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Your Past Doesn’t Define You [Episode 209] [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jun 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Your Past Doesn’t Define You [Episode 209]
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Today’s one of those shows where I’m going to be the sole presenter.

I actually started preparing this show during the World Series way back in October. Yes, folks, after 108 years of losing, the Chicago Cubs finally won the World Series.

At the same time, we were working (and have worked in the past) with amazing applicants who overcame hurdles – sometimes large and sometimes small – to get accepted either first time or via reapplication.

To me, these events had much in common. The applicants and the Cubs didn’t let their past define them. They looked to the future. And that’s what applicants need to do as they approach the admissions process – both first-time applicants and reapplicants.

While you can’t and shouldn’t ignore your background and previous experiences – both good and bad – I find that applicants tend to focus inordinately on the past and way too little on the future.

Focus on The Future

Let’s start with first-time applicants, because what I say here really applies to both first-time and re-applicants.

I sometimes get inquiries from applicants that start with what they’ve done in the past. And certainly, past achievements and blemishes are critical to this arduous process that you’re going through. They have to be dealt with, but the starting place for your application has to be your goals: What do you want to do when you finish your education? The answer to that question determines what degree you seek. The future you see for yourself is really the starting point of your application.

What Role Does Your Past Play?

Once you have that first ingredient of a successful application, you need to season it and perhaps temper it with your past. Your past will show if you are competitive in ways other than your goal. Look to see that you meet the requirements of your target programs (appropriate degree, required classes, test scores, relevant experience if required). Then evaluate your competitiveness by comparing your profile with the class profiles and other qualitative information available from your target programs and perhaps its students and recent alumni. You should be competitive at most of the programs you are applying to.

If not, you have to either improve your qualifications or change your target schools. Realize that for the overwhelming majority of you, there are multiple paths to achieving your goal. You don’t all have to go to Harvard or Top Choice Grad School to be the doctor, lawyer, business person, academician or whatever that you want to be. If Top Choice U (and its close cousins that are probably out of reach) didn’t exist, what you would you do? What would be your plan then? Would it be Second-Tier U that still has excellent placement in the kinds of firms you want to work for or the specialties you’d love to match at? Would it be a different career path?

Or, you can choose to improve your qualifications to become competitive at Top Choice U. We have lots of information on the site, www.accepted.com, about overcoming all kinds of weaknesses.

How to Change your Chances

But if you don’t want to change your goal, or change the schools you want to target, then you may need to change YOU to compete effectively in an intensely competitive process.

This is where not letting your past define you really comes into play. If you have poor study skills, take advantage of courses and resources to improve those skills – either at your undergraduate institution or through extension courses. If you had poor undergraduate grades, check out our podcast episode on how to mitigate them.

If your test score is keeping you up at night, consider changing your method of study and retaking the exam. If you did self-study to this point, try a course – online or offline, whichever works for you. If you tried a course previously, try tutoring now. But you must change something if you want to expect a different outcome.

If you come from a disadvantaged background or had a few bumps in the road of life, listen to the stories of people who have refused to let the bumps in their lives deter them from achieving their goals. I highly recommend “The Unbelievable Story of an Orthopedic Surgeon” or “Wharton MBA Student, Single Mom, Entrepreneur.” Or check out the story of Elad Shoushan, an MIT MBA who created a highly successful test prep app after struggling with the GMAT.

Tips for Reapplicants

Now let’s look at reapplicants, where I think the maxim’s applicability may be more obvious.

Yes, you’ve been rejected (or think you will shortly be rejected) from your target schools. You’re disappointed. Frustrated. Maybe a little embarrassed. But this is a setback. It doesn’t automatically need to be the end of your dreams, unless you decide the dream no longer appeals or simply isn’t feasible for you.

If that dream no longer attracts you or isn’t worth the effort necessary to make it feasible, that’s OK. Research other paths and goals and dreams, and go after them. The fact that this application or dream didn’t work, doesn’t mean you won’t succeed at others. Furthermore, you may look back and say that you are glad things worked out as they did, because in the future you may realize your new path really was best for you.

This has happened several times in my life, and if you keep perspective, it may be happening in yours.

Alternatively, you may decide that this dream, this goal, still is what you want to pursue. It animates and motivates you. You want it. You need to try again.

Great. The first step to a successful re-application is an evaluation of your last attempt so that you can improve. Again, the past doesn’t have to define or limit you.

Reapplying Strategically

Realize that rejection is caused by one of the following four reasons in broad strokes:

1. You simply weren’t competitive.

2. You were competitive at your target programs, but failed to effectively present your qualifications.

3. You did a good job on 1 &2, but were a victim of the numbers and intense competition at your target schools. (Don’t assume this was the sole reason.)

4. A combination of the above.

It’s easiest to point to a sub-standard GPA, test score, or some other quantitative element that isn’t up to snuff because numbers are so concrete. However, an unappealing presentation of your qualifications (for example, sloppiness in your application or failing to show fit) is just as dangerous, especially at highly competitive programs, be they MD, MBA, JD or whatever. Being a victim of numbers and competition, almost always implies weakness in presentation, which means that that combo comes into play a lot.

To make sure that you have a different outcome next time around, you must improve whatever you feel is weak. Sometimes that’s easier said than done, but that’s your mission as you reapply. Furthermore, even if you feel that you presented yourself well via your essay and that your academic stats were the issue, you still need to show commitment to the process and growth from your last application; I strongly discourage submitting the same personal statement or application essay as you sent in last year. Doing will so will damage your chances of acceptance.

For advice on mitigating less-than-stellar grades, please see our podcast episode, What to do About a Low GPA. Low test scores? Well, the best thing to do is prepare again and raise them. I know that’s much easier said than done, but that’s the reality of the situation.

We have tons of advice on the site related to writing your essays and resumes/CVs and presenting your story to schools. Just go to Accepted.com and click on the area that you are pursuing to access these resources. I’d like to highlight one podcast, Focus on Fit. I devoted the entire podcast to demonstrating fit and outlined four key elements necessary to do so.

Finally, if you really don’t feel you can improve those stats or the presentation of your qualifications, then you may have to change the way you achieve your goals. If you are pre-med, you may need to apply to lower ranked MD programs or osteopathic programs and not exclusively to top ranked allopathic programs. If you want to get an MBA to begin your career as a strategy consultant and can’t get into the top M/B/B feeder schools, consider achieving your goal in stages. Start at a program that sends grads into second-tier consulting firms, and plan to work your way over to the elite strategy firms or climb at these companies so that you get the best assignments. You’ll still be doing the work you want to do.

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Related Links:

Resources for MBA Applicants

Resources for Medical School Applicants

Resources for Law School Applicants

Resources for Grad School Applicants

Related Shows:

• The Unbelievable Story of an Orthopedic Surgeon

• What to do About a Low GPA

• Wharton MBA Student, Single Mom, Entrepreneur• Individual Mobile Test Prep and the MIT Sloan MBA Who Created Ithttps://blog.accepted.com/wharton-mba-student-single-mom-entrepreneur-episode-152/

Subscribe:

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Your Past Doesn’t Define You [Episode 209] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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UCLA Anderson MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jun 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: UCLA Anderson MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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The essay advice that UCLA Anderson provides is excellent, not just for Anderson’s essays, but for most MBA essays. We’ve provided it here. Read it carefully.

• Your essays are the primary way for you to share your perspectives and plans with the admissions committee. The best essays are introspective, genuine and succinct in directly answering our questions and responding to our topics.

• You should try to distinguish yourself by showing what makes you different from others who share similar profiles.

• Personal expression is what we are looking for, not platitudes.

• Making a strong case for your future plans requires you to first do research on career paths and find one that resonates. Even if this target will change during business school, your application essays should lay out a clear trajectory for short-term and long-term goals. Do this by demonstrating how you expect to build on skills from your past, and those you expect to gain from the MBA.

• Essays are more compelling if they include specific courses, programs, groups, opportunities, activities, etc. from which you would benefit, if admitted to UCLA Anderson. These references are best found through website research, personal discussions and a campus visit (if possible).

• Content and clarity are key elements, as we seek superior communication skills.

• Style is a consideration too, although we understand that those who speak other languages may have different manners of expression in English.We do check your essays for plagiarism, so make sure you always submit your own work.

• Length does not equal strength. A well-written short essay can have even more impact than a longer essay. Please try to respect the word limits indicated below.

• All essay responses are to be entered directly in the text box provided in your application.

My tips are in blue below.

Essays:

One essay is required, in written form only. One optional essay may also be submitted to supply information on extenuating circumstances.

We believe that the best results are achieved when you share success, think fearlessly and drive change. With this in mind, what are your goals at UCLA Anderson and in your short-term and long-term career? (750 words maximum)

Anderson gives you enough room to write a revealing response. Make sure this essay shows that you can answer the question articulately and that you belong at Anderson.

First think about Anderson’s motto: Share success. Think fearlessly. Drive Change. Watch the videos that Anderson provides on each of those values. Think about the ways you can show that those values are your values. How do those values motivate you to pursue the path your are pursuing? To apply to UCLA Anderson’s MBA program?

A great way to approach this essay would be to discuss an experience or anecdote that reveals you acting according to these principles. Then connect that story and your values to UCLA Anderson’s program and culture and your reasons for choosing its MBA program. Conclude by connecting relevant aspects of the Anderson MBA experience and program to achievement of your short- and long-term goals.

Your particular story may benefit from a different order, and that’s fine. Just make sure that the reader can follow it and that you include the requested elements.

Optional Essay:

The following essay is optional. No preference is given in the evaluation process to applicants who submit an optional essay. Please note that we only accept written essays.

Are there any extenuating circumstances in your profile about which the Admissions Committee should be aware? Please use your best judgment. (250 words maximum)

If there are extenuating circumstances that would add perspective on, context for, or “explain” a weakness, you can discuss them here. A few years ago, UCLA added the following: “Please do not submit redundant information in the Optional Essay.” Good advice for all optional questions. For more suggestions, please see Optional Essays: When and How to Write Them.

Re-applicants — One Required Essay:

Reapplicants who applied for the MBA program starting in 2016 or 2017 are required to complete the following essay:

Please describe your career progress since you last applied and ways in which you have enhanced your candidacy. Include updates on short-term and long-term career goals, as well as your continued interest in UCLA Anderson. (750 words maximum)

This is the key question in every MBA reapplication: How have you enhanced your candidacy? Career progress is an obvious place to start and something you must address, but if academics were a weakness, then what have you done since you last applied to show you can excel at Anderson?  Finally, if your career goals have evolved since you last applied, discuss that evolution.

If you would like professional guidance with your UCLA Anderson application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the UCLA application.

Deadlines:

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***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in your MBA Application Essay

• UCLA’s MS in Business Analytics: Prep for the Sexiest Job of the 21st Century 

• How an MBA from Anderson Helped this Career Switcher

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post UCLA Anderson MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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We Can Help You Pay for B-school! [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jun 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: We Can Help You Pay for B-school!
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While we’re not offering to foot the bill for you (sorry!), we are more than happy to share advice on how you can pay for business school abroad.

Check out the recording of our recent webinar, How Will You Fund Your MBA Abroad?, during which Prodigy Finance’s Michael Hollis discusses the steps you need to take to fund your MBA experience in a country that’s not your own.

Topics include:

• Funding options available for international students

• How the Prodigy Finance application and funding process works

• How much you can borrow

• Interest rates

• The repayment process

…and more!

Business school is expensive for most people, but foreign students encounter additional obstacles – learn what those obstacles are and how you can leap right over them.

View How Will You Fund Your MBA Abroad? now!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post We Can Help You Pay for B-school! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Diversity and International Innovation at LBS [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jun 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Diversity and International Innovation at LBS
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This interview is the latest in an Accepted blog series featuring interviews with business students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top programs. And now, introducing Bruna Moreira…

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad?

Bruna: I am from Brazil and I lived and studied my whole life there. I studied International Relations as an undergrad at Pontificia Universidade Catolica (PUC-Rio) in Rio de Janeiro.

Accepted: Where are you currently in b-school? What year?

Bruna: I am a first year student at London Business School (LBS). My graduation year is 2018.

Accepted: Why did you choose LBS? How were you a good fit?

Bruna: I was looking for three things when I was researching business schools: diversity, international opportunities and collaborative environment. At first, I did not even look at European schools, and US was my first thought. However, when I came to London to visit my sister (she’s been living in London for five years now) I decided to attend a campus presentation and found out LBS was just everything I was looking for! It is a two year course, which gives you more time to explore opportunities. The class is really diverse – there are 70 nationalities in my class and only 10% are from the UK. London is an easy place to travel everywhere, I just came from South Korea (a trip organized by Koreans in the school) and it is just a 12 hour flight from London. From my home city, it would take me at least 25 hours flying to get there. The students organize trips, and we also have a compulsory international module. I am very interested in different cultures and LBS is providing me a lot of opportunities to explore this. The third important aspect for me is the collaborative environment. As I was looking for diversity, it wouldn’t be very useful if the class was very competitive and not willing to share knowledge and experience with me. More than anything, I wanted the experience to be enjoyable and enriching and not a stressful one. I really loved everybody from LBS I talked to before applying, students are really helpful, honest and approachable. I knew I would feel good at LBS.

Accepted: What is your favorite thing about your program? Is there anything you’d change?

Bruna: My favorite things are certainly the diversity and the location. Both of these aspects combined open so many opportunities to all of us and there are always a lot of activities happening simultaneously. Making choices can be very hard: you keep learning about new industries, new companies, new destinations to travel to… For me it was very important to not be isolated in a small town as I wanted to get work experience outside Brazil and make the most of this experience in terms of international opportunities.

One thing I would change is expanding the campus more quickly. There are already two buildings acquired by the school but not finished yet and space is a challenge. Sometimes we have exams outside the campus, which is not a big problem for me as location is usually close to the school but it would be better to do them always on campus.

Accepted: Looking back at the application process, did you experience any challenges? How did you overcome them?

Bruna: I’ve never done exams on computers, so the GMAT was my first challenge. Exams in Brazil are very different, as an example usually we get at least one hour to do something like AWA, which is double the time the GMAT allows. In my first simulation I think I wrote just one or two paragraphs. I studied for the GMAT only through online courses for about three months while also working full-time and doing some volunteer work. I would stay up with coffee and chewing gum until 4 am almost every day. I had to wake up at 6.30 am to go to work.

About the LBS application process, I always believed in being true to myself. So I just tried to reflect on myself and what I wanted for the future, understand the underlying causes and forces that shaped my career up to that point. Probably what really helped me was that on the research process I was already looking for a school to fit my needs and plan so I did not need to fit myself to the school. In the end I only applied to UK schools and LBS was clearly appropriate for achieving my goals, and I think the admission team could also see that.

Accepted: You’re extremely involved at LBS and even co-founded your own company, Green It Yourself Now! Can you share a little about your endeavors?

Bruna: I am doing a lot of things simultaneously and I am probably crazy! But I run the Green It Yourself Now! Blog with my sister and we are planning its expansion to an online business. I work part-time as a Marketing Intern for busuu, an e-learning company and I am also VP Marketing for the Sports Business Club at LBS.

I really love to connect with people online and share information and all my endeavors are in a way connected to this. I manage the Facebook account for GIY Now and Sports Business Club and also the twitter profiles: GIY Now and SBC.

I confess sometimes it is hard to manage all these activities but I get a lot of support from other people and keeping focused and organized is certainly the key to keep going even at challenging times.

Accepted: Lastly, what are your plans for after graduation?

Bruna: I am really happy that one of my main goals is already achieved: working for a start-up at Old Street Roundabout in London (the “Silicon Valley” here) and I am experiencing a much more flexible and vibrant working environment. I only worked in really big companies in Brazil so this is a very different experience for me. After graduation I plan to work in Tech or Telecom (I had experience in both industries prior to the MBA) but I want to stay in London. Right now I haven’t decided the size of the company or the niche I want to be working in but I am certainly enjoying the start-up environment for now.

Besides this I plan to turn Green It Yourself Now! Into a profitable small business. The aim of the blog is to help people improve their homes, quality of life and contribute to a better environment and we think a small company is suitable for this but we figured out just sharing knowledge is not enough. We have really good content, but it can be time consuming for a reader to apply all our tips. We want to offer a little bit more than tips and help our readers further on improving their homes and saving money on bills.

You can follow Bruna’s journey by checking out her Twitter (@BrunaMoreira87) or by connecting with her on LinkedIn of by checking out her company Green It Yourself Now!. Thank you Bruna for sharing your story with us – we wish you continued success!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school applications, check out our catalog of MBA admissions services.

Do you want to be featured in Accepted’s blog? If you want to share your b-school journey with the world (or at least with our readers), email us at bloggers@accepted.com.

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Related Resources:

• College Students, Recent Grads Interested in Business: London is Calling!, a podcast episode

• 3 Ways to Determine Which B-Schools are a Good Fit for You• Why Study Abroad for Your MBA at All?https://blog.accepted.com/determining-school-fit/

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Diversity and International Innovation at LBS appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Accepted’s Selectivity Index: Are You Asleep When You Apply? [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jun 2017, 08:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Accepted’s Selectivity Index: Are You Asleep When You Apply?
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I once heard a story about a gentleman who was about to purchase a certain piece of land with the intention of building a school on that property. It was wartime, and the theater of war was rapidly approaching the region in which he and the property were located.

A friend heard about his intended investment, and thought his friend had gone nuts.

“How can you make this purchase now? Are you dreaming?” he asked incredulously.

Replied the real estate investor, “I am dreaming, but I am not asleep.”

Although I heard this story in a context far removed from graduate school admissions, I couldn’t help but think that some of you are “asleep” when you apply – at least the first time.

Dreaming while asleep in admissions:

• Applying exclusively to schools where you are not competitive based on the stats and available information.

• Focusing on the one metric where you are either very strong or very weak. Focusing on the one number that either makes you feel great or makes you feel terrible is another form of “applying asleep.” In either case, you fail to choose schools realistically and consequently “invest” poorly in your overall application effort.

• Ignoring weaknesses when applying so that you fail to address or mitigate them.

Applying “awake” while still allowing for your dreams means that you assess your competitiveness at your target schools by comparing your test scores and grades as well as the non-quantitative factors in your profile to the known stats and stated criteria of the schools you want to attend.

Armed with this information, you:

• Apply to a few “dream” schools, but mostly to programs where you are competitive.

• Assess your weaknesses or strengths in the context of your overall application so that you neither obsess over a weakness nor fail to provide positive reasons for acceptance.

• You work to mitigate weaknesses before and during the actual application process while highlighting strengths and creating a strong case for acceptance beyond the stats in your application.

A few of you may be thinking:

“I know my chances aren’t great at my target schools. But I’m working and making good money. It doesn’t pay for me to apply to any but these schools.”

There are some applicants in this situation. It’s true, but there are very few. If you’re one of them, you are applying rationally.  If you aren’t one of them and you could achieve your goals at programs where you are competitive, then well, you may be dozing…

Introducing the Selectivity Index™

Accepted has developed a new tool, the Selectivity Index™, to help you apply realistically and effectively. The Selectivity Index takes the most recent US News rankings data and reflects the schools’ average GPA, test scores, and acceptance rates so that you can assess the relative difficulty of acceptance. You can also order the schools by average test score, GPA or acceptance rate.

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We focused on those key metrics not because they are solely determinative, because they are not, but they do mirror how difficult it is to gain acceptance to a school. They also suggest which schools may be focusing on a particular metric and which may not.

Weaknesses in the Selectivity Index:

1. It doesn’t reflect non-quantitative information, which plays a significant role in holistic admissions and can allow those with non-quantitative strengths to get in when those “more qualified” per the stats are rejected.

2. In doesn’t reflect the schools’ desire for diversity in their classes and community.

3. It doesn’t reflect the importance of showing fit with an individual school’s strengths, mission, and values.

I’m not sure if this is a strength or weakness, but the Selectivity Index does not measure or reflect ROI, educational quality, or career opportunity.

Finally, while the Selectivity Index does reveal the relative level of competition at different programs, it doesn’t excuse you from making sure that the schools where you are competitive also will help you achieve your goals. It does you no good to get into a program that won’t that won’t help you achieve your goals and realize your dreams.

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Related Resources:

• Different Dimensions of Diversity, a podcast episode

6 Tips for Talking About Your Weaknesses

Should You Apply to a Safety School?

Tags: Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post Accepted’s Selectivity Index: Are You Asleep When You Apply? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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A Business Masters Degree is Not a Replacement for an MBA [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jun 2017, 09:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: A Business Masters Degree is Not a Replacement for an MBA
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According to new research by the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC), 75% of prospective graduate business school candidates who participated in the GMAC survey and who already have a master’s degree are considering enrolling in MBA programs. This is true for students with both prior business master’s degrees (61%) and non-business master’s degrees (86%). These statistics are from the 2017 mba.com Prospective Students Survey Report, in which 11,617 students who registered on mba.com between February and December 2016 responded.

The survey findings also demonstrate that globally 22% of potential business school candidates already hold a prior master’s degree. This varies by region: 40% of European candidates have a prior master’s degree, while only 14% of U.S. candidates do.

Here are some additional findings from the survey:

• Globally the number of candidates considering non-MBA Master’s programs, such as Master of Finance, Master of Accounting, and Master in Management, has increased from 15% in 2009 to 23% in 2016. This is especially true for candidates from East and Southeast Asia and Western Europe, where now more than 2 in 5 candidates report considering only these types of programs.

• Non-MBA and MBA programs attract different candidates looking for different outcomes. Non-MBA candidates tend to be younger, most have no previous full-time work experience, and are more interested in developing technical skills. MBA candidates are usually older, have full-time work experience, and are looking to develop their managerial and leadership skills.

• 59% of prospective business school candidates plan to apply to programs outside their country of residence, up from 49% in 2009.

• 63% expect to receive a higher-quality education.

• 58% hope to increase their chance of obtaining international employment.

• 51% plan to expand their international connections.

• 34% plan to look for work in the country where they prefer to attend school.

• 96% of U.S. candidates prefer to study domestically. Among full-time MBA candidates seeking study outside their country of residence, 58% prefer to study in the U.S., down from 61% in 2009. There has been an increase in MBA candidates’ preference to study in Canada since 2009 (4% vs. 7% in 2016).

• Non-U.S. candidates from business master’s programs are also shifting away from the U.S. Since 2009 there has been an increase in interest in applying to business master’s programs in Western Europe (34% in 2016 vs. 30% in 2009); Canada (7% in 2016 vs. 4% in 2009); and East and Southeast Asia (7% in 2016 vs. 4% in 2009).

• The cost of education is the main reservation candidates have about pursuing a graduate business degree. 52% indicate that not having enough money for their education may keep them from getting a graduate degree. The same is true for those concerned about having to take on large debts (47%).

• The two most important financial features that candidates look at when evaluating programs are total tuition costs and available scholarships. On average, candidates now expect to cover a larger share of the cost of their education with grants, fellowships, and scholarships and a smaller share with parental support, loans, and employer-sponsorship compared to 2009.

Click here to download the full report.

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Related Resources:

Why MBA, a free guide

GMAC Releases Results of Year-End Employer Poll

• The CEMS MIM: A Truly International Masters in Management, a podcast episode

Tags: Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post A Business Masters Degree is Not a Replacement for an MBA appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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MBA Admissions Decisions: Should You Go Full-Time Or Part-Time? [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jun 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: MBA Admissions Decisions: Should You Go Full-Time Or Part-Time?
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When I was applying to b-school, I contemplated part-time vs. full-time, and one of my best friends, Colleen, had to make the same decision at the same time.

Ultimately, I decided to attend the full-time program at the University of Michigan. Colleen decided to attend a part-time program at the University of Michigan. We shared 60% of the same classes, 40% of the same professors, and even had a class together. (At the time, Michigan offered courses where they reserved half the registrations for full-time students and half the registrations for part-time students. Since that time, the school has dramatically changed the full-time curriculum and it is unlikely that we would overlap now like we did then.)

I graduated two years before Colleen with a unique internship, an opportunity to begin a new career, and a lot of debt. Colleen advanced quickly with the company that hired her upon our graduation from college and graduated without debt because her company sponsored her education. We both have the same degree.

Now as an Accepted consultant and as a former Admissions Director and Dean of full-time, part-time, and EMBA programs, I lend you my insight and guidance from the other side of the table in this brief analysis of programs.

• Full-time programs

Traditional full-time programs are the media darlings of MBA programs. A school’s reputation relies mostly on its full-time program rankings. They consume the largest portion of the school’s budget, and they rarely make revenue for a school. More than 90% of all scholarships and fellowships are dedicated to full-time students. Full-time programs are perfect for career-changers in the 23-30 year old age range that can afford the opportunity cost of leaving work to immerse themselves in education and experience.

If you choose this experience, you will feel like you are an undergraduate again with clubs and activities, but the workload will be greater. You will have access to on-campus recruiting (I always recommend you conduct your own off-campus job search in parallel with on-campus recruiting), company presentations, fellowships and scholarships, and a lot of fun. Full-time students prioritize the job search and school. Family often gets the short stick, but there are typically resources to support a spouse. If you are single, it’s a great opportunity to form a romantic relationship. My grad school roommate found the love of her life in our core operations course.

• Part-time programs

Part-time programs are the cash cow of MBA programs and have to live in the shadow of their smaller full-time counterpart. They take very few resources, but they often share the same faculty as the full-time program. Many professors would rather teach at night or on the weekend to lighten their teaching load and dedicate their days to research. Schools will also complement the faculty with adjuncts in part-time programs.

Aggregated, the part-time applicant pool is not as competitive or as diverse in terms of admissions as schools typically receive fewer applications, and they are limited to their immediate region and the industries that dominate that industry. Furthermore, schools have the capacity to serve at least as many and often more students than their full-time counterpart.

Part-time programs are perfect for the 24-35 year old career enhancer, but rarely serve the career changer. Part-timers typically do not have the same access to comprehensive career services as full-time programs because company presentations and interviews are typically held during the day. At one school for whom I worked, we dedicated one career services staff member to all of our professional programs (part-time, EMBA, online) serving over 1000 students and five career services staff to the small 200-student full-time program.

Part-time students can often get full or partial sponsorship from their company lessening the financial burden, but do not typically have access to fellowships or scholarships from the school. It typically takes students longer than two years to complete a part-time program, and part-time students prioritize work first, school second, and again, family gets the short end of the stick. Part-time students often feel like the stepchild of the full-time counterparts.

As much as schools say the quality of the full-time students and the part-time students are the same, the quality is dependent on location and how that location generates applications. Bigger cities have an easier time of attracting great applicants to their part-time program and can maintain higher quality standards, but full-time programs generate applications from around the globe and it’s much easier to pick and choose candidates for admission.

• EMBA programs

EMBA programs are also lucrative for schools, but they typically are not as large as full-time programs, and schools charge a premium to attend an EMBA program. They are perfect for students in the 30-year-old to 42-year-old age range that have been supervising employees and that have the support of their executive management to attend a program because executives view these students as fast-trackers in their company. These programs are typically held every other weekend and offer no fellowships or scholarships because schools expect the student’s company to sponsor the student partially or completely. EMBA students typically prioritize work first, family second, and school last. While EMBA students may cross from technical supervisory roles to business supervisory roles in their companies, EMBA programs do not cater to the career changer only the career enhancer. Schools take care of their EMBA students for their tuition premium. However, these students rarely interact with either the part-time or full-time students, but bond well with their cohort and the faculty.

Check out our MBA consulting services, and get matched with an advisor who will help you choose the best program for you!

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By Natalie Grinblatt Epstein, an accomplished Accepted consultant/editor (since 2008) and entrepreneur. Natalie is a former MBA Admissions Dean and Director at Ross, Johnson, and Carey. Want Natalie to help you get accepted to business school? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

• Navigate the MBA Maze, a free guide

The MBA Family Tree: A Roundup & Overview of Different MBA/EMBA Options

Tips for Applying to Part-Time MBA Programs

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post MBA Admissions Decisions: Should You Go Full-Time Or Part-Time? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Your Knowledge of English in Your MBA Admissions Profile [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2017, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Your Knowledge of English in Your MBA Admissions Profile
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In the previous articles of this series we explored the first four elements of your MBA Profile: your Academic Performance, your GMAT, your work experience, and your extracurricular activities. The topic of the last post of this series is probably the most under-rated in business school admissions, and many times the one that non-native English speakers take lightly at their peril: mastery of the English language. The fact that you went to a bilingual school in your home country, or that you use English regularly in your work is not necessarily enough for the level of competence required for your application to a graduate business program.

Unless you completed your undergraduate degree in an English-speaking country, you will need to take one of the English as a Second Language (ESL) tests, such as the TOEFL, PTE, or IELTS, in order to apply to business school. Check which test(s) your target schools accept. Just like the GMAT or GRE, you will need to be familiar with the test well before taking it, and know the minimum score that your chosen schools require for admission.

To show your mastery of the English language, a high score on one of these tests is critical, along with a solid performance on the verbal portion of the GMAT or GRE. You provide further evidence when your essays and the rest of the application are free of grammatical or structural errors. As a non-native English speaker who has vast experience reading, reviewing, evaluating, and now critiquing/editing business school applications and essays, I recommend the following:

1. Significantly increase your reading inEnglish, particularly regarding business issues. You should read every-day publications such as The Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, and The Economist.

2. Read all kinds of books in English. If they are business-related, even better.

3. Watch movies or TV shows in English, listen to the radio, watch videos, listen to podcasts and audiobooks. Use your driving time to listen to audiobooks and podcasts.

4. Participate in blogs, or start your own.

5. If you live in a non-English speaking country, consider online exchange programs to increase your contact with native English speakers and improve your conversational skills. These communities, which are often free, give you the opportunity to interact with another person through Skype or similar software and improve your English, while you help the other party with your native language in exchange. This experience, besides serving as a good language practice, could very well add an interesting twist to your essays or your admissions interviews.

6. Consider joining Toastmasters, or taking advanced English courses, business English or advanced conversation, as a way to improve your written and spoken English.

Even if you have been exposed to the English language from an early age, if you feel your (written or spoken) English is not at the level of graduate school, it’s important that you make an effort to improve it. Most MBA programs require a level of written and verbal comprehension similar to that of a native speaker, and due to the great diversity of the faculty and students coming into their programs, they expect you to understand different accents and participate fluently in the classroom. You will be expected to write, talk, and engage in the program just as your native speaker classmates will, so try to spend some time in the coming months strengthening your mastery of the language.

Do you want a professional guide to help you with your MBA application? Check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages for general counseling, essay editing, interview prep,resume review, and more – one package for every aspect of your application!

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By Esmeralda Cardenal, previously the Associate Director of Admissions at Yale SOM, Director of MBA Admissions at MSU Broad, and consultant at Cardiff Business School in the UK. She is happy to help you showcase your achievements in your MBA application. Want Esmeralda to help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

MBA Action Plan: 6 Steps for the 6 Months Before You Apply, a free guide

MBA Admissions Directors Speak About How to Get Accepted

7 Tips to Jumpstart Your 2018 MBA Mission – Ready, Set, Go!

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Your Knowledge of English in Your MBA Admissions Profile appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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English Language Skills & Your MBA Admissions Profile [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2017, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: English Language Skills & Your MBA Admissions Profile
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In the previous articles of this series we explored the first four elements of your MBA Profile: your Academic Performance, your GMAT, your work experience, and your extracurricular activities. The topic of the last post of this series is probably the most under-rated in business school admissions, and many times the one that non-native English speakers take lightly at their peril: mastery of the English language. The fact that you went to a bilingual school in your home country, or that you use English regularly in your work is not necessarily enough for the level of competence required for your application to a graduate business program.

Unless you completed your undergraduate degree in an English-speaking country, you will need to take one of the English as a Second Language (ESL) tests, such as the TOEFL, PTE, or IELTS, in order to apply to business school. Check which test(s) your target schools accept. Just like the GMAT or GRE, you will need to be familiar with the test well before taking it, and know the minimum score that your chosen schools require for admission.

To show your mastery of the English language, a high score on one of these tests is critical, along with a solid performance on the verbal portion of the GMAT or GRE. You provide further evidence when your essays and the rest of the application are free of grammatical or structural errors. As a non-native English speaker who has vast experience reading, reviewing, evaluating, and now critiquing/editing business school applications and essays, I recommend the following:

1. Significantly increase your reading inEnglish, particularly regarding business issues. You should read every-day publications such as The Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, and The Economist.

2. Read all kinds of books in English. If they are business-related, even better.

3. Watch movies or TV shows in English, listen to the radio, watch videos, listen to podcasts and audiobooks. Use your driving time to listen to audiobooks and podcasts.

4. Participate in blogs, or start your own.

5. If you live in a non-English speaking country, consider online exchange programs to increase your contact with native English speakers and improve your conversational skills. These communities, which are often free, give you the opportunity to interact with another person through Skype or similar software and improve your English, while you help the other party with your native language in exchange. This experience, besides serving as a good language practice, could very well add an interesting twist to your essays or your admissions interviews.

6. Consider joining Toastmasters, or taking advanced English courses, business English or advanced conversation, as a way to improve your written and spoken English.

Even if you have been exposed to the English language from an early age, if you feel your (written or spoken) English is not at the level of graduate school, it’s important that you make an effort to improve it. Most MBA programs require a level of written and verbal comprehension similar to that of a native speaker, and due to the great diversity of the faculty and students coming into their programs, they expect you to understand different accents and participate fluently in the classroom. You will be expected to write, talk, and engage in the program just as your native speaker classmates will, so try to spend some time in the coming months strengthening your mastery of the language.

Do you want a professional guide to help you with your MBA application? Check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages for general counseling, essay editing, interview prep,resume review, and more – one package for every aspect of your application!

Image

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By Esmeralda Cardenal, previously the Associate Director of Admissions at Yale SOM, Director of MBA Admissions at MSU Broad, and consultant at Cardiff Business School in the UK. She is happy to help you showcase your achievements in your MBA application. Want Esmeralda to help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

MBA Action Plan: 6 Steps for the 6 Months Before You Apply, a free guide

MBA Admissions Directors Speak About How to Get Accepted

7 Tips to Jumpstart Your 2018 MBA Mission – Ready, Set, Go!

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post English Language Skills & Your MBA Admissions Profile appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Wharton’s Commitment Project – a Window into Wharton [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jun 2017, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Wharton’s Commitment Project – a Window into Wharton
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Today we’re doing something a little different: a deep dive into a specific program at Wharton. It’s a program that reveals a lot about Wharton’s culture, which also gives us insight into what the Wharton admissions committee is looking for.

Commitment. Purpose. Meaning. These are all terms that are bandied about amidst the fake news, leaks, tweets and headlines that take up so much of our attention. And let’s face it on a personal level, we all have made New Year’s Resolutions that lasted until January 2. However, we’ve also made other commitments, deeper commitments that we stick to. Benjamin Franklin wrote down four resolutions at the age of 20 and they became his “Plan of Conduct” throughout his long life. Franklin also founded the University of Pennsylvania, which is home to the Wharton School and its innovative Commitment Project. And that’s what we’re going to learn about in this show.

Today’s guests are Wharton’s Professor G. Richard Shell and Wharton Commitment.

Project founder Siamak Sarvari. Professor Shell began his professorial career at Wharton in 1986 and became the Thomas Gerrity Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics and Management in 2001. He’s written five books on negotiations, persuasion and personal success and won many, many teaching awards during his career.

Siamak Sarvari earned his bachelors and masters degrees in EE, the latter from the U of Toronto in 2010. He then worked as an engineer and project manager until coming to Wharton in 2015. In winter 2017, he found himself in Prof Shell’s class, and we’re going to learn what followed in just a second.

Professor Shell and Siamak, welcome to Admissions Straight Talk!

Siamak, what is the Wharton Commitment Project? [3:00]

WCP is a student-led initiative to encourage Wharton MBA students to reflect on their personal values, life goals, priorities, and commitments as they complete their graduate education and get ready for their post-MBA life. It’s a simple process: we ask what are your personal commitments as you think about your life beyond Wharton? We invite students to write down up to five commitments (up to 50 characters each). It concludes with a final ceremony where students share their commitments with a partner. WCP also awards a memento to each participant – a metal business card with their commitment inscribed on the back.

Do you have the card? [4:30]

Yes, I have it in my wallet. We also give them a certificate. But the card is a useful reminder.

Professor Shell, from your perspective, what is the WCP? [5:00]

It’s a great initiative, coming out of an evolving Wharton student culture.

Wharton’s famous for being a pathway to Wall St. But the financial crisis created a tectonic shirt – there’s now more of a multifaceted range of aspirations. So I think this part of that evolving student experience.

It’s a bottom-up experience: something students created as a way to highlight their values and goals. And it’s a values-based experience. So it’s addressing a larger interest in having careers be meaningful and finding work-life balance.

I think it’s something really distinctive about Wharton.

How did it come about, Siamak? [8:25]

The idea came to my mind during one of Prof. Shell’s classes – Responsibility in Business. Prof. Shell was talking about commitments and values in business, and mentioned the white coat ceremony, etc. I thought the idea could be applied in business. Many business students will be leaders in various fields, and having something like this that they will remember could be valuable. So I started working on it.

Considering the diverse paths of MBA students, we thought a one-size-fits-all approach wouldn’t work, so we focused on personalization.

The administration at Wharton seems supportive in facilitating student initiatives. Was that your experience? [12:05]

Prof. Shell: Wharton has two distinctive features. One is it’s big – 825 students in a class is a big program. The students who come here knowing it’s a big program tend to take initiative – they’re entrepreneurial in the student culture sense. They’re bubbling with things they want to do.

The impressive thing is the partnership between students, faculty, and staff to create initiatives. This initiative is a classic example of that.

Wharton rewards initiative.

How did this grow out of a course on Responsibility in Business and “success”? [15:50]

Prof. Shell: Faculty at Wharton have a lot of freedom within each course. In my class, I try to use things I use otherwise to reflect on the question of responsibility. So for example I draw in negotiation and use it as a basis to talk about ethics in negotiation.

The part about making value judgments (where WCP comes from) comes from self-judgment and self-control. I’m trying to help them have good judgment and be self-aware, to prepare them for situations when they may be faced with a challenge or pressure to behave badly – to help them understand what their non-negotiable values are.

Siamak, how did it come across to you? [20:20]

The same values we have that guide us to make the right decisions in situations where we could go wrong are the values that guide healthy personal decision making. Value-driven, purposeful living can serve us in many ways.

Professor Shell: I give an assignment where they have to submit (in writing) a statement of something that requires self-control/self-discipline. And then they need to report on how they handle it.

Self-discipline is a muscle – it’s something you need every day. If you’re a good person every day, the ethical challenge is less of an exceptional moment when it comes.

Siamak, can you share some of the popular commitments people made? [24:30]

Everyone uses their own phrasing, but there are common themes:

1. Care for family

2. Invest in personal relationships

3. Give back and serve others

4. Take care of health

5. Continue to learn and grow

Half are focused on the self, and half on others. Is there anything you attribute the different foci to? [25:50]

I think people did a good job thinking through the process – some items focused on family, career, etc. Almost everyone had a mix of their own internal needs and other people.

Prof Shell: I think it’s not surprising to see that balance. The only thing you don’t see in the top five is spiritual commitment.

You’ll face situations in your life when your commitments are in tension or conflict, and thinking about your values ahead of time helps you be ready to make decisions.

How does WCP reflect the culture at Wharton? [32:50]

Siamak: Both in how it came together and the commitments/results, it reflects the culture.

Wharton has a very entrepreneurial and student-driven culture. Everyone is so supportive of what you want to do as a student – whether you want to learn about a new industry or start a new initiative.

The commitments also reflect the culture. Wharton is diverse, collegial, and supportive. I’ve seen how students interviewing for the same job support each other during recruiting. They go out of their way to pay it forward when supporting the incoming class. So I wasn’t surprised to see those values reflected in the commitments.

Prof. Shell: At any business school, there’s always been some people who are there basically to stamp their passports, and others who take the experience more seriously. Since the financial crisis, the number of people taking it really seriously is on the rise.

What is the “lifetime partner” component of the WCP program? [38:38]

Each participant shares their commitment with another person, and commits to checking in each year whether they’ve followed through. It’s an accountability provision.

Where does WCP go from here? [40:00]

Siamak: Hopefully it will continue to grow and be something every class of Wharton MBAs does before graduation.

It’s supported by the administration. It’s now officially part of the McNulty Leadership Program, but will be run by students each year. We have three enthusiastic first years who will lead it next year.

I hope I will look back in 10-20 years and see it has grown and made a positive impact in people’s lives.

Thirty-five percent of the class participated in year one, which is great.

Aside from being bright, what are the common threads you see in the student body? [43:30]

Prof. Shell: Other than the change that we’ve been getting a broader range of interests – the level of maturity has gone up. Students are bringing a lot of responsibility with them. And interest in entrepreneurship has really increased.

This podcast is geared to applicants. For each of you what would you like applicants to take away from this show about Wharton’s Commitment Project? [46:10]

Siamak: Life is short, so focus on how you want to live it.

Wharton will provide the platform to facilitate the decision process, but you have to do it on your own. Wharton will provide the springboard.

Prof. Shell: We’re looking for students who know who we are.

We’re looking for students who see the opportunity to be at Wharton as transformative. If all they’re going to do is party for two years to put a gold star in their passport, they don’t need an MBA. But if they want the responsibility that comes with being at Wharton and being a Wharton MBA, serious people go, have a good time, and have amazing opportunities to learn and grow.

Any advice for applicants? [50:05]

Siamak: Take your essays very seriously. Take the time to think deeply about your short and long-term goals. That will help you in meaningful ways for years to come. That introspection will help you when you get to campus. I can’t emphasize that enough!

Have a list of priorities before you get to campus – what you want to get out of your MBA. There are endless opportunities at a school like Wharton.

Prof. Shell: Don’t limit yourself to thinking there are only two to three schools worth going to. Pick a school that’s going to fit you – not just on its brand identity.

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Related Links:

Wharton Commitment Project

Ben Franklin’s Four Commitments AKA Plan for Future Conduct

Wharton Commitment Project on Facebook

• Wharton 2016-17 Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• Get Accepted to Wharton [on-demand webinar]

• University of Pennsylvania Wharton B-School Zone

Related Shows:

• From Rwanda to Wharton to West Coast Start-Up: MP Davis’ Story

• From Wall St to Wharton, While Starting Wall Street Oasis

• Wharton MBA Student, Single Mom, Entrepreneur

The Lauder Institute Changes to Reflect the World

• A Wharton Grad Rids the World of Bank Fees

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, MBA Admissions

The post Wharton’s Commitment Project – a Window into Wharton [Episode 210] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Michigan Ross MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jun 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Michigan Ross MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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Ross is shaking things up this year. It has different essay questions (requiring very short answers) and a more traditional goals question, but all is different from previous years. Why? Here’s what Ross says about the change:

“We want to get to know more about you than we would in a traditional essay where you’d talk at length about one topic. You’ll get to share different sides of yourself that will be relevant to your experience during business school.”

And the short answer questions definitely provide you with the means to paint a more colorful, multi-dimensional picture of yourself than you could with last year’s essay questions. Keep that reasoning in mind as you respond. You don’t have to be something you’re not or be weird, but you can certainly use these questions to provide context to events described elsewhere and different perspective on who you really are. Remember, the application is a way for the admissions committee to meet you.

My tips are in blue below.

Part 1: Short Answer Questions

Select one prompt from each group. Respond to your selected prompts using 100 words or fewer (<100 words each; 300 words total).

While I wish Ross would have given you more room to answer these questions, make the most of what you’ve got here. The first question you’re going to have to answer is “Which prompts should I respond to?” Answer the question in each group that is easiest for to answer and that allows you to present events and experiences that complement each other and the information provided in other parts of the application. You want to minimize duplication and overlap.

Ross hasn’t labeled the groups thematically. It seems to me that Group 1 is an opportunity for you to talk about something you’re proud of — a contribution you made, an achievement. Group 2 relates to overcoming and bouncing back from a difficult experience or failure. And Group 3 is about you interacting with others. Again, choose the individual questions that allow you to present yourself best.

Think much more about what you want Ross to know about you as you choose what to answer. The questions tells you what they want to know. Now answer it in such a way that allows you to tell them what you want them to know.

Group 1

• I want people to know that I:

• I turned an idea into action when I:

• I made a difference when I:

Group 2

• I showed my resilience when I:

• I was humbled when:

• I am out of my comfort zone when:

Group 3

I was aware that I am different when:

I find it challenging when people:

A valuable thing I have taught someone is:

Given the 100-word limit on each response to these behavioral questions, spend most of the 100 words describing the incident, and if you have room, consider including some analysis. For example why you “want them to know” about X (Group 1, #1)  or what was the motivation behind your initiative for the second two questions in group 1.

Part 2: Essay

Please share your short-term and long-term career goals. What skills/strengths do you have that will be relevant to your career goals? How will Ross prepare you for your goals? (300 words)

In previous years, some applicants wrote about their long-term career goals. Others wrote about their immediate plans after B-school. We want to learn about both. So, we thought we’d ask you to spell it out.

In the second part of the career goal essay (re: skills/strengths) you don’t have to show that you have the experience needed to pursue a particular career goal. We want to know that you understand the skills that are important for your desired career. Recruiters assess whether you’re able to bring relevant skills/strengths to the table, so we do the same.

Some of the skills and knowledge you’ll need will be developed during your time in the MBA program, but students are more successful in their career search if they understand the skills required to succeed in their chosen field.

The final part of the question allows you to demonstrate your research on Ross and the experiences, knowledge, and skills you’ll develop here. We want to know how you see Ross helping you achieve your goals.

This is somewhat similar to Ross’ Essay 2 last year, but not identical. Ross is very clear in what it’s asking for: Your short- and long-term career goals, the skills you have developed already to prepare you for this path, and how Ross will complete the preparation. In other words, what are the gaps in your education and experience that Ross will fill in and that need to be filled in to achieve your goals?

The question, especially with the additional explanation is pretty straightforward. The word limit will make it difficult to go into any depth. You could start with a “day in the life” that you foresee after your MBA and how you intend to get there. Alternatively, you could start with an achievement or challenge that you faced and how it has influenced your goals while at the same time revealing gaps in your education and experience that the Ross MBA will close. You could also just answer the questions in the order posed, but that could get a little dull and also be what most people do.

Optional Statement

This section should only be used to convey information not addressed elsewhere in your application, for example, completion of supplemental coursework, employment gaps, academic issues, etc. Feel free to use bullet points where appropriate.

Use this statement if necessary to provide context surrounding circumstances that affected your performance or that may lead admissions readers to the wrong conclusion about your abilities.

Ross doesn’t provide a word limit, but keep it short

If you would like professional guidance with your Michigan Ross MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Michigan Ross MBA application.

Michigan Ross 2018 Application Deadlines:

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***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your MBA Application Essays, a free guide

• Make a Difference at Michigan Ross: An Interview with Soojin Kwon [Episode 185]

• How to Write About Overcoming Challenges Without Sounding Like a Whiner

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Georgetown Announces New Dean for McDonough School of Business [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jun 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Georgetown Announces New Dean for McDonough School of Business
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Georgetown University has announced that Paul Almeida, Ph.D. has been named Dean and William R. Berkley Chair of McDonough School of Business. His tenure will begin on August 1, 2017.

Almeida came to Georgetown in 1995 when he served as Senior Associate Dean for Executive Programs. He was then appointed Deputy Dean for Executive Education and Innovation in 2016. He also serves as Professor of Strategy and International Business. Almeida is considered an expert in business innovation, knowledge management, and alliances, in addition to information collaborations across firms and countries. He has received many awards for teaching, service, and research, including recognition as Georgetown’s “Outstanding Professor, Executive MBA Award” seven times.

According to Georgetown University President John J. DeGioia, “Throughout his tenure at Georgetown, Paul has exemplified a commitment to principled leadership, instilling a global mindset focused on service to others into each program and project he oversees. I am deeply grateful for his willingness to serve our entire university community as dean of the McDonough School of Business.”

Almeida heads the academic and administrative sectors of six executive degree programs, including the Global MBA he cofounded with the School of Foreign Service and ESADE Business School; the Executive Master’s in Leadership program customized for the D.C. public school principals and executives; and the M.S. in Finance, which is McDonough’s first tech-enhanced program.

During his term, McDonough’s executive degree and custom programs have consistently received high rankings. The Financial Times’ most recent rankings listed the Executive MBA as first in the world for international business and the Global Executive MBA program as fifth. The executive custom programs were ranked fourth in the U.S.

In his position of deputy dean, Almeida runs the school’s new Innovation Initiative, which strives to more deeply assimilate Georgetown’s Catholic and Jesuit values into the school; expand technology-based learning; leverage the school’s location in Washington, D.C.; and boost organizational excellence. “I was educated in Jesuit schools as a child, and I carry the lessons I learned in my youth with me every day, often drawing upon them in my own classroom,” Almeida says. “It is an honor to now have the opportunity to lead a school that is rooted in both excellence and educating students to be successful in the world and for the world.”

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Related Resources:

Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One

A McDonough MBA Student’s Take on Journalism & Social Responsibility

3 Ways to Determine Which B-Schools are a Good Fit for You

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Get Accepted to Stanford GSB Webinar Now Available On-Demand! [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jun 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Get Accepted to Stanford GSB Webinar Now Available On-Demand!
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If you missed Get Accepted to Stanford GSB, or if you’d like to view it again, the webinar is now available on-demand.

As you prepare for next year’s applications, learn the key strategies you need to approach Stanford’s application successfully.

How can you show that you’re a perfect fit?

How can you ensure your application will stand out?

How can you give yourself the best possible chance of acceptance?

Let Accepted’s Founder Linda Abraham provide you with a proven strategic framework for a successful application: View the webinar now.

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Get Accepted to Stanford GSB Webinar Now Available On-Demand! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Emory Goizueta Business School MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jun 2017, 08:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Emory Goizueta Business School MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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Taken together, these essay questions cover a lot of ground: your professional path and plans, your alignment with the program’s core values, and your unique individuality. Moreover, this vast ground is covered in few words – these essays are short, requiring tough decisions about what key points and anecdotes to include and what to leave out. Write simply and directly to pack as much meaning and impact as possible into each word. Most important: the three key questions require thoughtful reflection.

Essays:

Answer all essays, following the directions indicated in the questions. NOTE: Applicants who apply to more than one MBA program will only complete the essay question requirement related to their first-program preference.

Essay 1.

Define your short-term post-MBA career goals. How are your professional strengths, past experience and personal attributes aligned with these goals? (300 word limit)

This question invites you to define your short-term goals in three dimensions: your past experience, your skills, and your unique character. Yet, with only 300 words, you can’t give a comprehensive, detailed delineation of those elements. I suggest discussing one point from each category that is relevant to your goals. The key to making this part of the essay work is specificity, detail, and anecdote – e.g. don’t just explain how you have a charismatic personality that brings people together; show through a brief anecdote how it lets you be the “glue” in a rough-and-tumble team. Then discuss directly the relevance of this quality to your short-term goal. The question’s emphasis on short-term goals suggests practicality and concreteness: what (type of) position and in what industry, to achieve what, and why (and, sometimes, where).

Essay 2.

The business school is named for Roberto C. Goizueta, former Chairman and CEO of The Coca-Cola Company, who led the organization for 16 years, extending its global reach, quadrupling consumption, building brand responsibility, and creating unprecedented shareholder wealth. Mr. Goizueta’s core values guide us in educating Principled Leaders for Global Enterprise. Provide an example of your leadership – professional or personal – and explain what you learned about yourself through the experience. (300 word limit)

I suggest addressing this question as a story (a very succinct story): describe a time you led in a situation of some significance. Walk through it straightforwardly, focusing on your actions. In a final, brief paragraph reflect on what this leadership experience taught you about yourself; don’t list ten things, but rather focus on the one to two most meaningful.

To select the best topic or experience to portray, look for something that is fairly recent and that has a clear impact. While most people will want to grab this opportunity to showcase their impact at work, it may make sense to select a non-work story if, for example, it reflects a situation or experience that truly distinguishes you in a relevant way and illustrates substantial leadership as well. Think strategically in selecting the topic and choose one that enhances your overall application and adds to the information found elsewhere.

Essay 3.

Complete one of the following statements. (250 word limit)

• I am passionate about…

• The best piece of advice I’ve received is…

• The best day of my life was…

• A personal goal I want to accomplish is…

First, which question should you respond to? The one you will find easiest to answer in an engaging, enthusiastic, and authentic way. The one that will best complement the rest of your application by illuminating something fresh about you. It wouldn’t hurt to select something that might surprise the reader a bit; e.g., you’re a total tech nerd and your great-aunt urges you to take up knitting. Ideally your answer to this question will leave the reader with a little smile on her face.

Essay 4.

Share with the committee and your future classmates a fun or noteworthy fact about you. (25 word limit)

Align this short essay with essay three above – it’s another opportunity to round out your profile. This one can be work or non-work related.

Be natural in your tone – don’t strain to sound “fun” if it doesn’t come naturally to you in writing, and don’t hold back if it does.

Optional Essay.

If you have additional information or feel there are extenuating circumstances which you would like to share with the MBA Admissions Committee (i.e. unexplained gaps in work experience, choice of recommenders, academic performance issues or areas of weakness in application). (Please limit your response to 250 words.)

You can of course use this essay solely to address an extenuating circumstance. If you don’t need it for that purpose, if there is something you believe would add to your case for admissions that is not covered in the rest of the application, write about it here. Focus on one facet of your life or an experience that is important to you, reveals the human being you are, and isn’t described in other parts of the application.

Re-Applicant Essays.

Applicants who have applied to Goizueta Business School in the past are required to answer the following questions:

1. Define your short-term post-MBA career goals. How are your professional strengths, past experience and personal attributes aligned with these goals? (300 word limit)

See tip for Essay 1 above. If your goal has changed since the previous application, explain why.

2. Explain how you have improved your candidacy for Goizueta Business School’s MBA Program since your last application. (250 word limit)

This is THE key question for all MBA reapplicants. Goizueta just asks it explicitly. See MBA Reapplication 101 for more advice.

You may also submit the optional essay if you wish.

If you would like professional guidance with your Emory Goizueta application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Emory Goizueta application.

Deadlines:

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***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

• Why MBA?, A Guide to Writing About MBA Goals

• Optional Essays: When and How to Write Them, short video

School Specific MBA Essay Tips

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Emory Goizueta Business School MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Get Accepted to Stanford GSB Webinar Now Available On-Demand! [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jun 2017, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Get Accepted to Stanford GSB Webinar Now Available On-Demand!
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If you missed Get Accepted to Stanford GSB, or if you’d like to view it again, the webinar is now available on-demand.

As you prepare for next year’s applications, learn the key strategies you need to approach Stanford’s application successfully.

How can you show that you’re a perfect fit?

How can you ensure your application will stand out?

How can you give yourself the best possible chance of acceptance?

Let Accepted’s Founder Linda Abraham provide you with a proven strategic framework for a successful application: View the webinar now.

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Get Accepted to Stanford GSB Webinar Now Available On-Demand! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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What Harvard Business School is Looking For: The Habit Of Leadership [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jun 2017, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: What Harvard Business School is Looking For: The Habit Of Leadership
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This is the first post in our series, What HBS is Looking For.

Thank you, Harvard Business School. IMHO, that’s what applicants should think when they visit the program’s website and find “habit of leadership” on its “Who are we looking for?” admissions page.

It’s common knowledge that HBS values leadership, but with this phrase, the adcom succinctly expresses how they view leadership – dynamic, deep, intrinsic, long-term. It’s something you possess and bring to your experiences, not something that describes your involvement in isolated situations (i.e., the proverbial “leadership experience”). Not just HBS applicants, but all b-school applicants can benefit from reflecting on the phrase – and then determining how they embody it in their actions.

There are a gazillion excellent articles and treatises on the meaning of leadership. Many if not most of them are valid – it’s a concept that’s inherently contextual. I’m focusing on the other word. The key to this message is habit.

First, it’s active. It’s something done. It’s not something bestowed upon you (like the title Team Lead) and it’s not something ascended to (advanced to Project Manager). Whether good or bad, habits are something you do.

Second, a habit is reflexive, a part of you. You may think about it objectively in your mind, but it’s also behavior. Yet that doesn’t automatically mean it’s innate – a habit may be learned (you probably know someone who trained herself to become more patient or more decisive or less defensive). Therefore, if you aren’t a “born leader,” you can still develop the habit of leadership.

A habit knows no boundaries. You exercise the habit of leadership in school, in your family, with friends, at work, in your community. It means that when something needs doing or when you perceive an opportunity for positive impact, you shift into gear to make it happen – even if it’s hard, even if it’s not your designated role, even if you’re not sure exactly how you’ll do it. Simply, it’s what you do.

Because it’s action oriented, not title or ego oriented, the habit of leadership, ironically, may sometimes seem invisible, a hidden force. Routine and regular. Example: your friends, tired after a long day of canoeing on the Delaware River, squabble about where to go for dinner. You gently draw the group’s focus to the two most feasible options, proposed by two different members of the group; everyone starts to feel enthusiastic again. They may not consciously recognize your leadership; in fact, the person who proposed the “winning” idea might feel like the leader! (More irony: real leadership often allows others to feel like the top dog.) Of course, the opposite is also true sometimes: your leadership habit may require you to visibly assert an opposing vision or emphatically convince people to join you in taking a risk.

While this quality is something HBS explicitly seeks, any b-school adcom will value it – after all, someone with “leadership experience” isn’t necessarily a leader fundamentally, but someone with the “habit of leadership” is. All b-schools want leaders.

Having the habit of leadership is great, but it’s only helpful to the application if you express it effectively. That means – you’ve heard it from us ad infinitum – use examples and anecdotes. Look for opportunities to portray your habit of leadership, even in essays on other topics. Also, try to bring it out in your resume and your interviews. Ask your recommenders to highlight it. It can only enhance your application and your candidacy.

Work with an experienced admissions consultant who will guide you as you mine your experiences and then craft an application that demonstrates the habit of leadership that HBS is seeking.   

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

Leadership in Admissions, a free guide

Harvard Business School 2017-18 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

4 Traits That (Most) HBS Students Share

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post What Harvard Business School is Looking For: The Habit Of Leadership appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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GMAT Exam Updated to Offer Greater Control and Flexibility [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jun 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: GMAT Exam Updated to Offer Greater Control and Flexibility
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The Graduate Management Admissions Council (GMAC) announced the inauguration of Select Section Order, a new feature that will allow candidates to customize their GMAT experience by selecting the order in which they feel most comfortable taking the exam. Select Section Order will be offered to test takers worldwide beginning July 11, 2017.

According to Ashok Sarathy, VP Product Management at GMAC, “The idea of being allowed to choose the section order has been commonly requested by test takers. We conducted a pilot in 2016 to test this feature and received overwhelmingly positive feedback, with 85% of participants surveyed expressing that this new feature boosted their confidence prior to even taking the exam. Our pilot findings also concluded that taking the exam in different section orders continues to maintain the quality and integrity of the GMAT scores.”

Test takers will choose their desired section order at the test center on exam day, immediately before the start of the exam. The options for section order are:

Analytical Writing Assessment, Integrated Reasoning, Quantitative, Verbal (original order)

• Verbal, Quantitative, Integrated Reasoning, Analytical Writing Assessment

• Quantitative, Verbal, Integrated Reasoning, Analytical Writing Assessment

How to Choose Your Order

We spoke to Rich Carriero from Next Step Test Prep and asked him what we thought was the next obvious question: How should test-takers make this decision? Here’s what he shared with us:

“First – and this will be the more common – you have students who only really need to achieve the highest score possible on their quant/verbal scaled score. Typically students in this position will still need to keep their IR and AWA scores respectable but they are afterthoughts compared with the 200-800 score. For this type of student, the logical approach is to take the test in decreasing order of strength and preference.

“If you are strongest on quantitative, do that first while you have the most energy and attention. Squeeze as many points out of your strongest section as you possibly can to compensate for your weaker section. The only risk to this approach is a student having too much nervous energy – like a baseball pitcher who is too pumped up – and making careless mistakes. But paying attention to detail and avoiding mistakes is always the paramount concern when it comes to quant and verbal anyway.

“The other scenario is the student who has to achieve certain sub-scores across the board. If particular scores are more important to your application chances, then you should take the test in order of importance, again, approaching the preferred topics when you have the most energy and attention.

“Finally, I would caution anyone who is taking the test soon after July 11th and has been studying for some time up to this point to consider very carefully whether or not they want to take the test using an alternative section order. If you’ve been practicing the traditional section order for months and are achieving your target scores with it, I’d think long and hard about changing your approach. Certainly anyone who is contemplating the change should make a point of taking a few practice tests in their preferred order to see how it feels.”

GMAC’s Efforts to Improve the Test-Taking Experience

Since 2014 GMAC has taken various steps to improve test takers’ GMAT experience, including:

• Introducing GMAT Score Preview which allows test takers to preview their unofficial scores before deciding whether to report or cancel them

• Introducing GMAT Enhanced Score Report, which gives test takers access to an in-depth breakdown of their overall GMAT performance

• Removing cancelled scores from school reports

• Reducing the retake period from 31 days to 16

• Enabling test takers to access their official score report online using their date of birth in place of an authentication code

Sarathy further stated, “The GMAT exam shows business schools that the test taker is serious about earning a graduate business degree and demonstrates the individual’s commitment and readiness for the rigors of a graduate business program. Today 9 out of 10 new MBA enrollments at the top 50 US full-time MBA programs are made using the GMAT score.”

Look for GMAT scores to continue rising.

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Related Resources:

• The GMAT and Your MBA Admissions Profile

• Low GMAT Score? Don’t Panic…Yet.

• The GMAT and the Law of Diminishing Returns

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post GMAT Exam Updated to Offer Greater Control and Flexibility appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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UC Berkeley Haas MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jun 2017, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: UC Berkeley Haas MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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My comments are in blue throughout. The black font represents quotes from Haas, which provides excellent resources and advice on its web site. In a nutshell, Haas kept the basic structure of its app similar to last year’s, but really changed the essay questions, #1 in a dramatic way. Essay 1 is entirely new and distinctive among MBA essay questions. Please see below.

Essays help us learn about who you are as a person and how you will fit with our community. We seek candidates from a broad range of industries, backgrounds, and cultures. Our distinctive culture is defined by four key principles – Question the Status Quo, Confidence Without Attitude, Students Always, and Beyond Yourself. We encourage you to reflect on your experiences, values, and passions so that you may craft thoughtful and authentic responses that demonstrate your fit with our program – culturally, academically, and professionally.

Below are the required essay and optional essays for Fall 2018.

Required Essays:

Essay 1

Tell us a six-word story that reflects a memorable experience in your life-to-date. Elaborate on why it is meaningful to you. (250 words maximum)

Tip: A successful six-word story will pique the reader’s interest in the forthcoming explanation. Together, the story and explanation will share a specific and personal experience that helps the reader get to know you better, giving insight into your character, values, or how you would uniquely contribute to the Berkeley-Haas community. View sample six-word stories and video tips from the admissions committee.

First off, I strongly encourage you to watch the video and review the examples linked to above. Then follow these steps:

1. Think about what you want Haas to know about you that isn’t covered in the other essays or information that you provide. Realize that by asking this question, Haas is seeking to get to know you better. They want to glean “insight into your character, values, and how you will contribute to the Berkeley-Haas community.” This is a great place to show fit with Haas and its Four Principles (or at least some of them).

2. Then choose the six words that best reflect this memorable experience, and perhaps make them curious to know more. Haas says contractions are OK, and perfect grammar isn’t necessary. The “what” clearly isn’t nearly as important as the “why.”

3. The elaboration – the why – is where the rubber meets the road in this question. You may have to briefly provide context so the reader will know what you’re talking about and elaborate on the significance of those six words. Most of those 250 words should be devoted to why the event is important and the meaning you ascribe to it.

Please note that the six words and subsequent elaboration are supposed to focus on one experience, not your whole life or several experiences.

Essay 2

Respond to one of the following prompts: (250 words maximum)

• Describe a significant obstacle you have encountered and how it has impacted you.

• Describe how you have cultivated a diverse and inclusive culture.

• Describe a leadership experience and how you made a positive and lasting impact.

Tip: Responses can draw from professional or personal experiences. Through your response, the admissions committee hopes to gain insight into your achievements, involvement, and leadership footprint.

These prompts are all new this year, but like last year, you select the prompt you want to respond to.

First decision: Which to choose? Select the one that you can answer most easily and enthusiastically and that complements the other essays and information found elsewhere in your application. Please note that the first and third prompts are asking for one experience or one obstacle. While the second prompt isn’t as specific, the pattern in Haas’ questions suggests that they would prefer an experiential focus to your response. In most places in the application, Haas seeks an example that you find meaningful and illustrative of how you approach situations and events. They want a window into how you act and think. Whatever option you choose, answer the question in full.

Try to choose an event that illustrates you identifying with at least one of Haas’ Four Principles.

Essay 3

1. Briefly describe your immediate post-MBA career goals. (50 words maximum)

2. How have prior experiences motivated and prepared you to pursue these goals? (250 words maximum)

Tip: You are encouraged to reflect on both what you want to do professionally after business school and why this path interests you.

Last year’s Essay 3 was also a goals question, but it was less structured and specific, and gave you a little more room.

For #1, focus on the function you want to perform and the industry in which you want to perform it. If geography is relevant, include it. Note that this question is about your “immediate” post-MBA goal, not long-term.

For #2, focus on what is motivating you to pursue this goal and how past experiences have prepared you to achieve it. One possible approach: start with an achievement and then discuss how this experience reflects both your preparation for this kind of work and your motivation.

Optional Essay

Use this essay to share information that is not presented elsewhere in the application, for example:

• Explanation of employment gaps or academic aberrations

• Quantitative abilities

• For re-applicants, improvements to your candidacy

Haas isn’t restrictive in terms of its optional question, but its examples suggest that the admissions committee is not seeking info about an unusual hobby or personal challenge. They seem to prefer context for possible issues in your application. If you want to go beyond that to the unusual hobby, distinctive achievement or personal challenge not discussed elsewhere, it’s a judgment call.

If you would like professional guidance with your UC Berkeley Haas application, check out Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Haas application.

2018 Application Deadlines:

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***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsExploring the Haas MBA: An Interview with Peter Johnson, podcast episode

• Which B-School is the Best for You?

• Admissions Tip: BE YOURSELF!

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post UC Berkeley Haas MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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What’s the Trick to an HBS Acceptance? [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jun 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: What’s the Trick to an HBS Acceptance?
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If you’re planning to apply to Harvard Business School, you’re no doubt busy – balancing your professional responsibilities with family and community commitments, all while researching b-schools and prepping for your applications. You’re a multitasker and a leader. But how can you be sure you’re doing all you can to ensure your HBS application is as strong as it can be?

When you’re targeting elite MBA programs, strategy matters. There’s no trick – no special sauce, no magic wand. Just hard work and a solid strategy. That’s where we come in.

We’ve coached thousands of applicants just like you to acceptance at the programs of their dreams. Now we’ve distilled that expertise into our info-packed, one-hour webinar, Get Accepted to Harvard Business School, that will give you the tools to approach your HBS application strategically. Learn what HBS is looking for, how you can show you “fit,” and how you can make your application stand out in a competitive field. All in just one hour!

The webinar is free, but you must reserve your space.

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post What’s the Trick to an HBS Acceptance? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Showing You Can Do the Work [Fitting In & Standing Out] [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Showing You Can Do the Work [Fitting In & Standing Out]
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Two key goals of every application reflect a tension if not an actual conflict: you must show the admissions committee that you fit in – that you’re a perfect fit with their program and the exact type of candidate they’re looking for – while simultaneously showing that you stand out in the pool of qualified applicants. Over the next few posts, we’ll give you 4 key tips to help you fit in and stand out as an applicant.

For today, the first step to fitting in: showing that you can do the work and excel in your target program.

Can You Get the Job Done?

Grad and professional school programs want to admit students who are ready to do the work the program requires. If you aren’t ready for the rigor of the program, you will be neither a happy student nor a successful alum. So the first step to “fitting in” an applicant pool is to demonstrate that you have the intellectual/academic ability to do the work. As NYU Stern Associate Dean of MBA Admissions Isser Gallogly said in an Admissions Straight Talk podcast, “We want academic excellence….We’re looking for students who can thrive.”

How Can You Show This Ability to Thrive?

Most straightforwardly, through your academic record and test scores. Ideally you want to be at or above your target programs’ averages for both GPA and test scores. Or at worst, only a little below that average.

Some programs have additional considerations or academic requirements – for example, certain courses (medical school pre-reqs) or skills (foreign languages, computer skills, work experience for MBA programs, clinical exposure for medical schools), and if you want to be taken seriously as an applicant, you will have those skills and pre-reqs on your record.

What if Your Stats Aren’t High Enough?

• If the issue is your test score (GRE, GMAT, MCAT, LSAT, etc.), consider retaking the exam. Most, but not all, graduate programs weigh most heavily or exclusively your highest score. For these programs, retaking the exam and raising your score is the best response to a score that doesn’t represent your abilities fairly.

• If it’s your undergrad GPA that’s concerning you, a high test score (and excellent research/work experience, brilliant recommendations, etc.) can mitigate it. Depending on your field, you can also consider taking additional courses (and getting great grades in them) to prepare for grad school.

Demonstrating your academic ability is just the first step to fitting in – it is necessary, but not sufficient. In our next post in this series, I’ll discuss how to show you’re a fit with the mission and culture of your target school.

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Related Resources:

From Example to Exemplary, a guide to writing outstanding application essays

5 A’s for Your Low GPA, a podcast episode

How to Show Fit in Your Application Essays, a podcast episode

Tags: College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Showing You Can Do the Work [Fitting In & Standing Out] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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Showing You Can Do the Work [Fitting In & Standing Out]   [#permalink] 22 Jun 2017, 08:01

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