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Women Considering an MBA: Register ASAP for Upcoming 2017 Forté Forums [#permalink]

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New post 15 Aug 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Women Considering an MBA: Register ASAP for Upcoming 2017 Forté Forums
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2017 Forté Forums are taking place THIS MONTH, and if you are a standout woman considering an MBA, then you should make sure you’re at one of this season’s 12 free events. Forté Forums are designed to empower you with information about how an MBA can propel your career forward. You will gain an opportunity to speak with representatives, alumnae, and students from top b-schools in North American and Europe, and to learn how an MBA can help shape your future career in business. You’ll also gain insights into the business school admissions process.

Upcoming tour dates are:

Date
City

Monday, Aug. 14
Washington, D.C.

Tuesday, Aug. 15
Boston

Wednesday, Aug. 16
Atlanta

Thursday, Aug. 17
Miami

Monday, Aug. 21
Seattle

Tuesday, Aug. 22
San Francisco

Wednesday, Aug. 23
Los Angeles

Thursday, Aug. 24
Houston

Monday, Aug. 28
Chicago

Tuesday, Aug. 29
New York

Wednesday, Aug. 30
New York

Thursday, Aug. 31
Toronto

Monday, Oct. 16
London

Some of the many participating schools at this year’s Forums include:

• Arizona State W.P. Carey School of Business

• Babson Olin Graduate School of Business

• CMU Tepper

• Columbia Business School

• Cornell S.C. Johnson

• Dartmouth Tuck

• Duke Fuqua

• Emory Guizueta

• Georgetown McDonough

• Harvard Business School

• HEC-Paris

• Hult International Business School

• IE Business School

• IESE Business School

• Indiana Kelley

• INSEAD

• London Business School

• MIT Sloan

• NYU Stern

• Northwestern Kellogg

• Penn State Smeal

• Pepperdine Graziadio

• UC Berkeley Haas

• UCLA Anderson

• Chicago Booth

• Maryland Smith

• Minnesota Carlson

• UNC Kenan-Flagler

• Notre Dame Mendoza

• Oxford Saïd

• Wharton

• USC Marshall

• UT McCombs

• Toronto Rotman

• UVA Darden

• Vanderbilt Owen

• Washington Olin

• Yale SOM

For more information and to register, click here.

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Related Resources:

• How Forté Helps Women Get into Business and Stay in Business, podcast episode

• MBA Selectivity Index, discover the schools where you are competitive

• Launching Her Application with Forte and Following Her Heart to Chicago Booth

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Women Considering an MBA: Register ASAP for Upcoming 2017 Forté Forums appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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The Journey From India to Harvard MBA [Episode 220] [#permalink]

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New post 15 Aug 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: The Journey From India to Harvard MBA [Episode 220]
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What’s it like to be a Harvard Business School student and Google Intern? Let’s find out in today’s podcast!

Our guest today is Shantanu Misra, currently a 2nd-year Harvard Business School MBA student who just completed a summer internship at Google and will serve this year as the product manager for the Harbus, the independent, non-profit news organization of Harvard Business School.

A little background about Shantanu Misra. He graduated from IIT Kanpur in India with a BTech and M Tech in Civil Engineering focused on geoinformatics. He worked for BCG in Mumbai and Singapore until 2014. Then he made a fairly major switch and moved to Switzerland where he became the program manager for Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. About one year ago, he started his MBA at Harvard.

Shantanu, welcome to Admission Straight Talk!

Can you give us a brief overview of your path to HBS? [1:45]

I did my undergrad in engineering – I learned a lot of tech skills, and then pivoted to more of a business role, because I was fascinated by the idea of trying out different industries and solving strategic problems. That’s what attracted me to BCG after undergrad. I got a lot of exposure to different industries, different geographies, and different types of problems. But like any consultant, I wasn’t owning the solutions – so I was attracted to the opportunity in Switzerland with Gavi.

The role I had there was very interesting. Living in a new country gave me space to reflect on my career, and that’s when I decided to do my MBA. And that brought me to Harvard Business School.

How did you like the shift from advising to, in your words, owning the solution? [3:20]

It’s a major shift. People asked me how I was adjusting to living in Switzerland, and I would say living in Switzerland was easy – adjusting to the job requirements was a little more tricky.

One difference is that as a consultant, you take for granted the buy-in of the partner organization – the machinery runs very fast. But when you’re in an operational role, you’re part of that machinery – you don’t have that senior leadership-driven mandate all the time.

Another big difference is the level of detail in talking about your solutions. As a consultant you work at a high level. But operationally, you need to be detailed and practical.

Why do you feel you need an MBA? [7:00]

I don’t think of an MBA as an investment in the next 10 years of my career – it’s an investment in the next 30,35, 40 years of my career, in terms of the community and resources I’ll gain. That for me was the biggest reason.

Also, I have interests in public health, public education, etc, and in the MBA I’ve been able to work with people who are interested in social enterprise.

What did you find most difficult in the application process? [8:48]

The most difficult thing by far is the essay.

The rest of the package is ready – you’ve done the jobs you’ve done, you have the grades you have, but the thing you can change is how you represent yourself.

There are a lot of people who have a similar educational background to mine, and probably similar grades. So I spent a lot of time thinking about how to differentiate myself.

It’s a high risk event, applying for an MBA – you only get one or two stabs at it. So you want to do it well.

It helps to talk to people you know who’ve made it, so you can understand how you can stand out in your essay.

Did you get the Harbus essay guide as an applicant?  [11:13]

Yes, I did! For context, we at Harbus publish a guide with 20-25 successful essays.

When you read these essays you get a sense of what people do, and what are the content choices people make. Every year when I read the essays, they’re so different.

When you interviewed at HBS, what was the hardest or most memorable question? [14:55]

I was really surprised when the interviewer opened with a question about one of the hobbies I’d mentioned in my application – not even in one of the essays – about my experience doing street plays in India. Of course I was not prepared for that question, but it really helped me relax, because I was talking about things I’d experienced in my college life.

Do you remember what you wrote about in your Interview Reflection after your interview? [15:55]

Interview Reflection is an important part of your application. Reflection is a huge part of HBS pedagogy in general. So I think Interview Reflection is important because it helps give them a more holistic picture of you, and also shows how you’ll fit with the HBS culture.

What I wrote about was the question I just mentioned – how it made me relax, thanking the interviewer for that. And then I just reflected on some of the other parts of the conversation.

What has surprised you about HBS? [18:35]

You hear a lot of stories about the social life – that it’s a two-year party. What surprised me was the focus on the classroom. The amount of effort the faculty put in for each single class surprised and impressed me – the way they design and structure the discussion. The richness of the conversation that happens in the classroom is amazing.

How is the case method changing the way you think about business or product management? [20:50]

I think before an MBA the roles you do are more designed to be you contributing as an individual contributor – and I think b-school is great for helping you transition to being a team leader. And that’s applicable to product management as well.

The other thing for me is respect for diversity – that comes from being in a room with multiple nationalities, and you realize how valuable that diversity is.

Earlier, you mentioned your reason for pursuing an MBA was mainly related to the network/community, but it sounds like you’ve gotten much more out of it that you value. Is that fair to say? [23:30]

When you apply you’re focused on what you think you’ll take away from it, and once you’re there you end up taking away a lot more. I’m really enjoying my experience.

Can you tell us about your experience as a summer intern at Google? [24:25]

It’s been great!

I was working as a product manager. I was building on some of the skills I learned as a consultant – you have to be analytical, you have to take everyone along, get initiatives through, etc. At the same time, you’re in an operational role, so you have to be really detailed.

The muscle Google has to design products is amazing. Brainstorming about solutions that will impact billions of users is fascinating. It’s an experience I couldn’t have gotten anywhere else.

Do you feel aspects of your Harvard education have helped in your role as product manager? [26:10]

The biggest help is that I’m from HBS – I can reach out to all the other HBS grads working at Google. HBS has the strongest MBA network.

The pedagogy of HBS is case-based. When I came to Google I worked with game developers. I remembered I’d done a case on game developers – it helps build context on real world issues.

You mentioned the perception that the MBA is a two-year party. There have been rumors that you need a lot of money for the social life and extracurriculars at HBS, that it is elitist. Have you found that to be true? [29:00]

It’s a bit unfair to call it elitist or say you need a lot of money. There are people from different financial backgrounds – some are on financial aid, and some have a lot of money.

But what I’ve found is that there is a strong sense of community, especially within your section, and that people are respectful of boundaries. So if you’re on a budget, people are respectful of that.

You’re the product manager for the Harbus. What does that mean? [30:30]

The Harbus is one of the oldest campus news organizations, operating since 1937. As product manager, I basically own some of Harbus’s products, such as the essay guide. We also have an interview guide.

We’re thinking of launching some other new products. We also have an editorial team that manages our monthly newsletter.

What motivated you to become product manager? [31:40]

I had used the product, which was the biggest motivation!

I’d always had an interest in student journalism, and coming to HBS where we have this great historical asset, the Harbus, I wanted to be involved. And the team is great. So when I was deciding which extracurriculars I wanted to devote my time to (since you can’t do everything!), I chose the Harbus.

What are your plans for after graduation? [32:45]

The plan is for me to make a plan.

A two-year MBA gives you a lot of opportunity to reflect on your career. I want to use this year to reflect on my internship and my interests in tech, public health, etc.

What will you miss about HBS? [35:20]

Being full time in an educational program, the kinds of things you can explore and the opportunity to participate in extracurriculars.

The second big thing will be the community. I’ve made a lot of close friends. I’ll miss that a lot.

What other Harbus products are in the pipeline? [37:00]

We’re coming out with an interview guide, probably next month.

It will have real life interview questions from successful HBS students.

There are three or four other ideas in the pipeline. We may be coming out with a guide for 2+2 students, since that program has its own unique demands.

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Related Links:

The Harbus

The Harbus on Facebook

• The Harbus on Twitter

Get Accepted to Harvard Business School, an on-demand webinar

Harvard Business School 2018 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

HBS Post-Interview Reflections, a video

Sample Essay from Admitted HBS Student

What Does Harvard Business School Want?

Related Shows:

HBS 2016 Grad Reflects on Her Experience as a Harvard MBA

An HBS Student Helping HBS Applicants

HBS CORe: Teaching the Language of Business

Breaking Some HBS Stereotypes: An Interview with Ben Faw

Wharton’s Commitment Project

Subscribe:

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, MBA Admissions

The post The Journey From India to Harvard MBA [Episode 220] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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MBA Admissions: Why is Community Service So Important? [#permalink]

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New post 16 Aug 2017, 09:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: MBA Admissions: Why is Community Service So Important?
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If you’re applying to b-school NEXT year, then you probably haven’t started thinking about MBA applications yet. But now is actually an excellent time to get started – not just on test prep and boosting GPAs, but on taking time to examine your community service. At most top b-schools, community service is virtually a requirement, and if your involvement is on the weak side, then you have just enough time to start bulking up your experience…if you start NOW.

What is Community Service?

Community service is: “active participation in and assumption of responsibility for your community.”

That is an intentionally broad definition that includes taking an active role in sports teams, professional organizations, alumni groups, religious institutions, literacy programs, political campaigns, environmental causes, fundraising for immigrant assistance groups…whatever you define as your community. Community service almost always does – and should – reflect your values and priorities.

The operative phrases in the definition are “active” and “responsibility.” Writing checks is not enough. And helping your elderly neighbor occasionally makes you a nice person, but doesn’t mean you are taking responsibility for your community. Community service requires commitment.

Why is Community Service Important?

Community service is important because:

1. It provides an opportunity for you to demonstrate attributes that young applicants frequently can’t reveal in the classroom or in their jobs: leadership, initiative, interpersonal skills, and the ability to handle responsibility. It expresses your willingness to contribute.

2. A foundational principle of admissions is “Past behavior predicts future behavior.” To adcoms, a history of activism and participation shows that you will be an active participant in their student and alumni communities. That’s exactly the impression you want your application to make.

3. It indicates breadth and well-roundedness. It should come as no surprise that top MBA programs don’t want workaholic nerds.

At the most competitive schools, community service and extracurricular activities frequently make the difference between who is accepted and rejected among otherwise competitive applicants. If you have been involved in community service, great. Keep up the good work and strive for a leadership role. If you haven’t been an active participant or leader, become one. Choose an activity, cause, or organization that you would like to contribute to. And then be consistently and actively involved so that you will have a commitment to write about other than school and work. You may even find that you enjoy it.

Team up with an experienced guide who will help you discover your competitive edge and increase your chances of getting accepted to your top choice business school! Click here to learn about working with an admissions expert.

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Related Resources:

Leadership in Admissions, a free guide

MBA Admissions Directors Speak About How to Get Accepted

• Can You Get Into a Top Grad School if You Didn’t Attend a Top University?

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post MBA Admissions: Why is Community Service So Important? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Dartmouth Tuck MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Dartmouth Tuck MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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The Dartmouth Tuck adcom is interested in learning about what you as an individual, a businessperson, and a leader can contribute to Tuck’s small, close-knit program. Use your essays as a platform for expressing your earnest desire to enter the world of management and to make a difference and to be a part of the Tuck community. 

Before drafting your Tuck essays, please review Tuck’s Evaluation Criteria.

Regarding changes in this year’s in comparison to last year’s essays, Tuck changed its Essay #1 slightly and its Essay #2 significantly.

Accepted has been helping applicants to Tuck gain acceptance for roughly 20 years. Explore our services to learn more about how we can help you prepare your Tuck MBA application.

Essays:

Please respond fully but concisely to the following essay questions. There are no right or wrong answers. We encourage applicants to limit the length of their responses to a word count of 500. Please double-space your responses.

Essay 1. (Required)

What are your short and long-term goals? Why is an MBA a critical next step toward achieving those goals? Why are you interested in Tuck?

This is a classic, straight-forward goals question.

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: The MBA is a means to an end, not an end in itself. That’s why Tuck (and many other schools) ask question like this one. Tuck wants to know that it can help you achieve your goal. So clearly you have to have both short- and long-term goals to respond to the question.

You also have to be able to show the qualities of a wise leader with the potential for global impact. When have you shown the maturity to lead and influence in a way that improved either your company or some other entity that you were a part of?  How did that experience influence your short- and long-term goals or show that you have the ability to achieve those goals?  What is the benefit to society if you achieve what you want to achieve?

One possible approach to the essay: Start this essay with a brief anecdote about an accomplishment that reflects at least some of the qualities Tuck seeks and also influenced the development of your goals. Then discuss your goals and the path you intend to take and the hoped for impact of your realizing those dreams. The path should include the aspects of Tuck’s program that attract you to Hanover and will help you accomplish your goals.

Essay 2. (Required)

Tuck’s mission is to educate wise leaders to better the world of business. Wisdom encompasses the essential aptitudes of confident humility, about what one does and does not know; empathy, towards the diverse ideas and experiences of others; and judgement, about when and how to take risks for the better.

With Tuck’s mission in mind, and with a focus on confident humility, tell us about a time you:

• received tough feedback,

• experienced failure, or

• disappointed yourself or others.

How did you respond, and what did you learn about yourself as a result?

Unlike Essay 1, which focuses on the future and the hypothetical, this question is about one experience in the past.  It is not hypothetical at all. It also requires you to choose one incident and discuss how you responded to a difficulty, a challenge, or a disappointment where you were the central figure.  When did you really blow it?

A CAR approach will work well here:

Challenge

Action

Result

Keep it specific and concrete or you will blend in with others writing in generalities. Your response to this trying experience and lessons learned from it are the key.  How did you respond? grow? improve? If you can conclude with another later and similar situation when you used the lessons learned in the first experience and handled it with aplomb while demonstrating the wisdom Tuck is looking for, you’ll be acing this question.

Essay 3. (Optional)

Please provide any additional insight or information that you have not addressed elsewhere that may be helpful in reviewing your application (e.g., unusual choice of evaluators, weaknesses in academic performance, unexplained job gaps or changes, etc.). Complete this question only if you feel your candidacy is not fully represented by this application.

It is almost impossible for two (or even three) 500-word essays plus a bunch of boxes, a transcript, and a GMAT/GRE score to represent fully the uniqueness and talents of a truly impressive candidate. That comment has nothing to do with writing style and everything to do with the complexity of accomplished human beings. In my opinion this “optional essay”  is optional in name only.

At the same time, don’t waste the reader’s time by writing a meaningless, superficial “grand finale” or summary. Don’t repeat what can be found elsewhere. Let this essay add value to the reader’s understanding of you and your candidacy.

Essay 4. (To be completed by all reapplicants)

How have you strengthened your candidacy since you last applied? Please reflect on how you have grown personally and professionally.

Straightforward MBA reapplication question. It is critical that every reapplicant be able to answer it for every school they are reapplying to: What has changed that would compel Tuck to admit you this year?

If you would like professional guidance with your Dartmouth Tuck MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Dartmouth Tuck application.

Dartmouth Tuck 2017-18 Application Deadlines:

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***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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ByImage
Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsBuilding Your Consulting Career, and a Look Back at a Tuck MBA, podcast episode

Talking with a Military Tuckie

• Why MBA?, a guide to writing about your MBA goals

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Dartmouth Tuck MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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The Art of Interviewing—Are You a “Can” or a “Cannot”? [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: The Art of Interviewing—Are You a “Can” or a “Cannot”?
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“I am doomed…. This is a disaster….I really never expected this… What am I going to do?” This from Daniel, a prospective PH.D student.  I couldn’t imagine what had happened to cause such a negative response, especially as Daniel is a very strong candidate with impeccable credentials. My shock was further compounded when he went on to tell me that he had been invited to sit for an interview. Okay, now I was completely confused especially in light of the fact that this type of invitation is usually cause for celebration. It means that the academic committee is giving serious consideration to your application and wants to know more about you. I couldn’t help but ask, “And this is a disaster because? What am I missing here? Talk to me!”

Wow! The floodgates opened. He said, “You don’t understand… You don’t get it! I am no good at interviews. In fact I “choke” even on simple job interviews. This is not good. I thought I could bypass this requirement. Now what do I do?” I told him that I could teach him how to master the art of interviewing. He dismissed my offer by saying, “You can’t teach someone interviewing skills. It is something you can do or cannot. I am one of the cannots.” I shocked him into silence when I informed him gently and respectfully that I actually teach the art of interviewing in my Introduction to Communication class. I said, “I can take you from a “cannot” to a “can.” I promised to develop an Interview Preparation plan for him and we scheduled a follow-up meeting.

I decided to “borrow” some of the interview techniques I use in the communication classes that I teach and in the professional workshops that I offer. I was planning to use the “Three Plus One Strategy,” as I have coined it, involved in the Art of Interviewing.

At our next meeting I told Daniel that I had developed a “Three Plus One Strategy” that would thoroughly prepare him for the PH.D interview(s).  The “Three Plus One” is composed of: The Pre-Interview Stage, the Interview Stage, the Post-Interview Stage and the Plus One which is the Mock/Practice Interview Stage. The plan includes review and discussion of the bulleted items in each of the first three stages and then application of lessons learned in the Mock Interview stage. Upon completion of the Mock Interview, Daniel would receive verbal feedback as well as a comprehensive written assessment of his performance.

Here’s how we did it:

STAGE 1 — Pre-Interview

• Research all of web pages and any readily available print materials related to the University, Program, and faculty. You need to be prepared, during the interview, to show your full knowledge of the special features offered: size of University and your program, national and/or international rankings, accreditations, TA offerings, scholarships, interdisciplinary opportunities, faculty research, scholarly conferences and publications etc. You may want to reference some of this when you are answering interview questions. Remember you should avoid asking questions that might reveal to the committee that you did not take the time and effort to appropriately research the materials available.

• Compile a list/script of questions that you believe may be asked during the interview and create talking points for your answers. However do not write out the answers word for word as you want to sound spontaneous and natural rather than scripted and memorized.

• Carefully consider what you wear to the interview. How we package ourselves impacts how we are perceived by others and effects how we feel about ourselves. Choose attire that empowers and emphasizes your confidence and credibility. This may vary depending on the program for which you are being interviewed.  For example, for business programs you may choose to look “corporate” and for MFA programs you may choose attire that represents your creative and artistic nature.

• Conduct a real or virtual dry run in terms of travel to the interview. If possible allow for traffic and other delays by planning to arrive, at least, ½ hour earlier than scheduled.  This will allow you time to get a feel for the campus and, perhaps, even reference it during your interview. It may also serve as an additional talking point or question.

• Practice some positive self-talk and visualization which you can then re-visit before the actual interview begins.

• Practice some deep diaphragmatic breathing and muscle relaxing exercises to use before the start of the interview. Deep cleansing breaths really work.

• Although you may not be asked for it, bring multiple copies of your CV/resume in case they are requested by committee members.

• Review the Statement of Purpose that you submitted with your application to this school in case you are questioned on part or parts of it by individual committee members. You may even choose to reference and/or update something that you included in your Statement.

• Make sure that you perceive this experience as a wonderful opportunity to present yourself in person rather than an obstacle or challenge. A positive mindset is critical to your success.

Stage 2 — The Interview

• Keep in mind that the evaluation of you as a candidate begins the minute you step on campus. You would probably be surprised by how often I have heard members of the academic committee question the department secretary, receptionist and/or current students to get a completely different perspective on a particular candidate.  This is a very common practice in job interviews as well.

• Before you enter the interview area use some power-inducing nonverbal gestures to increase your confidence level. I suggest you visit TED.com and view Amy Cuddy’s video on the power of nonverbal.

• Avoid one word answers even if the interviewer uses a close-ended question. Utilize the techniques of behavioral interviewing by providing specific examples or short narratives to exhibit your strengths. For example: if you are asked if you consider yourself a thorough researcher, you shouldn’t just say “yes,” but refer to what you have accomplished that clearly exhibits how thorough a researcher you are. Telling stories may well set you apart from other candidates and make you far more memorable.

• Effective eye contact is critical in interviewing. If you are being interviewed by committee make sure that you make eye contact with each and every committee member. Eye contact will positively reinforce your passion, sincerity and willingness to engage in academic discourse.

• Monitor your posture and movement. Sit up straight and lean in ever so slightly as this will exhibit that you are fully engaged and deeply interested in the interview.

• Avoid wringing your hands, tapping your feet, or crossing and uncrossing your legs. This will draw negative attention to your actions rather than to all of the wonderful things you would like to share.

• Speak at a moderate rate and volume. The last thing you want is to make the interviewer uncomfortable with either a “too loud” voice, a “whisper soft voice,” or a “rapid fire” rate of speech.”  Make every attempt to minimize anything that might disturb or distort the message.

• It is more than okay to share your passion for the field of study and smile when appropriate. A pleasant manner and engaging personality always make a candidate more memorable.

Ask thought-provoking questions based on your research interests and the program offerings. Never ask a question that has an answer that is readily available online. It will send a very negative message (see note in The Pre-Interview Stage, bullet #1). However, you can use the information from your web research as a point of departure. For Example—“I noted on your webpage that you host several professional conferences on campus. Are graduate students encouraged to participate and/or present papers? If so, I would love to be involved. I participated in _______ conference as an undergraduate and it was a valuable experience.”

• Speak in your own voice, from your hea

rt—your sincerity, honesty, and authenticity will shine through.

Stage 3 — Post-Interview

• Make sure that you write the names and contact information for each interviewer for follow-up thank-you notes.

• Personalize each note so that it is clear that you really remember the interviewer by referencing something specific from the interview. Interviewers often compare notes so it wouldn’t serve you to write the exact same note to each interviewer. Make it personal. For example — “I really enjoyed our conversation about________ .”

• Conduct a thorough self-assessment of your performance on the interview. Ask yourself specific questions and offer yourself constructive criticism, positive feedback and suggestions for future interviews. Questions might include: What did I do well? How did I handle challenging questions? Which responses appeared to be received most positively? Why? What made those answers stand out over all others? In what way or ways might I improve? Be honest but don’t “beat yourself up.” Learn from the experience. On a personal note—even after over 30 years as a public speaker and professor of public speaking I still, after every speech, evaluate and take notes for improvement on my next speech.

Plus One — The Mock Interview

After Daniel and I worked through each of the first 3 stages, I strongly suggested that he prepare to be interviewed by me. He was a little nervous but also very excited to try out many of the strategies and techniques that we had reviewed. We scheduled the mock interview for the following week so that he could fully prepare himself. I was pleased that “Mr. Cannot” was slowly turning into “Mr. Can.”

I interviewed Daniel for about 1 hour. It was just okay at the start.  He appeared a little uncomfortable and somewhat anxious. It changed dramatically as soon as Daniel began to implement some of the techniques that we covered in the “Three Plus One Plan.” From that point on his confidence level increased—he sat up straight, made wonderful eye contact, and even shared a memorable story about one of his research experiences. It was engaging, humorous, and spotlighted his passion for the field.

Wow what a difference! My positive response to the story further encouraged him. His guard came down, and as such, he delivered an excellent interview. I even asked him a closed ended question to see how he would handle it. His answer was to tell me a story that was not only interesting but showed me who he was. He also posed some exceptionally thoughtful questions about research opportunities with individual faculty members. When we were done he asked me how he did. I threw it right back at him, “How do you think you did?”

He laughed out loud and said, “It’s a first. I actually enjoyed the interview. Who knew that with the right preparation and mind set I could become one of the “cans”? I told him that I would follow-up with a comprehensive written review which would include a few constructive suggestions for him. He promised to compare it with his self-assessment. He thanked me and said that he was now looking forward to his “real” interview and that he would stay in touch.

I imagine you might like to know what happened on the “real” interview. Daniel probably said it best—“Disaster averted. Huge success.”

The best way to feel confident going into your interview is to be absolutely sure you’ve taken the right steps to prepare. A mock interview and feedback from an Accepted admissions expert can help you put your best foot forward on the day of your interview. Contact us today!

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By Carol Drummer, Former Hofstra University Dean of Graduate Admissions, who for 10 years reviewed and signed off on over 4500 admissions decisions per year and has taught communications and rhetoric since 1991. Want Carol's help to get you accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• The Ultimate Guide to Medical School Interview Success

• Perfect Answers to MBA Interview Questions

• Prepare for Interviews with Positive Imagery

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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How to Apply to Wharton [And Get Accepted] [#permalink]

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New post 18 Aug 2017, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How to Apply to Wharton [And Get Accepted]
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Applicants who joined us for Get Accepted to Wharton got a great head start on their application strategy! Guided by Accepted founder Linda Abraham, they learned what the adcom is looking for and how to approach the application effectively.

If you missed it – or if you’d like to view it again – Get Accepted to Wharton is now available on demand.

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Watch it now!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

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4 Tips for Indian MBA Applicants [#permalink]

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New post 20 Aug 2017, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 4 Tips for Indian MBA Applicants
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It’s your job to demonstrate to the adcom that you stand out from the applicant pool and are exactly the person they want in their next MBA class. In this series, you’ll learn how to dig deep to unearth your unique character traits, experiences, skills, and talents and bring them to the forefront of your application, so that when the adcom pick up your file, they’re hooked from the very first moment.

Are you an Indian applying to a top MBA program? Well then, get ready to put some extra effort into making your application stand out. Indians are one of the largest demographics applying to business school, and – unfortunately for you – they’re often highly qualified, with strong work experience and high stats.

So let’s get right to work. What can you do to differentiate yourself from other Indian applicants? What can you do to show that you’re unique and special, even though you come from this crowded subgroup?

1. Maximize on your family biz.

It’s fairly common that Indian applicants will have a significant portion of their work experience (if not all) in the family business. Show the adcom that your work for mom and dad has been highly advantageous for your skills and preparation. The details will be important here. Your exposure to and experience with the various aspects of the family business – your management position, your responsibilities, your customer dealings, the accounting you’ve done, etc. – have provided you with a very well-rounded experience across all business fields, more than had you worked at a large corporation. Demonstrate that, as well as the fact that all of these skills can easily be transferred to a larger international company, and you will have made quite the solid case.

2. Highlight your non-IT strengths.

If you don’t work for your family company, then there’s a good chance that you work in India’s booming high-tech industry. And if that’s you, then you probably have high quant scores and loads of technical experience. But do you have management experience? Have you ever managed a team successfully to complete a non-technical project? How are your strategy skills? What ELSE can you do? You don’t want to be Indian IT Applicant #7432. Make sure your other skills, strengths, and talents shine.

3. Bulk up on extra extracurriculars.

Another way to steer clear of the Indian IT applicant stereotype is to highlight your non- work/non-school activities. Have you taken any leadership positions in these activities? How have these activities contributed to your goals, promoted personal growth, or helped you think outside the box or develop new ideas? Don’t just list your activities, but explain how they’ve shaped who you are today.

4. Choose your program wisely.

It’s safe to say that Harvard is a pretty great school, but that doesn’t mean that it’s the best program for you. This, obviously, applies to all of the top programs. Don’t assume that all top MBA programs in the U.S. are schools you should aim for. Do your research and apply only to those b-schools that best support your goals and meet your needs. Not only will you have a happier and more productive educational experience, but you’ll also increase your chances of getting into your top choice program if you aim for schools that are the best fit for YOU.

Successfully Differentiating Yourself

As an Indian b-school applicant, you’re starting out as a face in the crowd; but with some strategizing, you can draw out your uniqueness, highlighting to the admissions board how your background as an Indian makes you the ideal candidate for their next top MBA class.

Read the complete 9 Secrets to Standing Out in Your MBA Application series for more tips on how to create a compelling application that highlights your unique strengths, character traits, and talents.

For personalized advice tailored just for you, check out our MBA admissions consulting and editing services and work one-on-one with a pro who will help you discover your competitive advantage and use it to get ACCEPTED.

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Related Resources:

9 Secrets to Standing Out in Your MBA Application, a Free Guide

Can You Get Into a Top Grad School if You Didn’t Attend a Top University?

What to Do if You Belong to an Overrepresented Applicant Group

Tags: MBA Admissions

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UC Berkeley Haas EMBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2017, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: UC Berkeley Haas EMBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines
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These Haas EMBA essay questions reflect the larger Haas (and, even further, Berkeley) community and culture: they draw out the multi-faceted individual. Your professional goals and your prospective fit with the Haas EMBA program are expressions of, and extend from, that core individuality. Even though part-time, the EMBA program, again reflecting Haas culture, is intense in terms of student engagement, of community mindset, and of transformation both personal and professional. Ideally, your essays, together as a whole, will personalize your candidacy, showing you to be a potentially distinctive contributor within the program and beyond. Keeping the 4 Haas “Defining Principles” (see question 2) on your radar screen as you draft all 3 essays will help you stay in the right conceptual geography.

Essay Questions:

1. What are your future career goals, and how will the Berkeley MBA for Executives Program help you achieve them? Why is this the right time for you to undertake this program? (250 words max)

Future means post your current role, so start by discussing your next intended career step and move forward from there. Key details to include are position/role, company/industry, possibly geography, and expected scope of responsibilities. In addition – to go beyond just a logical answer and to make the reader excited about your goals – discuss what your vision is for your planned future career, what you want your professional footprint to be.

Address “why now” explicitly; a sentence will often suffice, but be concrete. Thinking of what this program will be a bridge from and to can help zero in on what to say.

In discussing how the program will benefit you, be specific: identify key skills and knowledge you need based on your goals, and how the program meets those needs.

2. At Berkeley-Haas, the following four Defining Principles describe our unique culture and are exemplified in our student body. Please select one of the principles and give a brief explanation of how you have exemplified this in your life. (250 words max)

• Question the Status Quo

• Confidence Without Attitude

• Students Always

• Beyond Yourself

Two good ways to decide on a topic for this essay are: (1) If you feel a strong affinity for one of these principles, that passion will shine forth in your essay, so focus on that principle and present one or more specific example of how you have demonstrated it in your life. (2) Think about your pivotal life experiences and determine which of these principles they most strongly represent.

Strategy tip: If possible, consider using as one example a relatively recent work story – this will provide a “close up” of the level of people and stakes you are dealing with, which is part of what you’ll bring to the MBA table.

Warning: it’s tempting to write about the principle and how meaningful it is for you. Don’t. Instead, show it through your examples. The instructions say “exemplify.”

3. Please tell us about yourself. You may include information about your family, where you grew up, your interests, or any other people or experiences that have influenced you. The goal of this essay is to get a sense of who you are, rather than what you have achieved professionally. In fact, we discourage you from spending much, if any, time on your education or professional background in this essay. (1,000 words max)

Yes, 1,000 words – and without school or work! Sounds like a lot of space, but if you address this topic in proper spirit, you’ll fill that space with ease. Indeed, this essay should be enjoyable to write – if it becomes a strain, refresh your perspective and revisit your approach.

I’ve seen this essay work in different ways – some successful applicants do what’s essentially a mini-autobiography. Others have effectively singled out a few discrete experiences and/or influences to explore and present in depth. Go with a structure and approach that is intuitive for you.

Don’t worry about presenting something unusual or dramatic; once you start mining the details of your most meaningful formative experiences and/or relationships, those experiences will inevitably be fresh and moving and informative, because the alchemy of the event, experience, or person and you at that place and time will always be unique.

In the balance between strategy and heart, between polish and openness/earnestness, favor the latter qualities. Doing so shows your emotional IQ in responding to the spirit of the question.

If you would like professional guidance with your Berkeley Haas EMBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Berkeley Haas EMBA application.

Deadlines:

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***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• Excellent Executive MBA Admissions Advice [Episode 140]

• 3 Tips for Writing a Winning EMBA Essay

• Executive MBA Applicants: 4 Immediate Action Items

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post UC Berkeley Haas EMBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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5 Things You Need to Know Before You Take the GRE [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 5 Things You Need to Know Before You Take the GRE
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Maybe you’ve just registered for the GRE and are already thinking ahead to test day—or maybe your test is in a few hours (or days, or minutes) and you’re starting to feel a little wobbly about taking it. In either case, you’re in the right place!

Whether you’re a novice or an expert test-taker, here are the five most important things you need to know before you take the GRE.

1. You can’t wing it. The GRE is a difficult exam, yes. On the other hand, it’s also a standardized exam, meaning that it tests you according to specific patterns that you can learn ahead of time. So be assured that there are a limited number of concepts and question types that you’ll see on test day.

With that said…the GRE test is difficult. To give yourself the best chance at getting the score you need for your dream programs, you need to learn those concepts and master those question types well in advance. How far in advance will depend on your current skill set. The best thing to do? Take a GRE diagnostic to see where you currently stand in terms of your test-specific knowledge, then create a study schedule around your strengths and weaknesses.

2. You need very specific tools. When you’re prepping for the GRE, just rifling through your high school math notes isn’t going to cut it. True, the math that the GRE tests is not high-level calculus—but it’s difficult in its own way, testing a variety of concepts in each problem and using tricky formats to evaluate your reasoning. What this means is that you need test-specific resources. The materials you use should provide realistic questions, good explanations, and a variety of practice tests so that you can master exactly how to work out each type of problem you’ll see on the GRE test.

3. Only perfect practice makes perfect. You can work on GRE practice problems while standing in line for brunch all you want (if, you know, you can tolerate it!), but unless you’re working some of the time under test-like conditions, you won’t have the opportunity to polish the skills you need before test day. Try to take at least one practice test a week in test-like conditions: a quiet area, timed precisely, with no going back to other sections as you work through the test in order. Then, analyze your test the next day: did you run out of time? What types of problems did you miss? Keeping a log of these can help you get a handle on exactly where you might slip up on test day.

4. The right test date can make all the difference. First of all, GRE seats fill up quickly, because the test centers offering the GRE also offer a variety of other tests—so register as soon as you know when you want to take the exam! Don’t leave it too long, or you might not be able to get your preferred timeslot or test center. By choosing between your preferred GRE dates, you’ll be able to find your Goldilocks test slot: not too far away (to allow for a retake if necessary), not too soon.

5. Perfectionism has its time and place…and that time and place is during your GRE practice, not on test day! Don’t be too hard on yourself in practice—you’re learning, after all—but when it comes to the official exam, know when to let a problem go. In both the Verbal and Quant sections, you’ll have just over a minute per question. If two minutes have passed and you haven’t solved the problem (even if you feel like you’re just about to), eliminate the answer choices you can, make your best guess, and then move on.

At the end of the day, your experience on GRE test day will have a lot to do with your experiences before the official exam. By preparing thoroughly, constantly analyzing your work, and knowing what’s in store, you’ll give yourself your best chance at getting the score—and into the program—of your dreams.

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 Rachel Kapelke-Dale blogs about graduate school admissions for Magoosh. She has a BA from Brown University, and did her own graduate work at the Université de Paris VII (Master Recherche) and University College London (PhD). She has taught and written about test preparation and admissions practices for eight years.

Related Resources:

• Get Your Game On: Prepping For Your Grad School Application

• Making Friends With the GRE: How To Overcome Test Anxiety and Perform at Your Best

• Affordable Online Test Prep, a podcast episode

Tags: Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post 5 Things You Need to Know Before You Take the GRE appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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How to Approach the Diversity Question [#permalink]

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New post 22 Aug 2017, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How to Approach the Diversity Question
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Tune in for an encore of one of our most popular 2017 podcast episodes, where Linda Abraham addresses one of the the most pressing topics on applicants’ minds: how to properly approach the diversity question.

Listen in as Linda answers your diversity-in-admissions questions, including:

1. Why is diversity so important?

2. How should I approach diversity?

3. What is the best thing to write about in my diversity essays?

And more!

For the show notes, check out the original blog post.

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Related Links:

Dimensions of Diversity Checklist

Fitting In & Standing Out: The Paradox at the Heart of Admissions

• Approaching The Diversity Essay Question

• Overrepresented MBA Applicants and Business School Diversity

• Med School Admissions Advice for Nontraditional Applicants: The Experts Speak

• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Grad School Personal Statement 

Related Shows:

• Focus on Fit [Episode 162]

• Stand Out! A Critical Goal for Your Application [Episode 181]

• D.O.s for Diversity: Ashley’s Osteopathic Med School Journey

Subscribe:
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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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Will You Be at Columbia B-School Next Year? [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Will You Be at Columbia B-School Next Year?
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Dreaming of starting your MBA at the “very heart of business” in NYC – at Columbia Business School?

Whether you’re focused on finance (like 37% of CBS grads) or interested in any of a truly dazzling array of strengths (Entrepreneurship! Luxury retail! Consulting!) – CBS is an exciting program in one of the world’s most dynamic cities.

Not coincidentally, as one of the top b-schools in the country, it’s also very selective. That can create stress for applicants like you:

How can you prove to the adcom that you have what they’re looking for in a Columbia MBA student?

How can you position yourself for a successful application season?

To give you the tools you need, we’ve created our special webinar, Get Accepted to Columbia Business School!

Drawing on decades of admissions expertise, Accepted’s founder, Linda Abraham, will share a strategic framework for application success.

You’ll learn what CBS is looking for; how you can prove you’re a great fit; and how you can stand out in the oh-so-crowded applicant pool.

And because we know you’re busy with work, application plans, and life, we’ve distilled all of it into just one hour.

The webinar is free – but registration is required. Reserve your spot today!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

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CMU Tepper MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: CMU Tepper MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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You know how you’re always reading that “all MBA programs are different” but after you’ve spent weeks and even months reading all of their websites, they can start to seem like they are pretty much the same. Well, not Carnegie Mellon Tepper. Tepper continues to march to the beat of its own drummer. CMU is committed to the rhythm produced by a combination of analytical skills and leadership education. Unlike many other MBA programs that now allow students to enroll in electives from their first semester on campus, Tepper stands firm in its belief that students are better served by having a common and fixed foundation in the fundamentals for the entire first half of that first year.

Tepper’s class composition is also significantly different from many of its peer programs. Tepper has just 200 students in its class, while Wharton has 860 and HBS has 942. Moreover, while only 25% of Wharton’s class and 38% of HBS’s comprises former STEM undergraduates, a whopping 48% of Tepper students majored in STEM subjects in college. And the flip side of that: while 42% of Wharton’s MBA class and 21% of HBS’s class studied humanities subjects in their undergraduate degrees, only 9% of Tepper’s class did. Does that mean that Tepper isn’t interested in people from humanities backgrounds? No! It means that any applicant from a humanities background had better demonstrate their facility with complex analyses to prove capable of handling the challenging Tepper curriculum.

Tepper has only one required essay and one optional essay in its application:

Essay:

Imagine that you meet up with a member of the admission committee at an airport while on a layover. You have an opportunity to make a memorable impression. Use this essay to introduce yourself. Include any information that you believe is important for the committee member to know about you both professionally and personally. (Maximum 300-350 words, 12-point font, double-spaced)

350 words is a very short essay, approximately 3 paragraphs in length. Since the Tepper online application form contains a small section to discuss your career goals – the industry and function you are targeting and 150 words each about your target role and your plan B if that goal proves elusive – you do not need to address goals in this essay. Instead, strong answers to this essay prompt would include examples of situations in which you demonstrated the ambition and talent that Tepper is seeking in its MBA candidates. In addition, since Tepper’s class is so small, applicants who demonstrate their fit with a small, tight-knit community will pique their interest.

Optional Essay:

• Use this essay to convey important information that you may not have been otherwise able to convey. This may include unexplained resume gaps, context for recommender selection, etc.

• If you are a re-applicant, explain how your candidacy has strengthened since your last application.

With only one required essay of 350 words, I highly recommend using this space to share more about your background. You can use this essay to demonstrate your potential or experience in a particular field or even to share an example of your analytical and leadership skills.

If you would like professional guidance with your CMU Tepper MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Tepper application.

CMU Tepper MBA 2017-18 Application Deadlines:

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***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Jennifer Bloom has been a consultant with Accepted for 19 years and is a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW). She is an expert at crafting application materials that truly differentiate you from the rest of the driven applicant pool. If you would like help with your application, Jennifer can suggest a number of options that work with any budget. Want Jennifer to help you get accepted? Click here!
 

Related Resources:

Fitting In & Standing Out: The Paradox at the Heart of Admissions, a free guide

7 Signs an Experience Belongs in Your Application

• What 3 Essential Ingredients Must You Include in Your Statement of Purpose?

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post CMU Tepper MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Act Fast to Beat the Price Increase! [#permalink]

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New post 23 Aug 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Act Fast to Beat the Price Increase!
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OK: you’ve made the big decision – you’re going to apply. We know you didn’t make this choice lightly – after all, going to grad school is a big investment in your dreams of the future.

Click here to get started >>

Whether those dreams involve creating new technologies, building new companies, teaching the next generation of scholars, caring for the ill, advocating for people’s rights, or anything else that’s in the realm of your imagination…in order to take the next step, you need to get accepted to the right program for you. That takes hard work and an effective application strategy.

That’s where we can help you. You’ll work one-on-one with an admissions expert who will be by your side throughout the admissions process. From consulting on school selection, to reviewing statements of purpose and CVs, to prepping for interviews, to helping you choose among acceptances – we’ve coached thousands of students like you to success at elite programs.

Not only is this a great time of year to start working on applications with fall and winter deadlines, but if you purchase before August 30th, you’ll beat our price increase. Contact us today to be matched with a consultant!

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Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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Cambridge Judge MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2017, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Cambridge Judge MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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The Cambridge Judge MBA program is a one-year program with a small class of 170 students. The education is internationally focused as only 8% of the class is from the UK and one-third of graduates stay in the UK upon graduation. While another 12% stay in Western Europe, a full 28% embark on post-MBA careers in Southeast and East Asia, 11% in North America, and over 6% in the Middle East and Africa. The Judge MBA is a very experiential program, with two required live client projects that immerse students in companies in the UK and around the world.

Judge is seeking applicants with proven academic abilities, ambition, the ability to thrive under pressure, international experience, and strong interpersonal skills. So use your essays to demonstrate that you have these qualities, but keep in mind that Judge is one of the few programs that is extremely strict about its word limits: not one additional word can be entered into the essay spaces beyond their word limits.

Here are Judge’s questions, with my tips in blue below.

Essays:

1. Career Objectives:  Please provide a personal statement. It should not exceed 500 words and must address the following questions:

What are your short and long term career objectives and what skills/characteristics do you already have that will help you achieve them?

What actions will you take before and during the MBA to contribute to your career outcome?

If you are unsure of your post-MBA career path, how will the MBA equip you for the future?

This is a straightforward goals essay. Strong essays will demonstrate clear goals, insight into what skills you need to gain to succeed in those roles, and an understanding of the Judge curriculum and other campus activities that will help you acquire those skills.

I personally love the phrasing of this question because for some applicants this is the first notification that they need to take an active role in their post-MBA job search. Only 61% of Judge graduates credit the school’s career services office with helping find their post-MBA job. The rest of the class landed their roles through a combination of networking, using LinkedIn, professional headhunters and even traditional responses to advertisements. The admissions office cannot accept students who expect the school’s name and career services office to open every door for them, so applicants need to demonstrate in this essay that they are comfortable with that reality.

2. What did you learn from your most spectacular failure? (up to 200 words)

To fail, you must take ambitious risks. This is a very concise space to demonstrate that you acknowledge and learn from your mistakes. I’ve seen first drafts where applicants wrote about failures that were completely out of their control or essentially blamed other people for the failure. These do not make good failure essay topics since they will not demonstrate your maturity or your openness to learning. Choose an example in which you could have done better and then show that you’ve internalized that lesson.

3. Describe a situation where you had to work jointly with others to achieve a common goal. What did you learn from the experience? (up to 200 words)

This is your opportunity to demonstrate your interpersonal skills, and possibly your international team leadership and ability to thrive under pressure. For this essay, show the challenges of both the project and the personalities and how you leveraged the latter to solve the former.

4. Additional Information About You: Please provide information on any aspect of your candidacy that requires further explanation, or information that you would like the Admissions Committee to know. (300 word limit)

I personally always recommend taking advantage of optional essay space when offered it. This would be a great opportunity to share more about your international experiences, your interpersonal skills, or your activities outside of work.

One additional area to expand beyond the tight word limits of Judge’s essay questions is within the job description boxes in the application form: Judge allows nearly 2500 characters for your responses to your greatest challenge and accomplishment in your current company, so you can share details that provide full perspective on these, including how you applied your business and interpersonal skills to succeed.

If you would like professional guidance with your Cambridge Judge MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and  MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Cambridge Judge application. 

The application dates for the 2018 cohort are below:Image

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Jennifer Bloom has been a consultant with Accepted for 19 years and is a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW). She is an expert at crafting application materials that truly differentiate you from the rest of the driven applicant pool. If you would like help with your application, Jennifer can suggest a number of options that work with any budget. Want Jennifer to help you get accepted? Click here!
 

Related Resources:

2017-18 School-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips

• How to Fund Your MBA Abroad

• How Do You Deal with Criticism? MBA Admissions Committees Want to Know

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Cambridge Judge MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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3 Tips for Parents of Grad School Applicants [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 3 Tips for Parents of Grad School Applicants
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I’ve been working in graduate admissions for more than 20 years so I have witnessed a change in this trend firsthand: Parents are playing a much larger role in the application process these days than they used to.

This isn’t necessarily a bad thing – parents can provide a lot of much-needed support (financial, practical, emotional) for their kids during the admissions process; but I cringe when I see parents overstepping their bounds, attempting to control their children’s actions and outcomes.

How much involvement is TOO MUCH involvement for parents of applicants? Check out these 3 tips:

Tip #1: Make Sure Your Child is in the Driver’s Seat

When you take the lead in the admissions process, you’re essentially telling your child: “I don’t think you have what it takes to manage this process yourself.” And what you’re telling the school is: “My kid isn’t competent or ambitious enough to apply to school themself.” You can help your child apply, surely, but make sure that’s what you’re doing – helping them, and not the other way around.

Tip #2: Your Child’s Voice Should be the Sole Voice of this Operation

All communication with the school should be between your child and the school. Likewise, the voice your child uses to write their application essays should be your child’s voice – and not yours. And it should go without saying that this advice relates to interviews as well. Help guide, coach, and edit, but never speak for your child.

Tip #3: Help Your Child Deal with Disappointment

Be it a rejection or a poor score, a parent needs to understand the role they play here. First, your child is the one experiencing this distress, not you. By showing your disappointment, you will only make your child feel worse, not to mention potentially preventing your child from continuing to move forward. Instead, allow your child time to express disappointment, provide the appropriate amount of comfort (you know your child best), and then encourage your child to persevere. Suggest that your applicant explore alternatives and examine the factors they can change to improve the outcome in the future. Play the role of the motivational coach; don’t play the blame game.

Not sure you can effectively guide your child through the grad school admissions process (in a balanced, non-pushy way, of course)? Browse our catalog of services to access professional guidance today!

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsGet Your Game On: Prepping For Your Grad School Application, a free guide

Will Your Graduate Education Pay?, a podcast episode

Flaws Make You Real

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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What’s The Rush? Round 1 vs. Round 2 For MBA Applicants [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: What’s The Rush? Round 1 vs. Round 2 For MBA Applicants
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Right now, most of my clients are scurrying about trying to complete their round 1 applications. Many of them will be ready to submit for round 1, but there are a handful of clients I’ve suggested wait until round 2, and we’ve discussed whether or not there is a true advantage to round 1 vs. round 2. For some schools, like Columbia that use rolling admissions, there is most definitely a distinct advantage, but for the bulk of the schools that use rounds, there is truly no advantage.

As a former Admissions Dean and Director, my job was to project the number of offers I could make given the Dean’s enrollment target and my projected applications. The projections are typically quite accurate and based on several factors including the number of GMAT/GRE reports sent to a given school, the overall number of test takers, the number of inquiries a director observes compared to the number of inquiries year to date. With this information at hand, a director instructs his or her admissions team to invite a percentage of the applicant pool to interview (or in the case of open interviews, advises his or her team to make a percentage of offers).

When the admissions team begins to make offers in round 2, the director uses the same percentage because he or she does not yet know the yield on any of the decisions he or she has made round 1. Round 1 tends to be a smaller pool and more clear cut (very qualified candidates and also weaker candidates that believe that Round 1 gives them an advantage over round 2). Schools tend to encourage round 1 applications to smooth out the bottlenecks in round 2 because round 2 tends to be 2 to 6 times the size of round 1 and the adcom is not only reviewing and interviewing applications in round 2, but also trying to yield the round one candidates. Once first round admitted applicants begin to make enrollment deposits (typically in round 3), the director will adjust the percentage of admits for all subsequent rounds and for the waitlist, often looking at the waitlist at the same time he/she is reviewing round 2 or 3.

So, what does all this mean for you? If you aren’t ready for round 1, don’t worry. Your chances of getting in for round 2 should basically be the same for schools that do not roll their admissions. If you are ready to apply in round 1 and the MBA program admits you, you have the advantage of knowing your fate earlier, obtaining financial aid, visas, housing and getting to know your classmate and you can alleviate your safety schools from your list, sit back and relax.

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By Natalie Grinblatt Epstein, an accomplished Accepted consultant/editor (since 2008) and entrepreneur. Natalie is a former MBA Admissions Dean and Director at Ross, Johnson, and Carey. Want Natalie to help you get accepted to business school? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Application Timing: When Should You Submit?

Which Round Should You Apply to Business School?

Admissions Directors Speak About How to Get Accepted

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post What’s The Rush? Round 1 vs. Round 2 For MBA Applicants appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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The Applicants That Stand Out at Columbia Business School [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: The Applicants That Stand Out at Columbia Business School
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My observation as a former insider at CBS is that Columbia is looking to build a diverse class of high-achieving world citizens who’ve got a bit of grit.

World Citizen

What do I mean by a world citizen? For a small fraction, it means applicants who are internationally famous due to their own achievements or by association. Let’s say, the guy who won an Olympic medal, or the gal who gets a call from the former president of “X” country and says, “Hi, Dad.”

A world citizen also means someone who will add their own confident, distinct vibe to a cosmopolitan student body. Columbia wants to admit people with strong intellects and big ideas. They want confidence, but not arrogance. They like people who thrive in large group settings and don’t need a lot of handholding. They’re looking for admits with resilience and who exude a joie-de-vivre — kind of like the city itself.

The Greatness of Grit

And what do I mean by grit? That means someone who has achieved extraordinary things in the context of his or her job. It’s someone who has mapped out a plan for his or her future, and has done the hard work of really getting to know Columbia’s program and can prove it’s a good fit.

It can also mean someone who doesn’t have good test scores or a glossy international background. But that person (usually a New York local) builds a relationship with an adcom member (though is not annoying!), retakes tests and makes efforts to improve at work or have an impact in the community. He or she might have to reapply, but showing that grit can eventually mean an admit.

The New York Connection

Finally, Columbia is looking for that New York connection. Why this city? Do you know what it has to offer? Can you thrive in its hyper-competitive business scene? Have you ever lived or worked here? A campus visit can be a huge plus–confirming for the adcom that you’re serious about attending.

New York can break your heart, or fulfill your wildest dreams. It will absolutely affect your experience at Columbia. They want to know you’ve got the right stuff to make the most of it.

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Michelle Stockman is a professional journalist, former Columbia Business School admissions insider, and experienced MBA admissions consultant.

 

 

Related Resources:

Fitting In & Standing Out: The Paradox at the Heart of Admissions, a free guide

Columbia Business School MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• Columbia Business School Admissions Director Answers Applicant Questions

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post The Applicants That Stand Out at Columbia Business School appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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4 Tips for Proving You’re an “Easy to Place” Older Applicant [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2017, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 4 Tips for Proving You’re an “Easy to Place” Older Applicant
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It’s your job to demonstrate to the adcom that you stand out from the applicant pool and are exactly the person they want in their next MBA class. In this series, you’ll learn how to dig deep to unearth your unique character traits, experiences, skills, and talents and bring them to the forefront of your application, so that when the adcom pick up your file, they’re hooked from the very first moment.

Adcoms often like to steer clear of applicants who are “difficult to place.” Like it or not, we live in an ageist business world. Youth is associated with being hip, tech-savvy, innovative, and ambitious. Older candidates may be viewed as out of touch. (Of course, these stereotypes are just that – stereotypes.)

If you are no longer a sprightly 20-something-year-old, you may need to think outside the box a bit to prove that age has nothing to do with your ability to think outside the box. How can you prove to the adcom that you will be just as employable (if not more so) as one of your younger competitors? How can you show them that 35 is the new 25?

1. Be a (wo)man with a plan.

In your MBA goals essay, you’re going to want to describe your post-MBA career path in as clear and detailed a manner as possible. Providing a step-by-step plan will demonstrate that you have realistic and achievable goals AND that you’re the right person to execute them. You may not be a spring chicken anymore, but that just means that you’ve had more time to think seriously about where you are going and how you plan on getting there.

2. Show you’ve got what it takes.

As an older applicant, you should pay extra attention to explaining how your rich and varied experiences increase your desirability. Why would they want a KID with three years of tech experience, when they can have YOU – with eight years under your belt AND a wider network and a more established name within the industry?

You’re in good shape if you can show you will have a job waiting for you when you graduate. Demonstrate that your age has contributed to your enhanced employability and positioned you on the “easy to place” list after all.

3. Demonstrate that one CAN teach an old dog new tricks.

Stress that you are extremely open to obtaining new information and learning new business and management techniques. Often adcoms worry that an older applicant will be too set in his or her ways to change in any way. Yes, you should enter the scene with concrete goals, but you should also express and demonstrate openness to change.

4. Consider an EMBA program.

If you are 35+ and have 10+ years of work experience, then an EMBA program may be a better match for you. Do your research and make sure you’re applying to the right business program based on your age-experience equation.

Finally, stay positive and be confident. If those elements are present throughout the MBA admissions process (that is, in your application and then later in your business school interview), the admissions committees will forget that they ever had concerns about your age.

Read the complete 9 Secrets to Standing Out in Your MBA Application series for more tips on how to create a compelling application that highlights your unique strengths, character traits, and talents.

For personalized advice tailored just for you, check out our MBA admissions consulting and editing services and work one-on-one with a pro who will help you discover your competitive advantage and use it to get ACCEPTED.

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Related Resources:

Why MBA, a free guide

Different Dimensions of Diversity, a podcast episode

Too Old for an MBA? Check Out 3 Outstanding MBA and EMBA Alternatives, a podcast episode

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post 4 Tips for Proving You’re an “Easy to Place” Older Applicant appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Admissions Consulting Services Price Increase Ahead: Shop Now & Save! [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Admissions Consulting Services Price Increase Ahead: Shop Now & Save!
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Fall and winter application deadlines can sound comfortably far off when you start your application research, but by late August, they can start to loom stressfully near!

There’s something else that’s happening at the end of August that we wanted you to be aware of so that you can make the most informed decision about your plans: our prices are going up.

If you purchase before August 31, you’ll lock in our current rates for whichever package you choose. So contact us now to determine which service is the best fit for your needs. You’ll be matched with a consultant who can assist you with any part of the application process – from brainstorming and selecting target programs, to reviewing statements of purpose, to prepping for interviews. We’ve coached applicants to success at top programs in every field. Contact us to be matched with your consultant – and beat our price increase!

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Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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The Columbia MBA Interview – A Fresh Lens [#permalink]

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New post 28 Aug 2017, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: The Columbia MBA Interview – A Fresh Lens
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“Do I want this person in my network for the rest of my life?”

In a recent Q&A session, Emily French Thomas, Columbia MBA Admissions Director, provided insight into the current Columbia MBA application interview process. A key takeaway: social and emotional IQ are key.

Columbia interviews are conducted by alumni, and French emphasizes that for them, a strong current running alongside and beneath the conversation is that question at the start of this post: Do I want this person in my network for the rest of my life? Considerations like “Would I want to work with this person” and “Would I want to be on a team with this person” may be objective factors for evaluation, but such evaluation will always be formed in part by the interviewer’s subjective response to you, the interviewee.

So, in the interview, pay attention to the person, to the vibe, and respond and adapt accordingly. It’s not a matter of becoming gregarious if you are reserved or vice versa – it is about connecting with the other person by being your authentic self. And this is important because both alumni and adcom are seeking students who will contribute to their program and their community; they’re invested. That raises one more point: they will be looking to see that you appear and behave professionally – even if the interviewer is around your same age and you meet at a cafe. By being professional, you are showing respect, and you are showing you belong.

Of course, your alumni interviewer does greatly care what you say! The interviewer (and by extension the adcom) usually looks to learn whether you have a clear sense of what you want to do in your career. Using social IQ, listen carefully. “What is your career vision” is quite a different question than “So, what do you want to do right after graduating?” The former is more expansive and reflects interest in your hoped for longer-term impacts; the latter seeks practical, concrete information about your next career step after earning your MBA. Also, they often are interested not just in why you want to come to Columbia, but also in how you plan to take advantage of being in the Big Apple.

Director French also discussed process. She noted that the interview is “one piece of the puzzle” – it’s helpful to see it that way, not as binary pass-you’re in, fail-you’re dinged. This mental framework encourages a more fluid give-and-take. Also, the interviewers do prepare a written report on the interview, which becomes part of that puzzle.

Click here to listen to a recording of part of the Q&A session.

If you would like professional guidance with your Columbia Business School MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the CBS MBA application.

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
Related Resources:

Perfect Answers to MBA Interview Questions, a free guide

Columbia Business School MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• The MBA Menu at Columbia Business School, a podcast interview with Emily French Thomas

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post The Columbia MBA Interview – A Fresh Lens appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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The Columbia MBA Interview – A Fresh Lens   [#permalink] 28 Aug 2017, 08:01

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