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E-GMAT: A New and Better Approach to GMAT Prep  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Mar 2019, 09:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: E-GMAT: A New and Better Approach to GMAT Prep
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Interview with Rajat Sadana & Payal Tandon, Co-Founders of e-GMAT [Show Summary]
Do you need to prep for the GMAT? Dreading having to go to class? Unsure about online test prep? Our guests today are GMAT online test prep experts. We’ll be speaking with the co-founders and CEO and COO of e-GMAT, the GMAT prep company that has 1,818 reviews on GMAT Club and a 4.7/5 rating.

An inside look at e-GMAT: The innovative test prep company that MBA applicants are raving about [Show Notes]
Our guests, Rajat Sadana and Payal Tandon are the co-founders of e-GMAT, which they started in 2010. Today they are also CEO and COO respectively of e-GMAT, which has 1,818 reviews on GMAT Club as of 2/19 when I prepared for the podcast, and most are 5 stars.

Rajat and Payal, how did you get involved with GMAT test prep? [2:10]
We were very fortunate as kids to have had great educations. We both had personalized attention and were provided the opportunity to learn anything we wanted to learn. We are technologists at heart and realized that not everyone is fortunate enough to have a private tutor, so we wondered if we could provide instruction similar to a private tutor but at the price of a book. The idea was to build a learning platform to provide this private-tutor-like instruction, and we had to start with something. With the GMAT there was clear demand, and we felt we could carve a niche. Our engineering background was key. We came at it from an ed-tech perspective as opposed to a GMAT perspective.

There are lots of test prep companies out there? What does e-GMAT bring to the marketplace that it previously lacked? [6:25]
The existing learning architectures were book-based or private tutor-based. For online courses, you learn a bunch of concepts, but there is no feedback on how well you’ve learned. A few people can excel in this type of format and are able to build on the foundational work. Others continue to try and learn a few more times and many give up. What we wanted to do was provide immediate feedback when you are learning a concept. So, you learn a concept with a 10-15 minute video, and then take an embedded quiz. If you haven’t learned any aspect of the concept well enough, you get that feedback and try again.

It is very structured. With each concept there are typically three different objectives to fulfill, and the quiz will test whether you know them all. If not, you go back and learn again and take the quiz again.

An example of a concept to learn about is modifiers. The three objectives are to learn what a modifier is, whether it is serving the intent of modifying a noun or clause, and placement of the modifier. At the end of the concept you take a 5-7 question quiz.

When you work with a private tutor they are able to tell you how to attack a problem step by step. When you make a mistake, they help you explicitly on where you made the mistake. With the other learning architectures you don’t learn where in the thought process you diverged from the correct answer. The goal of e-GMAT is to provide a private tutor experience at a more effective cost.

How is e-GMAT structured in terms of its products? [13:30]
We have two kinds of products that serve slightly different needs. We have an on-demand product for someone who needs a private tutor-like set up, but has enough discipline not to need to interact with another person. They want to be on their own to have flexibility to set their own study schedule and don’t want to be tied to a weekend schedule, which our live sessions are. 70% of our students do this. Then we have an instructor-led course, which provides accountability and live sessions to refine applications. Students have to study the material first and in the session the instructor reinforces the concepts.

What happens when a student gets stuck, particularly in the online course? [17:30]
We have a dedicated forum for every concept, which every student has access to. While watching the video, you can pause, post your situation/doubt and we will respond within one business day, but typically within about eight hours. When you are taking quizzes, our forums are even more modular, and you can look up posts related to each question by answer choices. You can filter forum choices and see what other students had doubts about.

Can you discuss your guarantee? [20:39]
We guarantee a 4-point improvement in verbal score, and 3-point improvement in quant score. We are very comfortable with this because the average improvement on verbal is typically 9 points, on quant is 7 points, and our refund rate is just 1%.

What are your top GMAT prep tips? [23:48]
The first thing is to create a milestone-driven study plan. There are so many students who just hope that they will put in effort and get the score they want, but you need to think of it as a project and make sure you have well-defined milestones. So if you want to get to a 730, evaluate where to aim. Spend time figuring out how you will get to the score, and set milestones for each aspect – algebra, geometry, reading comprehension, etc. The GMAT is a very logical test, so when you think of a 720 score you could get it with a Q50 and V38, and another combination is Q48 and V40. Question which one is right for you. If you choose the Q48, how will you get there? Evaluate your starting and ending abilities.

Make sure you allocate enough time to achieve your milestones. For every 10-point improvement on the test, we recommend 8-10 hours of study. So if you are starting with a 600 and want a 700, you will need to put in about 80-100 hours of study. Question where you need to spend it, and decide that based on your starting and ending scores. How do you split your time in verbal? You don’t have to get to the same level of expertise in each section, it depends on your innate capabilities and milestone goals. At the end of the day treat GMAT study as a project, prioritize, and spend time to get those returns.

The latest thing we have created is an online milestone-driven study plan that will calculate milestones to go for, and will be available to anyone. You spend five minutes, input the number of hours you will spend studying on a daily basis and when you plan to take the exam, and it will show how your score will improve. It gives you a neat calendar view.

What do you see in your crystal ball for e-GMAT? [32:40]
The principle for us of course is to provide private-tutor based instruction. Going forward we have made drastic changes to the architecture which will get to 80-90% of what private tutors can provide.

Logical verticals for us to go into are the GRE, LSAT, etc., but we want to make sure our product is perfect before we take the technology and replicate it with other tests.

Soon we will provide our own mock quizzes. We don’t currently offer our own mock tests, but we will, and reporting and insights you get will be beyond what you get for other forms of GMAT prep.

What would you have liked me to ask that I didn’t ask? [36:07]
When we started this business, we started with a focus on internationals and English as a Second Language applicants, and serving that niche. Since then we have invested and expanded product offerings and 30% of our customers are native-born English speakers, as opposed to the international population.

Remember that balancing GMAT study with a professional career gives you a glimpse of what your life will be like in business school, so it’s the opportunity to work on time management, managing relationships, etc.

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Related Links:

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• MBA Admissions Consulting Services

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• HEC Paris MBA: Excellence, Diversity, and Community

• Exploring London Business School’s Master’s in Analytics and Management

• What’s New at INSEAD?

• Innovative Education in NYC: All About Cornell Tech

• The Interviewer Becomes the Interviewee

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The post E-GMAT: A New and Better Approach to GMAT Prep [Episode 304] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Share Your Experience. Take This Survey  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Mar 2019, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Share Your Experience. Take This Survey
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Have you been accepted to b-school? Do you want to win $500?

Help others get to where you’ve gotten by sharing your experiences in the 2019 AIGAC survey. This survey is for applicants who have been admitted to one or more business schools that start Aug./Sept. 2019.

Your survey results will help everyone involved in the admissions process – from the business schools themselves to consultants like us to applicants like you.

You can read more about AIGAC (Association of International Graduate Admissions Consultants) and this survey here.

Do your part to help out those around you by taking this survey by March 31st – plus, you’ll be entered in a drawing to win $500!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Share Your Experience. Take This Survey appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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How to Apply to B-School with a Low GPA  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Mar 2019, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How to Apply to B-School with a Low GPA
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Not proud of your undergraduate GPA? Concerned it may ruin your chances of getting into a top MBA program? It’s time to tackle this issue head-on and create a plan for successfully applying to business school with a low GPA.

What defines a low GPA?
Maybe you’re a perfectionist and you’re bummed about your 3.9 GPA, so let’s be clear about what “low” really means. First, please – if your GPA is more than 3.7, you’re FINE (in this area at least). Save your worry-energy for something else.

For our purposes, a low GPA is:

  • One that is at least 0.3 points below your target school’s average GPA for accepted students (on the U.S. 4.0 scale).
  • One that is below your target school’s 75th or 80th percentile.
You can find this info in the Accepted Selectivity Index or the school’s class profile.

Both of these definitions require you to look at your numbers relative to those of the schools that you are targeting. So if you have a 3.2, and the average GPA of the entering class is a 3.2, then you do not have a low GPA. However, if you have a 3.2 and the school you are aiming for has an average GPA for accepted students of 3.6, then all of a sudden your average 3.2 GPA transforms into a low 3.2 GPA.

Analyze your GPA: 5 questions to ask yourself
Put your GPA into perspective by asking yourself these questions:

  • Did you have a hard time adjusting to college, so your GPA took a hit your freshman year, but improved the following year, and then every year after that? Did you end up recovering from that first clueless year by landing on the Dean’s List for the last two years and having a 4.0 GPA the last year?
  • Did an illness in the family or other circumstance beyond your control cause a drop in your grades for a specific period of time, thereby dragging down an otherwise tip-top GPA?
  • Did you declare the wrong major and have poor grades in that major until you realized your true calling, at which point you started to excel?
  • Were you working part-time to support yourself or did you have a major sports commitment in order to qualify for an athletic scholarship that you needed to maintain in order to stay in school?
  • Did your GPA have a downward trend, starting out strong in your first year, and then declining as you lost your motivation throughout the following years?
These questions present several causes that could explain a low GPA in order of difficulty in overcoming them (easiest to hardest). The degree of severity of your case will influence how much effort you need to put in to mitigate the situation.

Addressing your low GPA: Let’s get to work
Your goal will be to convince the adcom that your GPA isn’t an accurate reflection of your abilities and that you’re capable of much, much more. Here’s what you need to do.

  • Ace that GMAT
    You need a high GMAT score. The test score indicates you have the raw talent and aptitude for your chosen field.

  • Get yourself some A’s
    Take a class or two (or more) in a quant or verbal subject (depending on where your weaknesses are greater). Maybe even pursue another degree. But no matter what you do, make sure you’re ready to study hard and earn those A’s. This is your last shot at demonstrating that you are a good student with strong skills and you’ve got what it takes to excel in b-school.

With an above average test score and evidence that you can perform academically, you are well on your way to dealing with that low GPA.

How to Provide Context for Your Low GPA in Your Optional Essay
Use the optional essay to provide context to your GPA, showing that whatever contributed to your poor performance is either not a factor in your life anymore or is something that you’ve learned how to deal with so that it doesn’t affect your performance any longer.

Whatever your reasons may be (extenuating circumstances or circumstances totally beyond your control), explain the situation in a straightforward, honest manner. For real mistakes that you’ve made, fess up, take responsibility for your actions, and indicate that you are a changed person who has learned lots and moved forward. But no whining please!

Keep in mind: B-school admissions is a holistic process
MBA admissions is about much more than your GPA. You cannot look at any single number and focus exclusively on it, especially once you weigh in the circumstances that led to your low GPA and the trending direction of your GPA. Your GPA also doesn’t at all reflect the impact of your diversity and non-academic experiences – important factors taken into consideration by adcom members.

When you are admitted to b-school (or rejected, for that matter), it is due to the complete package, the holistic sum of all your parts. Yes, your GPA is extremely important, and you’d be unwise to think otherwise – but it’s not the be-all and end-all of your admissions profile. Work hard, demonstrate your academic abilities in other ways, and prove to the adcom that you’re ready to hit the books and ace the heck out of b-school.

Do you need help evaluating your profile, deciphering your stats, and creating a strong MBA application strategy? Our admissions advisors have worked with thousands of applicants and know what works and what doesn’t when it comes to every aspect of the admissions process. Check out our MBA Admissions Consulting & Editing Services and work one-on-one with your personal advisor who will help you get ACCEPTED.

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Related Resources:

• Applying to Business School With Low Stats: What You Need to Know, a free guide

Applying to Top MBA Programs with a Low GPA, a short video

• Top 10 or Bust: Dispelling 2 MBA Myths

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post How to Apply to B-School with a Low GPA appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Do MBA Rankings Matter?  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Apr 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Do MBA Rankings Matter?
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You’ve defined your goals and assessed your qualifications. Now it’s time to move on to the program research stage of the MBA admissions process. There is a sea of information out there: rankings, books, MBA program websites, MBA fairs, Poets & Quants, student and adcom blogs, school open houses, your neighbor’s sister’s boyfriend’s dad – the list goes on and on.

Where do the rankings fit in?
If you’ve read our blog, attended our webinars, read our admissions guides, etc., you know we caution against relying exclusively and uncritically on rankings to decide where to apply (so that means no “I’m just going to apply to the top 5”).

Well, here we’re going to suggest the opposite: use the rankings…at the beginning of this research phase, because they are helpful at the start. But don’t stop with the rankings.

6 steps to using the rankings to your advantage
Below you’ll find 6 key steps for doing MBA program research in a way that a) yields meaningful info for decision-making and list-making, and b) is efficient and focused – conserving and respecting your precious time.

Step 1: Look at rankings
With your competitive profile in mind, look at several broad MBA rankings. Determine what levels/ranges of programs for which you’re competitive generally (taking into account reasonable reaches, on-pars, and maybe safeties). Note the plural – rankings – as each has its idiosyncrasies (U.S. News,Financial Times, Bloomberg Businessweek, etc.). Sometimes a program will be below or above your target competitive range, but it still might make sense to apply for some reason (in the following steps you’ll gain the additional info needed to make this decision).

Step 2: Talk to people
At this point it’s good to start talking to people with MBA experience – colleagues, friends, mentors, etc. – and add a qualitative dimension to the above step. Ask about their impressions and experiences, and assess how their views align (or not) with what you gleaned from the rankings vis-à-vis competitive fit.

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Step 3: Search industry/function-specific rankings
Research industry- and/or function-specific rankings in your area(s) of interest. Identify programs from these rankings that overlap with those from Step 1 (and factoring in any learning from Step 2).

There may be programs in your competitive range that do meet your academic needs but don’t show up on specialization rankings (e.g., Kellogg isn’t known as a finance school but offers much in this area and might be great for someone in PE who will be doing a lot of managing; Columbia doesn’t often appear on entrepreneurship rankings but is quite strong in it). So indulge in some unstructured exploring, to “see what you might see.”

Step 4: Start digging deeper
Go to the source – the websites of programs that interest you. Look for specifics that you care about (structure of curriculum, flexibility, appealing concentrations, students from a given industry or geographic region, placement strengths, etc.). Listen to your gut as well as your objective response; does it feel like a good fit? Remember, you can keep the rankings info in mind as you look deeper into your target programs. For example, check the schools’ average GMAT and GRE scores – are your scores within range?

Step 5: Go to MBA fairs and visit schools
What better way to understand your fit with a school than to see the students, professors, and administrators in action? You will get the most out of MBA fairs and school information sessions at this point in your research, after you already have a good idea of what each program offers and how you’d fit in competitively.

If you can swing it, a school visit will really help you get the vibe of the schools you’re considering. A school may seem perfect to you on paper, but if you step on campus and feel like a fish out of water, you may disqualify the program (though, be sure you’re giving it a fair chance). On the other hand, if you visit a school that you were iffy about and immediately “click” with the school, that’s a great sign that a program that may not have seemed like “the one” should become a top contender.

Step 6 – Put the puzzle pieces together
You’re narrowing and refining a list. Now it’s time to focus more on adcom and student blog posts, searching the web for articles and information, and attending school information sessions, and of course, continuing to talk to people with MBA program experience and insight. You should now have a finalized or near-finalized list of programs to apply to. You can continue refining the list and deciding on other programs to add later.

NOTE: This is a guideline, not a rigid process. Always stay open to discovery – maybe you’ll come across a school in a blog or a respected colleague suggests a program you hadn’t considered. Maybe you thought you wanted to stay in the U.S. but were seduced by INSEAD… Who doesn’t love a pleasant surprise?

4 ways you should NOT use the MBA rankings
The most important thing you need to remember is that while the rankings are useful, they do not offer you a complete picture.

So now I’d like to present you with the other side of the story – the rankings’ limitations. Blinding yourself to the rankings’ flaws could lead to an expensive, time-consuming mistake: choosing the wrong MBA program for you.

  • They don’t measure your priorities. The rankings are general reports usually based on some data and survey responses from students, alumni, and faculty…none of which include you (yet). You can gain valuable information from the rankings, as we’ve discussed above, but when it comes down to it, they measure the responses and priorities of others; take them with a grain of salt and realize that everyone’s situation and experiences are different…yours included!
  • General rankings hide strengths (and weaknesses) in specific areas. There are numerous “gem” programs that thrive outside the top ten or top twenty. Many MBA students have a great chance of gaining acceptance PLUS receiving financial aid at these gem schools. Sure, getting into Wharton would be a huge accomplishment. But what if you got accepted to Washington Foster, got a full scholarship, and found that when you visited the campus, you felt right at home? Then the fact that Foster doesn’t sit in the top 10 may not matter nearly as much.
  • Averages are exactly that. Average. They aren’t a cut-off and don’t reflect extenuating circumstances or the interplay between myriad factors in an admissions decision. At every school there will always be applicants who are accepted with below-average stats and who are rejected with above-average stats.
  • Surveys, especially surveys of students and alumni, can be gamed. Students and alumni know that higher rankings increase the value of their degrees and have an incentive to think kindly of their schools.
In short, don’t give the rankings too much importance. Don’t replace school research and self-reflection with rankings to determine where you should apply or attend.

Do you need help discovering the MBA programs that are the best fit for you, or assistance on any other element of the application process? Review our MBA Admissions Services and work one-on-one with an expert advisor who will help you get ACCEPTED.

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One, a free guide

• Are You a Competitive Applicant at Your Dream School?, check out Accepted’s MBA Selectivity Index

3 Ways to Determine Which B-Schools Are a Good Fit for You

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Do MBA Rankings Matter? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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MBA Admissions Tip: Dealing with a Low GPA  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Apr 2019, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: MBA Admissions Tip: Dealing with a Low GPA
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You want to apply to business school but are worried about your lower-than-ideal GPA. Don’t worry – it’s NOT the end of the world! Explaining a low GPA can be difficult, but it can be done. The first thing you need to do is examine your GPA’s trend. Once you understand this, you’ll have an easier time explaining to the MBA admissions committee what happened.

3 GPA trend scenarios
  • Scenario A – 3.0 GPA, upward trend
    You goofed off for your first few semesters and didn’t weigh the consequences. You failed some classes and started out with an embarrassingly low GPA not because of lack of ability, but because of immaturity. Mid-sophomore year you wised up and continuously hit above the 3.8 mark for the rest of your undergraduate career.
  • Scenario B – 3.0 GPA, downward trend
    Your college experience started out with a motivated streak of genius – three solid 4.0 semesters in a row. But then…things took a turn towards apathy and laziness and your grades began to suffer significantly.
  • Scenario C – 3.0 GPA, static
    You work hard, but not too hard. You take some classes seriously, and some not so much. You never really cared about school or grades to really put the effort in. A few years out of school and a life-changing career move have motivated you to new heights and you want to apply to b-school. But now you need to deal with your less-than-impressive record.
Interpreting these 3 scenarios
If you’re like the student in Scenario A, then you don’t really have too much to worry about (unless you’re applying to a top MBA program for which a 3.0 GPA is a significant hurdle). Many students early in their college careers have a couple of bad semesters because of immaturity. Your grades went up, proving your capabilities and your increased maturity.

If you’re more like Scenario B’s student, then you may be in more of a bind. You’ve proved your abilities by acing those first few semesters, but why the dramatic downturn? Did things get too difficult for you? Do you have trouble performing under pressure? Or do you just not care about improving and perfecting your academic capabilities?

The problem of mediocrity looms over you if you’re like our Scenario C student. You will need to prove your skill level if you want to be considered for a spot in the next MBA class.

Recovery plans for each scenario
  • Student A: You don’t need to prove ability as much as motivation and seriousness, which you may have already proven with your last few years of work. You may want to ask one of your recommenders to vouch for your maturity and steadfastness. A high GMAT/GRE score will help.
  • Student B: You will need to enroll in some college courses to prove your verbal and/or quantitative abilities (especially if your test scores weren’t so great). You’ll want to make sure your essays express your newfound motivation as well as your keen writing abilities. Your essays should include clear anecdotes that illustrate how you’ve matured since your last few semesters and how your skills should be judged based on recent work experience, rather than past college experience.
  • Student C: You’re in a similar boat as Student B. You’ll want to retake some of your math and English courses and you’ll want to get solid A’s this time. B’s and C’s just won’t cut it if you want to prove you’re b-school material. Strong essays and letters of recommendation will also boost Student C’s chances of acceptance.
Understanding your unique scenario
Of course many of you will not be like Students A, B, or C. Your grade-dive may have resulted from illness or family crisis or circumstances beyond your control. Or perhaps steady, mediocre grades resulted from your working 20-30 hours per week to support yourself through school. There are many other scenarios too. The key is to prove that today you have the ability to excel in your target MBA programs and that the circumstances that contributed to the poor marks in college no longer affect you.

Moral of the story: A single low number can be explained or put in a less damaging context with hard work and a solid application strategy.

And the consultants at Accepted CAN HELP. Check out our MBA Admissions Consulting Services to learn more about how we can guide you to acceptance at your target b-school, even with that imperfect GAP!

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Related Resources:

Navigate the MBA Maze, a free guide

5 A’s for Your Low GPA, a podcast episode

How to Apply to B-School with a Low GPA

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post MBA Admissions Tip: Dealing with a Low GPA appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Can You Improve Your B-School Stats In 1 Hour?  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Apr 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Can You Improve Your B-School Stats In 1 Hour?
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Well, maybe you can’t literally change your numbers – but here’s what an hour of your time can do: You can learn how to understand your stats and their significance for your application, and also (most importantly!) learn how to mitigate low stats in your MBA applications.

It’s understandable that your GPA and GMAT score could induce anxiety – we get that.

We know that the application process is hard as it is, especially if you’re dealing with low stats. That’s why we’ve created How to Get Accepted to B-School with Low Stats, a webinar that addresses precisely these concerns. Accepted’s founder, Linda Abraham, will show you how to decipher your profile strategically so that you can mitigate weaknesses, emphasize strengths, and get accepted.

There’s still time to register for How to Get Accepted to B-School with Low Stats – reserve your spot now!

Reserve Your Spot:

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Can You Improve Your B-School Stats In 1 Hour? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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How MBA Adcoms Evaluate Your GPA  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Apr 2019, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How MBA Adcoms Evaluate Your GPA
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“But my undergrad school was highly competitive…”

“But I worked 20 hours a week during college…”

“But I was a varsity athlete at a Division I school…”

“But even though it took me a couple of years, once I got it together I made dean’s list every semester…”

“But my PhD GPA was 3.9…”

These are the fretful “buts…” of MBA applicants who fear their applications will be doomed by a poor undergraduate GPA. Behind every GPA is a story. Often it’s a story that arouses frustration, confusion, uncertainty, and even anguish on the part of applicants.

Your undergraduate GPA is important – this is true – but adcoms view your GPA (like the rest of the application) holistically. And this isn’t just how they view low GPAs, but how they view all GPAs.

How your GPA fits into the MBA application puzzle
First, no matter how well or how poorly your GPA represents your actual ability, the adcom will consider it and take note of it when reviewing your application. You cannot, by convincing explanations or subsequent courses, erase a low undergrad GPA from adcom consideration, but you can work to mitigate it, sometimes substantially.

Second, the adcom will examine the context of your GPA. They can see some aspects of that context automatically when they look at your transcript (like rigor of courses and school), but for other contextual hints (like pneumonia during your sophomore year), you will need to state them directly, usually in an optional essay. They will see whether your GPA trends up (good) or down (a problem that might need explaining), and they will see from other areas of your application whether you were working during school and/or participated in a lot of activities, etc.

Why the context of your GPA matters
The admissions committee will draw some conclusions from this contextual review. Here are a few scenarios that could account for a low GPA and that you may want to draw attention to in an optional essay:

  • If you worked while you were in college, the admissions committee will probably assume you had to, and so will be less likely to blame you for time management challenges that weren’t necessarily your choice.
  • If you started college in the U.S. barely knowing English and struggled for a year or two until your passion and ambition propelled you to the dean’s list, then you should explain this particular challenge in an optional essay.
  • If the adcom sees lots of activities, they’ll note the positive aspects (sociable, contributor) and the possible negative aspects if your GPA was low (less than great time management and prioritizing).
  • If your GPA trends up, they may understand that you were just a kid still growing up, and will most likely view your last two years as more representative.
They’ll also note things like change of academic focus (like your grades really improved once you switched your major from physics to East Asian Studies).

Part of your job in writing your application is to anticipate and envision the context the adcom sees for your GPA and fill in the gaps. For example, if an overabundance of activities undermined your grades, you can show in your essays how you subsequently learned to better manage your time while maintaining your vibrant community involvement.

Moreover, good GPAs are not just given an “OK” from the adcom. They actually review your transcript. An otherwise strong GPA that has one C in your only quant course could raise an eyebrow. So could a GPA that starts very strong and trends down – even if it’s solid in aggregate.

“Fixing” your undergraduate GPA through post-undergrad actions
Post-undergrad efforts also shape the context of your undergrad GPA. A strong GMAT, demanding professional certifications, an “alternate transcript” of courses to demonstrate academic capability and counter a low undergrad GPA, and/or a strong grad school GPA all will help to mitigate a low GMAT – but again, they will not erase it from your profile. They will have other positive impacts though, such as showing commitment and maturity.

Self-evaluating your GPA through the eyes of the adcom
The adcoms’ use of context in evaluating GPA means ultimately there is no one formula applied. It’s nuanced, unique to the candidate, and qualitative. Try to see your GPA in their eyes to determine (a) if you need to provide context for your performance, (b) if you should take steps to mitigate your low GPA like additional courses, and (c) whether your GPA in its holistic context enhances your candidacy at a given school.

Need help evaluating your admissions profile to determine what actions you need to take to boost your competitiveness? Need assistance creating an application that highlights your strengths and mitigates your weaknesses? Check out Accepted’s MBA Admissions Consulting & Editing Services to learn more about how our expert advisors can help you get ACCEPTED.

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Related Resources:

MBA Action Plan: 6 Steps for the 6 Months Before You Apply, a free guide

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How to Apply to B-School with a Low GPA

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NYU Stern’s New Online Masters in Quantitative Management  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Apr 2019, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: NYU Stern’s New Online Masters in Quantitative Management
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Merging two hot new programs — analytics and management — as well as online delivery so that you don’t need to leave the workforce, NYU Stern has created a new exciting entry in the master’s in management and data analytics space. Let’s learn about it from the Vice-Dean for Online Education at NYU Stern.

Interview with Kim Corfman, vice dean for MBA programs and online learning at NYU Stern [Show Summary]
In this interview with Dr. Kim Corman, Vice Dean of Online Learning at NYU Stern, she discusses Stern’s brand-new online option in graduate management education. Aimed at early-career applicants, the program merges two degrees in demand: data analytics and a master’s in management.

NYU Stern’s new online master’s in quantitative management [Show Notes]
Our guest today is Dr. Kim Corfman. She is a Professor of Marketing, NYU Stern’s Vice Dean for Online Learning, and Academic Director of Stern’s MBA in Fashion & Luxury. She has served previously as Vice Dean for MBA Programs, Academic Director of the Langone Part-Time MBA Program, and coordinator of the doctoral program in marketing. Needless to say she knows a ton about management education and NYU Stern, and as I mentioned, today we’re going to talk about Stern’s brand new MS in Quantitative Management.

What is the Master’s in Quantitative Management at NYU Stern? Can you provide an overview? [2:10]
The program is a combination of things we’ve never done before and is designed for a market need we didn’t feel was being met. It is for people without business degrees, and combines the business essentials (essentially MBA core courses) with an emphasis on analytics. It is designed to help professionals become more able to use data, which is very important to their professional success – how to ask for data, analyze it, and make decisions from it. It is online and you can attend from anywhere, with two short residential immersions each August, offering the chance to meet the cohort and do interactive face-to-face work. The program is lockstep and fits well with working professionals’ schedules, and can reach people all over the world.

Business Analytics master’s programs have been mushrooming and the number of master’s in management programs have also increased. How did NYU Stern decide to combine analytics, management, and online in one distinctive program that a student can complete in 20 months. [4:11]
We could have developed an online master’s in management, but are sensitive to the fact that most of our MBA students find the most benefit to their careers from more analytics than they thought they needed. It is critical everywhere and the new business essential. Any working professional has greater demands on their time, but our format makes it much easier to do. In a given week it is self-paced, with optional synchronous Q&A sessions with faculty, and various deliverables each week.

I realize that an undergraduate degree in business is not a requirement for this program, but what kind of coursework are you looking for on applicant transcripts? [5:42]
We are looking for people who know how to do well in whatever they have done in the past. They have taken courses that challenged them and have succeeded in them, and who know why they are taking this program. We take people with backgrounds in social science, liberal arts, natural science, engineering, everything. We don’t require quantitative coursework per se, but applicants do have to take the GMAT, so a quantitative assessment is part of the process.

What else are you looking for in the admissions process? [6:45]
Applicants who know why they are doing this, and that it fits with their objectives. We also want good community members. While this program is online it has the same needs – students are working in virtual teams throughout the program.

On the Stern website, the MSQM is listed as an “early career program.” Can you define that? Is relevant work experience optional? What is the maximum amount of work experience that you would consider? [8:16]
We don’t require any work experience. We are open to applicants who have just graduated from college and even with no internships. No academic or professional background is required, but a plan is important. It may be someone who wants a business career but doesn’t have one yet, or someone in an entry-level job that needs the business basics and has an appreciation for the importance of using data. There is no maximum amount of experience but the program is definitely not for mid-career or more senior professionals.

Can you describe the application process for the MSQM? [10:18]
It is much like the application process for the MBA. We ask about academic background and professional background. There is one essay where we ask about the applicant’s career plan and how the program fits into that. We have an optional essay for anything additional the applicant feels is important to tell us, and a recommendation. Some applicants are invited to interview if we are not 100% sure if they would be a good fit, but most are admitted without an interview. Interviews can be done online or in person.

How does the MSQM differ from an MBA with a focus on analytics or NYU Stern’s MS in Business Analytics for Experienced professionals? [11:57]
Our MBA students all have work experience, take the same core, essentially, with a few additional courses that are electives. The MSQM is lockstep so has no electives, which is a big difference. If someone wants to explore additional functional areas like finance or marketing they will not have the opportunity to do that beyond the core course. The MSQM is also half the number of credits.

What if an MSQM student or graduate decides they want an MBA? Will Stern give them credit for their MSQM coursework? [13:00]
They can’t get credit if they have already been granted the degree, which is a rule we are stuck with. However, if they want to make the transition to the part-time MBA program before the MSQM is granted we will transfer all of their credits. This is why we made the application process so similar – we don’t want to admit people to the MSQM program whom we would not admit to the MBA program.

What size do you anticipate for the inaugural class of 2020? What do you see going forward? [14:12]
We are capping the first class at 50 to remain nimble. A smaller group means we can adjust on the fly if necessary. Ultimately we won’t have cohorts larger than 50 but may have multiple cohorts.

Any discussion at NYU Stern about additional online degree programs? [14:40]
We have five online certificate programs already and will develop more in the next year or so. In terms of an online MBA, it seems unlikely. We do have online content for pre-MBA content and online primers.

At the time the show airs, the next and last application deadline will be May 15 for the inaugural class starting in August 2019. Any advice for those interested in the MSQM and starting in August? [15:53]
Finish your application and get it in!

What about those planning ahead to apply next year? How can they prepare? [16:51]
Take the GMAT or GRE, and if you don’t like your score, take it again. We only take the highest score. Be thoughtful about your reasons for wanting to attend, and take time with your essay. If you don’t have a math background, taking some time to brush up would be helpful as it will really benefit you while in the program.

What is the most exciting part of launching this program to you? [17:43]
It is exciting to combine business, analytics, and online. It is also exciting that we have signed up faculty who are among the best at Stern, who are excited to go through the process of developing online courses. We have an in-house learning science lab with experts in edtech and an in-house studio, and we are producing all of these ourselves. It takes about three months to produce a course from start to finish, and it is interesting taking a learning objective and exploring the tools available to achieve them in an online setting.

What is a frequently asked question about the program that surprised you since announcing the MSQM? [22:14]
“Will it say online on my diploma and transcript?” It won’t, and the program will be just as good, and in some ways better, than a traditional program. Someday I hope “online” won’t imply “inferior.”

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Related Links:

NYU Stern MS in Quantitative Management

NYU Stern MBA Application Essay tips

Accepted’s Admissions Consulting Services

Related Shows:

Exploring London Business School’s Master’s in Analytics and Management

Early Career Management and European MBA Programs with Jamie Wright

The Berkeley MFE: One Tough Program with Amazing Opportunities for Grads

UCLA’s MS in Business Analytics: Prep for the Sexiest Job of the 21st Century

MIT Sloan Master’s in Finance: How to Get In! 

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The post NYU Stern’s New Online Masters in Quantitative Management [Episode 306] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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The Most Important Thing You Can Do This Week If You’re Worried About   [#permalink]

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New post 09 Apr 2019, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: The Most Important Thing You Can Do This Week If You’re Worried About Your GMAT/GRE
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Applying to b-school is a challenging process – all the more so if you have weaknesses in your profile, such as a low GPA or GMAT score. It’s important to have a strong application strategy and an understanding of the role that low stats play in the admissions process.

There’s still time to sign up for this week’s webinar, How to Get Accepted to B-School with Low Stats. Guided by Accepted’s founder, Linda Abraham, you’ll learn how to evaluate your profile from an admissions perspective; how to mitigate low grades and/or test scores; and how to adapt your application strategy to account for weak points in your profile.

In just an hour, you’ll learn how to craft a successful application strategy! Sign up now.

Reserve Your Spot:

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Stanford MBA Class of 2020 Profile  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Apr 2019, 18:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Stanford MBA Class of 2020 Profile
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Who makes up Stanford MBA Program’s entering 2018 class? Here’s a look at the class profile.

  • Total Applicants: 7,797
  • New Students: 419
  • Women: 41%
  • International: 42%
  • U.S. Minority: 27%
  • Average GMAT Score: 732
  • Range of GMAT Scores: 600-790
  • Average GRE Verbal Score: 165
  • Range of GRE Verbal Scores: 155-170
  • Average GRE Quantitative Score: 165
  • Range of GRE Quantitative Scores: 152-170
  • Average TOEFL Score: 113
  • Range of TOEFL Scores: 101-120
  • Average GPA: 3.73
  • Average Work Experience: 4 years
  • Range of Work Experience: 0-11 years
  • Advanced Degree Holders: 14%
<< Work with an admissions pro to create a Stanford GSB applicationthat gets you accepted! Click here to get started. >>

Breakdown of Undergraduate Majors:

  FIELD
  PERCENT

  Business
  18%

  Engineering / Mathematics / Natural Sciences
  34%

  Humanities/Social Sciences
  48%

Previous Industry Experience (306 Organizations Represented):

  FIELD
  PERCENT

  Investment Management/Private Equity/Venture Capital
  27%

  Consulting
  19%

  Technology
  17%

  Government/Education/Nonprofit
  10%

  Consumer Products & Services
  7%

  Financial Services
  6%

  Arts/Media/Entertainment
  4%

  Healthcare
  4%

  Manufacturing
  3%

  Other
  5%

  Clean Tech/Energy/Environmental
  3%

  Military
  2%

  Real Estate
  1%

Schools and Countries:

  U.S. Institutions
  81

  Non-U.S. Institutions
  91

  Countries (Including U.S.)
  63

Are you aiming to submit your R3 Stanford MBA application this spring? Or are you going to apply next fall? Either way – we can help! Check out our MBA Admissions Consulting & Editing Services and work one-on-one with an expert advisor who will help you create an application that will get you to the top of the Stanford GSB admit pile. Learn more here.

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Related Resources:

Stanford GSB MBA Application Tips & Deadlines

Show Intellectual Vitality to Get into Stanford GSB, a short video

Understanding Stanford GSB’s Interest in Personal Qualities and Contributions

Last updated on April 16, 2019.

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Journey to Duke Fuqua: Marine-Turned-MBA, Entrepreneur, and Dad  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Apr 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Journey to Duke Fuqua: Marine-Turned-MBA, Entrepreneur, and Dad
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Learn how real students navigate their way through the business school admissions process and b-school itself with our What is Business School Really Like? series.

Meet Andrew, a Marine veteran, entrepreneur, new father, and first-year MBA student at Duke Fuqua.
Andrew, thank you for sharing your story with us!

What made you decide to go to business school?
Andrew: Leaving the Marines I knew that in order to be hired into mid-level management positions, an MBA would be a good route for me to take.

How did you decide which programs to apply to? Were you willing to relocate to attend school?
Andrew: I only applied to Fuqua. I loved my experience so much that I put everything I had into being accepted. In theory, I would have relocated but I am local to Raleigh so relocating wasn’t my first choice.

Applying to only a single business school shows real dedication. What was your level of familiarity with Fuqua prior to applying? How did you know it would be a good fit?
Andrew: I visited Fuqua several times before applying, and I found everyone to be very open and welcoming. I was especially drawn to its veteran community. It didn’t take long for me to realize that Fuqua was where I wanted to be, and I decided that making a full commitment to Duke gave me the best chance to have success with its rigorous and competitive application process. My family and some of my friends thought I was a little crazy for applying only to Duke, but it was a risk I was willing to take, and I’m gratified it’s worked out so well.

Did you experience any bumps along the road to business school admission? How did you identify and deal with the issues?
Andrew: The experience in general is extremely stressful. I reached out to current students and alumni in order to get insight and help.

What about extracurriculars? What extracurricular activities did you participate in either in the military or your civilian life?
Andrew: I worked with a nonprofit organization called Warrior Wellness Solutions from 2013-2018. WWS is based in Durham and offers holistic health solutions to American military veterans who are wounded, ill, or injured. I’ve worked as a peer mentor and in event planning and fundraising. Working with the veteran community has been and continues to be a tremendously rewarding experience.

Duke is known to have some creative (and tricky!) application essay questions. How did you approach your essays? How, specifically, did you approach the 25 Random Things About You question?
Andrew: With my essays, I tried to caveat my experiences as an entrepreneur and Marine into a relatable experience with the culture at Fuqua. I took specific experiences I had and explained the lessons learned and how I would translate those lessons to better the Fuqua community I wanted to belong to. The essays are your chance to show a side of yourself outside of your resume. My 25 things essays highlighted highs, lows, growth, and experiences. I really tried to show the admissions team my true self outside of my resume.

Once business school began, what surprised you most about the experience?
Andrew: How thoughtful and friendly my classmates are. I wasn’t able to attend many social events because my wife was 8½ months pregnant. My section mates understood this and surprised me with signed books and baby gifts for my daughter. It was very touching and a huge surprise.

Congratulations on the birth of your daughter! How do you manage to juggle your roles as student, husband, and father?
Andrew: It was hard, especially at first, but I learned that Team Fuqua is for real. My classmates and first-year team really kept me afloat for the first few months after my daughter was born. They actually stopped class to surprise me with baby gifts. They bought us a mamaRoo bassinet and onesie pajamas, and my entire 76 student section signed books and left notes for my daughter. When I was struggling to keep up from lack of sleep, some of them took the time to help me in subjects within their areas of expertise, and they made sure I grasped the material well enough to pass my classes. It reminded me a lot of the Marines – the fact that it takes a team effort to achieve objectives. As for outside of the classroom, I put my duties as a father and a husband first. Things have gotten a little easier now that our daughter is older, and my wife and I have even found time to go out socially every once in a while.

How have your experiences and duties in the Marines prepared you for business school and for the world of business?
Andrew: Serving as a sergeant in the Marines taught me several things, including the value of teamwork and the importance of leadership skills. It also helped me develop the kind of work ethic that kept me going while attending school fulltime and working in my family’s entrepreneurial startup. Marines are taught to accomplish their mission no matter what roadblocks they may encounter, and even to make something out of nothing if that’s what it takes. I’m learning to apply those lessons in the business world and to share them with friends and classmates whenever it seems appropriate.

What is Juicekeys and what role have you played in the company?
Andrew: Juicekeys is an entrepreneurial startup created by my wife Kelly and her brother Chris. Kelly became interested in the power of healthy foods when she was transitioning from a career-ending gymnastics injury years ago. Like me, Chris is a former Marine, and he was exposed to many different juice bars when he was stationed in California. After he left active duty, he completed his MBA at USC Marshall and brought the vision of Juicekeys to Raleigh. It had very humble beginnings, with an original staff of only Kelly, Chris, and their parents.

In three years, we have grown from one to three locations and we now have more than 45 employees. I started at Juicekeys in a managerial position and later became the director of operations. It’s pretty much a jack-of-all-trades job that includes leadership development, supply chain, customer relations, and whatever else might be needed at a particular moment.

How did your civilian experiences in entrepreneurship make you a stronger MBA applicant?
Andrew: This is a great question! When people tell me they want to be an entrepreneur, I usually give them the Southern response of “Bless your heart.” Being part of a startup isn’t for everyone. I know what it’s like working 20-hour days and taking no pay in the hope of growing a business into a successful venture. And we’ve been able to create what I and others think is the best juice bar in North Carolina. I’m confident that the things I’ve learned at Juicekeys, and also in the Marines, will help me as a mid-level or senior executive in a company that values people with a Fuqua MBA.

What do you think your classmates would be surprised to know about you?
Andrew: I am a complete teddy bear. The Notebook is one of my favorite movies. I told my wife on our second date I was going to marry her. She told me I was “crazy.” I laughed and said “You’re probably right, but I am going to marry you.” When I proposed to my wife I got in touch with Nicholas Sparks and had him sign her favorite book with the inscription “Kelly will you marry Andrew, with love Nicholas Sparks.” This December will be five years that we have been together.

Did you grow up in the South, and if not, how do you have ties to the area? How has Duke’s location affected your business school experience?
Andrew: I grew up in Chicago and Southern California. My wife’s family is from Raleigh. I love the area and think Durham is a great place to live.

Was it difficult to become a student again after years spent away from the classroom?
Andrew: I’m actually in my fifth year of school at this point. I started my undergraduate degree in 2014 while I was transitioning out of the Marines. It was discouraging at first because after taking placement exams at the local community college I had to start with developmental courses. My math score, for example, was around the eighth-grade level. I graduated from Campbell University with a 3.92 GPA in 2018 and started at Fuqua last August. It was definitely hard at times, but I had an amazing support system to give me a reality check when I needed it.

Fuqua has definitely been the most difficult coursework I have personally experienced. The great thing is you’re always around amazing people who are extremely talented. So it is easy to push yourself in order to match the output of your peers. Working in teams has also been a huge help because more often than not one of us has experience in the subjects we may be covering and can help the group to understand better.

Have you participated in a student internship?
Andrew: I will be starting an internship in project management at Cisco this summer. I will be working on global strategy, planning, and operations. Cisco is a great company and it’s high on my list of places I’d like to work within the tech industry. I’m grateful for the opportunity and can’t wait to get started.

Why did you decide to pursue an MBA as opposed to one of the many related graduate degrees that seem to be gaining popularity in recent years (Master’s in Finance, Master’s in Management, Master’s in Data Analytics, etc.)?
Andrew: An MBA from Fuqua holds a lot of weight. We have world-class professors that teach every one of these subjects. For example, I could choose to major in Finance and Decision Sciences. In my opinion, not all MBAs are created equal. In my opinion, Fuqua is the best MBA program in the United States. We are truly a community that looks after one another.

What are your plans, post-MBA?
Andrew: I’d like to work in the technology industry in project or product management, with a backup plan of doing tech sales. The decision sciences, marketing, and strategy classes I’ve attended at Fuqua have been priceless in helping me prepare to accomplish that goal.

What advice do you have for students beginning their MBA journey?
Andrew: I would say be genuine, be intentional, be yourself, ask for help, and build relationships. I would not be at Fuqua if I didn’t have advocates in the form of admissions staff, current students, the Duke Armed Forces Association, and alumnus. I wanted to be at Fuqua more than any other school, so I really put myself out there with admissions. I sent updates on my progress and stayed in touch with staff. When the time came to choose candidates for acceptance there was no doubt how committed I was to coming to Fuqua.

Do you have questions for Andrew? Questions for us? Do you want to be featured in our next What is Business School Really Like? post? Know someone else who you’d love to see featured? Are there questions you’d like us to ask our students in this series? LET US KNOW!

You can learn more about Andrew by connecting with him on LinkedIn. To learn more about Juicekeys, click here.

Are you setting out on your own b-school journey? We can help you reach the finish line! Check out our MBA Admissions Consulting Services to team up with an admissions expert who will help you join the ranks of thousands of Accepted clients who get accepted to their dream schools.

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Related Resources:

Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One

Meet Duke Fuqua’s New MBA Admissions Director, Shari Hubert, a podcast episode

Duke Fuqua MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Journey to Duke Fuqua: Marine-Turned-MBA, Entrepreneur, and Dad appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Journey to Duke Fuqua: Marine-Turned-MBA, Entrepreneur, and Dad   [#permalink] 25 Apr 2019, 09:01

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