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8 Tips for Better Admissions Resumes [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 8 Tips for Better Admissions Resumes
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Looking for solid tips for the actual writing of your resume? What should you include? What should you leave out? What sort of tone should you use? What do you need to know? The following eight tips will guide you towards creating an impressive, persuasive, accurate resume:

1. Know your target program’s mission.

The best way to convince the admissions board to offer you a spot in their next class is to understand the goals and mission of their program. Before starting your resume, you should learn as much as possible about what sorts of candidates your program seeks. Then, customize your resume toreflect the aspects of your background that are most relevant to the program you are applying to.

2. Know yourself professionally – your skills and your accomplishments.

What skills are you particularly good at? What accomplishments are you proudest of? What have you achieved that gained you the most recognition? Interview yourself and inventory your previous jobs, the skills you acquired, and your “greatest hits” as a professional – the times when you contributed to your organization the most. Look through your formal performance reviews for glowing appraisals, scan your work files for successes you may have forgotten about, or keep a personal career folder where you keep track of new skills you’ve learned or the comments of happy customers.

Additional questions to consider: Do you fill a role traditionally filled by someone much older than you? Have you become one of only a few to transition to a coveted department or role? Have you earned awards for your work that far surpass the average rate of recognition? You can list these types of data points in a Highlights section at the top of your document.

3. Stand out personally.

Fight negative stereotypes about your profession to show that you are exceptional. If you are an accountant, admissions committees tend to assume you are risk averse, so you need to add material that shows some of the bigger risks you’ve taken: entrepreneurial efforts, motorcycle racing, etc. If you’re a finance type, you might be perceived as conceited or aloof, so you should be sure to include evidence of your social skills and humility: community service efforts, mentoring, etc.

4. Be concrete, specific, quantitative.

Don’t say “Developed e-commerce plan that was selected for implementation” when you mean “Designed $5 million e-commerce strategy that increased revenues by 12% and attracted six new clients.” If you work for a private company and can’t disclose revenue figures, refer to percentage increases or improvements or cite the improved industry ranking of the organization’s product or performance as a result of your contribution. Think of numbers and other hard details as the proof that you can deliver.

5. Know how far back to go.

As a general rule, if you are applying to graduate school and have at least two years of work experience, your high school activities should not be included in your resume. However, there are exceptions to this rule. For example, if you won a prestigious national award in high school, you may consider including this important recognition.

6. Know your negatives.

The vast majority of us have screwed up once or twice in our careers: been downsized, locked in a dead-end job, or just failed to work to our full potential for a time. You can’t lie about these career plateaus (see Tip #7) but you can present them in the best possible light so you have the chance to explain them fully if they come up during the interview. It all starts with your resume. With the right strategy you can deal with everything from typecasting and job- hopping to limited experience and unemployment.

7. Don’t lie.

Making up degrees, accomplishments, and other personal and professional facts is always a bad idea. Don’t do it – it’s unethical and potentially self-destructive. Adcoms won’t hesitate to show students to the door when they learn their resume is more fiction than fact. But less brazen forms of dishonesty should also stay far from your resume. For example, if you were one of six members of a team of managers with equal rank and responsibility, don’t say you “Served as lead of six-member management team.”

8. Be strategically creative.

No, we don’t mean using DayGlo ink or faux marble resume paper. We do mean bringing to the preparation of your resume the same capacity for thinking outside the box that you bring to your career. For example, if the traditional chronological resume will bury your best material near the bottom, consider using a “functional” resume format or even a combination of the chronological and the functional. Similarly, if you paid for your entire college education, add a line mentioning this in your resume’s education section. Want to let the adcom know that you’re from a minority group without committing the no-no of adding a personal data section? Add a memberships section to your resume and include the name of community organizations (for example, “South Asian Business Alliance of Ohio”) you belong to so adcom readers know what groups you identify with.

The logic underlying all of these points is that your resume is not just a list of your experiences – it is a strategically assembled document that shows your impact and makes a case for what a great fit you will be in your target program.

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Related Resources:

Leadership in Admissions, a free guide

How to Write the Qualifications Summary for Your Resume

What Should I Write About? Making a Difference

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post 8 Tips for Better Admissions Resumes appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Stanford Reliance Dhirubhai Fellowship Application Essays [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Stanford Reliance Dhirubhai Fellowship Application Essays
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Indian students considering applying to the Stanford MBA program should check out the Reliance Dhirubhai Fellowship. The scholarship covers all tuition and associated fees for up to 5 Indian students to attend Stanford GSB, and the top 50 finalists for the Fellowship will even receive a break on applying – submitting Stanford’s application for free. The Fellowship’s application process has already begun and registration will end on June 7th, so if you are considering applying to Stanford this year, be sure to complete the application soon.

Successful Fellowship applicants will need to demonstrate excellent academics and career progress plus a strong commitment to India’s development (financial need is also a factor). The Fellowship application is short, asking for educational history, test scores, employment history, a CV, financial information, and only one short essay of 250 words or less: “[b]How do you aspire to shape India’s future?“[/b]

Two-hundred and fifty words is not a lot of space, so I recommend that your past leadership experiences be detailed well in the CV to leave this brief essay solely to your vision for the future: In what areas do you aim to make the greatest headway? How do you plan to undertake that effort? What goals do you aspire to and how do you intend to help India reach them within the next 10 to 20 years?

Obviously, goals based upon previous experiences and involvement will strike the Fellowship’s review committee as the most authentic, so take the time to identify what areas of development are truly the most important in your eyes and share your passion through this essay. Once the top 50 finalists for the Fellowship are selected, they will proceed to complete the regular Stanford application.

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

If you would like professional guidance with your Knight-Hennessy application, please consider Accepted’s essay consulting and editing, which can be used for strategic guidance, essay and resume editing, and interview coaching for the Reliance Dhirubhai Fellowship application.

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Jennifer Bloom has been a consultant with Accepted for 17 years and is a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW). She is an expert at crafting application materials that truly differentiate you from the rest of the driven applicant pool. If you would like help with your application, Jennifer can suggest a number of options that work with any budget. Want Jennifer to help you get accepted? Click here!

Related Resources:

• Stanford GSB Zone

Different Dimensions of Diversity, a podcast episode

• Having Trouble Securing a Loan for Your International MBA?

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Stanford Reliance Dhirubhai Fellowship Application Essays appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
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Kudos [?]: 581 [0], given: 74

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MBA Letters Of Recommendation: Who, When, What, Where & How [#permalink]

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New post 21 May 2017, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: MBA Letters Of Recommendation: Who, When, What, Where & How
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Selecting your recommenders requires a strategy. I like to begin with the basics: Who, When, What, Where, and How. I also like to suggest that you waive your right to access it. The waiver makes the recommendation more credible to the admissions committee.

Who?

Who are the best people to address the questions the schools are asking? Who are the best people to affirm what you say and also add information that you don’t have the chance to include in your application essays?

Many schools ask that a supervisor writes your LOR, and while that is ideal, there are times when you just can’t ask a supervisor for a letter. If you find yourself in that situation, you’ll need an explanation. For example, “I asked my mentor [instead of my supervisor] to write my recommendation because she knows my leadership, drive, and work ethic better than anyone else I know.” Or, “I’ve asked a former supervisor to write my recommendation letter because asking my current supervisor would jeopardize my current project/promotion.” Or, “I’ve asked a supplier to write my recommendation because my supervisor has only been on board for one month and I’ve known my supplier for three years.” Regardless, develop a strong relationship with your recommender prior to “the ask.”

When?

It’s best to ask your recommender to write the letter at least six weeks prior to your anticipated date of submission. Everyone will face delays, so allow for them. Six weeks should give your recommender enough time to:

1. Review your preparation materials (see What? below)

2. Meet with the recommender for the request (in person if possible)

3. Meet again to give the packet of information that you will provide

4. Meet again to answer any questions the recommender may have for you

What?

Many schools ask similar questions, but it is best to use the unique e-form each school provides the recommender and answer the questions the school asks. You will add the recommenders’ contact information on your application, and the school will send your recommender a link. Many of these documents can be written in Word and then uploaded.

Regardless of how the letter is delivered, you need to give your recommender a packet of information to use to help them answer the questions. Often the questions will ask about your leadership in relation to your peers or when did your recommender offer you criticism and how did you receive the criticism? This latter question has been problematic for many recommenders. I suggest that the recommender think about the question in a different way: rather than thinking about a weakness, think about a time the recommender “offered the candidate advice and how did the candidate act on that advice.”

A letter of recommendation is not your annual review; it’s your recommendation. Your recommender may even ask you to write the letter, and they’ll just sign it when you’re done. You need to stand your ground and say, “the school really wants your honest perspective, and I would be so grateful to you for your original work.”

However, you can coach your recommender by providing a list of the schools you are applying to and the reasons why, a copy of your resume, your goals statement, and additional items you want your recommender to cover (like your achievements or items that you can’t cover in your essays but that your recommender can elaborate on, like your affinity for paragliding or your talent with the cello).

You can also ask your recommender to highlight achievements that may counteract a negative – like your communications skills if you have a low verbal score or a quantitative achievement if you have a low quant score.

I know when I write letters for my former students, having this information will remind me of the great things that the student did for the school or for me. It gives me the launching point to tell a story.

All the statements a recommender makes should be backed up with evidence (a story) to make it more interesting and hammer home the point of the recommendation.

Many recommendations also offer grids. Your recommender should be honest.

Where?

If your recommender says they don’t have the time to write the recommendation, I’ve suggested my clients book a one hour appointment (after they give the packet of materials needed to write the recommendation) and then call the recommender and say that they’d like to use this hour to write the recommendation. You can also offer to do things like pick up dry cleaning or groceries, walk the dog, or drive carpool to make time in your recommenders’ schedule to write the letter. Regardless, they need at least one hour of quiet time to get this right.

How?

If your recommender says that they can’t write a strong letter for you, you need to find another recommender. If they enthusiastically say “yes!” make the task easy for them by giving them the packet (as mentioned in the What? section).

Check out our Letter of Recommendation assistance service if you have other questions regarding your recommendations, and good luck!

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By Natalie Grinblatt Epstein, an accomplished Accepted consultant/editor (since 2008) and entrepreneur. Natalie is a former MBA Admissions Dean and Director at Ross, Johnson, and Carey. Want Natalie to help you get accepted to business school? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

Leadership in Admissions, a free guide

MBA Letters of Recommendation – 10 Tips for Recommenders

How Not to Ask for a Letter of Recommendation

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post MBA Letters Of Recommendation: Who, When, What, Where & How appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans [Application Essa [#permalink]

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New post 21 May 2017, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans [Application Essay Tips]
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Paul Soros was often overshadowed by his younger brother, financial wizard George Soros, but he was a millionaire in his own right. In contrast to George Soros’s success in the financial industry, Paul Soros made his mark on the world by innovating in the shipping industry, filing patents, winning several engineering awards, and innovating in everything from loading methods to shipping routes. Complementing Paul’s background, his wife Daisy Soros studied interior design and has been a lifelong supporter of the arts. Paul and Daisy Soros both immigrated from Hungary in the wake of World War II, so it is only fitting that the fellowship for graduate education that they founded supports young, first-generation Americans. The Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowships provide half of the annual tuition (up to $20,000) plus a $25,000 stipend to each of 30 Fellows each year.

In addition to age and immigration status requirements, the criteria for the Soros Fellowship are threefold:

1. Creativity and initiative

2. Proven drive and sustained effort

3. A demonstrated commitment to the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights.

Some examples of how this year’s Fellows exemplified these values include developing a product to keep musical instruments clean, founding a science education outreach program for underserved populations, publishing 10 mathematics research papers, and analyzing the human genome for genetic factors in cardiovascular disease. The Fellowship aims to support students whose graduate study will propel them to even greater contributions to society.

The Soros Fellowship application allows uploading of a resume, 2 essays, and optional exhibits – copies of your artwork or articles written about your work, for example. In addition, the application requires 3 letters of recommendation, with the option to submit up to 5 recommendations. The Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans is open now and due by November 1, 2017. Applicants may apply for the Fellowship as they work on their graduate school applications; there is no need to wait until you are accepted for graduate study.

Here are the Soros Fellowship application essay questions, with my guidance in blue.

1. Tell us about your experiences as a New American. Whether as an immigrant yourself, or as a child of immigrants, how have your experiences as a New American informed and shaped who you are and your accomplishments?

Feel free to discuss how individual people (such as family or teachers), institutions, aspects of law, culture, society or American governance made an impact on your life as an immigrant or child of immigrants. The program is especially interested in understanding and contextualizing your accomplishments, be they personal, professional, or academic. (Maximum length: 1000 words)

In guidance from the Fellowship committee, applicants are advised to use this space to share stories that provide a window into their world as a new American, and many Fellows find that talking with their parents about their childhood challenges and triumphs helped them illuminate the most salient lessons and experiences for this essay.

As immigrants and the children of immigrants, what opportunities and rights did you gain in the U.S. that you would not have enjoyed in your parents’ native country? How did that insight influence you? Alternatively, were you challenged by those differences and how did that challenge influence your direction, perspective, and actions? Essays that share the depth of your feelings and not just your actions will resonate most intensely with the Fellowship committee.

2. Tell us about your current and near-term career-related activities and goals, as well as why you decided to pursue the specific graduate program(s) and school(s) that you have. How do you see your current work and study informing your early career goals? If you have not been accepted into a program yet, please tell us about why you selected the programs to which you are applying. (Maximum length: 1000 words)

This essay will be much less personal and possibly unrelated to your new American experience as you discuss your academic interests and ambitions. The thinking that you do for this essay will be helpful in writing your statement of purpose or goals essay for the master’s programs and vice versa. Often, it helps for applicants to write about the questions for which they are seeking answers, the tasks they would like to do well, and the missions they would like to contribute to. This discussion then provides an easy segue into how graduate study will prepare them for those roles. With 1000 words, you will also have plenty of room to add details about how you have pursued those answers thus far, providing an additional opportunity to demonstrate that you are a good fit with the Soros Fellowship’s search for creative, driven, persistent, and committed new Americans.

While there is space to upload up to 5 optional Exhibits, these are considered supplementary to the application, and the admissions committee is not required to review all of them. Therefore, place the most compelling evidence of your talent and fit with the Fellowship first to capture their interest and, hopefully, encourage them to continue perusing that opus.

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

If you would like professional guidance with your Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans application, please consider Accepted’s essay editing, which include advising, editing, a resume edit and interview coaching for the Fellowship application.

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Jennifer Bloom has been a consultant with Accepted for 17 years and is a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW). She is an expert at crafting application materials that truly differentiate you from the rest of the driven applicant pool. If you would like help with your application, Jennifer can suggest a number of options that work with any budget. Want Jennifer to help you get accepted? Click here!
 

Related Resources:

Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans: Funding, Community for Immigrants, a podcast interview

Different Dimensions of Diversity, a podcast episode

3 Tips for Showing Strengths in Your Application Essays

Tags: Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans [Application Essay Tips] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

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NYU Stern Unveils New Tech MBA and Fashion & Luxury MBA One-Year Progr [#permalink]

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New post 23 May 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: NYU Stern Unveils New Tech MBA and Fashion & Luxury MBA One-Year Programs
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New York University’s Stern School of Business’s new Tech MBA and Fashion & Luxury MBAs will enable students who are firmly committed to business careers in those areas to build applicable skills and knowledge, gain relevant real-world experience, and earn an MBA in one year by taking 51 credits over the 12-month period. The first class for the Tech MBA and Fashion & Luxury MBA will enroll at Stern in May 2018. Stern anticipates that the inaugural classes will have 30 students in each specialty.

The program is made up of four parts: a business core, a tech or fashion & luxury core; real-world experiential learning projects with organizations in the respective specialty areas; and electives.

Stern has offered experiential learning projects to its MBA students for more than 15 years by matching students with faculty to help an organization solve a real business challenge in real time. By establishing the new focused MBAs which will incorporate real-world business projects as a vital part of the curriculum, Stern is raising its commitment to experiential learning and branding it Stern Solutions.

Business leaders from such giants as Amazon, BuzzFeed, Citigroup, and General Catalyst helped Stern develop these programs, and are among the members of the newly-formed Advisory Boards. They will all partner on future Stern Solution projects.

The Tech MBA is intended for business candidates with strong technical backgrounds and will prepare students to further their careers in Product Management, FinTech, and Tech Entrepreneurship across a variety of industries. The program’s tech core was designed with NYU’s Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences. NYU Stern’s large faculty of computer and data scientists will also be brought into the Tech MBA.

Stern is the first business school in the U.S. to offer a Fashion & Luxury MBA. This program is intended for students with a commitment to management roles in such sectors as:

• Accessories

• Apparel

• Beauty

• Jewelry

• High-end automotive

• Fine wines and spirits

• Real estate

• Wearable tech

They will also be able to use the Stern Fashion Lab, a new central hub being started for industry-related projects and networking for all Stern students.

According to Raghu Sundaram, Vice Dean for MBA Programs and Online Learning, “Stern’s Tech MBA and Fashion & Luxury MBA are intentionally designed for a specific type of MBA candidate, one with a definitive career focus and a passion for these fields. These new MBAs provide broad exposure to core business areas with a depth of focus on the specialty area through an efficient schedule, reducing the opportunity cost with a more affordable MBA option.”

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Related Resources:

NYU Stern B-School Zone

Get an NYU Stern MBA: Interview with Admissions Dean Isser Gallogly, a podcast episode

How Can You Show Passion in Admissions?

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post NYU Stern Unveils New Tech MBA and Fashion & Luxury MBA One-Year Programs appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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Harvard Business School MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 24 May 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Harvard Business School MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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HBS must have liked the responses to last year’s excellent essay question. This year’s question is the same. Indeed there is very little change in the broad strokes of HBS’ application this year. The essay is again required and there is NO word limit.

The deadlines are only slightly different from last year. The Round 1 deadline is Sept. 6, 2017, one day earlier than last year.

My tips are in blue below.

There is one question for the Class of 2020:

As we review your application, what more would you like us to know as we consider your candidacy for the Harvard Business School MBA program?

There is no word limit for this question. We think you know what guidance we’re going to give here. Don’t overthink, overcraft and overwrite. Just answer the question in clear language that those of us who don’t know your world can understand.

Before you begin to write I have two suggestions for you:

1. Review Harvard’s criteria for admission.

2. Watch the embedded video on the case method at HBS.

[youtube2]p>

If you would like professional guidance with your Harvard Business School application, check out Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the HBS application.

2018 Application Deadlines:http://blog.accepted.com/resources/mba-admissions/mba-essay-tip-posts/

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***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsWhat Is Harvard Business School Looking For?

• HBX CORe: Teaching the Language of Business, podcast

• 4 Traits That (Most) HBS Students Share

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Harvard Business School MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
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UCLA's MS in Business Analytics: Prep for the Sexiest Job of the 21st  [#permalink]

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New post 24 May 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: UCLA's MS in Business Analytics: Prep for the Sexiest Job of the 21st Century
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Are you a quant jock with a bit of a poet in you? Learn about UCLA Anderson’s new MS in Business Analytics!

Harvard Business Review declared in 2012 that being a data scientist is the “sexiest job of the 21st century.” Glassdoor last year claimed it’s the “best job of the year.” And in a February Business Insider article, Dr. Andrew Chamberlain, Glassdoor’s chief economist said, “It’s one of the hottest and fastest growing jobs we’re seeing right now.”

Enter UCLA Anderson’s MS in Business Analytics and its newly appointed executive director, Paul Brandano. Paul earned his MBA from UCLA Anderson in Management and Marketing in 2006. After earning his MBA he worked for IBM becoming a Business Analytics Software Specialist before returning to Anderson to serve as the Executive Director for Marketing of Management Field Study Programs. This month, he became the Executive Director of Anderson’s new Masters of Science in Business Analytics – and that’s the program we’re going to discuss today. Welcome, Paul!

Can you give us an overview – what is the MS in Business Analytics at Anderson? [1:50]

Business Analytics has been part of our MBA program for a long time – in every one of our programs, quantitative analysis is a component (marketing, finance, operations, etc). But when you look at the world today, the data is growing, and the demand for an increasingly complex set of analytics is increasing with it. The tools for analysis also grow, and you get a very complex environment.

When I was at IBM, I saw there was often a gap in the marketplace between the people in IT who understood the technologies, and the managers who were looking for that real-time feedback. We see an opportunity to create a liaison – a person with an MS and the analytical training and skills to understand new technologies, with real business communication as a foundation.

What does the program consist of? [3:50]

It’s a 13-month MS program. We wanted it technically oriented. Students start with a five-week intensive course (off-site, asynchronous). This is focused on making sure you have the skills to be successful – you take four courses in that first five weeks to acquire a strong business/technical foundation.

Then there are two full (10 week) quarters of courses, followed by a summer internship, then a final fall quarter on campus before going on to your first job.

Courses include: fundamentals of business; data management; prescriptive modeling; and an industry seminar each quarter (including case studies).

What are the options for the industry seminar? [6:36]

We’re initially focusing on internet, entertainment, and healthcare. These are areas where big data technologies are being applied each day, and where data scientists are in high demand.

We also have many centers on campus focused on these (and other) key industry areas.

If you look at Anderson as a school, we differentiate on that practical/experiential learning component – every student will have done something in the real world, working for a real company.

Business Analytics is a mushrooming field. What’s distinctive about UCLA’s program? [8:50]

We specifically put it in the business school. Business analytics programs can often be in the engineering school, the CS department, stats, etc.

I mentioned earlier that gap in business practice between IT and business – we saw an opportunity to put it in the heart of our business school. Our faculty wanted to draw on advanced quantitative methods, and it was a great fit.

What are you looking for in the admissions process? [10:00]

A person who is first and foremost a quant – who has a tremendous skill set. But they have to have a bit of a poet in them as well – they have to understand the nature of business, and create unique insights that can be communicated to a CEO, CFO, chief of marketing. So they need to communicate well. And they need to be able to take complex unstructured data-sets and turn them into new and better decision-making on the part of a company – so there’s a bit of artistry in it.

We’re looking for someone who did really well on the quantitative side of the GMAT/GRE.

What about work experience – is it required? Preferred? [12:50]

We’re primarily looking for strong quantitative aptitude and an interest in business. There isn’t necessarily a work requirement – if you have a strong computer science background, we believe you can be successful right out of undergrad and we take a certain number right out of undergrad.

If we were to be approached by someone who wanted to retool after some years of work experience in IT, we’d definitely consider that person.

Most of our applicants are probably one to two years out of undergrad. But it’s wonderful to have people with more work experience, too. Our answer will evolve as the program grows.

We’re looking to bring in as diverse a class as possible.

What is the application process? [15:05]

We’re admitting our first class for the fall.

Go on our website, register for an info session. You apply online. There are two essays (and a third optional essay). The topics are standard – why MSBA, why UCLA Anderson, why now? And a personal history statement. We ask for test scores, undergrad educational experience (transcripts, international diplomas, etc). Pretty standard things.

We’ll be down-selecting the pool to a group that we’ll interview – we’re looking to make offers quickly, and have a class in place by mid-summer. We start in November.

What is your target class size – both this year and ultimately? [17:33]

Space is always our limiting factor. I expect our first year’s class to be around 25-50 students, growing up to 60-65. A useful comparison is our sister program, the Masters in Financial Engineering, which grew steadily and then opened a second section.

How many do you plan to interview? [19:00]

It depends on the fit of the applicants. But about twice as many as we accept.

What is the interview like? [19:50]

It’ll be one to one, typically audio only. We’ll ask quantitative questions.

How does the MS in Business Analytics differ from a MS in Stats? [20:45]

The spectrum of applications for a MS in Stats is probably broader, since you can use that in a lab setting or as a stepping stone to other science fields. We’re seeing this through a business filter – so we’re taking a business oriented approach to the questions.

We’ll use similar tools you might learn in a stats or applied math degree – but with a business orientation/application.

How do the field placements work? [22:25]

This program will allow our students to apply their skills in real time to customer questions.

A client could come to us with data and our teams would pull datasets together with new insights. Our capstones will be oriented at companies no matter the size or type – helping create new insights.

What is next year’s application timeline? [28:05]

We’ll be following a traditional MS tour timeline – getting on the road to meet with people in early fall.

We’ll open in three rounds next year: one deadline probably in late October, one in the winter, and one in May.

This timeline will be a great advantage for us next year.

We want to be as precise as possible in our search – we’re building a program for the right skillsets. I see it almost like an athletic coach recruiting exactly the right people for a team.

I should also say that internet, entertainment, and healthcare are really a starting point – every industry is thinking about these questions. We anticipate demand all over the place.

Is there any discussion about a joint MBA-MSBA? [30:50]

There’s no official discussion, but we’ve spoken about the connection points. We already have joint programs between the MBA and other degrees at UCLA, so it’s something to think about.

We’re starting out with a pure fulltime program. But in the future it would be in our interest to think about our connection points.

Any advice for people interested in applying next year? [33:46]

Look at what this program is really about and think about your interests. It’s a short time-frame – just 13 months. So it’s helpful to come in with some idea about how you might apply your skill set – how you want to impact the world with your degree/skills.

This is a program we’ve built over a long period of time. It started with discussions with faculty about tools they were using, and developed with conversations about jobs/recruiting.

It’s a really compelling story as we’re getting ready to launch our first class.

For those of you who are more interested in the MBA than the MSBA, join us for Get Accepted to Stanford GSB at either 10 AM OR 5 PM PT on June 7. The webinar is free, but you do need to register!

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Related Links:

UCLA Anderson’s Masters of Business Analytics

P&Q on Anderson’s MSBA

Introducing MIT Sloan’s New Master of Business Analytics Degree

UCLA Anderson MBA Essay Tips

Related Shows:

Get Into IE, A Business School with a Program for Everyone

Contemplating a Career in Data Science/Business Analytics?

Entrepreneurship at UCLA Anderson

UVA MS in Global Commerce: 3 Continents, 2 Masters, 1 Amazing Year

How To Think Like A Dean Of Admissions

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post UCLA’s MS in Business Analytics: Prep for the Sexiest Job of the 21st Century [Episode 208] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Do You Have What Stanford’s Looking For? [#permalink]

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New post 24 May 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Do You Have What Stanford’s Looking For?
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If you’re planning to apply to Stanford GSB, you know your application must be exceptional: when you’re competing for a spot at a top program that only accepts about 6% of its applicants, you need to stand out!

How can you make a great case for admission?

Step one: show that you’re a great fit.

And step two: be a stand-out!

Of course, there are other key strategies along the way – that’s why we’ve created our free webinar, Get Accepted to Stanford GSB, to guide you through a proven framework for application success. And because we know your time is valuable, we’ve packed it all into just one hour.

Join us on June 7, 2017 – the webinar is free, but you must reserve your spot!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Do You Have What Stanford’s Looking For? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Understanding Stanford GSB’s Core Value of Intellectual Vitality [#permalink]

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New post 25 May 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Understanding Stanford GSB’s Core Value of Intellectual Vitality
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Do you have the smarts that Stanford GSB is looking for? What are the qualities that Stanford GSB is looking for as they build their class? How do successful applicants stand out from the crowd? At a school as competitive as Stanford, it’s a fact that many smart, accomplished applicants won’t get in—so how can you demonstrate that you have that “it” factor? Let us walk you through Stanford’s evaluation criteria and give you some advice.

Criteria #1: Intellectual Vitality

You’re smart. But this isn’t about smart. Most of the people Stanford GSB rejects are smart (usually very smart). A person of average IQ may have enormous intellectual vitality, while a person with a stratospheric IQ may have scant intellectual vitality. Pretty much everyone uses their raw intellect, whatever its degree, in practical application – to get things done. People with intellectual vitality do that and more:

• They nurture and refine their raw intellect to make it a powerful force that draws them to explore new and challenging territory; to question and probe. They turn it into energy (something vital, as in – yes – vitality).  Now that’s attitude! (Attitude being part of intellectual vitality, per the website.) No wonder Stanford wants it.

Let’s parse it further. Here are 5 key components (separated for discussion purposes only, as they’re interconnected).

1. Zest for ideas.

When you encounter a new or challenging idea, you’re tantalized. You have to find out more. What does it really mean? Where did it come from? And how, and why? You relish ideas for their inherent meaning and for their potential implications; they’re alive to you. You value them as a new lens to see through.

2. Dynamic, engaged mind.

You’re always mentally comparing and contrasting, probing limits and boundaries, seeing overlaps between disparate points and differences between similar ones. To you, an event is not static, but rather part of a continuum, with a history to explore and future ramifications to consider. You never take things at face value!

3. But why…?

When you were a child, you probably were told you’re too curious. But curiosity underpins intellectual vitality. It drives you to learn more and more and more about something, to set off on thrilling learning journeys. (And you sometimes snag other people along for the ride!)

4. The reasons behind what you believe and what you do.

Back to ideas – they animate you. Whether you’re politically conservative, moderate, or liberal, you’re not that way because your family or friends are, but because you’re interested in and think about the issues – from multiple angles – and come to certain conclusions. Your thought process informs your decisions, beliefs, actions.

5. Open, as in unafraid.

So, you have your beliefs, your ideas. But you don’t hide behind them. You welcome them being challenged – it’s actually… fun. Intellectual fun. And you challenge back, thoughtfully. You’re a skillful devil’s advocate, able to argue from multiple perspectives, even ones you personally disagree with. You relish discerning what drives and underlies opposing ideas and beliefs (there’s that curiosity again).

Hopefully the above points make clear that intellectual vitality is not something ponderous – it’s a thrill! Yes, it engages matters of seriousness and gravity. But it’s fundamentally invigorating. It fuels you. And it scintillates others.

Now, how do you let Stanford know you have it? The application essays are the perfect venue for showcasing this quality – integrate it into anecdotes, details, and reflections. If you are invited to interview, that’s an ideal place to demonstrate intellectual vitality.

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Cindy Tokumitsu  has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted to Stanford GSB? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

Stanford School of Business Zone Page

Stanford GSB 2018 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• Valentine’s Day, Economics, and Stanford GSB, podcast

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Understanding Stanford GSB’s Core Value of Intellectual Vitality appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Yale SOM MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 25 May 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Yale SOM MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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As you did for the last two years applying to Yale SOM, you need to make the most of its single required essay, but you also need to take the time to make every box in the application a home run. They are not after-thoughts. Your job descriptions and activity history are very important. Write and edit them carefully. Focus on achievements. Quantify when possible and keep in mind Yale’s commitment to “educating leaders for business and society.”

My tips are in blue.

[b]Essay Question:[/b]

Describe the biggest commitment you have ever made. (500 words maximum)

This essay would do really well with an anecdotal response telling the story of the commitment you made. What was the challenge or problem that triggered this commitment. How did you follow up? What were the results? Did you solve that initial problem or successful achieve your goals in meeting that challenge? You can start with the moment of challenge or the moment of triumph. If you choose the latter, then go back, provide context, and tell your story of commitment, resolve, hurdles overcome, and challenge handled. If the impact has lasted — on you and others — say so.

 If you would like professional guidance with your Yale MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Yale SOM application. 

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

Yale SOM 2017-18 Deadlines:

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your MBA Application Essays, a free guide

• Bruce DelMonico on The Yale School of Management, a podcast episode

• How to Write About Overcoming Challenges Without Sounding Like a Whiner

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Yale SOM MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Admissions Resumes: Putting it All Together [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Admissions Resumes: Putting it All Together
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This post is taken from The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes. Click here to download the full guide.

MBA and other graduate school applicants frequently submit a resume with their applications. Many schools require it, and some schools, such as Columbia Business School, even specify a given format. The resume not only will present a valuable context for your other materials, but it also will give the adcom readers an easy point of reference as they read your essays.

To use the resume strategically in the application, you must align it with your essays. First, follow the basic rules of good resume writing for your application resume. Beyond that, there are several points to consider in preparing your resume for your graduate school applications:

1. Approach your application holistically.

The resume can free up space in your essays. By summarizing your experience, responsibilities, and achievements in the resume, you don’t have to worry about cramming every noteworthy item into your essays or sketching out your career path. Rather, you can be very selective and detailed in the experiences you do elaborate on in the essays. These two components, the essays and the resume, should complement each other rather than being redundant. When they harmonize, they sharpen your message and give both depth and breadth to your application.

2. Be consistent in your resume and essays.

Refer to companies, job titles, departments, technologies, and other items in the same way in both pieces. Not only does this practice prevent confusion, it also heightens the unity and coherence of the overall application.

3. Use your resume to highlight your strengths.

Review your essays and determine whether there are particular skills, abilities, talents, or experiences that you should reinforce. Then use your resume to do so. For example, if your verbal score was low, presumably you demonstrated your verbal skills in your essays. Use the resume to further strengthen the impression of strong verbal skills.

4. Use your goals to anchor your application essays and statements of purpose.

Everything you write, including your resume, should directly or indirectly relate to your goals. In selecting the experiences and accomplishments to highlight, give the resume a slant that reflects your goals.

No matter what field you’re studying or what type or degree you’re applying for, your resume is a crucial part of your application package. Work with an admissions expert to create a personalized resume strategy that will help you get accepted! Check out our Admissions Resume Services. 

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Related Resources:

Stand Out! A Critical Goal for Your Application, a podcast episode

Leadership in Admissions, a free guide

Write a Resume That is Readable, Impactful, and Unique

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Admissions Resumes: Putting it All Together appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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How an MBA from Anderson Helped this Career Switcher [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: How an MBA from Anderson Helped this Career Switcher
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This interview is the latest in an Accepted blog series featuring interviews with business students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top programs. Here’s a talk with James about his experience at UCLA Anderson. We first met James three years ago – you can find that post here.

Accepted: Welcome back, James! For those who haven’t read your previous interviews, can you tell us a little about yourself? Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad? Where did you go to business school?

James: For sure! My name is James Huntington. For a while now, I have been blogging as MBAreapplicant84, but recently switched the name over to MBA Afterlife. I was born in Okinawa, Japan, and lived there from about eight years. Other than that, I primarily grew up in California. I actually dropped out of high school when I was 16, but somehow made my way to Brigham Young University for my undergrad.

Since it had been awhile since I had lived in Japan, and I really wanted to reconnect with that part of my life, I decide to study Japanese Language & Literature during my time at BYU. I went to business school at UCLA Anderson. Before Anderson, I worked for 6 years, the last 2+ years as a Senior Operations Analyst at Goldman Sachs.

Accepted: What was your favorite thing about UCLA Anderson? And if you could change one thing about the program, what would it be?

James: There are so many things that I loved about UCLA Anderson. The students were great, the academic experience was solid, and I definitely can’t complain about the location (I have three kids and I took them to Disneyland 50+ times during the two years we lived in LA). That being said, my favorite thing, or rather the most important thing for me, was being able to do several part-time/academic internships during the school year, in addition to my summer internship. This was without a doubt the reason I was able to make the dramatic career shift from finance/operations to tech/marketing. It’s not something the school markets enough in my opinion. The start-up and overall business scene in LA is fantastic, and because of the connections and experience I was able to gain, by the time I was interviewing for full-time marketing roles, I had an entire year of marketing experience under my belt, not just a 10-week summer internship.

If I could change one thing about the program it would have been the timing when we started first-year. Anderson at the time started almost a month after most other business schools, so we had to work extra hard to get up to speed with recruiting. That being said, I know Anderson just this past year moved up the start date quite a bit to help students hit the ground running.

Accepted: Can you share some advice to incoming students, to help make their adjustment to b-school easier? What do you wish you would’ve known when you started the program?

James: Growing up, for me good grades equaled academic success. Just like many of my classmates, we were all used to pushing ourselves to do well in our classes. I think the toughest initial adjustment I had when starting b-school was realizing that, while I wanted to do well in my classes, success was more than just good grades. A 4.0 doesn’t guarantee a great internship or an ideal job. Finding a balance between academics, recruiting, networking, and socializing was crucial. The faster you can find balance, the better off you will be.

Also, with so much going on, you are definitely going to experience some FOMO (fear of missing out). But a lot of what is going on may just be a distraction to whatever your goal is in b-school. For me it was about being able to successfully make a career transition. I would recommend seriously evaluating anything that you do that isn’t helping you work towards that goal. When I got focused, I started experience the opposite of FOMO… JOMO (joy of missing out). I was happy when I was working on things that mattered to me and wasn’t allowing myself to be distracted by all the other noise. That being said, make time for fun and don’t take things too seriously.

Accepted: Looking back, what was the most challenging aspect of the b-school admissions process? How did you approach that challenge and overcome it?

James: My work experience was a bit all over the place (retail management to e-comm operations to investment banking ops). I also wasn’t completely clear on what I wanted to do after business school. In hindsight, there was a lot I should have done and figured out before I went to school. Both of those things made it very difficult for me to tell a really tight story with my application. This is something I learned was vital to a good application while I was a student admissions interviewer at Anderson.

It was hard to overcome this. It took a lot of introspection and evaluating of my skills and experience, and figuring out how it aligned with my post-MBA goals. It was hard to fight the tendency to want to highlight every cool thing I had ever done, but there were a lot of things that wouldn’t strengthen my story, they would have just confused it. I had to be disciplined about highlighting the points that strengthened my story and stripping away the ones that didn’t. I think the best way to think about it is: Where do you want to go? What are the skills you need to get there? What are the applicable skills that you already have? How are you going to gain the skills that you need?

Accepted: Now that you’ve graduated, what are you up to?

James: Since graduating, my family and I have moved from Los Angeles up to the Seattle area. I am working as a Digital/Content Marketing Manager at Microsoft. I have been in my role for almost a year now and am really enjoying it. I am also doing some freelance writing and graphic design. Other than that, my three boys (ages 8, 5, and 2) keep me busy with baseball, legos, and 3-on-1 wrestling matches. Image

Accepted: What role, if any, did UCLA Anderson have in securing your position at Microsoft?

James: UCLA Anderson played an absolutely crucial role in my securing a position at Microsoft. The Anderson brand and the connection the school has with great companies like Microsoft opened the door. Academics combined with the internships/consulting projects I was able to do while at Anderson prepared me with the skills I needed to make the career transition I did. The Anderson alumni network helped me to better understand what to expect from working at a place like Microsoft. Finally, the Parker Career Management Center (which I can’t speak highly enough about) helped me do a ton of introspection so I could figure out what direction I wanted to take my career, and then ultimately prepare me to be successful when I interviewed. Could I have gotten to where I am right now without Anderson or an MBA? Maybe, but certainly not as fast as I did.

Accepted: Lastly, do you have any other advice for our business school applicant readers?

James: Start preparing early. Try to figure out as fast as you can the direction you want to take your career. That being said, stay open, because you will have possibilities and opportunities you didn’t even know would be possible or existed opened up for you. Take control of your MBA experience and your career. An MBA from a top school doesn’t guarantee a great job. Be willing to work hard and put in the time to build the skills that you will need to make you successful. Finally, don’t get caught up in the idea of a “dream job” or “dream company.” There are a ton of jobs and companies you could work for and be happy. Instead, focus more on building skills and cultivating a passion that will drive you in the long-term. I am not happy simply because I have a job at a great tech company like Microsoft. I find satisfaction in my career because I have the opportunity to grow and build out my writing, graphic design, and communication skills – things that I really enjoy. Working at Microsoft is just the cherry on top.

Take the time to figure out what you enjoy doing. I think “follow your passion” is terrible advice, because it supposes that everyone has a pre-determined “passion.” I never really had a passion that seemed applicable to a career. I don’t know about you, if I were to have followed that advice, I would be reading, watching football, and surfing all day long. I like the idea of following your curiosity more. Find what you are interested in. Explore that. Grow that skills. Then when you have earned the right to be skilled at something, you can call it your passion.

You can keep up with James’ journey by checking out his blog MBA Afterlife, following him on Twitter (@iamjameskenichi), or by connecting with him on LinkedIn. Thank you James for your time and advice – we wish you continued success!

For one-on-one guidance on your med school applications, check out our catalog of MBA admissions services.

Do you want to be featured in Accepted’s blog? If you want to share your b-school journey with the world (or at least with our readers), email us at bloggers@accepted.com.

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Related Resources:

• What MBA Hiring Managers Look For

• Exactly What Are Goals?

• Academic Performance in Your MBA Admissions Profile

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Understanding Stanford GSB’s Take on Demonstrated Leadership Potential [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Understanding Stanford GSB’s Take on Demonstrated Leadership Potential
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What are the qualities that Stanford GSB is looking for as they build their class? How do successful applicants stand out from the crowd? At a school as competitive as Stanford, it’s a fact that many smart, accomplished applicants won’t get in—so how can you demonstrate that you have that “it” factor? Let us walk you through Stanford’s evaluation criteria and give you some advice.

Of course, Stanford GSB seeks demonstrated leadership potential – don’t all b-schools? And naturally you’ve got leadership, or you wouldn’t be applying to Stanford.

But. There are some unique nuances to Stanford’s conception of leadership that are essential to understand in order to portray it effectively in your application. Let’s break the phrase down word by word, starting with the core principle.

Leadership.

Leadership starts with your personal character in Stanford’s eyes —your own “values and ideals.” Whatever change you’re guiding the client to achieve, or whatever vision you’re advocating, or whatever project you’re driving the team through Hades to complete on time – your character informs it in some way, shape, or form. Even if the project in question is not of deep importance to you – still, how you lead the group will reflect your character.  To provide appropriate and meaningful leadership, you must have core values or ideals and be guided by them – including as you lead. GSB’s preferred leadership is essentially value- and ideal-driven, what it calls “directed idealism.”

Potential.

Even if you are already a leader per the above definition, you’re not satisfied. You know that improving will only enable you to achieve more of what you value – therefore you actively seek to grow as a leader. You are open to critique and feedback, you are resourceful, you are humble, and you are hungry to learn.

Demonstrated.

Concrete evidence that convinces the adcom to conclude that you will grow as a leader and provide leadership in the future. You must demonstrate both leadership and potential to grow as a leader. For the former, provide this evidence by portraying experiences in your application boxes, essays, resume, and (if you provide some inputs for your recommenders) recommendations that reflect your leadership to date. For the latter, in these same application components frankly reflect on where you are in your leadership development – you understand what parts are innate to you, and where you need to improve.

So “demonstrated leadership potential” is actually rather complex. So spend some time and effort on a strategy to integrate these points into your entire application.

Check out the first post in this series, Understanding Stanford GSB’s Core Value Of Intellectual Vitality.

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Cindy Tokumitsu  has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted to Stanford GSB? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

• Stanford School of Business Zone

• Stanford GSB 2017-18 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

4 Ways to Show You’ll Contribute in the Future

Tags: MBA Admissions

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310-815-9553

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Work Experience in Your MBA Admissions Profile [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Work Experience in Your MBA Admissions Profile
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The last two articles explored the importance of the academic portion of your MBA application, including your undergraduate performance as well as your GMAT. This article will focus on the other, equally important, side of the coin: your work experience.

Although more schools are now open to considering candidates without post-college experience, most top MBA programs still strongly prefer candidates who have worked a solid two to five years. Schools believe that students with work experience are able to take advantage more fully of the MBA experience, and that they can contribute more to the classroom and to their peers.

What part of your work experience is the most important? Based on my experience as an admissions consultant and previously as Admissions Director, I can point to the following elements:

1. Leadership. More than the type of company you work for, or the type of work you do, the most important element of your work experience is your leadership. This is one of the elements that is given the most weight. Your resume should be packed with concrete evidence of leadership: how many people you supervise, the teams you lead, the size of the budget you manage, and the impact you have had. It’s not enough to say that you are a leader; you must back it up with concrete numbers and achievements.

2. Professional development. In addition to leadership, it’s important to give evidence of growth through promotions within the company or movements to another company for higher responsibility. Besides describing the change in roles, it is important to give evidence of growth and dynamism. Again, specifics matter.

3. Stability. Even though adcoms will want to see progress in and out of the organization, they will also value your professional stability. This means that you should change jobs only when it represents an advancement for your career. Changing jobs every 12 months (or less), for example, shows instability and leads to suspicion about your ability to hold a job—or appeal to on-campus recruiters. Although changes in employment are often necessary and inevitable, try to keep them to a minimum, and if possible, avoid long lapses between jobs, as you will find them difficult to explain in an application later.

Your resume must display your professional accomplishments with numbers and details. The resume is not a never-ending list of duties and responsibilities, but a quantified record of your achievements. Spend time and attention in building your resume. It is an essential part of the application and consequently one of the keys to your admission to business school.

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By Esmeralda Cardenal, previously the Associate Director of Admissions at Yale SOM, Director of MBA Admissions at MSU Broad, and consultant at Cardiff Business School in the UK. She is happy to help you showcase your achievements in your MBA application. Want Esmeralda to help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

Leadership in Admissions, a free guide

What MBA Hiring Managers Look For

What Your Work Experience Reveals About You in Your MBA Application

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Work Experience in Your MBA Admissions Profile appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Planning on Stanford GSB? Plan for This! [#permalink]

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New post 30 May 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Planning on Stanford GSB? Plan for This!
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We know that for many MBA wannabes – especially those with entrepreneurial aspirations – Stanford beckons. How can you approach the application thoughtfully and put yourself in the best position to succeed? What does Stanford GSB value in the application process?

We also get it: applying to top schools is stressful – and that you’re looking for clear, direct information and advice. That’s exactly what you’ll find in our free webinar, Get Accepted to Stanford GSB. In just one hour, Accepted’s founder, Linda Abraham, will guide you through a proven strategic framework for application success.

Plus, now is a great time to prepare for your Round 1 Stanford MBA application. The webinar is timed to help you do just that. Don’t miss it!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Planning on Stanford GSB? Plan for This! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Understanding Stanford GSB’s Interest in Personal Qualities and Contri [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jun 2017, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Understanding Stanford GSB’s Interest in Personal Qualities and Contributions
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What are the qualities that Stanford GSB is looking for as they build their class? How do successful applicants stand out from the crowd? At a school as competitive as Stanford, it’s a fact that many smart, accomplished applicants won’t get in—so how can you demonstrate that you have that “it” factor? Let us walk you through Stanford’s evaluation criteria and give you some advice.

In an MBA essay on a meaningful personal experience:

• Applicant A describes his ascent of Machu Picchu; we learn that it was awe-inspiring, challenging, and required excellent teamwork; he concludes by asserting that he was moved on a deep level and grew from the experience.

• Applicant B takes us on a walk around her block. We learn about the struggles of her neighbors in the face of gentrification and her mixed feelings as one of the gentrifiers; how she informally refereed an argument among residents about the stop-and-frisk policy; the diversity of canine life on the block and the blossoming friendship between her pug and a neighbor’s Rottweiler.

We conclude from these essays that Applicant A spends a lot of money on personal fulfillment, lacks imagination, relies on banalities, and relishes physical challenges; and that Applicant B is alive to the richness of daily life, addresses ambiguity head-on, has humor, is compassionate, is attentive, and cares about meaningful issues.

Point: Our personal qualities flow from and mirror our character. And when it comes to personal qualities, be assured, Stanford will prefer those of Applicant B – even though Applicant A’s topic is superficially more dramatic or impressive – because of the quality of character they reflect. Unlike Applicant A, Applicant B’s personal qualities –represent an engaged, observant, thoughtful person. Certainly, there’s nothing wrong with climbing Machu Picchu or with writing about such an experience – but it’s not the fact of doing it that will impress; rather, what you have to say about it, arising from your personal qualities and reflecting your unique perspective that will catch the thoughtful admissions reader’s eye.

• Don’t struggle and strain for “unique” things to say.

• Rather, for Stanford, share your life. Open it up, let it dance or swagger or sashay or skip or march or cartwheel, whatever your style is.

Now the contribution part. Because Applicant B is attentive to and cares about her surroundings, she can respond and contribute to the daily life of her neighborhood. Again, nothing particularly dramatic or unique; mainly interactions with neighbors. But they’re quality interactions. She cares. She has specific questions and concerns and feelings and insights – which become her offering. She can bring this abundance, this world, this humanity “to the table.” You just know this person will be a big contributor wherever she is. She doesn’t have to explain that fact – it’s obvious! Follow her example. Let your personal qualities come alive by sharing what’s meaningful to you in your essays (and elsewhere if/as possible in the application). Don’t explain that you will contribute; show that you do contribute. It’s simply who you are.

Check out the rest of the What Stanford GSB is Looking For series!

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your MBA Application Essays, a free guide

Stanford GSB MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• 4 Ways to Show How You’ll Contribute in the Future

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Understanding Stanford GSB’s Interest in Personal Qualities and Contributions appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Stanford MBA Class of 2018 Profile [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jun 2017, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Stanford MBA Class of 2018 Profile
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Who will be receiving their MBA from Stanford in 2018? Here’s a look at this year’s incoming class.

• Total Applicants: 8116

• New Students: 417

• Women: 41%

• International: 40%

• U.S. minorities: 29%

• Average GMAT score: 737

• Range of GMAT score: 590-790

• Average TOEFL score: 112

• Range of TOEFL score: 104-119

• Average undergraduate GPA: 3.73

• Average work experience: 4 years

• Range of work experience: 0-13 years

• Advanced degree holders: 11%

Breakdown of Undergraduate Majors:

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Previous Industry Experience:

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Schools and Countries:

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Would you like to be part of Stanford GSB’s next class? Check out our free, on-demand webinar, Get Accepted to Stanford Business School, to find out the steps you need to take to uncover your competitive edge and get accepted!

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Related Resources:

Stanford GSB MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

Understanding Stanford GSB’s Core Value of Intellectual Vitality

Understanding Stanford GSB’s Take on Demonstrated Leadership Potential

Tags: MBA Admissions

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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EMBA Interview Tips You Need to Get Accepted [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jun 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: EMBA Interview Tips You Need to Get Accepted
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If you’re like many of my EMBA clients, it’s been quite a while since you’ve interviewed – at least as the interviewee. And if you have recently sat in the hot seat, it’s been for a job interview, not a school interview. Most EMBA applicants have strong interpersonal and communication skills (otherwise, you wouldn’t be where you are professionally), and so theoretically needn’t worry about the interview. Yet the unfamiliarity with the situation triggers nerves. In addition, you’re probably applying to only 1-2 programs, giving each interview great weight – no room for error!

One simple way to alleviate those nerves and get in the EMBA interview groove: prep and practice! It can be casual prep or it can be more involved, whatever works for you.

In coaching EMBA applicants for interviews, I’ve identified the unique challenges and distinction of the EMBA interview process. Here is a summary plus tips on how to deal with them.

When in the process will you interview?

This will affect your approach and preparation. (While most EMBA interviews occur after you have submitted your application, some, such as NYU and sometimes Wharton, occur before.)

• If you interview before submitting, don’t just jump into it without thinking through your “story” and your goals. What you write later in the application must align with what you say initially.

• If you interview after submitting, you’re immersed in your story and goals from the app writing process. Be careful not to sound like you’re reciting your application – your challenge here is to be fresh and engaged.

Blind interview or not?

A blind interview is one where your interviewer has not read your application, only possibly your resume – or as Kellogg currently does, you’ll bring your resume to the interview. Most EMBA interviews are not blind – the interviewer will have read your application.

For blind interviews, you’re essentially a blank slate in the interviewer’s eyes. Your challenge is to impart a distinct, compelling impression that will leave the interviewer enthusiastic and interested. Bring stories and points to the table that will create that impression, and work them into your answers. If you’ve completed your application, you can use examples and stories in it, because they will be new to the interviewer.

For non-blind interviews, expect questions probing your application, and do not reiterate stories and examples from your application; have some new examples/anecdotes at hand. Also, review your application shortly before interviewing, so that you remember it well.

Types of questions to prepare for

You should be ready for anything. Still, there are types of questions that almost always pop up.

• Open questions such as “So, tell me about yourself” or “Please walk me through your resume” are common as openers. For the latter, avoid going on too long, repeating every item – a common pitfall. Rather, summarize your career trajectory and zoom-in on 1-2 key points to add value, e.g., an important decision or learning/growth experience. Give more emphasis to recent positions. Actually, I suggest always preparing a “Tell me about yourself” reply – it requires you to identify key points about your candidacy, which helps you strategize overall. It’s a great interview prep exercise.

• Since EMBAs are part-time programs, expect a question about how you will balance and fit school into your work and life – be specific and practical. Acknowledge the challenge and show you’re prepared.

• For open questions like “What is your leadership style” or “What are your strengths and weaknesses as a manager” don’t just explain, but also give a brief example. For EMBA strategy questions, find examples/stories that show you in a high-level role and/or dealing with high stakes issues, to underscore your appropriate level.

• Also, there may be behavioral questions: “Describe a time when…”; essentially stories. The key is answering with enough detail to make the story meaningful and interesting but not drag on too long. Again, for EMBA strategy, select stories that reflect higher level, higher stakes situations and responsibilities or that reflect distinctive aspects of your candidacy.

• Goals questions are almost inevitable. Be consistent with your application, and indicate why you want to pursue that path – share your motivation with the interviewer. What do you hope to do during and after your EMBA that you can’t do now?

Why the program, why an MBA: everybody loves to be loved – including EMBA adcoms. Let your enthusiasm for the program show! Cite program details that excite you, connecting the program to your goals and professional growth needs. If it’s a non-blind interview, do bring in some new points.

Beyond these, there are often questions about your industry, your function, your work culture, etc.

A few final tips

• STRATEGIZE: Think about your candidacy and what points you want to make – then during the interview find opportunities to weave those points into your discussion.

• Nudge the interview toward dialogue, rather than just interrogation style Q&A.

• Use social IQ to adapt to the interviewer’s style, tone, interest level, etc.

Good luck and enjoy the interview – it should be an enjoyable conversation. If you’d like coaching or practice before the big day – that’s what I’m here for!

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

• Excellent Executive MBA Admissions Advice, podcast interview

• 6 Steps to Better Self Knowledge & a Successful MBA Interview

• Do I Really Need a Mock Admissions Interview? [Short Video]

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post EMBA Interview Tips You Need to Get Accepted appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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The Best Thing You Can Do This Week for Your Stanford MBA App [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: The Best Thing You Can Do This Week for Your Stanford MBA App
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You can’t apply to Stanford GSB on the spur of the moment – at least, you really shouldn’t if you hope to get accepted. But you can still make a last-minute decision to attend our free webinar, Get Accepted to Stanford GSB. With the strategies you’ll learn, you’ll be prepared to craft a thoughtful, stand-out application.

We know you’re busy – and that you’re getting a lot of information about admissions. Cut through the static and learn clear, proven strategies for application success – strategies we’ve seen work again and again.

Register for Get Accepted to Stanford GSB!

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Extracurricular Activities in Your MBA Admissions Profile [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jun 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Extracurricular Activities in Your MBA Admissions Profile
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While business schools deeply value your academic background, GMAT, and work experience, they also ascribe significant weight to your extracurricular and community service activities. Why? Because they want to see that you are an individual who is not just focused on work, that you have other passions, and that you are well rounded.

Whether it be practicing sports, singing in your church’s choir, or helping at soup kitchens, community service and extra-curricular activities are extremely important for you as an applicant beyond their feel-good value. Why do b-schools care about these activities? They:

1. Create a more holistic picture of you. You are not just the two-dimensional person going to work every day and taking it easy on the weekends. It shows them that you have other interests, and that you’re not afraid to take (mostly unpaid) responsibilities outside of your job.

2. Reveal traits that would probably not come out in the rest of the application: your leadership, initiative, passion, and interpersonal skills. People that are used to acting to the benefit of others make for better team players, whether in the community or the corporate world. Those traits are indispensable in order to succeed at b-school and later on in your career.

3. Indicate you’ll be an involved student and alum. Individuals who have a track record of community service, once they are in b-school, are likely to be involved in clubs, school initiatives and later, the alumni association.

What if you haven’t volunteered or committed significant time to a non-professional activity and are planning to apply to business school this fall? Start today. You may think that adcoms will notice that this sudden increase in your extra-curricular commitments and community service coincides with the start of your application preparation, and you would be right. They’ll notice that, but they won’t hold it against you. If anything, your initiative will help you.

As the saying goes, better late than never. A little bit of community service is better than no community service at all. Why start right now? If you plan on applying to Round 1 deadlines, that would give you about three months of service or participation. By the time the schools invite you to interview, you’d have around six months under your belt. Those are six months of experience and anecdotes that can bring color to your interview. By your enrollment date, you would have done over a year of community work, an invaluable experience that would give you an advantage when you meet recruiters and start interviewing for internships.

What if you don’t get admitted this time around? What if you have to reapply? No one knows what the future holds and in spite of your hard work and dedication, there’s the chance that you will get waitlisted or, heaven forbid, denied admission. In this scenario, you would have 15 months of community service or non-professional commitment by the time you hit your application submit button next year, and that might make the difference the second time around.

So, go and serve. You’ll become a better applicant, and most importantly, a better person for it.

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By Esmeralda Cardenal, previously the Associate Director of Admissions at Yale SOM, Director of MBA Admissions at MSU Broad, and consultant at Cardiff Business School in the UK. She is happy to help you showcase your achievements in your MBA application. Want Esmeralda to help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

Leadership in Admissions, a free guide

4 Ways to Show How You’ll Contribute in the Future

4 Tips for Writing About Last Minute Extracurricular Activities

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Extracurricular Activities in Your MBA Admissions Profile appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 581 [0], given: 74

Extracurricular Activities in Your MBA Admissions Profile   [#permalink] 06 Jun 2017, 09:01

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