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Wharton Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Wharton Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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The Wharton EMBA adcom, through its three required questions, expresses its values and its interest in a relationship with students who share those values. Each of the questions highlights a different facet of this relationship. Respecting, recognizing, and responding to that vision through your essays will be the key to a successful application.

Essay question 1 focuses on your goals and Wharton’s role in helping you achieve them.

Essay question 2 invites you to share your understanding of Wharton more broadly and delineate your fit with Wharton’s culture and community.

Essay question 3 seeks confirmation that you understand in practical terms what a commitment to attending the program involves.

My tips for answering Wharton’s EMBA essay questions are in blue below.

Essays:

1. What are your career objectives and how will the Wharton MBA Program for Executives contribute to your attainment of this objective? (750 word limit)

You may want to start by discussing your current career situation to set the context, and clarify how the MBA education will enable you to achieve your immediate goals in your current role. You can then naturally move on to your future goals. In describing your goals at any given point, indicate why you are taking that step or pursuing that role. Put more detail on the roles you plan immediately post-MBA and the several years following; longer-term goals need less detail, but they still should present a clear direction.

In discussing how the program will benefit you, be specific: describe what skills and knowledge you need, and how the program meets those needs. Also refer to the structure and special features of the program, detailing how they will support you and your goals.

2. In his groundbreaking Ted Talk “Are You a Giver or a Taker?” Adam Grant describes three primary personality types in the workplace: givers, takers, and matchers. Based on your understanding of yourself and our program, how do you intend to give and take as a student at Wharton? (750 word limit)

First, listen to the Ted Talk, and ground your essay in its concepts of givers, takers, and matchers. As you write, occasionally refer to the talk and integrate it into your discussion. Doing so conveys engagement with ideas that are clearly important to the Wharton EMBA adcom.

Essay 1 addresses how Wharton supports your goals specifically; this question focuses on Wharton as a broader community and culture and on you as a person. Professional factors will certainly be part of your answer, but there may well be community, social, personal and other facets of life where you and Wharton intersect. That said, don’t explain how you will give and take as a Wharton student – frankly, future, prospective activity isn’t all that interesting or credible. Rather, SHOW the adcom how you will give and take (and match) by providing brief examples of how you have done so already.

Not only will using example and anecdote to make your points be more credible, vivid, and interesting than the drone of explanation, it also gives you an opportunity to strategically showcase aspects of your life and experience that distinguish you and/or enhance your application.

3. Given your already demanding job and the desire to remain committed to important family and personal obligations, how do you plan to handle this additional demand on your time once you enroll? (500 word limit)

This straightforward question deserves a straightforward answer. Discuss the accommodations you will make at work, such as delegating more, adjusting travel schedules, etc. Don’t tell them every single thing you can think of – focus on the most significant two or three adjustments.

Also address your personal responsibilities and how you will meet them with this additional significant demand on your time and energy; even acknowledging that you’ll have less time at the playground with your toddler or mentioning the support of your significant other will show that you’re facing this issue squarely. If you’ve already successfully balanced school and working full time, by all means mention it.

Optional Essay. Please explain any extenuating circumstances you feel the Admissions Committee should be aware of (e.g., unexplained gaps in your work experience, choice of recommenders, inconsistent academic performance). You may also take this opportunity to share other aspects of your life that you feel have shaped you that the Admissions Committee would not otherwise have learned from your application or resume. (500 word limit)

You can use the optional essay not just to explain a problem (low GMAT, employment gap) but also to present new material that will further illuminate your candidacy. However, if you do the latter, use good judgment and make sure your points are germane to and truly enhance your application. For structuring the essay, first, succinctly explain any points that need explaining. Then, if there is some additional content, write about it succinctly.

If you would like professional guidance with your Wharton EMBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Wharton EMBA application.

Deadlines:

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***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
Related Resources:

Get Accepted to Wharton, webinar

• Wharton’s Commitment Project – a Window into Wharton, podcast episode

• 3 Tips for Writing a Winning EMBA Essay

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Wharton Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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5 Ways to Make the Most of B-School Visits, Fairs & Receptions [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 5 Ways to Make the Most of B-School Visits, Fairs & Receptions
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Applying to MBA programs in the Fall? Then you’re probably planning to meet with MBA admissions committee members at various types of events – school visits, MBA fairs, school receptions, etc. – as part of that process.

Adcom members are preparing for you as well. In their interactions with prospective applicants, they look to get an early read of your “social intelligence.”

Here are some tips to make a positive first impression while also getting the most out of the visits for your own informational and decision-making needs.

1. Polish up your resume to bring with you. You can always refine or modify it later if need be. Sometimes you may have a chance to show it to an adcom member or a current student willing to give feedback on your competitiveness for the program.

2. Have your overall “goals story” on the tip of your tongue. Most visiting applicants will have a simple sentence prepared (like “My goal is to become an IT manager in finance and eventually CIO”), but ideally, you’d have something more substantial to share. The goals story includes another sentence that shows why you have these goals (your motivation) and your vision for what you want to achieve (often these two elements are interrelated).

This story will enable you to engage more meaningfully with adcoms or students – people will care about your goals when they know why you want to do it!

3. Have a couple of thoughtful questions ready about the program. For each school you visit, prepare questions related to your learning and career needs. It never hurts to show ‘em the love. Moreover, your ability and willingness to identify your specific developmental needs reflects maturity.

4. Request contact info to facilitate follow-up when meeting students from your target schools. There are all kinds of opportunities to learn more about the program from students (for example, one student may connect you to a classmate who leads a club of interest to you) – gaining unique and fresh insights that can greatly enhance your essays.

5. Learn how to create an elevator pitch and prepare one. In response to questions I was getting from clients, I wrote a post about creating an elevator pitch for visiting schools – it’s advice I still endorse.

The preparation sketched above will yield rich rewards: good impressions on adcoms, fruitful contacts with students, and deeper knowledge of the programs to fuel your decision making and propel your essay writing.

Need help getting your resume in tip-top shape? We can help you with that!

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
Related Resources:

The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes, a free guide

MBA Admissions Advice from MBA Adcom Memebers

3 Ways to Determine Which B-Schools are a Good Fit for You

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post 5 Ways to Make the Most of B-School Visits, Fairs & Receptions appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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All Your Questions about Columbia Business School – Answered! [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jul 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: All Your Questions about Columbia Business School – Answered!
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When you’re applying for b-school, there are a lot of sources of information about the process – some of which are extremely helpful, and some of which may only stress you out. What if you could immediately know that your time will not just be well spent, but will give you a chance to have your questions answered authoritatively – by Emily French Thomas, Director of Admissions at Columbia Business School?

On July 19 (9am PT/12pm ET), we’ll be hosting a video Ask Me Anything (AMA) with Emily French Thomas of CBS. She’ll provide an overview of the application process and share her expert advice on what Columbia is looking for in a successful application. And then she’ll answer your questions – live! Accepted CEO’s own Linda Abraham will moderate the conversation.

If you’re planning to apply to CBS, this is your chance to get the inside scoop. Come with your questions – and come ready to learn from other people’s questions.

The AMA is free, but you must register to reserve your seat.

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post All Your Questions about Columbia Business School – Answered! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
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Duke Fuqua MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Duke Fuqua MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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Leadership, teamwork, ethics, and a global approach to business are essential elements of the Duke Fuqua MBA, which is why you’ll need to make sure you express your passion for these ideals in your application essays. Impress the Fuqua adcom by positioning yourself as an innovative leader and team player, as someone who can see the big picture, work collaboratively, and shape global business.

My tips are in blue below.

Three short answer questions and two essays are required from all applicants.

• Responses should use 1.5 line spacing and a font size no smaller than 10-point.

• Do not copy the essay question in the document you upload with your application.

• Respond fully and concisely. Length requirements vary by question, and are detailed below.

• Responses must be completed before submitting your application.

• Prepare your responses carefully. The Admissions Committee considers your answers important in the selection process.

• All essays are scanned using plagiarism detection software. Expressing your ideas by using verbiage from existing sources, including other applicants’ essays or materials, without properly crediting those sources constitutes an act of plagiarism. Plagiarism is considered a cheating violation within the Honor Code and will result in an application denial. Note: if you have worked with a consultant to complete your application materials, please ensure that the honor code policy is discussed and he/she will not share your essays with other potential applicants.

Application Tip: Check out Fuqua’s selection criteria.

Required Short Answers Questions

Instructions: Answer all 3 of the following questions. For each question, respond in 500 characters only (the equivalent of about 100 words).

1. What are your short-term goals, post-MBA?

State what you see yourself doing immediately after you earn your MBA in terms of function and industry. If location or geography are important to your goal, include them. If you know the type of companies you would like to work for, you can include that information too, but don’t say you want to work for Company X, unless Company X is sponsoring you. Without sponsorship, a “Company X” answer is probably too narrow, but saying you would like to work for a firm like Company X would work.

2. What are your long-term goals?

Your long term goals should flow logically from your short-term goals. They can be fuzzier both in terms of direction and timing. But you should have them. They can, but don’t have to, include larger aspirations and present a broader perspective on where you are headed. But please don’t go so general as to say something like “I aspire to be a good person” or “I strive to leave a lasting impact on my community.” Nice sentiments, but way too vague.

3. Life is full of uncertainties, and plans and circumstances can change. As a result, navigating a career requires you to be adaptable. Should the short-term goals that you provided above not materialize what alternative directions have you considered?

What’s your Plan B? If you can’t get a job at a leading strategy consulting firm – your first choice – what do you want to do? If Plan A is investment banking, what’s Plan B?

First Required Essay: 25 Random Things About Yourself

Instructions: Present your response in list form, numbered 1 to 25. Some points may be only a few words, while others may be longer. Your complete list should not exceed 2 pages.

The “Team Fuqua” spirit and community is one of the things that sets The Duke MBA experience apart, and it is a concept that extends beyond the student body to include faculty, staff, and administration. When a new person joins the Admissions team, we ask that person to share with everyone in the office a list of “25 Random Things About Yourself.” As an Admissions team, we already know the new hire’s professional and academic background, so learning these “25 Random Things” helps us get to know someone’s personality, background, special talents, and more.

In this spirit, the Admissions Committee also wants to get to know you–beyond the professional and academic achievements listed in your resume and transcript. You can share with us important life experiences, your likes/dislikes, hobbies, achievements, fun facts, or anything that helps us understand what makes you who you are. Share with us your list of “25 Random Things” about YOU.

Have some fun with this list. It certainly allows a more creative approach than permitted by most essay prompts. Note that the questions asks you to go “beyond the professional and academic achievements listed in your resume and transcript.” So you can list your Pez collection or perhaps your brief membership in a rock band or the fact that you took violin from ages 6-18 or your membership in a gospel choir or your volunteer work in a hospital, your needlepoint, your favorite recipe or photo. Gosh – the list is endless. Just let it reflect you. Think of this list as an introduction to potential friends. For more insight into this question and the  motivation behind, please read Megan Overbay’s, the former Director of Admissions’, advice. Yes, it’s old, but I believe you will find it helpful. And very friendly.

Second Required Essay: 

Instructions: Your response should be no more than 2 pages in length.

Fuqua prides itself on cultivating a culture of engagement. Our students enjoy a wide range of student-led organizations that provide opportunities for leadership development and personal fulfillment, as well as an outlet for contributing to society. Our student-led government, clubs, centers, and events are an integral part of the student culture and are vital to providing you with a range of experiential learning and individual development experiences.

Based on your understanding of the Fuqua culture, how do you see yourself engaging in and contributing to our community, outside of the classroom?

Do your homework about Fuqua (and yourself) before responding to this question. What activities and groups appeal to you? How do you see yourself participating? Making a difference? Then look at Duke’s multi-faceted definition of “Consequential Leaders.” Which do you most identify with? Imagine how you would participate and sometimes lead. While you can reference similar activities in the past, keep the focus of this essay on what you would do at Fuqua.

One approach to responding to this question: Address a letter to a close friend or colleague and tell her how you would contribute to this very participatory culture. That letter could morph into this essay.

Optional Essay Question:

If you feel there are circumstances of which the Admissions Committee should be aware, please explain them in an optional essay (such as unexplained gaps in work, choice of recommenders, inconsistent or questionable academic performance).

• Do NOT upload additional essays nor additional recommendations in this area of the application.

• The Optional Essay is intended to provide the Admissions Committee with insight into your extenuating circumstances only.

• Limit your response to two pages.

Why isn’t your current supervisor writing your rec? Why is there a six-month gap on your resume? Why did your grades dip during the first semester of your senior year? What are your responsibilities while working for a family business after having left a prestigious investment bank, and why did you make the change? Answering any of those questions (but not all) could be the topic of your optional essay.

If you would like professional guidance with your Duke Fuqua MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and  MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Duke application. 

Duke Fuqua 2017-18 MBA Application Deadlines:

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***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Related Resources:

How To Earn A Spot On Team Fuqua, podcast episode

• Culture, Location, and Support: A Duke MBA Speaks

• School-Specific 2017-18 MBA Application Essay Tips

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Duke Fuqua MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Standing Out By Showing You Have a Unique Perspective [Fitting in & St [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jul 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Standing Out By Showing You Have a Unique Perspective [Fitting in & Standing Out]
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The application process is a tricky balancing act: You want to show your target schools that you’re a perfect match, but you don’t want to blend into the multitude of applicants or become just a number. How can you show your authentic self in the application process? How can you present your strengths, and stand out? This series shows you how.

Once you’ve shown that you have what your target school is looking for – that you fit in – your challenge is to stand out among a pool of applicants who may, on a superficial level, look just like you.

When there are a lot of applicants who have pursued similar academic paths to prepare for grad school, taken the same exams, and may have parallel professional trajectories (at least at first glance), how can you make sure you don’t blend into the crowd?

The key is to show the committee what makes you unique, what makes you YOU.

Revealing Your Individuality – Identity, Deeds, Ideas

There are several ways to constructively reveal your individuality, and most importantly your ability to contribute to class discussions and your community, both on campus or after your graduate. In broad strokes, here is an overview:

1. Identity – Who are you?

Your background is a part of your identity and can help you differentiate yourself from your competition. Are you the first in your family to attend college? Did you grow up in a rural area or a country or state that doesn’t send many students to the programs you are applying to? Are you a member of an underrepresented minority? All those elements of your identity could contribute to your target program’s diversity and the richness of the learning environment that it provides.

Much like showing fit, you need to demonstrate your ability to contribute to the diversity of your class throughout your application, but a diversity statement or personal history, if requested, is prime territory for this endeavor. How has your background contributed to your interest in the field or perhaps to a distinctive interest not related to your professional or educational goals. Let them know how your identity animates your interests, drives your ability to contribute distinctively, and makes you tick.

If this sounds like you need to do serious thinking before you start writing, you’re right. Self-reflection is a great foundation for a good application. Journaling and taking notes before you sit down to write that essay or diversity statement may also be helpful. Thinking and “pre-writing” can help you show that you fit in and stand out.

2. Deeds – What have you accomplished?

As we’ve already discussed with reference to goals, one key strategy when you’re developing your application essay(s) is to make connections between what you have done in the past and what you plan to do in the future – the admissions committee needs to see that their program makes sense for you. The same logic applies to this Standing Out principle: by drawing on your past contributions, you can show how you have had an impact in the past, and make a link to how you will have an impact during grad school.

What are some areas where your unique experiences and contributions can make you stand out? Here are a few:

• Excelling in your academics or profession

• Success/leadership in your community service or volunteer work

• Unusual hobby or interest

• Unusual travel

Overcoming a disability

This is another point where self-reflection and journaling/note-taking can help you. How have your unique experiences shaped your perspective? How have the contributions you’ve made in the past prepared you for the goals that lie ahead? How do the experiences that you are most proud of reveal the qualities and attributes that your target programs value?

3. Ideas – How you think?

Your unique perspective, formed by your experiences, can help you stand out as an applicant and show the committee why you’re great for their program. For example, someone with a background in analytics and big data can revolutionize retail and marketing or healthcare or all kinds of fields. Maybe you’re someone who has a record of looking at complicated problems in a new way, reaching innovative solutions: that’s a unique perspective and can help you stand out. Or perhaps your background combines seemingly disparate interests – such as music and law, or medicine and literature. Use your application to show how your experiences have given you both critical analysis and excellent listening skills.

Where can you do this on your application? The diversity statement and/or personal history would be one place. But the theme of contribution – the impact you’ve had, what you’ve learned from it, how you’ll contribute in the future – is something that should run through your entire application, including your statement of purpose, community service descriptions, and CV. It is something that you should be prepared to discuss in an interview.

Bottom Line

As we discussed at the beginning of this series, one of the central challenges and paradoxes of the application process is that you need to simultaneously fit into the school’s target applicant pool and also stand out within that pool. In a competitive application process, only “fitting in” is not enough – you must distinguish yourself and show that you’re more than a number. Likewise, if all you do is “stand out,” the program may have qualms about your ability to do the work or participate constructively in its community and your chosen profession.

You must simultaneously fit in and stand out.

We’ve covered four aspects of this challenge (proving you can do the work, showing you fit in with the school’s culture, highlighting your goals, and demonstrating that you will contribute distinctively to class, school, and community) showing you how to use different parts of your application to both demonstrate your fit with the programs you’re applying to and your distinctiveness.

If you – like so many applicants – have concerns about how to apply this advice in your particular situation, we can guide you one-on-one just as we have guided thousands since 1994.

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Related Resources:

Leadership in Admissions, a free guide

Approaching The Diversity Essay Question

Stand Out! A Critical Goal for Your Application, a podcast episode

Tags: College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Standing Out By Showing You Have a Unique Perspective [Fitting in & Standing Out] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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Chicago Booth Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Chicago Booth Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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Chicago Booth EMBA gives you just one essay, but with ample space to make your case holistically. This approach to the essay question indicates that they are looking for people who can organize their thoughts, build a credible and compelling case for their candidacy, and maintain an extended yet focused discussion. The Booth EMBA adcom clearly puts value on verbal expression and expects senior level managers to have mastered this skill. Give yourself time to develop and refine your essay accordingly.

Essays:

1. Why are you seeking an MBA from Chicago Booth and what unique knowledge and experiences do you hope to contribute to the program? (maximum 2 pages, 12 pt. Times New Roman)

The question zeroes in on the elements directly relevant to the adcom, but allows you to elaborate within those parameters. Considering the pivotal role the one required essay plays in your application, the key challenge is making good decisions about the following four elements:

• Within the overall space allowance, how much space should you allocate to each part of the question?

It will vary person to person. For example, a person who has her own company will require some “backstory” for context setting before discussing future plans, so she would allocate more space to goals than someone who is rising up the ladder at McKinsey. Someone with atypical goals will need to spend more time clarifying why he wants the Booth MBA than a more conventional applicant. Analyze your own case and block out the essay accordingly.

• You have to discuss your professional goals in order to explain why you are “seeking an MBA from Chicago Booth,” but how to present them?

Since EMBA programs are part-time, an ideal place to start is your current work: what do you want to achieve and how do you want to grow during the years in the program? (This has the added benefit of giving the adcom a view of what you’ll bring to the table based on this work.) From there, move on to your goals for the 5-year period following graduation – give the most detail here; make it really concrete. Then sketch your longer-term career vision/plans, necessarily less detailed. Finally, explain how each of these career/goals phases require skills, knowledge, and perhaps relationships derived through the Booth EMBA.

• How should you structure this relatively long, complex essay?

Simply and straightforwardly is usually best. Start with your current/immediate goals. (If you need to provide some backstory for context, as noted above, do so as succinctly as possible.) Then progress through your goals. Next, discuss why you need the Booth EMBA now, connecting your reasons to the previously stated goals. Finally, present your contributions.

• What “unique knowledge and experiences” should you talk about?

Select two to four, and for at least two, give concrete examples. For all, discuss relevant insights – after all, that’s what you’re really bringing, not the fact of having done something. To select the best examples, consider what aspects of your experience would be interesting and/or useful to the Booth EMBA cohort and give them fresh insight or perspective. These experiences could be related to industry, function, geographic/global experience, a formative personal experience, a particularly meaningful extracurricular (community or other non-work) involvement, etc. Choose points that expand the reader’s understanding of you, things they won’t necessarily glean from your resume, AND that have relevance to them.

2. OPTIONAL: If there is anything else you would like the Admissions Committee to know about you, please share that information here. (maximum 2 pages, 12 pt. Times New Roman)

This question invites you to present new material that will enhance your application, as well as to explain anything that needs explaining (e.g., gap in employment, choice of recommender if not using a direct supervisor, etc.). As far as enhancement points, there should be a clear value to the information you’re sharing – and it should not be content that more appropriately belongs in the main essay (contributions of unique knowledge and experiences).

3. REAPPLICANTS ONLY: Please give us an update on your professional, academic, and community activities since your previous application and highlight what you have done to strengthen your application. (maximum one page, single spaced, 12pt. Times New Roman)

Whatever developments you discuss, for each, describe the situation/experience concretely and clarify the impact you had. Also clarify how it demonstrates growth (i.e. not just “another” achievement), and why it makes you a stronger candidate.

If you would like professional guidance with your Chicago Booth EMBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Chicago Booth EMBA application.

Chicago EMBA 2017-18 Deadlines:

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***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
Related Resources:

• Executive MBA Pros & Cons

• Executive MBA Applicants: 4 Immediate Action Items

• Excellent Executive MBA Admissions Advice

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Common Grammatical Errors: How to Use “Leverage” & “Comprise” Properly [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jul 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Common Grammatical Errors: How to Use “Leverage” & “Comprise” Properly
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Non-native English speakers (and some native English speakers) frequently make some easily avoidable mistakes. Even if you have excellent English there are sometimes words that get lost among misused prepositions. Here are some tips to help applicants improve their use of two words that are commonly misused: leverage and comprise.

1. Leverage

Rule: Do not use a preposition with the word “leverage.”

“Leverage” is most often used to indicate that you made use of one thing to obtain another. Most applicants understand what leverage is; the mistake only comes in how they phrase it. The correct way is without a preposition.

Correct usage: I leveraged my knowledge of marketing to champion my idea throughout the department.

Incorrect usage: My leverage on brand loyalty made me eager to pursue a job at Nike.

Remember, you can leverage credibility, loyalty, knowledge, and even debt, but the key is to do it alone, don’t use a preposition (like the frequent error “leverage on”).

2. Comprise

Everyone knows this word, but for many people for whom English is a second language – even those who spent their entire lives studying in English in school – this term comes with another prepositional complication.

“Comprised” can be used in two ways:

1. A team can be “comprised of” certain members.

OR

2. Certain members can “comprise” the team.

Applicants frequently make mistakes when using the preposition “of” – either adding it when it isn’t necessary or dropping it when it is needed. So remember, when team members comprise a team, they do it alone – without a preposition.

If you keep getting confused, maybe write those two sample sentences out on a sticky note to put on your computer screen.

These words come up all the time, especially in leadership and teamwork admission essays.

Contact an Accepted consultant to guide you through these and other subtle English issues and make sure that your qualifications are not buried under prepositions!

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Related Resources:

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Application Essays, a free guide

10 Tips for Better Essay Writing

5-Step Checklist Before Submitting Your Applications

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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AIGAC 2017 MBA Applicant Survey Results Released [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jul 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: AIGAC 2017 MBA Applicant Survey Results Released
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AIGAC (the Association of Independent Graduate Admissions Consultants) released the results of their 2017 MBA Applicant Survey, which shows an interesting paradox about millennials: they love the instantaneous availability of information in today’s digital world, yet also feel that personal attention and human contact are extremely important. Other data show that the applicant pool continues to include candidates with a wide variety of professional and personal backgrounds, but with common concerns and preferences regarding the admissions process.

Additional findings include:

• 86% of applicants state that they use websites most frequently for school-related information.

• 79% of applicants say that MBA rankings are the most influential outside source of information.

• Applicants regularly seek advice of current students. 45% of those who do so say that current students are their most valued source of information.

Applicants also use admissions consultants. These students find rankings less important. 31% of all applicants believed that rankings were their most valuable source of independent information compared with 21% of those who worked with admissions consultants.

Admissions officers were considered very important in the decision-making process. Applicants felt that friendliness, responsiveness, and personal attention were very important. They gave high marks to admissions officers who treated them as a person instead of a number. These 10 programs were ranked highest in getting to know applicants in person (in order of rank): ESADE, Vanderbilt Owen, Dartmouth Tuck, IE, Duke Fuqua, INSEAD, Michigan Ross, Cambridge Judge, Harvard Business School, and IESE.

• 39% of those surveyed stated that their admissions consultant proposed schools that the applicant hadn’t previously thought about, as compared to 29% last year.

• More applicants outside the U.S. stated that their consultants suggested schools they hadn’t considered than those living in the U.S. (44% compared to 35%).

• 49% of applicants who used a consultant applied to 4-6 schools compared to 31% of all survey applicants.

• Reasons for applying to MBA programs included acquisition of new information, skills or knowledge (52%); access to job prospects/change of careers (48%); desire to make a positive difference in society (36%); and increase salary (37%).

The survey was completed by more than 2,800 applicants from March 2-April 30, 2017. 61% were male and 57% live in the U.S. At the time that they completed the survey, 50% had already decided where they would attend.

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Related Resources:

Choosing an MBA Admissions Consultant, a free guide

MBA Selectivity Index, discover the schools where you are competitive

Admissions Directors Speak About How to Get Accepted

Tags: MBA Admissions

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MIT Sloan MBA Application Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jul 2017, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: MIT Sloan MBA Application Tips & Deadlines
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This year’s MIT Sloan MBA application, like most MIT applications in the last fifteen years, includes its signature cover letter and resume. Brand new this year is a video requirement. This year you are given an additional 50 words for your cover letter, so the max is now 300 words.

There are no required essays unless you are invited to interview. If you are so lucky, you will also be asked to answer, in under 250 words, “The mission of the MIT Sloan School of Management is to develop principled, innovative leaders who improve the world and to generate ideas that advance management practice. Please share with us something about your past that aligns with this mission.”

My tips are in blue below.

Cover Letter and Resume:

MIT Sloan seeks students whose personal characteristics demonstrate that they will make the most of the incredible opportunities at MIT, both academic and non-academic. We are on a quest to find those whose presence will enhance the experience of other students. We seek thoughtful leaders with exceptional intellectual abilities and the drive and determination to put their stamp on the world. We welcome people who are independent, authentic, and fearlessly creative — true doers. We want people who can redefine solutions to conventional problems, and strive to preempt unconventional dilemmas with cutting-edge ideas. We demand integrity and respect passion.

Taking the above into consideration, please submit a cover letter seeking a place in the MIT Sloan MBA Program. Your letter should conform to a standard business correspondence, include one or more examples that illustrate why you meet the desired criteria above, and be addressed to Mr. Rod Garcia, Senior Director of Admissions (300 words or fewer, excluding address and salutation).

This year MIT has helpfully provided more insight into what it’s looking for in the cover letter. Like all cover letters, this one is a marketing document. Make your case for admission using your accomplishments, specifically those where you show the qualities mentioned above. How do the talents revealed in your examples demonstrate fit with the MIT Sloan program, its tight-knit community, and its innovative culture? Your resume should reveal above-average progression on the job and increasing responsibility.

Note: this is not an essay. Make sure your letter is a professional letter with a date, a header, a salutation, a close, and formatted as a letter.

In making your case and mentioning your accomplishments, make sure to highlight your role and the impact or results on you and the entities you contributed to — those results are “your stamp on the world” so far.

Resume. Please submit a resume that includes your employment history and academic record in reverse chronological order. Other information appropriate to a business resume is welcomed and encouraged. (no more than 1 page in length)

Go beyond mere job descriptions to highlight achievement. If your title is “consultant,” saying that you “consulted on projects” is redundant and uninformative at best. Writing that you “Led a 6-member team working on a biotech outsourcing project to Singapore with a budget of $X; it came in on time and under budget” conveys infinitely more. Quantify your impact as much as possible. You want the reader to come away with a picture of you as an above average performer on a steep trajectory who has the hand-on, problem-solving focus that demonstrates you belong at MIT Sloan.

Video Statement.

Please introduce yourself to your future classmates via a brief video statement.

You will need to use an internet-connected computer, with a webcam and microphone. As part of the application review, the Admission Committee will evaluate your response to see how you express yourself and to assess fit with the MIT Sloan culture. The simple, open-ended question is designed to help us get to know you better.

Instructions:

• Please make sure you are using a working Internet connection not wireless or shared wireless connection. If your Internet is not a strong signal you will not be able to upload. Please also make sure you have the most up to date browser. 

• You will need to use an internet-connected computer with a webcam and microphone.

• We suggest using Google Chrome* or Firefox as your browser.

• If using Google Chrome – please click the camera icon in your browser to allow the site to access your microphone. If you are having issues with your microphone please re-start your computer for Google Chrome to access your microphone.

• Once the video statement question is viewed you will have 60 seconds to prepare, and then 60 seconds to record your answer.

• You will only have one attempt to record your response.

The video statement is entirely new this year at MIT Sloan. Your goal here: deliver your statement with poise and presence. I suggest you outline a 60-second statement that you would use to introduce yourself to your classmates (not the admissions committee members; they’re just important flies on the wall who happen to be listening in.). Don’t be too casual, but think of your classmates as your future professional network and social group. What would you tell them about yourself?  What would show you already are a member of MIT’s community you just don’t happen to pay tuition yet?

A few tips for the video part of this exercise. Practice in front of a web cam so that you get used to talking to a little lens that has no affect, feedback, or expression. Recording yourself on video is not the same as talking on Skype with another human being. I suggest you put a smiley face behind the webcam to remind you to smile at appropriate points in your statement. Then view your practice videos looking for poise and presence. During some of the practices, maybe have a friend present to encourage you, but also practice without anyone else in the room.

For the real statement, dress in business or business casual attire. If you’re not confident that your attire is appropriate, it probably isn’t; dress more conservatively. Make sure your location is quiet and that pets and children are in a location where they won’t be heard or disturb you. Make sure your background is neutral and not a distraction. Blank walls make a great background.

Additional Information. 

Please provide any additional information you would like the Admissions Committee to know that may be helpful in evaluating your candidacy (i.e. choice of recommenders, areas of concern in your academic record, other extenuating circumstances, etc.). This information should be provided in a written format (200 words or less).

If there is an issue or concern that may confuse the admissions readers or incorrectly detract from their evaluation of your application, address it succinctly here. For more suggestions on writing the optional, please see Optional Essays: When and How to Write Them .

If you would like professional guidance with your MIT Sloan application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the MIT Sloan application.

MIT Sloan 2017-18 Application Deadlines:

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***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsSchool-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips

• Tips For MBA Video Essay Questionshttps://blog.accepted.com/2013/08/22/understanding-stanford-gsbs-take-on-demonstrated-leadership-potential/• Insights into MIT Sloan MBA Admissions with Dawna Levenson, podcast episode

Tags: MBA Admissions

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What is CBS Really Looking for in Your Application? [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jul 2017, 03:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: What is CBS Really Looking for in Your Application?
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Is it us, or does summer seem to go by in a flash? Especially when you’ve been telling yourself, “No worries – I have plenty of time to work on my Columbia MBA application over the summer.” Well, here’s an opportunity you really don’t want to blink and miss: our video AMA (Ask Me Anything) with Columbia Business School’s Director of Admissions, Emily French Thomas.

This is your chance to learn what CBS is looking for in a successful applicant – straight from the Director of Admissions. She’ll be joined in conversation by Accepted CEO Linda Abraham – and she’ll take your questions live, via video.

Register today, and join us on July 19th with your questions ready!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

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UCLA Anderson’s Dean Alex Lawrence: Not About the Status Quo [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jul 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: UCLA Anderson’s Dean Alex Lawrence: Not About the Status Quo
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Come learn about UCLA Anderson’s full-time MBA program with Assistant Dean of MBA Admissions and Financial Aid Alex Lawrence.

It gives me great pleasure to welcome Alex Lawrence, Assistant Dean of MBA Admissions and Financial Aid at UCLA Anderson School of Management, which just happens to be where I earned my MBA. Alex is a fellow Anderson alum, who earned his MBA in 1999. Prior to that he earned a bachelor’s and master’s in electrical engineering. After earning his MBA, he worked in management consulting for four years and then returned to UCLA Anderson as Director of the Riordan Program. In 2012 he became first the director and then the Assistant Dean for MBA Admissions. Welcome!

Can you give us an overview of Anderson’s full-time MBA program? [1:50]

It’s a great program in a fantastic location – Los Angeles – that offers so many opportunities. We have recruiting strengths in management consulting, finance, real estate, entertainment. Students have a flexible curriculum, and an amazing career services center. There are so many opportunities for those who attend Anderson and become part of the family.

What’s new or changing at Anderson? [2:55]

We’re building a new building! Marion Anderson Hall – we’re breaking ground soon and we expect it to be ready in 26 months. It will be fantastic, building on what we already have.

We have a new leadership development program, which launched last year. And our social development specialization just launched.

We changed the start of the school year for first year students. Now we bring first year students to campus in August (instead of September). They appreciate the chance to get used to the environment earlier – they take one course and have an orientation before fall quarter starts at the end of September. It also means that recruiting and info sessions are spread out over an extra month and a half.

What is the nature of the leadership development program? [8:10]

It gives students the opportunity to learn from their peers and from staff, and to build a rapport with senior leadership. They get insight on qualities they want to develop. They all take the Berkman Assessment Tool. It’s an opportunity to get feedback from a different perspective from the classroom.

In the classroom, there’s not always an opportunity for them to share all their skills – but working with the coaches they can get guidance on the opportunities they’re seeking.

UCLA Anderson is proud of its culture where students share success, think fearlessly and drive change. Let’s unwrap each of those core qualities. What do they mean? [11:10]

Share success – when you collaborate to win, that’s when you share success. We have our students collaborate in learning teams. We want them to support each other. Second year students serve as coaches for first years. And alumni remain supportive and involved – I’ve definitely been the recipient of that support.

Thinking fearlessly – our entire community is fearless in thinking about opportunities and innovations. When you look at the accomplishments of our alumni, there are countless examples of how they’re thinking of how to do business differently and respond to challenges.

Driving change – this really comes from the idea that we’re pragmatic, action-oriented. We measure ourselves against results. Being part of the community as a student, alumnus, and part of the staff, I see how these qualities come out in the community. There’s something different about UCLA Anderson.

Anderson has had a capstone project since before I got there. It was then called Field Study. It has by now morphed into Applied Management Research, and recently Anderson added the BCO, Business Creation Option. Can you describe these options? [17:10]

Anderson was the first b-school to create this project over 50 years ago. It’s a 20-week project where our students partner with a client to solve a key strategic business challenge that the client has. The client could be a Fortune 500 company, a small business, a startup, etc. It’s a fantastic opportunity to have a chance to solve real world problems and gain experience. And it’s not localized to Southern California – there are opportunities across the US and internationally.

The Business Creation Option is for more entrepreneurially-minded students. Each year 20-23 teams participate. Students get input from faculty and exposure to the VC community. We have a number of success stories. Over 50% of the BCO projects have launched! An example of a success story is Vow to Be Chic – a designer bridesmaid rental site.

You mentioned Anderson’s location – how is it an advantage? [23:20]

Many times people think automatically about media and entertainment, and that’s definitely a strength of being in LA, but it’s much more than that. The student experience is very rich – people are taking advantage of academic year internships in all industries. The classroom environment is exciting: we have lecturers who bring in their industry experience. And the Dean brings industry leaders to speak and meet with students.

Recruiting is changing. There are more recruiters, and more opportunities, but the hiring path is more diverse and splintered than it was ten years ago. How is Anderson adapting to those changes? [30:00]

The career center does over 4,000 advising sessions for our students. We have “day on the job” events coast to coast. We prep students for video interviews, and help them get their resumes ready. And we begin those relationships even before students arrive on campus.

We hear from recruiters that Anderson students are as competitive as students from other top programs, and they’re also really strong team players.

UCLA Anderson accepted approximately one out of every four applicants. Who gets the interview invitations? From those invited to interview, who gets accepted? How do you winnow it down? [34:40]

We really want to bring in individuals who resonate with our culture – people who show evidence of working in teams and being collaborative.

Our class profile is on our website. People often ask if they need to have a certain GMAT/GPA. We do admit people with lower scores, and deny some with higher scores.

We ask, how will this person perform academically and contribute to the community? We’re not looking for the “lone wolf” profile. Academically, you have to be competitive – in the range – but it’s a holistic process overall.

UCLA has a new essay question. Can you share the question and some advice? [38:00]

We have two essays this year. We’re not trying to make it more complicated – we’re just giving the applicants more opportunity to showcase why Anderson is the right choice for them.

Essay 1: Describe your short-term and long-term career goals. How can UCLA Anderson contribute to your career development?

Most people pursue an MBA to advance their careers – how does UCLA Anderson fit into your career trajectory?

Essay 2: Describe how you would contribute to the UCLA Anderson community.

The people who are most successful have done their due diligence. We’re a very open campus – visitors can attend a class, meet professors, potentially meet an admissions officer. We travel as well for info sessions. Once you start learning what it’s like to be part of the Anderson community, think about how you would fit into it.

We know not everyone can visit, but our website has a lot of information, videos, student ambassadors you can contact. Learn why they chose Anderson. Learn about speakers, conferences, etc. It’s great when you can start talking to people who’ve been there and done it – you can really visualize yourself as a member of the community.

Any other changes to the application? [43:40]

There’s starting to be a move to a common letter of rec. I can’t talk about the nuts and bolts of it now. But at the end of the day, schools all want to learn similar information from a letter of rec.

Do you have advice for people planning ahead to apply in 2018? [45:55]

It takes a while to get the standardized test score you really want – it takes some prep. So start thinking about that.

If possible, visit the campus. Starting in October, you can visit our campus and visit classes. Start talking to people who’ve gone to b-school and have an MBA – people learn about b-school from people who’ve done it already.

Start looking at the elements of the application itself – for multiple schools. Some schools have video essays and different interview formats. So it’s good to be aware.

If they’re not sure of their career direction, should they take time to clarify that direction this year, and maybe do informational interviews, etc? [50:25]

Definitely, definitely. The strongest applicants are those who have a sense of what their goals are.

Having an awareness of what the career is and the skillset it demands is very important. Go a couple of layers below the surface.

Finding the right fit from a school standpoint is important – you need to know if the school will help you get to your ultimate goal.

What do you wish people would know about Anderson? [52:25]

They don’t realize we’re not just an entertainment school. People here go into tech, finance, consulting… They start their own businesses. LA is an incredibly vibrant startup/small business scene. It’s more about what you want to do.

We have a worldwide alumni network and a strong brand.

Being in an environment where people are not just going to be part of the status quo is exciting.

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Related Resources:

Anderson Full-time MBA

UCLA Anderson B-School Zone

UCLA Anderson Essay Tips & Deadlines

How an MBA from Anderson Helped this Career Switcher

B-School for Good: Pursuing Social Impact Through UCLA Anderson’s Fully Employed MBA

UCLA Anderson Executive MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines

Related Shows:

UCLA’s MS in Business Analytics: Prep for the Sexiest Job of the 21st Century

What’s New at NYU Stern? A Lot!

From Wall St to Wharton, While Starting Wall Street Oasis

What’s Life Like as a Darden MBA and Entrepreneur?

Make a Difference at Michigan Ross: An Interview with Soojin Kwon

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, MBA Admissions

The post UCLA Anderson MBA Admissions According to Dean Alex Lawrence [Episode 215] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Kellogg Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jul 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Kellogg Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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Kellogg’s EMBA application essay questions may seem deceptively simple. They’re short – but complex, and together they draw out a holistic view of you as a person and as a professional, including both what you’ve done and how you think and perceive. To the extent possible, ground your essays in detail and concrete experience, and use reflection as the thread weaving those details and experiences together into a vivid whole. 

There are no word limits, which may be good – or not (as Linda Abraham has said about long essays and no word limits, “They give you lots of rope…”). The open word limit means you must supply your own discipline. Outline your Kellogg EMBA essays, and start by thinking, not, “Great, I can get everything in,” but, rather, “What are the 2-3 most important points I must make in this essay,” and stick to those points, with thoughtfulness and depth. Quell the instinct to include “everything.” Depending on your expression style and your unique case (e.g. someone with goals at a well-known company will need fewer words to describe the company than someone planning to join a young startup with which the adcom will not be familiar), 400-800 is a good range to target.

Instructions: Please include the essay prompt in bold at the top of the page. Please use 12-point Times New Roman font, line spacing at 1.5 lines and 1-inch margins. 

Essays:

1. What do you want to achieve in your professional life? What have you already done to get there and how do you think Kellogg can help you?

“What you want to achieve” means your career vision; therefore, discuss the impact you hope to have. Support this vision by, succinctly, discussing your goals in specific terms: likely positions, which company or companies, desired location, and possibly anticipated challenges. Then connect the dots: explain how this stated path will enable you to achieve the vision.

In asking what you have already done to pursue these goals, the adcom is essentially seeking evidence that you are truly committed to this career, and that it’s not just something you thought of yesterday. Answering this part allows you to show that you are proactive, strategic, and resourceful. Don’t cite everything you’ve done in this regard, but identify the 2-3 most important things – and what you gained from them. In discussing why Kellogg will be the next important step on that path, link the resources of the Kellogg EMBA to your specific learning and professional needs arising from your planned path. (And keep in mind essay 2, to avoid redundancy.)

2. What is Kellogg’s value proposition for you and how will you make Kellogg stronger by being part of our community?

This question gets to how you think, essentially. A poor answer is to select a quality of Kellogg EMBA (e.g., commitment to diversity) and heap praise on it. Rather, identify one or two of Kellogg’s characteristics or programs, and then link it to your own experience and goals to show how and why it’s valuable to you. The adcom already knows how great the program is; they don’t yet know you, and this essay should help them do so.

The contributions can reference your experience from work or outside work; think of what about you would be most meaningful and interesting to prospective classmates. This element of your response is an opportunity to show that you understand the program.

Optional Essay: Please feel free to add anything else that you think the admissions committee would like to know about you. 

This question invites you to present new material that will enhance your application, as well as explain anything that needs explaining (e.g., gap in employment, choice of recommender if not using a direct supervisor, etc.). Beyond such necessary points, if you write about other things you believe are important to illuminate your candidacy, there should be a clear value to the information you’re sharing. Finally, keep it short.

If you would like professional guidance with your Kellogg EMBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Package, which includes advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Kellogg EMBA application.

Deadlines:

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***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
Related Resources:

• Excellent Executive MBA Admissions Advice, a podcast episode

3 Tips for Writing a Winning EMBA Essay

• EMBA Interview Tips You Need to Get Accepted

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Kellogg Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Can You Get Into a Top Grad School if You Didn’t Attend a Top Universi [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Can You Get Into a Top Grad School if You Didn’t Attend a Top University?
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Abhishek from India recently asked on our blog what Indian applicants who graduated from undergraduate programs not among the elite Indian IIT’s can do to gain acceptance to the top global MBA programs. While Abhishek was particularly focused on Indian MBA aspirants, this question applies to all applicants who did not graduate from an elite university in their home country. Do the top programs only accept graduates from the top undergraduate schools?

Abhishek and others from similar backgrounds need not be concerned solely with the name of their undergraduate institution. Plenty of alumni of non-IITs, U.S. state schools and programs outside of the top 5 in their home countries gain acceptance to the top MBA programs.

Here are two ways to surmount the obstacle of a less renowned program on your resume:

1. Demonstrate academic excellence on your own merit, not just by riding the coattails of your school’s reputation. Instead of relying on the program name to prove your academic abilities, share other evidence of your intelligence and intellectual curiosity. Did you take the most notoriously challenging courses? How did you challenge yourself and explore during your studies? Share evidence of your academic potential

such as academic awards, rank in your program and/or nationally, research projects that you conducted and published, and certifications such as the CFA or FRM. Finally, a high GMAT or GRE score will also demonstrate your academic potential.

2. Differentiate yourself so you are more than just an alumnus of your academic program in the admission committee’s eyes. Were you a campus leader with significant impact on student life? Have you passionately steered your career since graduating from your undergrad program? Have you led your company or its clients to tap new markets, chart a new course, or solve a relentless, pervasive problem? The impact you have been able to make on campus, in the workplace, in your industry, in your country or region will prove that you have EQ – a high emotional quotient – needed to lead people, shape teams, and guide senior management and clients.

Harvard Business School shares the range of undergraduate programs that recently-accepted applicants attended, including some lesser renowned Indian programs as Visveswaraiah Technological University, University of Poona, University of Bombay, Punjab Engineering College, Jadavpur University in addition to India’s IITs, NITs, BITSes, and SRCC.

So yes, Abhishek, non-IIT grads can make it to HBS and the other top MBA programs. Good luck with your applications!

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Jennifer Bloom has been a consultant with Accepted for 17 years and is a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW). She is an expert at crafting application materials that truly differentiate you from the rest of the driven applicant pool. If you would like help with your application, Jennifer can suggest a number of options that work with any budget. Want Jennifer to help you get accepted? Click here!
Related Resources:

From Example to Exemplary, a free guide to writing outstanding essays

Different Dimensions of Diversity, a podcast episode

• Stand Out! A Critical Goal for Your Application, a podcast episode

Tags: Admissions Consulting, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Can You Get Into a Top Grad School if You Didn’t Attend a Top University? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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A Proven Strategy to Get Accepted to Wharton [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: A Proven Strategy to Get Accepted to Wharton
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Wharton. It’s one of the top-ranked business schools in the world – with the rigorous curriculum and amazing resources to help you accelerate your career in nearly any direction you can imagine.

It’s also very selective. When you’re up against the hard reality of stats like Wharton’s – an acceptance rate under 20% – it’s easy to be intimidated. Do you have what it takes to impress the adcom and get accepted?

We know applying to elite programs can be stressful: That’s why we’ve created our free, one hour webinar, Get Accepted to Wharton. Accepted founder Linda Abraham will give you a clear action plan for your Wharton strategy and show you how you can prove you’re a great fit for Wharton while standing out in the applicant pool. And because we know your time is valuable, we’ve packed it all into one hour.

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The webinar is free, but you must reserve your space.

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Indiana Kelley MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Indiana Kelley MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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These questions are a straightforward mix of professional and personal. The adcom wants assurance that you have a clear professional focus and a solid plan for making productive use of the Kelley MBA resources. Beyond that, they’re looking for engaging applicants who are willing to share their life experiences and understand what they have to contribute. Strive for balance and coherence among the essays overall: use them to present different facets of your character, while avoiding contradictory qualities (i.e., you can be a vigorous risk-taker in one and a tender-hearted soul in another, but not a vigorous risk-taker in one and tentative or overly cautious in another).

Essays:

Your essays will give us an idea of your personality, perspectives, and opinions and will let us know how closely your professional objectives match the objectives of the MBA program. We encourage you to be honest, informative, creative, and concise.

Essay 1:

Please discuss your immediate post-MBA professional goals. How will your professional experience, when combined with a Kelley MBA degree, allow you to achieve these goals? Should the short-term goals you have identified not materialize, what alternate career paths might you consider? (500 words max)

This question encourages you to present your goals in the context of your experience and to integrate your MBA plans with both. With only 500 words, be selective and thoughtful about what points from your career to discus to contextualize your goals. Also, the question specifies short-term goals. While it would be fine to add a sentence or a phrase about longer-term goals or overall career vision, keep your goals discussion focused on the same time frame the question focuses on: immediately post-MBA. This question is asking for linkages among your experience, your short-term goals, and your anticipated MBA experience, so make an essay plan or outline that forms an integrated message out of these elements.

In answering the last point, continue the linkage approach: the alternatives you identify should build on your experience in some way and be consistent with your expressed career interests. Show that you are adaptable and strategic, informed about the options, and resourceful in your thinking.

Essay 2:

Please respond to one of the following short essay prompts. (300 words max)

a. My greatest memory is…

b. I’m most afraid of…

c. My greatest challenge has been…

d. I’m most proud of…

Consider which question will give you the best avenue to both (a) round out your profile and (b) showcase an interesting and relevant aspect of your life and/or experience.

Once you decide on a topic and question, write this short essay in mini-story format. Sometimes the story itself will convey the message and/or insight, sometimes you may want to add a concluding sentence with this information. And be sensitive to the tone and presentation of the question – it really is asking for something engaging, meaningful, and lively.

Essay 3:

Share a brief fact about yourself that your classmates would find interesting, surprising, or noteworthy. (25 words max)

Your topic selection here should balance the topic in essay 2 and reflect another aspect of you. Also, if you choose an older story above, make this one more recent. (It’s fine to have them both be recent, but not so great to have them both from far in the past.)

Optional Essay:

Is there anything else that you think we should know as we evaluate your application? If you believe your credentials and essays represent you fairly, you shouldn’t feel obligated to answer this question. (300 words max)

This question first and foremost invites you to explain anything that needs explaining (e.g., gap in employment, choice of recommender if not a direct supervisor, etc.). As far as unnecessary points, that last phrase is a polite warning that anything extra must be pretty darn important.

If you would like professional guidance with your Indiana Kelley School of Business’ application, check out Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Kelley School of Business application.

Deadlines:

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***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
Related Resources:

Why Do You Need an MBA?, free guide to answering ‘Why MBA?’

Your MBA Goals Essay: Get Ready, Get Set, THINK!

• How Personal is Too Personal in Your Application Essays?

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Indiana Kelley MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Wharton MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Wharton MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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Last year, Wharton didn’t change its essays after years of shrinking its application. This year it’s steady state, at least in terms of the essay questions. However, Wharton has made significant changes to its recommendations. It asks recommenders to choose from two lists of positive adjectives the three that best describe the applicant. In addition, Wharton asks recommenders for two examples – one demonstrating fit with Wharton and one showing the candidate’s career potential.

In discussion at the AIGAC conference, Frank DeVecchis acknowledged that on some level “recommendation” or “evaluation” are misnomers for what Wharton is looking for from the people asked to provide “recommendation.” They are looking for insight into your character. Not a recommendation or an evaluation.

My tips for completing the Wharton application essays are in blue below.

Essays:

Essay 1.

What do you hope to gain professionally from the Wharton MBA? (500 words maximum)

This question is exclusively “professional.” What do you want to do professionally that you can’t do now and that a Wharton MBA will help you do? What “soft” and “hard” skills do you hope to acquire at Wharton? How will a Wharton MBA – the education, the credential, and the experience – help you achieve your dreams?

As with most MBA goals questions, Wharton wants to see how you plan to connect your Wharton education to your future. Keep in mind that Wharton has an incredibly rich curriculum. How will you take advantage of its premier offerings to prepare yourself to achieve your vision for the future?

To answer this question well, you need to have professional direction and you need to know which of Wharton’s myriad resources make it perfect as the next stop on your professional journey.

Essay 2. 

Teamwork is at the core of the Wharton MBA experience with each student contributing unique elements to our collaborative culture. How will you contribute to the Wharton community? (400 words maximum)

To respond effectively you have to understand the importance of clusters, cohorts, and student clubs at Wharton. Students constantly work in teams and groups in and outside of class. In addition, much learning and networking goes on outside of class. Finally, Wharton values its community and wants to admit people who will enrich and contribute to it.

When have you contributed to a team? It could be a sports team, a band, a religious or political group. It could be that you spearheaded a fundraiser with a group of peers or started an exercise initiative at the office in cooperation with others. There are an infinite number of possibilities. However, in order to complement Essay 1, try to choose a non-professional team example. Show how that experience will allow you to contribute similarly to a Wharton club, resource, or event.  Maybe you’ll start a new initiative using the lessons you learned from this previous experience.

Additional Question (required for all Reapplicants):

Explain how you have reflected on the previous decision about your application, and discuss any updates to your candidacy (e.g., changes in your professional life, additional coursework, extracurricular/volunteer engagements). (250 words)*

The name of the MBA reapplicant game is Growth and Improvement. Wharton is asking for reflection and you need to provide it, but also show how that reflection led to action and improvement. You need to be a better candidate this time than last.

*First-time applicants may also use this section to address any extenuating circumstances. (250 words)

“Addressing extenuating circumstances” means that you should describe those circumstances in a straight-forward way. Give the admissions committee context. Avoid excuses and whining.

If you would like professional guidance with your Wharton MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Wharton MBA application.

Wharton 2017-18 Application Deadlines:



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*To be considered for a round, you must submit a complete application by 5:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST) on the day of the deadline.

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsWharton’s Commitment Project – a Window into Wharton

• Wharton MBA Program Announces Establishment of Moelis Advance Access Program

• Harvard, Stanford, Wharton: What’s the Difference?

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An Inside Look at Wharton’s MBA at the 2017 AIGAC Conference [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: An Inside Look at Wharton’s MBA at the 2017 AIGAC Conference
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Last month, during the 2017 AIGAC (Association of International Graduate Application Consultants) conference in San Francisco, my consultants, colleagues, and I spent an illuminating morning visiting Wharton West. Wow. It’s on the Embarcadero by the Bay, next door to Google; it has exposed brick walls and soft gray carpets; quiet, glass-walled cubicles; spa waters in abundance; blue-chip art adorning the hallways and rooms; and loft-like eating space (“cafeteria” doesn’t quite fit the ambience) where on all tables, small vases hold an African daisy. Oh yeah, and school.

If you attend Wharton, you can apply to spend one semester in this paradise. Wharton West largely targets MBA students focused on entrepreneurship and/or technology, given its location, and it takes full advantage of the regional assets in these areas.

During our visit, we had the good fortune to hear directly from several Wharton adcom members including Frank DeVecchis, Director of MBA Admissions; Claire Leinweber, Managing Director of Penn Wharton Entrepreneurship; and Barbara Craft, Director of Admissions for Wharton’s EMBA program, about the latest developments in the program and the application evaluation approach.

A key takeaway for me regarding the academic program was the ever-increasing emphasis on entrepreneurship. And the Wharton West opportunity is one major manifestation of that change. Of course, Wharton has always been a strong all-around program, which included entrepreneurship, but until recently, one would not necessarily think of Wharton first or even second when asked what the top MBA programs are for entrepreneurship. Speaking for myself at least, that’s changed. I’ll now include Wharton when that inquiry arises.

The Wharton adcom takes a close, thoughtful look at entrepreneurial applicants. For applicants who are presenting themselves already as entrepreneurs, according to Claire, they look at four things:

1. What are you doing?

2. Who is helping (employees, investors, partners…)?

3. How is it going (in concrete terms – how is it growing, how much funding, etc.)?

4. What have you learned?

Here are further insights about entrepreneurship and the Wharton MBA:

• It’s multidisciplinary – increasingly, non-Wharton students participate with Wharton students for entrepreneurial activities (e.g. engineering, education, etc.).

• “Entrepreneurship” for goals purposes includes people who want to be serial entrepreneurs and/or start ventures post-MBA (or even during), who want to take a position in a startup or young venture post-MBA, and who want to be entrepreneurial “disrupters” in an established company. You must specify your entrepreneurial goals; don’t just talk about being “an entrepreneur.”

• Increasingly, students are building social impact into entrepreneurship at Wharton.

• In five years, Wharton has doubled internships in startups, to about 13%. Employment offers from startups are about 7%.

• Career advisement has developed specific guidance for entrepreneurial minded students, and has them consider: personality fit, lifestyle, timing, and ecosystem.

• Current Wharton MBA students can attend Wharton’s “Scale School” which is mainly for Wharton entrepreneur alumni. The quarterly sessions are given by alumni and others experienced in the featured domain.

Frank DeVecchis and his colleagues discussed some other aspects of the admissions process – here are my distilled notes:

• Evaluation is three-pronged, looking at community impact, academic preparation, and professional focus.

• The GMAT is less important now; it’s used as a baseline predictor, whereas they see academic prep as more holistic.

• Tip for the application award section: select those awards that are significant and have impact, don’t write down everything just to show a lot. They’re interested in your judgment about the quality of the award/recognition, not how many you got.

• For extracurriculars, they are looking for and evaluating both breadth and depth.

• For the goals essay, no 20-year plan please. They are interested in how and why you chose your future path and how you envision that Wharton can help.

• They evaluate for your prospective contribution to a culture of innovation (and this certainly does align with their current entrepreneurship emphasis).

• They look for and evaluate alignment between your past experience and your future plans, and, even more important, why Wharton is right path – how you connect your actual learning/growth needs with Wharton’s resources.

• They get excited, ultimately, about applicants they can really “see in the program.” They want doers. NOTE: This is a great “guiding star” for how to approach your Wharton application.

Interestingly, they have revamped their recommendation approach completely. They talked to about 1,200 recommenders and companies/recruiters in an effort to make recommendations a better evaluation tool. Their new approach: offer two lists of positive traits and ask the recommenders to select three from each list that best describe the applicant. The premise is that this approach requires recommenders to make a decision. Then, they ask two questions, requesting examples illustrating why they think the applicant will do well (a) in the Wharton classroom and (b) in their career.

All Wharton adcom readers read applications from all regions, industries, etc., and they receive bias training to be able to evaluate without bias.

Finally, we gained some insight into the Team-Based Discussion (TBD) component of the application. It’s not binary (i.e., did well = admitted, did poorly = rejected); rather, the adcom reviews the whole application again, incorporating the TBD evaluation. In fact, they’ve been rigorously evaluating their own TBD process by running analytics on the process for five years on the back end. The aim is to ensure lack of bias and a process doesn’t favor extroverts over introverts, and does deliver gender balance. They do admit to “tweaking” to “normalize” before going to committee. At the end of the year, they use data analytics to provide feedback to evaluators on their own performance on these parameters.

Conclusion: the adcom not only seeks rigor in its applicants; they apply rigor to themselves.

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Why MBA, a free guide to writing about MBA goals

From Wall St to Wharton, While Starting Wall Street Oasis, a podcast episode

Wharton MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post An Inside Look at Wharton’s MBA at the 2017 AIGAC Conference appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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The Consortium Can Help You Get Your MBA [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: The Consortium Can Help You Get Your MBA
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It gives me great pleasure to have for the first time on AST, Danni Young, Director of Recruiting at The Consortium for the Graduate Study of Management. Danni earned her bachelors degree from Lincoln University in Missouri and her MBA from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. FYI she loves cats. Welcome!

Let’s start with the basics. What is the Consortium for the Graduate Study of Management? [1:17]

We’re a stellar organization that’s been around since 1966. Our mission is to increase the representation of African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Native Americans in business schools and corporate management.

We serve as a connector between students and schools, and with our corporate partners.

Today our network is made up of 19 partner schools across the US. We have 900 current students, 9000 alumni (in the US and abroad), and 78 corporate partners. And we’ve awarded $390 million in fellowship support over the last 51 years.

What role does the Consortium play at the application stage? [4:40]

We have a common application, so for prospective students, they have the ability to apply to up to six schools with one application. They submit everything to the Consortium and we forward the materials to the member schools.

Can anyone use the Consortium application? [3:30]

There are eligibility requirements.: Any US citizen who can demonstrate commitment to our mission – but you must have a four-year bachelors degree, and you must be applying to one of the member schools.

How do applicants show a commitment to the Consortium mission? [4:15]

We require a membership essay. They can talk about their experience as champions for diversity. There’s also a mission recommendation, where the recommender attests to their commitment to our mission.

Which schools are member schools? [5:00]

We have 19 member schools currently. The full list is on our site, but just to name a few: UCLA, UC Berkeley, USC, Cornell, Yale, Dartmouth, UNC, Michigan. Recently, Rice joined as our latest member.

Do you have to be a member to apply via CGSM? [6:10]

When you apply via CGSM, you’re applying for admission, Consortium membership, and fellowship opportunities as well.

Is membership automatic? [7:05]

No. It’s not automatic. We determine that based on the mission essay.

The admission application will still be considered, but you may not get the benefits of Consortium membership.

How much does it cost to apply through CGSM? [7:50]

We have a tiered application fee structure. The minimum is $150 for two schools. And the maximum you would pay is $300 for six schools. So you can save money and time.

Are this year’s essay questions available yet? [9:05]

The general essay questions are the same as last year’s. The member schools’ essays have now been updated. Our core questions are the same as last year.

What are the other elements of the application? [9:55]

Beyond essays – we ask applicants to provide their transcripts (from all schools). There are recommendations – three total (two professional and one mission recommendation). The applicant inputs the letter writer’s information and the writer gets an invitation to upload the letter.

We ask for your most recent GMAT or GRE score.

And finally, there’s the application fee.

The recommender only fills out one form, and it goes to all the schools. And the mission rec is only seen by the Consortium.

What are the benefits of Consortium membership? [12:05]

One initial benefit is that every new member has the chance to attend our orientation program (OP) – it’s a major annual conference, including alumni, corporate representatives, and students from across the country.

It gives them participants access to seminars, corporate partners, and other Consortium members from different schools. Some people walk away with internship offers before they’ve even started business school!

Membership also gives people a chance to get fellowships that cover the entire MBA program.

And they get access to our network: we have 9000 alumni, corporate partners – membership is lifelong.

Are there dues? [14:30]

No, there are no membership dues, but we do ask members to pay it forward and give back when they can.

What’s the difference between “members” and “fellows”? [15:00]

All our members are actually classified as fellows, even if they don’t win a fellowship. They all get financial benefits, such as subsidized travel to OP, etc.

Did you go to OP when you were about to start your MBA? [15:45]

I did attend one of our member schools – Washington University in St. Louis – but I went to the evening program, which is not part of the Consortium. So I didn’t have the opportunity to be a Consortium member. But I’ve had the chance to participate in three OPs, and it’s very exciting and rewarding.

Can you share a memorable moment from a recent OP you attended? [16:40]

One that stands out: we have students take a class photo, and we have about 470 students. So they were all grouped close for the photo. One funny moment was just after the photo was taken, a few more students trickled in, and we had to retake the photo – and then a few more students came in. The students in the bleachers were heckling the people coming in. It was fun to see them bonding so quickly.

You mentioned people leaving OP with internship offers already. How does CGSM help its members in career placement? [18:55]

We don’t help with career placement, but we help connect students with our corporate partners. So starting at OP they have a lot of opportunities for networking. They get direct access, and with that access comes opportunity.

At OP we have a career forum – that’s how people walk away with internships. And we have an online career center for Consortium alumni. Our corporate partners are actively looking for diverse talent.

Do you have advice for someone planning to apply through CGSM this year? [20:35]

Prepare, prepare, prepare!

Students try tend to wait to the last minute.

We have two deadlines – Oct 15 and Jan 5. The application is available early. There are so many components – you have to prepare ahead. If you haven’t taken the GMAT or GRE yet, make sure you have enough time to do that.

On our site, we have contact information for student liaisons at each partner school – connect with them.

Do your research. Preparing and applying takes work and time – make sure you’re applying to the right schools.

Attend recruitment events. We have recruitment events in the fall. We also have Consortium alumni in attendance.

So my best advice: prepare and do your research!

What’s coming up for the Consortium? [24:00]

We’re going to continue trying to increase our applicant pool and make people more aware.

We’re hoping to build our class size – we want to reach a class of 500. Last year’s class was 475. There may be more schools joining us. And we’ll keep doing what we’ve done as it relates to our mission.

Related to the fellowship: how many were offered last year? [25:30]

There were 413 fellowships last year – full rides (tuition and fees). That’s a lot of fellowships provided to our students!

Last year we had 1179 applications. Of that, 741 were offered admission to at least one school, and there were 413 fellowships. We’re very proud of the applicants, and of the schools for providing the fellowships.

What differentiates a fellowship winner from a non-winner? [26:50]

Fellowships are decided by the member schools. They’re merit based. You first have to apply for Consortium membership.

They look at test scores, work experience, academics – all play a role in fellowship applications.

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Related Links:

The Consortium for the Graduate Study of Management

Applying for Your MBA Through the Consortium: Best Deal in Town

Welcoming Keith Vaughn to the Accepted Family

Related Shows:

• UCLA Anderson MBA Admissions According to Dean Alex Lawrence

• What’s New at NYU Stern? A Lot!

• Wharton MBA Student, Single Mom, Entrepreneur 

• Make a Difference at Michigan Ross: An Interview with Soojin Kwon

• Exploring the Haas MBA: An Interview with Peter Johnson

• A 20-Year MBA Admissions Veteran Shares His Insights

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, MBA Admissions

The post The Consortium Can Help You Get Your MBA [Episode 216] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Kellogg MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jul 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Kellogg MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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Kellogg tweaked essay one this year to better reflect its current focus and branding. Essay two is unchanged.

My tips are in blue below.

Essays:

Essay 1.

Kellogg’s purpose is to educate, equip & inspire brave leaders who create lasting value.  Tell us about a time you have demonstrated leadership and created lasting value.  What challenges did you face, and what did you learn? (450 words)

First things first: Kellogg is asking for ONE experience. Not more. Unlike many similar essay questions, Kellogg is not limiting you to professional settings. You do have the option to use a non-professional leadership experience.

You can use a CAR framework for this response (Challenge, Action, Results). Start with the challenge or challenges that you faced by simply describing the situation and obstacles. Then relate your actions. How did you motivate others to move in one direction? How did you influence and persuade? Finally, what were the results? How did you create value, not just for yourself but for your team, group, department, company, club, or whatever entity you were contributing to. And what did you learn about leadership, collaboration, and influence?

While it isn’t a requirement, and I can imagine instances where this may not be true, examples where you led by virtue of your stature and others’ respect for you will be more compelling than those where you led by virtue of station and title.

Essay 2.

Pursuing an MBA is a catalyst for personal and professional growth. How have you grown in the past? How do you intend to grow at Kellogg? (450 words)

This is a difficult question, and the response should provide Kellogg with real insight into the individuals applying to its MBA program. Before responding, do your homework on the Kellogg program and what you want to do after you leave Kellogg. The latter will tell you how you want to grow and the former will tell you how you will do so at Kellogg.

First think about times you have grown either professionally or personally. Which of those instances would you like Kellogg to know about? Ideally the event you choose to focus on will relate in some way to the growth you want to have at Kellogg.

Then reflect on how you intend to grow while at Kellogg. I think a strong answer to this question will really go beyond mere skill acquisition, although that can be part of your response. How are you going to take advantage of what Kellogg offers to become a person who can see opportunity when faced with challenge, envision an outcome when faced with a void, and harness emotional intelligence, data, and acquired skills to lead collaboratively and with clarity of purpose?

Finally this very short essay also asks for you to give an example of a time you grew in the past. You can tie your future growth to this past growth, even if not in a professional arena, by highlighting your vision, interpersonal skills, or ability to lead collaboratively in the past and in the future.

Certain applicants will respond to additional questions:

Dual-degree applicants:

For applicants to the MMM or JD-MBA dual degree programs, please explain why that program is right for you. (250 words)

A straight-forward response is required here. What do you want to do that requires both degrees? Why is this joint program the right one to fill in the gaps in your education and take you to a point where you can go down your desired professional path?

Re-applicants:

Since your previous application, what steps have you taken to strengthen your candidacy? (250 word limit)

No trick questions here. How are you a better candidate today than when Kellogg rejected you? Have you addressed weaknesses in your previous application?

All applicants have the opportunity to provide explanations or clarification in Additional Information:

If needed, use this section to briefly describe any extenuating circumstances (e.g. unexplained gaps in work experience, choice of recommenders, inconsistent or questionable academic performance, etc.) (no word count)

This is a true optional question. If necessary, use it to provide context for possible negatives. Take responsibility for mistakes if necessary and discuss what you have changed so that you don’t err in the same way again.

Keep this section short and to-the-point. Don’t be fooled by “No word count.”

Video Essay: 

The Video Essays provide applicants with an additional opportunity to demonstrate what they will bring to our vibrant Kellogg community – in an interactive way. Each applicant will complete two short video essay questions. The questions are designed to bring to life the person we have learned about on paper.

• After submitting an application and payment, you will be able to access the video essay through the your application status page. One question will be a “get to know you” icebreaker type of question. The second question will be an opportunity to describe your plans for the future and how Kellogg will help you on that journey. The other questions will be randomly generated questions that will be similar to interview questions.

• There are practice questions that you may complete as many times as you like to get comfortable with the format and technology. The practice questions and experience will simulate the actual video essay experience, so this is meant to be a useful tool to help you feel prepared.

• We encourage you to practice so you are comfortable with the format once it is time to complete the official questions. There is not an opportunity to re-do the answer to the official video essay questions.

• You will have 20 seconds to think about the question and up to one minute to give your response.

• We estimate the video essays will take 20-25 minutes to complete – which includes time for set-up and answering all the practice questions. You will need an internet connected computer with a webcam, microphone and an updated version of Adobe Flash in order to complete the video essay.

To prepare for your webcam session, you need to practice for the experience of talking to a video camera with no responses from another human being. For tips on how to prepare and behave during the webcam session, please see Kellogg’s “Video Essay” on its Application Process page as well as my Tips for Video MBA Essay Questions, linked to below.

If you would like professional guidance with your Kellogg MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Kellogg application. 

Kellogg 2017-18 MBA Application Deadlines:

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*Your application must be received by Kellogg no later than 5 p.m. CT on the deadline for the round in which you are applying.

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your MBA Application Essays [Free Guide]

• Want a Kellogg MBA?, a podcast episode

• Tips for Video MBA Essay Questions

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Kellogg MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Will You Be at Wharton Next Year? [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jul 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Will You Be at Wharton Next Year?
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Are you planning to apply to Wharton this year? Or maybe next year?

We know there’s a lot of information out there for applicants – some of which is helpful, and some of which, let’s face it, probably only increases your anxiety level. We’re committed to providing clear, direct, dependable advice – advice that is built on our decades of admissions experience and has been proven to help applicants get accepted.

One way to take advantage of this expertise is our free webinar, Get Accepted to Wharton.

Accepted founder Linda Abraham will share a proven strategic framework for your Wharton application, and help you understand what your application must accomplish.

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There’s still time to register! Don’t miss it.

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Will You Be at Wharton Next Year? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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Kudos [?]: 583 [0], given: 74

Will You Be at Wharton Next Year?   [#permalink] 26 Jul 2017, 10:01

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