.

Deadlines:

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***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Jennifer Bloom has been a consultant with Accepted for 19 years and is a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW). She is an expert at crafting application materials that truly differentiate you from the rest of the driven applicant pool. If you would like help with your application, Jennifer can suggest a number of options that work with any budget. Want Jennifer to help you get accepted? Click here!
 

Related Resources:

• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Application Essays

How to Write About Leadership in Your Application Essays

• 4 Application Strategy Tips: Stand Out AND Fit In

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Former Investment Bankers Current Admissions Experts [Episode #227] [#permalink]

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New post 03 Oct 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Former Investment Bankers Current Admissions Experts [Episode #227]
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Read Time: 6 minutes 

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About a year ago I received an email from someone interested in working for Accepted. She had admissions office experience, an MBA from a top business school, and investment banking experience on Wall Street and in Hong Kong.

About a week later, I received another email from another potential consultant who attended a different top MBA program, but also had admissions office experience, an MBA from a top business school, and had worked in investment banking in both Wall Street and Hong Kong. And their first name was the same, though spelled slightly differently.

They both joined Accepted and have been doing an outstanding job for our clients ever since.

Madelaine Baker and Madeleine Wang, welcome to Admissions Straight Talk!

Can you each tell us about your background prior to joining Accepted? [1:50]

M. Baker: My first experience in MBA admissions was working at MIT Sloan in 2002. Then I decided to go to business school – I went to Columbia. After b-school I decided to work on Wall St. I worked as a banker off and on for about ten years in New York and Hong Kong.

At CBS, I was always involved in admissions. When I decided I didn’t want to be in investment banking anymore, I contacted Yale SOM and worked as an outside admissions reader there. Then I joined Accepted!

M. Wang: After my undergrad, I worked in investment banking in New York and Hong Kong before business school. While I was in business school at Wharton I decided that I wanted to take on a part-time job as a grad member on the admissions committee – I really enjoyed it, and it was an important part of my b-school experience.

After I graduated I worked in management consulting. I was an active Wharton alum, interviewing candidates, etc. I also worked with people in my firm who were applying to business schools, and I really loved that process. Over the last few years I decided to take my work in a different (more flexible) direction, and that led me to Accepted.

You both spent a lot of time in financial services. What are critical qualities that investment banks and top financial services companies look for in applicants? [5:32]

M. Wang: I would say that I would look for strong quantitative skills. From a resume perspective that can be demonstrated by statistics, a high GMAT, and work experience that shows strong quant ability. From a personal perspective, they look for very hard workers – investment banking is very demanding. So banks are looking for candidates with drive and resilience.

M. Baker: They’re looking for smart, motivated candidates that have the grit and determination to succeed. And somebody who’s willing to play well on a team. I think that’s what b-schools want to see, too.

That’s just what I was going to ask next – do you see b-schools looking for the same qualities? [8:25]

M. Baker: Absolutely – very similar qualities. Quant skills will get you in the door, but they’re not enough – you need to be a team player. You need to be resilient and persistent.

M. Wang: I think some qualities are the same – being smart, having perseverance. But when you’re building a class for business school, you’re also looking at different things because you’re looking for a diverse group that can teach each other – so you’re looking for a diverse range of interests and leadership skills.

Were the criteria different for consulting? [11:45]

M. Wang: They’re similar in that you’re looking for highly intelligent people, but they’re also a little more diverse than banking. There’s more emphasis on problem solving, and more emphasis on someone who presents very well, because of the level of client interaction.

In looking at b-school admissions, do schools take into account a student’s goals and what employers in that industry will look for when they consider an applicant? Or do they consider the applicant’s skills more broadly? [13:15]

M. Wang: In looking at an applicant, you want to make sure what they’re saying makes sense and that it’s a logical/realistic path for them. In b-school people often discover new interests. So you’re looking broadly at whether someone has the qualities to be successful post-MBA.

M. Baker: That’s true and schools understand that people change paths. But schools look closely at the goals people describe in their applications with the idea that those goals should be realistic and achievable.

You both worked in Hong Kong, Are there elements in the admissions process that Asian applicants tend to be unaware of or underestimate? [16:05]

M. Baker: The number of applicants coming from Asia is so much greater than the seats available. The GMAT scores from Asia tend to be higher – so applicants have to be sure they’re not just planning to stand out through high scores. They need to stand out through a unique story, not through their stats.

M. Wang: Highlight your achievements without being overly modest.

What surprised you working in the admissions office? [20:40]

M. Wang: It was eye opening in a good way to see the sheer diversity of people who apply and go to business school. The diversity of backgrounds was something I learned from. Wharton is known for having strong finance, but there’s a huge diversity in terms of people’s experience. The negative that surprised me as someone who’s very detail oriented – there were apps that came in that weren’t proofed. (Language errors made by native English speakers, sloppy mistakes such as leaving in the name of another school – easy things that applicants could have addressed.)

How has your perspective changed since becoming a consultant? [23:15]

M. Baker: I remember reading applications for Yale – it’s easy to forget how much work goes into preparing these applications. To me that was eye opening – how much time and work is involved.

M. Wang: Post-MBA I’d worked with applicants before joining Accepted. I really realized how much being able to write reasonably well matters. When you’re reading applications on the adcom, all you have to get to know an applicant is on the paper in front of you.

To be able to present yourself well really matters, and I see that so much as I review early drafts.

What would you say about the different cultures of the business schools you’ve experienced? [28:00]

M. Wang: Wharton is one of the larger schools – the sheer diversity of the offerings stands out. The size of it allows it to have a great set of resources, and it was a great benefit. There’s also a great alumni network. I felt that the school was very collaborative and teamwork-focused – possibly more than I even expected. It’s constantly improving itself – it’s very responsive to student feedback. It’s a very dynamic program.

M. Baker: My first experience was at MIT Sloan. I remember it as an extremely smart, tight-knit community. Students are so energetic – they’re always organizing and doing things. It’s a tight-knit, nice community.

CBS, as part of NYC, is a much bigger school. There’s a big emphasis on teamwork, and it has an excellent network (which is instrumental in organizing trips downtown). The cluster system breaks down the large school into smaller communities. And the women’s network is really strong.

Yale is completely different. I wasn’t as involved in the student community since I was reading applications. But the campus is collaborative, international, and places a big emphasis on teamwork.

Did you also review the Yale video? [35:00]

M. Baker: They’re really revealing. You get a sense of who the person is and how they present themselves.

It’s insightful into how prepared applicants are – how did they dress? Did they check the lighting?

How can you prepare for a video question? [37:20]

M. Baker: First of all, you do have to prepare! Some people think you can wing it. Record yourself and review the recording (and have someone else review it and give you feedback). You really, really want to practice it.

M. Wang: You want to practice enough that you can relax in front of the camera so you come across as personable.

Madelaine Baker, any tips for European applicants? [41:00]

Coming from Germany, the grading is pretty straightforward.

If English isn’t your first language, then proofreading is important. And it can be helpful to get advice on content in letters of rec to see how Americans read letters of rec.

Can you share some tips for people applying this year? [42:15]

M. Wang: Get started right away, if you haven’t already. Early planning requires getting your test scores and list of schools together so you have enough time to work on your application materials.

M. Baker: If you haven’t started, you need to get on it as soon as possible.

Have someone proofread your application – even if you decide not to work with a consultant. There’s nothing worse from a reader’s perspective than a sloppy application.

Think about the story you want to present to admissions, then sit down and write.

Do you have advice for people planning ahead to next year or later? [45:10]

M. Baker: Think about what the gaps are in your resume – volunteer work, leadership, etc. Take a step back and think about what you can work on over the next year to strengthen these soft spots.

M. Wang: You should also think about – if you’re moving toward a career change – starting to explore the new career, so that you can be sure about the choice you’re making and have knowledge and experience you can point to when you apply.

Image

Related Links:

Madelaine Baker’s Bio

Madelaine Wang’s Bio

MBA Admissions Guidance

Related Shows:

• Wharton Lauder: An MBA/MA that Prepares You for Global Business

• A Lot About Yale SOM’s EMBA Program

• Insights into MIT Sloan MBA Admissions with Dawna Levenson

• The MBA Menu at Columbia Business School

A 20-Year MBA Admissions Veteran Shares Hhs Insights [Episode 163]

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Former Investment Bankers Current Admissions Experts [Episode #227] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Former Investment Bankers Current Admissions Experts [Episode 227] [#permalink]

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New post 03 Oct 2017, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Former Investment Bankers Current Admissions Experts [Episode 227]
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Read Time: 6 minutesImage

About a year ago I received an email from someone interested in working for Accepted. She had admissions office experience, an MBA from a top business school, and investment banking experience on Wall Street and in Hong Kong.

About a week later, I received another email from another potential consultant who attended a different top MBA program, but also had admissions office experience, an MBA from a top business school, and had worked in investment banking in both Wall Street and Hong Kong. And their first name was the same, though spelled slightly differently.

They both joined Accepted and have been doing an outstanding job for our clients ever since.

Madelaine Baker and Madeleine Wang, welcome to Admissions Straight Talk!

Can you each tell us about your background prior to joining Accepted? [1:50]

M. Baker: My first experience in MBA admissions was working at MIT Sloan in 2002. Then I decided to go to business school – I went to Columbia. After b-school I decided to work on Wall St. I worked as a banker off and on for about ten years in New York and Hong Kong.

At CBS, I was always involved in admissions. When I decided I didn’t want to be in investment banking anymore, I contacted Yale SOM and worked as an outside admissions reader there. Then I joined Accepted!

M. Wang: After my undergrad, I worked in investment banking in New York and Hong Kong before business school. While I was in business school at Wharton I decided that I wanted to take on a part-time job as a grad member on the admissions committee – I really enjoyed it, and it was an important part of my b-school experience.

After I graduated I worked in management consulting. I was an active Wharton alum, interviewing candidates, etc. I also worked with people in my firm who were applying to business schools, and I really loved that process. Over the last few years I decided to take my work in a different (more flexible) direction, and that led me to Accepted.

You both spent a lot of time in financial services. What are critical qualities that investment banks and top financial services companies look for in applicants? [5:32]

M. Wang: I would say that I would look for strong quantitative skills. From a resume perspective that can be demonstrated by statistics, a high GMAT, and work experience that shows strong quant ability. From a personal perspective, they look for very hard workers – investment banking is very demanding. So banks are looking for candidates with drive and resilience.

M. Baker: They’re looking for smart, motivated candidates that have the grit and determination to succeed. And somebody who’s willing to play well on a team. I think that’s what b-schools want to see, too.

That’s just what I was going to ask next – do you see b-schools looking for the same qualities? [8:25]

M. Baker: Absolutely – very similar qualities. Quant skills will get you in the door, but they’re not enough – you need to be a team player. You need to be resilient and persistent.

M. Wang: I think some qualities are the same – being smart, having perseverance. But when you’re building a class for business school, you’re also looking at different things because you’re looking for a diverse group that can teach each other – so you’re looking for a diverse range of interests and leadership skills.

Were the criteria different for consulting? [11:45]

M. Wang: They’re similar in that you’re looking for highly intelligent people, but they’re also a little more diverse than banking. There’s more emphasis on problem solving, and more emphasis on someone who presents very well, because of the level of client interaction.

In looking at b-school admissions, do schools take into account a student’s goals and what employers in that industry will look for when they consider an applicant? Or do they consider the applicant’s skills more broadly? [13:15]

M. Wang: In looking at an applicant, you want to make sure what they’re saying makes sense and that it’s a logical/realistic path for them. In b-school people often discover new interests. So you’re looking broadly at whether someone has the qualities to be successful post-MBA.

M. Baker: That’s true and schools understand that people change paths. But schools look closely at the goals people describe in their applications with the idea that those goals should be realistic and achievable.

You both worked in Hong Kong, Are there elements in the admissions process that Asian applicants tend to be unaware of or underestimate? [16:05]

M. Baker: The number of applicants coming from Asia is so much greater than the seats available. The GMAT scores from Asia tend to be higher – so applicants have to be sure they’re not just planning to stand out through high scores. They need to stand out through a unique story, not through their stats.

M. Wang: Highlight your achievements without being overly modest.

What surprised you working in the admissions office? [20:40]

M. Wang: It was eye opening in a good way to see the sheer diversity of people who apply and go to business school. The diversity of backgrounds was something I learned from. Wharton is known for having strong finance, but there’s a huge diversity in terms of people’s experience. The negative that surprised me as someone who’s very detail oriented – there were apps that came in that weren’t proofed. (Language errors made by native English speakers, sloppy mistakes such as leaving in the name of another school – easy things that applicants could have addressed.)

How has your perspective changed since becoming a consultant? [23:15]

M. Baker: I remember reading applications for Yale – it’s easy to forget how much work goes into preparing these applications. To me that was eye opening – how much time and work is involved.

M. Wang: Post-MBA I’d worked with applicants before joining Accepted. I really realized how much being able to write reasonably well matters. When you’re reading applications on the adcom, all you have to get to know an applicant is on the paper in front of you.

To be able to present yourself well really matters, and I see that so much as I review early drafts.

What would you say about the different cultures of the business schools you’ve experienced? [28:00]

M. Wang: Wharton is one of the larger schools – the sheer diversity of the offerings stands out. The size of it allows it to have a great set of resources, and it was a great benefit. There’s also a great alumni network. I felt that the school was very collaborative and teamwork-focused – possibly more than I even expected. It’s constantly improving itself – it’s very responsive to student feedback. It’s a very dynamic program.

M. Baker: My first experience was at MIT Sloan. I remember it as an extremely smart, tight-knit community. Students are so energetic – they’re always organizing and doing things. It’s a tight-knit, nice community.

CBS, as part of NYC, is a much bigger school. There’s a big emphasis on teamwork, and it has an excellent network (which is instrumental in organizing trips downtown). The cluster system breaks down the large school into smaller communities. And the women’s network is really strong.

Yale is completely different. I wasn’t as involved in the student community since I was reading applications. But the campus is collaborative, international, and places a big emphasis on teamwork.

Did you also review the Yale video? [35:00]

M. Baker: They’re really revealing. You get a sense of who the person is and how they present themselves.

It’s insightful into how prepared applicants are – how did they dress? Did they check the lighting?

How can you prepare for a video question? [37:20]

M. Baker: First of all, you do have to prepare! Some people think you can wing it. Record yourself and review the recording (and have someone else review it and give you feedback). You really, really want to practice it.

M. Wang: You want to practice enough that you can relax in front of the camera so you come across as personable.

Madelaine Baker, any tips for European applicants? [41:00]

Coming from Germany, the grading is pretty straightforward.

If English isn’t your first language, then proofreading is important. And it can be helpful to get advice on content in letters of rec to see how Americans read letters of rec.

Can you share some tips for people applying this year? [42:15]

M. Wang: Get started right away, if you haven’t already. Early planning requires getting your test scores and list of schools together so you have enough time to work on your application materials.

M. Baker: If you haven’t started, you need to get on it as soon as possible.

Have someone proofread your application – even if you decide not to work with a consultant. There’s nothing worse from a reader’s perspective than a sloppy application.

Think about the story you want to present to admissions, then sit down and write.

Do you have advice for people planning ahead to next year or later? [45:10]

M. Baker: Think about what the gaps are in your resume – volunteer work, leadership, etc. Take a step back and think about what you can work on over the next year to strengthen these soft spots.

M. Wang: You should also think about – if you’re moving toward a career change – starting to explore the new career, so that you can be sure about the choice you’re making and have knowledge and experience you can point to when you apply.

Image

Related Links:

Madelaine Baker’s Bio

Madelaine Wang’s Bio

MBA Admissions Guidance

Related Shows:

• Wharton Lauder: An MBA/MA that Prepares You for Global Business

• A Lot About Yale SOM’s EMBA Program

• Insights into MIT Sloan MBA Admissions with Dawna Levenson

• The MBA Menu at Columbia Business School

A 20-Year MBA Admissions Veteran Shares Hhs Insights [Episode 163]

Subscribe:

Image
            Image

Image

Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, MBA Admissions

The post Former Investment Bankers Current Admissions Experts [Episode 227] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 583 [0], given: 74

Former Investment Bankers Current Admissions Experts [Episode 227]   [#permalink] 03 Oct 2017, 12:01

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