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8 Tips to Make the Most of Your B-School Visit [#permalink]

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New post 04 Apr 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 8 Tips to Make the Most of Your B-School Visit
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School visits are common during this time of year. Many applicants wait until their applications are submitted and, while classes are still in session, travel to their business schools of choice to either score some brownie points towards their application or to be better informed about the school’s offerings and fit.

With so many applicants visiting the school, you want your visit to be a memorable one. Preparation before your trip is key. Here are some tips:

1. Before you visit, try to go through the school’s website and refresh your memory regarding its offerings and unique attributes. Pay particular attention to any news or new initiatives. You want to be well-versed on anything going on, and reflect this in your conversations with students, faculty, and staff during your visit. Don’t limit your search to the program’s website, look for related news articles related as well.

2. Be up-to-date on any news in your industry and in the industry you want to work in after your MBA. Read The Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, and The Economist well before your visit.

3. Take advantage of the information session, have lunch or coffee with the students, attend a class, and take part in the tour. Even if you have visited the school previously, try to take part of everything the school offers to prospective students and meet as many people as you can.

4. Don’t request to talk to an admissions officer unless you have a particular concern you would like to address, one for which a meeting with an adcom would really be necessary. Never ask about the status of your application, or why they haven’t invited you to interview. These types of questions will put the adcom in an uncomfortable position and might affect your chances for admission.

5. Include time in your day to get to see other parts of the university. You never know when resources outside of the school will be relevant to you.

6. If it’s relevant to your situation, check the family-friendly resources the school (and the university) offers.

7. Collect business cards, write down names, and send individual thank-you emails to each and every one of the students, staff, and faculty that you meet during your visit. In your email, include a reference or two about a conversation you had with that person, and reiterate your desire to attend the school.

8. After your visit or during breaks during the day, write down notes about your impressions, things you liked, and things you didn’t like. If there were any particularly memorable statements that you may want to incorporate into an essay, jot them down.

Whether you are visiting after having submitted your application or checking out the school for the first time, it’s important that you plan your visit well. The information gathered will help you in your essays, in your interview, and ultimately in your decision to attend (or not) this school.

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By Esmeralda Cardenal, previously the Associate Director of Admissions at Yale SOM, Director of MBA Admissions at MSU Broad, and consultant at Cardiff Business School in the UK. She is happy to help you showcase your achievements in your MBA application. Want Esmeralda to help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

Best MBA Programs, a guide to selecting the right one

MBA Applicants, Start Your Engines

3 Ways to Determine Which B-Schools are a Good Fit for You

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post 8 Tips to Make the Most of Your B-School Visit appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Accepted Applicants: Got 2 Minutes? Help Us Out & Help Fellow Applican [#permalink]

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New post 05 Apr 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Accepted Applicants: Got 2 Minutes? Help Us Out & Help Fellow Applicants
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The AIGAC survey will be closing on April 24, which means you’re running out of time to participate in this important research endeavor AND you may lose your chance at winning $500!

Share your application experience with us now by filling out this survey – it’ll take you just a few minutes and will help business schools, consultants, and applicants alike.

The survey is for admitted students who will be starting business school in August/September 2017.

Do your part. Take the survey now.

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Accepted Applicants: Got 2 Minutes? Help Us Out & Help Fellow Applicants appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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How Forté Helps Women Get into Business and Stay in Business [Episode  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Apr 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How Forté Helps Women Get into Business and Stay in Business [Episode 200]
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Today’s episode is an extra special show. This is AST’s 200th episode! It’s fitting that we welcome back Elissa Sangster, who was the very first guest on AST almost five years ago. Today she is the first guest to come back for a third time.

This show should be valuable to you because of Elissa’s critical role as head of the Forté Foundation in increasing women’s representation in business school and business, and because of her profound insider’s knowledge of the business school and professional worlds.

Elissa earned her MBA at Texas A&M’s Mays Business School in 1994 and immediately became the Assistant Director of its MBA program. She moved on to UT Austin in 1997 where she served in different roles including the Assistant Dean and Director of McCombs’ MBA program. In 2004, she became the first director of Forté Foundation, a consortium of business schools and companies working to increase the number of women in business leadership positions. Welcome back, Elissa!

Can you review Forté’s backstory for us? [3:00]

The origins go back to 2000-1, due to a Catalyst research study on women in MBA programs, called “The Gateway to Opportunity.” That research was looking at why there weren’t more women enrolled in b-schools, and that was the motivation for creating Forté.

It started with five events back in 2002. I came on board in 2004, and we’ve continued creating programs aimed at preparing women early in the process.

We’ve understood that we need to reach out earlier in the decision-making process, too, so we’ve created programs at the college/university level that help women see what careers in business can look like.

And we do professional development programs.

There’s a lot of lack of awareness, lack of role models – a lot of young women have no one in their influence set telling them that b-school would be a great fit. So we’re taking that role.

What is the Forté Fellows program? [6:40]

It started in 2005. We asked our partner schools to give significant scholarships (averaging half of tuition) to two students each year. In 2005, we had about 35 students. For 2018, 1100 students received fellowships. There are now about 5000 alums. It’s a great group.

The benefits are beyond financial – it’s about being part of a broader community. The fellows are involved in programming on their campus, programming for undergrads, etc. It’s a community we know we can depend on.

How do you become a Forté Fellow? [9:48]

Each school makes their own selection. We’ve given them general guidelines.

We start communicating and bring them into the Forté community as soon as they receive the award.

Another significant Forté program is MBALaunch (and Virtual Launch). Can you tell us about that? [10:35]

MBALaunch creates a very active community – they tend to bond and are very supportive and engaged.

It’s a ten-month program that starts with a live kickoff event (with sessions on different topics). Then they’re grouped, and they spend the next ten months working with their peers and a coach preparing for the MBA application. They address all parts of the application (essays, interviews).

There are 570 participants this year. We want them to be competitive.

We want them to apply to schools they might not have thought about if they did the process in isolation.

Virtual launch includes access to all webinars. You don’t attend the live launch, and there’s no live coach, but you do get a peer support group.

Are there any successes Forté can point to? [14:00]

When we started, the average female enrollment at business schools was around 28%. We follow our 50 schools and track their averages (along with their total number of women graduates). In fall 2016, the average was around 37%. So it’s a pretty significant increase.

A good number of schools are maintaining averages in the 35% range in the last couple of years. And a few are nearing or over 40%. It’s encouraging.

Another new Forté initiative is Men As Allies. What is this program? [16:20]

The idea came from HBS, where they had a group called Manbassadors that said they wanted to support women and have conversations about gender equity.

We had a great conversation with them and thought there was a role for Forté to play.

We built a toolkit and website (podcasts, interviews, etc), focused on MBA campuses and how men and women can build this kind of chapter.

We’re also looking at ways we can grow this in the professional environment.

I’m really excited about the response, and helping men and women have these conversations.

Do you see Forté expanding to other professions, like STEM fields or top law schools (where women’s enrollment still lags)? [21:20]

No – though the law school statistics are interesting.

We’ve talked about other industries, but we feel business is our niche and the area where we can have the most impact. There are some ways to replicate what we’re doing in other fields, though.

What does Forté offer women who have entrepreneurial ambitions? [23:30]

What we’ve done in the past is focus on integrating entrepreneurship into our events as a topic – featuring women at different stages of the entrepreneurial journey and sharing their stories.

What we haven’t done much yet is have specific programming around becoming an entrepreneur. This year we had a pitch competition at our conference – that’s our first step. We plan to build out a program that supports MBA women – maybe similar to how we do the MBALaunch program, leveraging our networks to start thinking about the key points in the entrepreneurial journey.

Is Forté active outside the US? [27:50]

Primarily in Canada, Europe, and the US – our main centers are London, Toronto, and cities around the US.

Where is Forté going in the future? [28:30]

We’re really looking to build up the entrepreneurship space.

And we’re continuing to develop the college space – reaching out to women in college, no matter their major – to help them see how business skills relate to their future career goals.

We have a program called Rising Stars for college women (working with our university partners) – we identify women who’ve taken steps to achieve career readiness by college graduation.

Our career readiness program is a way to help them achieve the success we know they can achieve.

We’re also continuing to develop and grow our MBA activities.

Do you have advice for someone considering an MBA? [31:25]

It’s such an individualized choice.

I would suggest researching more about the industries people with MBAs go into. Identifying people with MBAs who have jobs you’d be interested in doing is a good way to get perspective.

When it comes to where/when, it’s individualized – do your research. School websites, podcasts, interviews, etc, can be really helpful in giving personal stories that make it real and tangible.

And any advice for someone who has definitely decided she wants to apply? [34:10]

Come to the Forté Forum! Come with a list of questions – network with adcom reps. Getting a specific impression of each campus will help. Learn what each program has to offer and how they present it to students.

Talk to your peers and alums from each campus. Visit campuses. Look where grads are going. If you have a specific interest, don’t recreate the wheel – go where a school has established excellence. Student experience and career outcomes are important to consider.

Narrow it down! Don’t apply to 20 schools – pick three to five.

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Related Links:

Forté Foundation

MBALaunch

Men as Allies

Related Shows:

What’s Life Like as a Darden MBA and Entrepreneur?

• Admissions Straight Talk: Interview with Forté’s Elissa Ellis Sangster

• Forté Helps Women in Business Thrive: Interview with Elissa Sangster

• Will Your Graduate Education Pay?

• Make a Difference at Michigan Ross: An Interview with Soojin Kwon [Episode 185]

Subscribe:

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, MBA Admissions

The post How Forté Helps Women Get into Business and Stay in Business [Episode 200] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Your GMAT Isn’t You – Is It? [#permalink]

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New post 06 Apr 2017, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Your GMAT Isn’t You – Is It?
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Every year, MBA applicants call us to ask whether their profile (GPA, GMAT, work experience) is competitive at the schools they’re targeting. It’s a question we take seriously and address individually, because there are so many factors that impact competitiveness. We understand that deciding where to apply is crucial, and you have a lot riding on that decision: if you target the wrong schools, you could end up not getting in – and who wants to delay/deny that b-school dream?

That’s why we’ve drawn on our experience coaching thousands of applicants to b-school success to create our info-packed webinar, How to Get Accepted to B-School With Low Stats. Accepted’s founder, Linda Abraham, will show you how to:

• Evaluate your profile;

• Understand the role of stats like your GPA and GMAT and what is “low.”

• Mitigate low stats; and

• Craft a successful application strategy based around your unique profile.

Don’t risk a thoughtless application. Learn How to Get Accepted to B-School With Low Stats.

The webinar is free, but you must reserve your space – do it today!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Your GMAT Isn’t You – Is It? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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How to Choose X Essay Questions to Answer from Y Choices [#permalink]

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New post 07 Apr 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How to Choose X Essay Questions to Answer from Y Choices
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If you face multiple essay questions on an application, how are you going to choose which one(s) you should answer and which one(s) you should skip? What factors should you consider when choosing the best essays for you?

Appreciate Your Options!

First, options are good! But they do force you to think (a task we’re not always so excited to do). If a school makes you choose one out of three or three out of four questions to answer – how do you know which one(s) to pick?

You want to choose the questions that allow you to portray yourself at your best – to present your most impressive qualifications and talents, and to demonstrate to the adcom that you’re top applicant material.

How to Choose the Best Questions

Here are two tips for selecting the questions that will help you best portray yourself:

• Think complimentary AND complementary

Choose topics that complement the other topics that you have discussed (or will discuss if you haven’t written any yet), and that complement the information you’ve provided in other parts of your application (like your resume/CV, letters of rec, transcript, etc.). For example, your resume presents your work history, but can’t go into any depth. Your essays can go into depth and can discuss experiences in greater detail, as well as non-professional experiences that didn’t make it into your resume.

• Write what you’re comfortable writing about

If you feel uncomfortable writing about a certain topic (like if a question asks about your career vision, and your career goals are still fuzzy), then that’s another reason to choose (or not choose) one question over another.

In short, figure out what you would like the admissions board to know about you, and then choose essays that will do the job and minimize repetition.

You’ve got options – and opportunity!

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Related Resources:

From Example to Exemplary, a free guide

“I’m Smart, Really I Am!” Proving Character Traits in your Essays

What Should I Write About? Making a Difference

Tags: College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post How to Choose X Essay Questions to Answer from Y Choices appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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6 Tips for Applying to Business School with Low Stats [#permalink]

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New post 07 Apr 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 6 Tips for Applying to Business School with Low Stats
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For most business school applicants, “low stats” refer to GMATs and GPAs at the lower end of or below the mid-80% range for a given school. It may be difficult to find average GPAs on your target school’s website, but if you have a 2.6, you know it’s low for almost any MBA program, and any GPA below 3.0 will warrant a deliberate effort to counterbalance.

How do you counterbalance that less-than-average GPA or that not-so-great GMAT? You can still get accepted to b-school with low stats by addressing those low numbers, improving your profile in the troubled areas, and creating an otherwise stellar application. Here are 6 tips for applying with low numbers:

1. Analyze your situation.

Which numbers are low – test score (GRE or GMAT), GPA, or both? If your GPA is low, did you have an upward trend that would show the committee you improved during college? Did you have one bad semester that pulled you down? If the problem is your test score, is there one section that is stronger than the other?

2. Address low quant scores (GMAT/GRE and transcript).

Address your low quant scores by taking additional courses for higher grades; highlighting your quant-oriented achievements in your essays; and asking recommenders to confirm your quantitative ability.

3. Address low verbal scores (GMAT/GRE and transcript).

Address your low verbal scores by writing fantastic essays; taking additional courses that focus on business communication or involve substantial writing; and asking recommenders to comment on your communication skills.

4. Make your essays count!

Draw on examples of your accomplishments, leadership skills, and exceptional impact to counterbalance the low scores.

5. Pick the right schools to apply to.

Some schools are more focused on numbers, while others are known for a more holistic review.

6. Consider the optional essay.

If your scores are below the 80% range, you’ll probably want to acknowledge and provide context for your situation. The optional essay provides an opportunity to briefly explain the circumstances behind your scores. If you write the optional essay, make it short and straightforward. Provide a brief explanation, take responsibility, and focus on evidence of your talents that counters the impression made by the low stats. Also, explain (or, ideally, show through example and anecdote) that either you have dealt with the problem causing the poor grades, or the circumstances no longer apply.

Don’t let those low scores convince you that you’re not business school material! Assess the situation, work to fix those weaknesses, and present a super-strong application that shows that adcom that you have what it takes to succeed!

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Related Resources:

Should You Retake The GMAT? [Short Video]

How to Apply to B-School With a Low GPA, Part 1

How to Apply to B-School With a Low GPA, Part 2 [Addressing Your Low GPA]

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post 6 Tips for Applying to Business School with Low Stats appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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Tips For MBA Video Essay Questions [#permalink]

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New post 09 Apr 2017, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Tips For MBA Video Essay Questions
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“Tips for video MBA Essay Questions” is the latest post in our series Navigate the MBA Maze.

Worried about being literally on stage? Here are my tips if you need to respond to a question in a short 1-2-minute video.

First, realize that these video essays, like the written ones, are attempts to get to know you. Unlike the written word, however, the schools are seeking to see how you present yourself visually and with little time to prepare or polish answers. They are testing articulation and presence in a way that essays can’t and at much less expense than interviews. In that sense, these videos are a pre-interview screening device in addition to a way to learn more about your likes and dislikes, achievements, dreams, goals, and challenges.

And while you may not be able to prepare for a specific question, you definitely can and should prepare.

You need to practice videoing yourself with no human responses — no, the adcoms won’t chat you back one second later. You’ll be getting zero immediate feedback. I found the experience very unnatural, but I think/hope I’ve gotten better with practice. You can too.

Until the questions become known, practice answering different essay questions in the announced time limit and then view the video. Here are a few sample questions to get you started, but I may update this list as we get more information from the schools:

• What do you do for fun?

What are your passions, interests, and hobbies?

• If you could travel across the United States in a car with anyone, whom would you choose to travel with and why?

• What would you do on a rainy Sunday afternoon?

• How have you handled a difficult interaction? What did you learn from it?

• Describe a difficult professional decision you had to make. What were the consequences, and what, if anything, did you learn?

If you are really nervous about the video exercise or about speaking in public, consider joining Toastmasters and forcing yourself to speak publicly. You will improve your “presence” and gain confidence. Both will help you with your video interview, any admissions interview, job interviews, and required public speaking.

So beyond preparing and simply getting comfortable with the format or anticipated questions, when it comes time for the real thing, do the following:

1. Dress neatly. Follow any dress guidelines the school provides. Women, put on make-up and jewelry lightly. If you wonder if your attire is too revealing, it is. Men, have a hair-cut and shave. Make sure beard or mustache, if you have, are trimmed and neat.

2. It should go without saying, but keep your language clean — no profanity.

3. Think for a few seconds before you reply and then minimize pauses that we tend to fill with “ums” and “uhs.” They don’t contribute to “presence.”

4. If you tend to perspire, put on the air conditioning so the room is cool.

5. Sit up straight and lean a little bit forward.

6. Remember to smile. I put a smiley face next to the camera.

And two final points:

1. Schools want to accept students who reflect well on them.

2. You’ll do great!

If you would like help with your video essay, Accepted’s experienced MBA admissions experts, who have been prepping and critiquing MBA applicants for almost twenty years, are more than happy to help you.

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Related Resources:

Navigate the MBA Maze, a free guide

Why MBA?, your guide to identifying and writing about your MBA goals

• MBA Video Essays: A Conversation with Rotman’s Niki da Silva

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Tips For MBA Video Essay Questions appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

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What to do About a Low GPA [#permalink]

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New post 13 Apr 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: What to do About a Low GPA
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Many of you are planning ahead for your first application this summer and fall. Others are concerned that you may need to reapply because the news you’ve received so far isn’t what you wanted. In either case, if your grades are a concern, this podcast is for you. This week, join us for a rebroadcast of one of our most popular shows – our discussion of how to address a low GPA.

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Download the 5 A’s for a Low GPA Cheat Sheet:

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post What to do About a Low GPA, an Encore [Episode 201] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
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3 Steps for Applying to Business School with a Low Undergraduate GPA [#permalink]

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New post 13 Apr 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 3 Steps for Applying to Business School with a Low Undergraduate GPA
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Your grades show whether you previously performed well in an academic setting. If your college GPA is low, then you need to provide evidence that even though you may have faltered back then, now you’re A-game and are capable of academic excellence.

But how can you demonstrate that you’re b-school material, even with your low stats?

The following 3 steps will help you overcome a low GPA and present a solid case to the admissions board that shows that you mean academic business:

Step 1: Identify

First, identify the cause of your low GPA.

Is it low because you partied a little too hard your first two semesters, but then buckled down after that and worked to pull up your low freshman GPA? Or did you start out high and then get really lazy and bored with school your senior year and let things spiral out of control? Or is it possible that your low GPA is truly an indication that your workload was too challenging and that you’re not school material? Or perhaps you were dealing with a serious illness or family problems? Or maybe back then you just weren’t motivated to succeed?

Once you understand why you have a less-than-impressive GPA, you’ll have an easier time figuring out what to do next (Step 2) and how to explain the situation (Step 3).

Step 2: Ameliorate

Once you determine that you are motivated this time around and are capable and competent academically, then it’s time to take action to improve your profile. (And if after deep introspection you decide that school is just not for you, then consider yourself lucky that you figured that out now and not after you’ve paid $100,000+ on even more schooling.)

Obviously, you can’t go back and raise your undergraduate GPA, but there are things you can do NOW to show the adcom that your undergrad GPA doesn’t define your current academic abilities:

• Take a few business-related, college-level courses and earn A’s in them.

Ace the GMAT.

Step 3: Explain

There are three places in your MBA application where you may want to address a low GPA: (1) the optional essay, (2) the required portions of the application, and (3) your letters of recommendation.

In a non-whiny, non-defensive tone, you can clearly and straightforwardly explain why your GPA is lower than it should be in the optional essay. Perhaps there was a death in the family one semester or maybe you had emergency surgery that left you on bed rest for three weeks mid-semester. Or maybe you just didn’t realize the importance of grades until halfway through your sophomore year, and by then your GPA had taken a serious hit. Or maybe you worked thirty hours a week to support yourself. Let the reader know the context of your grades. Write honestly and write well.

In other parts of the application, show the skills that your transcript hides without drawing attention to the grades. For example, if you did not do well in Econ 101 or college math classes, but are now doing some really heavy lifting in terms of financial modeling, then either in your resume or in a required essay, write about a quantitative challenge that you handled with elan.

Regarding letters of recommendation – getting a supervisor to vouch for your maturity and abilities is probably one of the best things you can do to bolster your case. Again, if you had poor grades in classes requiring a lot of writing, ask your boss if she can comment positively on your communications skills. If you had poor quant grades, ask if she can praise your quantitative analysis of a complex project. In either case, your boss doesn’t have to reference the negative you are trying to overcome – just the positives you want to bring out.

Remember through Identifying the problem, Ameliorating the issue, and Explaining the situation, you’ll be better positioned for an acceptance to b-school despite – or even in spite of – your less-than-ideal GPA.

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Related Resources:

MBA Action Plan: 6 Steps for the 6 Months Before You Apply, a free guide

Dealing with a Low GPA [3 Common Scenarios]

How MBA Adcoms Evaluate Your GPA

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Mid-Career, a Peruvian Economist-Engineer is Energized at CMU Tepper [#permalink]

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New post 14 Apr 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Mid-Career, a Peruvian Economist-Engineer is Energized at CMU Tepper
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This interview is the latest in an Accepted blog series featuring interviews with MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with an MBA student at CMU Tepper, Daniel Espinoza…

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad?

Daniel: I am from Peru. I am an Economist Engineer, and graduated from National University of Engineering. It is a career related to Econometrics and Quantitative Economics. Interestingly, my father had Peru’s first degree in that career, so I grew up among books of economics, finance and long discussion about economics issues with my father. Also, I obtained a Master of Sciences in Investments Projects in my alma mater, earning first place in my cohort. I developed my career in several industries and in several roles such as Civil and Urban Infrastructure, Consulting, Mining and Health Care. Since I am an entrepreneur and I like changes, I decided topursue an MBA in a world class university like Carnegie Mellon to incorporate a fresh set of tools to my profession.

Accepted: Which business school did you attend? When did you graduate?

Daniel: I am going to Tepper Business School of Carnegie Mellon University. I will graduate in May 2017.

Accepted: What ultimately led to your decision to attend Tepper School of Business? What were some of your favorite aspects of their program?

Daniel: In a high level, I developed my career in Mining and Health Care, and Pittsburgh has been a mining and industrial city of coal and steel so it made sense to come here. Additionally, Pittsburgh is a big hub in Healthcare with big corporations such as UPMC and Highmark, so definitely I obtained the right mix that combined nicely with my background. Tepper is a business school that cultivates three important areas of knowledge related to Behavioral Economics, Mathematics and Decision Analysis which are intimately related to my two professional dissertations: Strategic Decision Making in Mining and Risk Analysis in Public Projects. So Tepper provided me the right match to my interests.

Accepted: What made you pursue an MBA program at this stage in your life? Did you consider EMBA programs?

Daniel: Since I developed my career in several Planning and Strategic Departments in Mining and Health Care, I was exposed to a variety of problems related to Finance, Operations, Commercialization, Supply Chain and Strategy. Moreover, I played an important role leading my company as Commercial Chief during the crisis of metal commodities. I not only accomplished my daily duties such as managing warehouse operations, identifying P&L drivers, forecasting metrics, doing market research, and tracking sales, but also collaborated in the due diligence that crystallized in the acquisition of my company by Nyrstar –in an operation of $ 23 M. Moreover, I took on new responsibilities during the M&A by leading the implementation of SAP to promote change management. All these experiences made me think that I was ready to play in the big leagues, so I decided to pursue my MBA in 2012 and I was accepted by Tepper in first round in December of 2014. I preferred a full-time MBA just to internalize and rewire my mindset to be prepared for future business challenges.

Accepted: Looking back, did you experience any challenges while applying as an international applicant? How did you overcome them?

Daniel: Applying as an international applicant involves many challenges and very detailed planning. In my case coming from Peru, with a different university system and language, was particularly challenging. I divided the work in three categories:

First, I began my preparation to take the TOEFL and GMAT, which are everyone a complete universe in themselves. The decision of what is first and what is second is always tricky. I began taking the GMAT and finished taking the TOEFL, defining a minimum desirable score for each one.

Second, I asked to my different schools the respective transcripts and additional documentation to support my level of education and accomplishments.

Third, I had to translate everything from Spanish to English. I employed an Official Translator.

I did all these things while I was working in one of the biggest hospitals in Peru as a Project Specialist moving forward several initiatives in Urology, Critical Care, Metabolic Support, Dentistry and IT. To sum it all up, it is required a lot of stamina and determination to overcome all these activities.

Accepted: How have your MBA studies at Tepper School of Business helped you achieve your long-term career goals?

Daniel: Since my MBA is still in progress, I am really excited to see the impact to achieve my long-term career goals. However, I’ve learned a lot of interesting approaches to solve problems, to lead teams, and to accomplish goals in a real job setting. One indicator, is my Internship in Hospital Corporation of America in Houston (Texas) during the summer 2016 as Performance Improvement Engineer. It is an internal consulting role that generates initiatives to improve several aspects in the Healthcare Value Chain such as Labor, Clinical Excellence, Operations Room, Emergency Department and Throughput. For example, I generated a positive impact in financial and operational reporting, and increased efficiencies in the Operations Room by reducing physicians’ overtime.

In another instance, I worked for 33 Birds –a non-profit organization that provides food and useful extracurricular activities to poor children in NYC, to which I elaborated its first Business Plan, first Brochures and first Databases of potential fund-providers. So, these experiences make me think the great opportunities that my MBA is opening for me which will fulfill my long-term career goals working in the intersection of Technology, Finance and Business Development in a variety of roles such as Project Management, Product Management, Business Improvement, or Supply Chain.

Accepted: Lastly, do you have any tips for those who are contemplating pursuing an MBA program later in their career?

Daniel: I am convinced that success is a natural result from hard work and dedication to meet unexpected and impressive opportunities that the market offers. I feel that building respect and trust are important for strong business and professional relationships. Today we have an extraordinary tool that can tremendously leverage our careers and prepare us to reach higher goals: the MBA. It is a decision that should be taken carefully and thoughtfully. Especially, I recommend it when you have great accomplishments and experiences that can be shared with your classmates. On the other hand, the courses that you will take can be contrasted with your experiences making the process of learning and personal transformation more fruitful. Another piece that I considered was to take the Leadership Certification that Tepper offers to enhance my leadership skills. It is never too late; on the contrary, it is a beautiful pause that can re-energize our careers. If you have these elements, it is the right time.

You can keep up with Daniel’s journey by checking out his blog The Economist Engineer or you can connect with him via LinkedIn. Thank you Daniel for sharing your story with us – we wish you continued success!

[b]For one-on-one guidance with your b-school application, check out our MBA Application Packages.[/b]

Do you want to be featured in Accepted’s blog? If you want to share your med school journey with the world (or at least with our readers), email us at bloggers@accepted.com.

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Related Resources:

• Leadership in Admissions

• The Importance of Extracurriculars and Community Service

• The MBA Family Tree: A Roundup & Overview of Different MBA/EMBA Options

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Wharton MBA Program Announces Establishment of Moelis Advance Access P [#permalink]

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New post 14 Apr 2017, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Wharton MBA Program Announces Establishment of Moelis Advance Access Program
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Ken Moelis W’80/WG’81 and Julie Taffet Moelis W’81 have made a $10 million gift to the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania to establish the Ken Moelis and Julie Taffet Moelis Advance Access Program. This program will provide highly qualified UPenn undergraduates whose academic and career interests are outside those of traditional business school students with a deferred admission opportunity. Eventually the program will grow to permit applications from the best undergraduate schools throughout the US and around the world.

The program is open to all Penn undergraduates beginning with the Class of 2018 who want a guaranteed pathway to a Wharton MBA while they pursue meaningful work experience. Students in the College of Arts and Sciences, School of Engineering and Applied Science, School of Nursing, the Wharton School, and all other coordinated dual degrees are able to apply. Applications will be accepted starting March 2018 during Round 3 of the MBA admissions cycle.

Students admitted as Moelis Fellows have guaranteed admission to the Wharton MBA Program after a two- to four-year deferment period to be used to pursue job opportunities in fields that are of interest to them, including those that go beyond the traditional definitions of business. Moelis Fellows will submit a Declaration of Intent to enroll during each year of the deferment period, updating their employment information for verification. During this period, Moelis Fellows will also participate in professional development, mentoring occasions, and social programs. Finally, they will be considered for a $10,000 fellowship per year during the two-year full-time MBA program.

According to UPenn President Amy Gutmann, “Ken and Julie [Moelis] are encouraging students to think early about their graduate degree, venture into diverse fields after graduation, and bring these robust, interdisciplinary experiences to their Wharton MBA journey.”

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Related Resources:

Get Accepted to Wharton, a free webinar

Wharton 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

MBA Prep Advice for College Students, a blog series

Tags: MBA Admissions

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4 Tips For Team Interviews [#permalink]

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New post 16 Apr 2017, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 4 Tips For Team Interviews
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“4 Tips For Team Interviews” is the latest post in our series Navigate the MBA Maze.

Since so much of b-school life and learning includes team discussions, the adcom needed a tool for assessing how applicants will fit in the team-based discussion culture of their programs. Thus, the Team-Based Discussion (TBD) was born.

In team-based interviews, applicants need to use a different set of skills than they use during traditional, individual interviews. Personal interviews require one-on-one presentation, interpersonal skills, and self-awareness, while team interviews require critical thinking, listening, persuasion, and leadership.

Here are four to-do’s to help you win an Academy Award for your performance in an interview:

1. Review school material. This includes the specific materials that the school provides prior to the interview, as well as all other material about the program. As with an individual interview, you need to know the school well – its mission, curriculum, teaching style, etc. Review the school’s website and speak with current students and recent grads so you get a clear picture of what it’s like to be a student at B-School X.

2. Read Case in Point. This is an excellent book by Marc Consentino that will teach you how to state your position during team-based interviews, and then clearly and succinctly support your position.

3. Role-play. Use family, friends, colleagues, and consultants at Accepted to role-play with you. The more in-the-know your mock interviewer and peers are, the better idea you’ll get of how the interview will run on the big day.

4. Take notes. You are allowed to bring notes to the interview, and while you don’t want to read off a piece of paper or even refer to it frequently, it may help you feel more confident knowing that some of your key points are written down in case you need them. You never know how performance anxiety may set in, and if your brain freezes and you completely forget your plan, you’ll be glad you jotted some ideas down beforehand.

TIP: Don’t bring a 400-page stack of papers! You don’t want to spend the whole time shuffling through your notes, making noise and ignoring your co-interviewees while they speak. Paperless notes on a tablet may reduce the shuffle, but they won’t reduce the distraction – keep paperless notes to a minimum as well.

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Related Resources:

MBA Interview Prep: How to Ace Your Interview, a free guide

Are You Selling Yourself Short?

How to Ace Your Team Based Interview [4 Tips for the Big Day]

Tags: MBA Admissions

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The GMAT and the Law of Diminishing Returns [#permalink]

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New post 19 Apr 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: The GMAT and the Law of Diminishing Returns
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There is a time in every applicant’s life where you need to look long and hard at your GMAT score and ask: “Is my score high enough to get me into my schools of choice? Or should I retake the GMAT? What are my chances of getting into b-school with low stats? How will retaking the GMAT help my case? Can it hurt?”

You should retake the GMAT to achieve your highest possible score, but beware: the law of diminishing returns applies to the GMAT and sometimes overtaking the exam can be to your detriment.

Why Too Much Effort Doesn’t Always Pay Off

The classic economic theory of diminishing returns implies that if you continue to put forth effort into the GMAT, you will reach a point where the effort you put into the test will have negative consequences (diminished returns). You may in fact continue to raise your score, but there is a point at which the number of times you take the GMAT, could negatively impact your application.

So How Many Attempts is Too Many Attempts?

How many times should you retake the exam? At what point do you become a serial test taker?

When I was an admissions dean and director, I liked to see candidates take the test two or three times to try to raise their score. If they did, that was certainly in their favor – and if they didn’t, we simply used the highest score.

However, taking the test six, seven, or eight times did negatively impact the way I looked at the candidate. But times have changed with the flexibility the Graduate Management Admissions Council is now giving candidates to cancel their scores.

Canceling the Score

Since July 19, 2015 a test taker has the option to cancel scores at the test center for no charge or within 72 hours of the start of the test for a fee. A test taker can also reinstate a canceled test score for a fee. Regardless, the schools will receive a candidate’s score report that does not reflect instances when the test taker cancels the score within the 72-hour timeframe. This ability to cancel the score without ramifications has also encouraged test takers to take the test multiple times. However, candidates need to be cautious when a school asks its candidates to upload scores from his/her own score report as those cancellations do appear on the document. And the Graduate Management Admissions Council has now set a lifetime limit of 8 attempts at the test (5 attempts within a 12-month period).

The GMAT Isn’t Everything!

While one can argue that a director should reward the student’s persistence, I would argue that the candidate who takes the GMAT too many times is putting too much emphasis on only one aspect of the application. While the GMAT, along with the academic record, offers schools a strong correlation to a student’s academic performance in the core, it does not give the admissions board an indication of leadership, impact, business skills, or fit.

Bottom Line

You need to show that you are a well-rounded applicant and if after taking the GMAT two or three times, you still don’t achieve the score you want, cast your school net a bit wider.

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By Natalie Grinblatt Epstein, an accomplished Accepted consultant/editor (since 2008) and entrepreneur. Natalie is a former MBA Admissions Dean and Director at Ross, Johnson, and Carey. Want Natalie to help you get accepted to business school? Click here to get in touch!

 

Related Resources:

• The GMAT: Low Scores, Retaking & Strategies for Success, a free webinar

Your 3 Part Plan to Dominate the GMAT, a free webinar

How Does Your GMAT Score Fit into the Holistic MBA Application Puzzle?

Tags: MBA Admissions

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A Wharton Start-Up Story [#permalink]

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New post 19 Apr 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: A Wharton Start-Up Story
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Today’s guest, Mary-Patton Davis, earned her BA in Government and French from Georgetown in 2010. She worked in marketing in the U.S. and in Rwanda, started a yoga business in Rwanda among other things, and earned her MBA from Wharton in 2016. While there she co-founded and led LeadUp, a mindful leadership program emphasizing health and wellness for ambitious young business leaders Since August she has worked in San Francisco for NerdWallet, a personal finance start-up. Welcome, Mary-Patton!

Can you tell us more about your background and your path to Wharton? [1:40]

It’s a non-traditional background. I majored in international relations and French at Georgetown – at the time, I was very interested in political communications. I stayed in DC right after graduation for about a year and a half. Then my sister was launching a women’s college in east Africa, and she asked me to help with communications, so I moved to Rwanda and worked with the Akila Institute. I loved living in the country and the work I was doing. Through that experience, I met leaders of family conglomerates, including one who asked me to create a digital marketing department in his advertising firm.

Why did you decide to pursue an MBA? [5:20]

As you can imagine, I never really had an MBA in my sights. After working in the nonprofit realm with my sister, I was working in the advertising agency and realized I really liked it. It drew on different skillsets. But I also realized I needed more training. The head of the family conglomerate I worked for had his MBA, and he was a big mentor for me – he really coached me and helped me identify the MBA as the next step.

Why did you choose Wharton? [7:18]

I targeted quantitative, finance-oriented schools because I knew I needed to build those skills.

It was definitely a steep learning curve my first year! But it was the right choice.

What do you miss from Wharton? [9:45]

There’s a lot of nostalgia for business school when I get together with my classmates in San Francisco.

I really miss the crazy international trips and the social life! From a more academic perspective, I miss the organized opportunities for intellectual stimulation – talks, clubs, etc.

What could be improved at Wharton? [12:45]

One thing that’s a function of the wealth of opportunities is FOMO – fear of missing out. You feel pressure to do everything. You have to remember to dole out your time according to what’s most important to you and spend your time appropriately.

Did you find the MBA valuable? Is it valuable in the tech world? [14:50]

For me, it was absolutely the right decision – I was transitioning from a non-traditional background and from working abroad.

But the MBA isn’t for everyone. If you just feel like you’re stagnating or don’t know what you want to do next, it may not be the best option. It’s a big investment and a big decision – don’t decide to do it by default.

What is LeadUp and how did you found it? [18:10]

It was a fun project I started with a friend at Wharton. The idea was to provide immersive experiences for young leaders to help them develop their skills and reflect. It was for grad students across Penn – not just MBA students.

We came to this after realizing how intense the MBA experience is – we started from wanting to create a space for mindfulness, and it became a great holistic experience.

We applied for incubator funding in second year, but we decided not to pursue developing it formally.

How did you balance your activities and school? [23:10]

When you get to business school, it’s easy to get overwhelmed. I tell people to focus on the three to four things that matter most – for some people that’s getting really high grades, or participating in leadership, or social activities. For me, it was LeadUp – which also gave me experience building a small business while finding space to explore mindfulness and positive psychology.

What is NerdWallet? [25:50]

It’s a personal finance tech company. We educate consumers on the best options available to them – including how to refinance student loans, etc.

I really like the mission of financial education. We try to be an external third party to help give people education/information on financial products.

What is your role? [28:28]

I work with the strategy and business operations team (BizOps). My role includes both strategic and operational duties – and combines quantitative analysis and execution.

Were there any challenges in transitioning from the MBA to a startup, or from the east coast to the west coast? [31:15]

I did Wharton’s semester in SF program, which was a nice intro to west coast living.

In general, the transition from b-school to the workforce can be jarring – facing the pressure to deliver after being in school. It was my first job in the US since 2011.

What you learn in the classroom is helpful, but there’s nothing like learning on the job! It’s exciting to be actively learning on the job and see progress week after week.

I’ve been talking with a lot of people recently about recruiting. [35:20]

I encourage students to think about their recruiting process in a criteria-driven way, and prioritize which one is most important: function, industry, etc. What do they want out of their job?

Do you have advice for MBA applicants or recent admits? [38:15]

For people applying: highlight your unique experiences. Explain your story and why you made the decisions you did. What is unique about you and how will you add value to the b-school?

For those about to start b-school: focus on prioritization and goals. Take time before starting the MBA to think about what you want to get out of school, and build out a plan for the first six months of school.

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Related Links:

MP is for Mary-Patton

Nerdwallet

Leadup

• Wharton 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

Get Accepted to Wharton, on-demand webinar

Wharton B-School Zone

Related Shows:

• What’s Life Like as a Darden MBA and Entrepreneur?

• When Global Business is the Goal

• Haas, McCombs, and Case Interviews• Wharton MBA Student, Single Mom, Entrepreneur

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, MBA Admissions

The post From Rwanda to Wharton to West Coast Start-Up: MP Davis’ Story [Episode 202] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Can One Hour Improve Your B-School Stats? [#permalink]

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New post 20 Apr 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Can One Hour Improve Your B-School Stats?
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Well, maybe not directly – but here’s what it can do: in one hour, you can learn how to understand your stats and their significance for your application, and also (most importantly!) learn how to mitigate low stats in your MBA applications.

It’s natural that the GPA and GMAT are often anxiety-provoking aspects of the b-school application process – we get that. And we know that a lot of applicants worry about some aspect of their profile, especially if they’re dealing with low stats. That’s why we’ve created How to Get Accepted to B-School With Low Stats, a webinar that addresses precisely these questions.

Accepted’s founder, Linda Abraham, will show you how to understand your profile strategically so that you can mitigate weaknesses, emphasize strengths, and get accepted.

There’s still time to register for How to Get Accepted to B-School With Low Stats!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Can One Hour Improve Your B-School Stats? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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How MBA Adcoms Evaluate Your GPA [#permalink]

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New post 21 Apr 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How MBA Adcoms Evaluate Your GPA
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“But my undergrad school was highly competitive…”

“But I worked 20 hours a week during college…”

“But I was a varsity athlete at a Division I school…”

“But even though it took me a couple of years, once I got it together I made dean’s list every semester…”

“But my PhD GPA was 3.9…”

These are the fretful “buts…” of MBA applicants who fear their applications will be doomed by a poor undergraduate GPA. Behind every GPA is a story. Often it’s a story that arouses frustration, confusion, uncertainty, and even anguish on the part of applicants.

Your undergraduate GPA is important – this is true – but adcoms view your GPA (like the rest of the application) holistically. And this isn’t just how they view low GPAs, but how they view all GPAs.

How Your GPA Fits into the MBA Application Puzzle

First, no matter how well or how poorly your GPA represents your actual ability, the adcom will consider it and take note of it when reviewing your application. You cannot, by convincing explanations or subsequent courses, erase a low undergrad GPA from adcom consideration, but you can work to mitigate it, sometimes substantially.

Second, the adcom will examine the context of your GPA. They can see some aspects of that context automatically when they look at your transcript (like rigor of courses and school), but for other contextual hints (like pneumonia in sophomore year), you will need to state them directly, usually in an optional essay. They will see whether your GPA trends up (good) or down (a problem that might need explaining), and they will see from other areas of your application whether you were working during school and/or participated in a lot of activities, etc.

Why the Context of Your GPA Matters

They will draw some conclusions from this contextual review. Here are a few scenarios that could account for a low GPA and that you may want to draw attention to in an optional essay:

• If you worked while you were in college, the admissions committee will probably assume you had to, and so will be less likely to blame you for time management challenges that weren’t necessarily your choice.

• If you started college in the US barely knowing English and struggled for a year or two until your passion and ambition propelled you to the dean’s list – you can’t assume the adcom will know you overcame rudimentary language skills. The optional essay allows you to explain this particular challenge.

• If they see lots of activities, they’ll note the positive aspects (sociable, contributor) and the possible negative aspects if your GPA was low (less than great time management and prioritizing).

If your GPA trends up, they may understand that you were just a kid still growing up, and will most likely view your last two years as more representative.

• They’ll also note things like change of academic focus (like your grades really improved once you switched your major from physics to East Asian Studies).

Part of your job in writing your application is to anticipate and envision the context the adcom sees for your GPA and fill in gaps. For example, if an overabundance of activities undermined your grades, you can show in your essays how you subsequently learned to better manage your time while maintaining your vibrant community involvement.

Moreover, good GPAs are not just given an “OK” from the adcom. They actually review your transcript. An otherwise strong GPA that has one C in your only quant course could raise an eyebrow. So could a GPA that starts very strong and trends down – even if it’s solid in aggregate.

Post-undergrad efforts also shape the context of your undergrad GPA. A strong GMAT, demanding professional certifications, an “alternate transcript” of courses to demonstrate academic capability and counter a low undergrad GPA, and/or a strong grad school GPA all will help to mitigate a low GMAT – but again, they will not erase it from your profile. They will have other positive impacts though, such as showing commitment and maturity.

Self-Evaluating Your GPA through the Eyes of the Adcom

The adcoms’ use of context in evaluating GPA means ultimately there is no one formula applied. It’s nuanced, unique to the candidate, and qualitative. Try to see your GPA in their eyes to determine (a) if you need to provide context for your performance, (b) if you should take steps to mitigate your low GPA like additional courses, and (c) whether your GPA in its holistic context enhances your candidacy at a given school.

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

MBA Action Plan: 6 Steps for the 6 Months Before You Apply, a free guide

What to Do About a Low GPA, a podcast episode

6 Tips for Applying to Business School with Low Stats

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post How MBA Adcoms Evaluate Your GPA appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Waitlisted. Now What? [#permalink]

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New post 23 Apr 2017, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Waitlisted. Now What?
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“Waitlisted. Now What?” is the latest post in our series Navigate the MBA Maze.

First, a word of introduction: Realize that receiving a wait-list letter means you qualify for admission. You pass. You are probably on the wait-list (and not admitted) because they have already admitted applicants with your profile and want diversity in the class. Or they find your qualifications impressive, but find someone else’s even more so.

I encourage you to seize the initiative and launch a campaign. Unless the school discourages additional contact, take a proactive approach. You have already shown that you qualify for the school; otherwise you wouldn’t find yourself on the wait-list. They like you. Now give the adcom additional reasons to admit you by writing a succinct wait-list letter.

Your waitlist updates and letters of support from others should focus on three areas:

1. Your qualifications: specifically recent professional achievements, academics, research, increases in responsibilities, initiatives, and community service.

2. Steps you have taken to ameliorate weaknesses.

3. How you fit with the school.

The first two areas demonstrate that you are an even better applicant today than you were when you applied. The third reveals that you belong at that school like a hand fits in a snug glove on a cold winter day, and that you will attend if, or should I say when, accepted.

Suggestions for a Waitlist Update:

1. Briefly thank the school for continuing to consider your application and mention how the school’s philosophy and approach fit your educational preferences and goals. Don’t dwell on your disappointment at not being accepted.

2. Agree to take any additional courses or follow any additional instructions provided.

3. Discuss recent achievements. Did you have a 4.0 during the last quarter? Have you led a project or organization? Volunteered? Have you taken your department, business, or club in a new direction? Have you had an article published? Earned a patent? Launched a business? Received a promotion or assumed additional responsibilities? Succeeded in a particularly demanding class or project? You should bring out any recent accomplishments not discussed in your application and ideally tie them back to some of the themes or experiences you raised in your essays.

4. Discuss how you have addressed shortcomings—without highlighting them. For example, if you enrolled in Toastmasters to improve your communications skills, inform the adcom that you did so two months ago, tell them of any awards you have won, and enlighten them as to how much you are enjoying the experience. BUT don’t say that you are doing all this because you are concerned about your low verbal score or sub-standard grades in social science courses.

5. If you are certain you would attend this school, make it clear that this is your first choice and that you will attend if accepted.

Keep the letter short and sweet — two pages max. Don’t succumb to the temptation to rewrite or even summarize your life history or essays. Stay focused on what you have accomplished since applying.

Accepted’s consultants are available to help you evaluate your application, advise you on your waitlist strategy, and edit waitlist letters. For more information, please visit our waitlist services for more details.

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Related Resources:

Navigate the MBA Maze, a free guide

Help! I’ve Been Waitlisted, a podcast episode

How to Write Waitlist Update Letters

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Waitlisted. Now What? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Do Low Stats Sink Your App? [#permalink]

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New post 23 Apr 2017, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Do Low Stats Sink Your App?
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Applicants and Admissions Directors almost always seek the same thing. Applicants want to be desired by Admissions Directors and Admissions Directors want their schools to be desired by applicants. Applicants want to optimize their ability to gain admission to the highest-ranking school that fits their education/career needs, and Admissions Directors want to optimize their ability to climb in the rankings, so that applicants will continue to find their schools desirable.

Logic has it that if Admissions Directors can change the input of the rankings by increasing test scores and GPA (a metric that fails to take into account the school of origin and the rigor of the curriculum), then the school should climb in the rankings. However, in a year like 2017, a year when average GMAT scores in the top 10 climbed faster than ever, we know the schools will stay relatively the same in the rankings. Schools in the top ten changed places within the top ten, but not much more. In fact, the US News ranking hasn’t changed dramatically over the years for this very reason: the schools move in a group.

It’s a vicious cycle that often leaves incredibly gifted and desirable applicants in the dust. It’s also a vicious cycle that leaves incredibly forward thinking/innovative schools in the dust.

If you are an applicant with high aspirations and low statistics, you need to be strategic about your actions and your application choices but there are also several things you can do to improve your chances of acceptance.

1. Request an assessment:

Obtain a realistic assessment from an admissions officer or an admissions consultant. The assessment should give you an indication of schools that would be stretch for you, schools that match your qualifications, and schools that you should select as safeties. You would be surprised to learn the number of C-level executives and successful entrepreneurs who attended safety schools.

2. Cast your net widely:

Note that the larger the class, the better an admissions director can hide his or her lower statistic candidates. Look at the Forbes wealthiest individuals and aside from the over-proportional number of drops outs (note: I believe in education opening doors and do not condone dropping out of school even if you are Bill Gates, Larry Ellison, Marc Zuckerberg or Sheldon Adelson), you will see a lot of billionaires that attended schools that many prospective students don’t have on their radar.

3. Be proactive:

If your grades tanked, take classes to mitigate concerns before you apply.  If your scores tanked, obtain tutoring you need to bring your score up (tutors have helped my clients increase their scores dramatically in just a few hours of intense study).

4. Show your interest:

Visit the school. Get to know students and alumni who can go to bat for you on your behalf.

5. Be interesting:

One-trick ponies don’t make for interesting reading. The Art of Admissions is very much like blind dating. It’s up to you to get the admissions committee interested in eating a 5-course meal with you rather than speeding through a cup of coffee.

6. Make a compelling case of acceptance.  

Show fit with the school’s culture, strengths, and values. Reveal leadership, contribution, impact, innovation, and a track record that will cause the admissions readers to say “Wow!”

As an admissions director, I was more likely to invite the person behind an interesting, well-written application for an interview – regardless of stats. If a candidate could engage me in the interview, I would recommend a well-spoken, witty candidate over someone who had high numbers and offered only one dimension.

Of these lower statistics students whom I accepted, many have become successful business people – and some of the most prestigious alumni.

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By Natalie Grinblatt Epstein, an accomplished Accepted consultant/editor (since 2008) and entrepreneur. Natalie is a former MBA Admissions Dean and Director at Ross, Johnson, and Carey. Want Natalie to help you get accepted to business school? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

• GMAC Releases Tool That Organizes, Compares & Explains Major Rankings

What to do About a Low GPA, an Encore [Episode 201]

U.S. News & World Report’s 2018 Best Business Schools (MBA & EMBA) Rankings

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Do Low Stats Sink Your App? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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Why is it so difficult to find EMBA acceptance rates?

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The Most Important Thing You Can Do This Week If You’re Worried About  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Apr 2017, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: The Most Important Thing You Can Do This Week If You’re Worried About Your GMAT/GRE
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Applying to b-school is a challenging process – all the more so if you have any weaknesses in your profile, such as a low undergrad GPA or weak GMAT. It’s important to have a strategy, and really understand your own profile – and the role that those stats play in the admissions process.

There’s still time to sign up for this week’s webinar, How to Get Accepted to B-School With Low Stats!

Guided by Accepted’s founder, Linda Abraham, you’ll learn how to evaluate your profile from an admissions perspective; how to mitigate low grades and/or test scores; and how to adapt your application strategy to account for weak points in your profile.

In just an hour, you’ll gain knowledge that can help you create a successful application strategy! Sign up now.

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post The Most Important Thing You Can Do This Week If You’re Worried About Your GMAT/GRE appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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The Most Important Thing You Can Do This Week If You’re Worried About   [#permalink] 24 Apr 2017, 10:01

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