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Chicago Booth MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jun 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Chicago Booth MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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The two required questions have 250-word minimums. While specifying MBA essay length minimums is very unusual, it fits with Booth’s history of breaking the mold. At the same time, don’t infer that the absence of a maximum is a license for verbosity. As Booth says, “We trust that you will use your best judgment in determining how long your submission should be.” Do use your best judgement, otherwise you will be showing a different kind of judgement, and you really don’t want to do that.

Chicago Booth MBA Application Question #1:
How will the Booth MBA help you achieve your immediate and long-term post-MBA career goals? (250 word minimum)

In order to answer this question you need to know three things:

1. Your immediate post-MBA goal, which you should be able to define in terms of function (what you want to do after you earn your MBA — not study during the MBA) and industry or type of company. Sometimes location can play a role, and if so, provide that information, too.

2. Your longer-term professional aspirations. These don’t have to be as specific as your short-term goal, but the two should be related.

3. The Chicago Booth program. Specifically how do you intend to use distinctive Booth strengths to build on your past and prepare yourself for your chosen career? If it’s not obvious how your previous education and experience when combined with the Booth MBA will help you achieve both goals, clarify.

To answer the question, you can start with a seminal experience, preferably an achievement that shaped your goals and aspirations. Tell a story about this experience and describe what you learned from it and how it has influenced you and your short- and long-term goals.

Then talk about Booth. Look at the curriculum, strengths, career placement, and extra-curricular activities that support your ambitions.

Alternatively, start with the achievement of your goal — a day-in-the-life approach — then flash back and tell the story of that seminal experience and how it and Booth prepared you for the future day that started your essay.

Last year I attended the AIGAC conference, hosted for one morning by Chicago Booth. During the informative sessions at Booth, the admissions committee members made clear that they are looking for students who demonstrate self-awareness and direction. They want to read your application and see, based on what you’ve done, that you’re going to make a mark on the world.

Write this essay so that it shows both self-awareness and your ability to make that mark.

Chicago Booth MBA Application Question #2:
Chicago Booth immerses you in a choice-rich environment. How have your interests, leadership experiences, and other passions influenced the choices in your life? (250 word minimum)

Choose 1-3 important decisions that you’ve made, ones where the outcome was anything but certain, you had lots of options, and there was no obvious right way or clear winner among the options. Think of a fork in the road with many pathways leading from it.

You were then in a choice-rich environment, like the one that Booth will provide. What “interests, leadership experiences, and other passions” influenced your choices? Is there a common thread to your decision-making process that will tie together these decisions, as well as your essay?

An excellent response to this essay has to show the self-awareness that I heard about at the conference as well as a clear sense of priorities. The ability to prioritize will be vital to anyone accepted to Chicago Booth’s MBA program.

Response Guidelines:

• Length: There is no maximum length, only a 250 word minimum. We trust that you will use your best judgment in determining how long your submission should be, but we recommend that you think strategically about how to best allocate the space.

• Acceptable Formats:Submissions must be entered into the text box provided in the application.

Chicago Booth MBA Optional Essay Question:
Is there any unclear information in your application that needs further explanation? (300 words maximum)

This is a restrictive optional question. Booth is really asking only for information that will clarify something that is unclear, like a drop in grades one semester or a period of unemployment, or why your current supervisor is not writing your letter of recommendation.

This question, unlike the required questions, does have a word limit. Respect it.

Chicago Booth MBA Reapplicant Question:
Upon reflection, how has your perspective regarding your future, Chicago Booth, and/or getting an MBA changed since the time of your last application? (300 words maximum)

The answer to this question is critical for MBA reapplicants, and it’s different from most reapplication essays in that it’s more about your perspective than what you’ve done. Chicago wants to see growth and development. Same old, same old got you a ding last time and probably will again this time.

Let this brief essay show a maturation and evolution of your goals and reasons for wanting to attend Chicago Booth. Let it also reveal that you meet Chicago’s criteria better this year than last.

For expert guidance with your Chicago Booth MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to Chicago Booth’s MBA program and look forward to helping you too!

Chicago Booth 2019-20 MBA Application Deadlines:

Application Deadline
Decisions Released

 Round 1
September 26, 2019

11:59 p.m. CST
December 5, 2019

 Round 2
January 7, 2020

11:59 p.m. CST
March 19, 2020

 Round 3
April 2, 2020

11:59 p.m. CST
May 21, 2020

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted. Linda earned her bachelors and MBA at UCLA, and has been advising applicants since 1994 when she founded Accepted. Linda is the co-founder and first president of AIGAC. She has written or co-authored 13 e-books on the admissions process, and has been quoted by The Wall Street Journal, U.S. News, Poets & Quants, Bloomberg Businessweek, CBS News, and others. Linda is the host of Admissions Straight Talk, a podcast for graduate school applicants. Want an admissions expert help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Which Applicants Get Accepted to Chicago Booth?

Why MBA?, a free guide to writing about MBA goals

Focus on Fit, a podcast episode

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Chicago Booth MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Listen to Admissions Straight Talk for interviews with admissions directors, MBAs, test prep pros, and financial aid sources.
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog
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Why Does an MD Need an MBA? This UCLA Student Tells All  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jun 2019, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Why Does an MD Need an MBA? This UCLA Student Tells All
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Interview with Trisha Mathelier, MD/MBA student at UCLA [Show Summary]
In today’s episode Trisha Mathelier, an MD/MBA student with the Drew/UCLA Medical Education Program, shares her medical school journey as well as what led her to decide on getting an MBA in addition to her medical degree. She fills us in on the uniqueness of the Drew/UCLA program, as it provides her with the opportunity to be part of a small and close knit community at Drew (just 24 students per class), but also with the wealth of resources at the large world-class research program at UCLA. Trisha then lets us know what she has planned for the immediate term and the future as an MD/MBA – she plans to be a clinician and also a serial entrepreneur.

An MD/MBA candidate speaks about her passions for both the clinical and business sides of healthcare [Show Notes]
Our guest today is Trisha Mathelier, MD/MBA student participating in the Drew/UCLA Medical Education Program. Tricia grew up just outside New York City and graduated from Harvard College in 2013. At Harvard she majored in Psychology, Social and Cognitive Neurosciences, and Global Health and Health Policy. She took a gap year between graduation and started at UCLA in 2014. She intends to earn her MBA in 2020 and her MD in 2021.

Can you tell us about your background outside of medicine? Where you grew up? What do you like to do for fun? [2:41]
I grew up in a suburb outside of Manhattan. I am an only child, and was very active in my church and youth group. I volunteered a lot through my church, but most of my time was spent cheerleading – I was on a competitive all-star team. Before that I did competitive gymnastics and dance. Every weekend practically throughout high school I traveled all over the east coast for cheerleading competitions on a nationally ranked team – from Maine to Florida. When I wasn’t in the gym I just enjoyed being a kid. I would go to the beach, go to the lake, essentially a typical suburban New York life. One piece of advice that I really took to heart around that time that I would pass along to your listeners is to do things that you are generally passionate about, because people will see the passion and know you are genuine and not just doing something to impress an interviewer.

How did you know you wanted to be a doctor? [5:31]
I had a really close relationship with my pediatrician – he was a close family friend. After every appointment he would take me into his office to get a sticker. Looking at all the degrees and awards I was so impressed and told him so, and he said I was smart and I could be a doctor, too. I decided I was going to be a pediatrician just like him.

My mom was studying then to be a nurse and as a single mom of an only child she didn’t always have a babysitter so I would sometimes go with her to classes or the lab or listen along to her audio lectures. She would play them nonstop like music, and there were times in the tape where the lecturers would stop and ask questions to keep the listener engaged. There was a failure to thrive question in newborns around jaundice. It was an open ended question, and I answered it and was right. My mom was amazed and asked how I got it right. I said, “I’ve been listening to your nursing stuff and think I kind of get it.”

You took a gap year between undergrad and med school. What did you do and are you happy you did it? [9:55]
I started working for an NGO my senior year in college called Physicians for Haiti. A Haitian hospital was designing a social medicine course to figure out the social determinants of health. They invited students from the US and other countries to participate, and so I was involved in interviewing students for the program, setting up the curriculum, and the logistics on how it would work. During the summer just after graduation I was in Haiti to help implement the course. I then applied to medical school and worked as a scribe, which was a great way to gain clinical experience and knowledge. A lot of the documentation I did was really relevant during my first year and made learning easier and a lot more fun. The gap year was one of the best decisions of my life.

Why did you decide to attend Drew/ UCLA Medical Education Program? [12:45]
I knew I wanted to work in urban underserved communities. I am passionate about that, and the Drew/UCLA program focuses on it. Of the 190 students who are UCLA medical students, 24 are also enrolled at Charles Drew University of Medicine. We get unique clinical opportunities that allow us to work in the underserved communities of L.A. and have a required thesis that targets urban underserved healthcare. It made sense to prioritize a program that allowed me to focus on that. A lot of other schools I applied to had similar tracks and urban scholars, but the Drew/UCLA program was a lot more comprehensive in my opinion.

What have you liked best about your medical school experience at UCLA/Drew? [14:54]
Drew is an HBCU that is really small – in terms of med students affiliated there are only 25-30 per class. HBCUs are known for having a more close knit family feel. I am pretty sure most of the administrators are in my contacts list in my phone, and the community feels like a family. Drew is in the heart of a very underserved community, and it is great to have those kinds of mentors. UCLA is in West LA and serves a completely different demographic. They have a lot of respected specialties, and I could do any kind of research I wanted to do, covering all of my expenses. The benefit of being in the program is I don’t have to compromise – I have a smaller tight knit school but the benefits of being at a research powerhouse, which to me is the best of both worlds.

What could be improved? [17:14]
I would love to see nationwide an improvement in the pipelines for those underrepresented in medicine – to have access to attend medical school and improve diversity. I would like to see more women and underrepresented groups as faculty. Medicine to me is a boys club, so I would love to see more female surgeons, neurologists, orthopedic surgeons, and I would like to see the transition happen sooner.

Where are you at in your medical studies now? [18:40]
I completed my third year of medical school and now am wrapping up my first year in the MBA program. For a second degree the program is typically more flexible, and you can double up on coursework to finish in a condensed amount of time. I have done the opposite and decided to take a complete leave of absence from medical school so am completely enrolled in the full two years for the MBA program and will graduate in 2020, returning to medical school to finish my fourth year. This summer I was afforded so many unique opportunities for my internship but ultimately settled on consulting, most likely on a healthcare project.

Why did you decide you also wanted an MBA? [20:50]
UCLA is a research powerhouse, and I was afforded the opportunity to go back to Haiti, where my family is originally from, to lay the foundation to pilot a research study. After the study was finished it was published, and essentially laid out that HIV positive pregnant women in Haiti have a high percentage of STDs, and they were not being treated. However, they wanted treatment and had to sometimes travel often as far as three hours away for treatment. The study confirmed there are STDs in Haiti and women are willing to do whatever it takes to get to a clinic for treatment, so how can we create large scale expansion to make treatment available in rural areas, not just the capital.

I realized I don’t have the skills to make these types of decisions, and I don’t want to be the researcher who just asks the questions. I want to see what the evidence says and develop solutions. During my clinical rotation I found myself interested in the hospital logistics and operational issues. One clinic was notorious for not having regular hours, and the reason was because the clinic had so many patients coming through each day, and it was understaffed. It seemed like the work flow could be redesigned to make things more efficient, but again I didn’t have the skills or background to answer those questions.

I also am very interested in entrepreneurship, healthcare startups, digital health, and a lot of the healthcare startups popping up. There are so many great gadgets and companies, how do you manage their impact? So ultimately, I realized I am very interested in the business side of healthcare, which I can’t learn more about in just medical school.

Why did you decide you wanted to do the full two-year MBA in addition to medical school, essentially elongating it? [24:41]
I had the option to limit the MBA experience but I wanted the greater connections and internship, which wouldn’t have been possible otherwise. I knew I wanted my career to be a balance of clinical and non-clinical, but in order to decide that balance I need to experience the non-clinical side, too. Like many premeds I initially had a rigorous timeline I was going to follow. When I took the gap year I realized that in the grand scheme of things it didn’t matter. An extra year wouldn’t make or break my experience so I adopted that over time, realizing that an extra two years to get an MBA has more value than negative consequences.

You have a blog, Three Thousand Miles. Can you tell us a little bit about it? When did you start writing it? Why? [26:56]
I started it my second year in medical school and honestly started it out of procrastination – I was supposed to be studying for something. I’ve always been a blog reader, and one day I was sitting in my apartment and just decided to do it. It’s called Three Thousand Miles since that is how far from home I am. I shared admissions tips to start, because I volunteer with admissions and work with postbac students and lead workshops for them every month, so I had a lot of experience in medical admissions and wanted to share free resources. I realized that not everyone has access to great counselors like I did. Most of the time people reach out and say they found my blog when searching how to study for the MCAT.

Over time I realized there is more to my life than just medical school – I love photography, baking, cooking and travel, and I wanted my blog to highlight that you can go to med school and still do other things – you can have unique interests and hobbies and school doesn’t have to consume your life. The med school stereotype is that one is obsessed with med school, worried about getting in, staying in, block exams, etc., etc. I wanted to hold on to my freedom. I wanted to still have fun, not always being in the library and always studying. I wanted to show you can have diverse interests and pursue them and still be a great student and become a great doctor.

How do you see your career evolving after you finish at UCLA/Drew? [30:58]
I have a lot of interests in healthcare. Four classmates and I are applying to be a part of the business creation option at UCLA Anderson. We are working on building a company that we want to go live after graduation. Ideally I see myself as a cofounder of a company that has funding and being a resident. In the long term I see myself being a serial entrepreneur. I am really passionate about kids, especially those with developmental disabilities, and I see myself a practicing doctor but with multiple startups. Creating and innovating is definitely part of my future.

What would you have liked me to ask you? [33:18]
What has been the highlight of my experience so far. For me it has been forming this business creation option team. There are people so passionate about healthcare. We connected because we were all interested in putting together scalable solutions in the healthcare space. They all have worked in healthcare before business school, but seeing that you don’t have to be a clinician to have a meaningful role in healthcare is really neat. In business school there are people with all kinds of different backgrounds, and the interdisciplinary collaboration is really exciting.

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Related Links:

The Ultimate Guide to Secondary Essay Question from Top Med Schools, a free download

Three Thousand Miles, Trisha’s blog

Accepted’s Medical School Admissions Services

Accepted MBA Admissions Services

Related Shows:

Doctor, Mother, and SMILE Score Creator

Endocrinologist, Writer, and Bollywood Critic Tells Her Story

Family Practitioner, Author, Advocate: An Interview with Dr. Alexa Mieses

Kaiser Medical School: State-of-the-Art, Patient-Focused, and Free

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Why Does an MD Need an MBA? This UCLA MD/MBA Student Tells All [Episode 316] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
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Applying for Your MBA Through The Consortium: Best Deal in Town  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jun 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Applying for Your MBA Through The Consortium: Best Deal in Town
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Our consultants receive a lot of questions from clients about applying to MBA programs through The Consortium for Graduate Study in Management. I’ve heard myths flying around that suggest that applying to one (or more) of the 20 Consortium schools through The Consortium’s application is disadvantageous. But as the former director at two Consortium schools, I can assure you that nothing could be further from the truth — provided you meet The Consortium’s minimum qualifications.

Though the requirements, the schools, and the corporate partners have changed over its 53-year history, The Consortium is not only the best deal in town; it also gives Consortium members an alumni network that expands throughout the 20-member schools.

Consortium history and mission
Initially, The Consortium provided opportunities for young African-American men to have a fair chance at rising up the corporate ladder via the MBA. Later, The Consortium added Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, and women to its mix. Membership came along with the fellowship.

However, after the Supreme Court decided on the Gratz vs. Bollinger and Grutter vs. Bollinger cases, The Consortium opened up its doors to offer membership to selected applicants that further the mission of The Consortium in providing inclusion of African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Native Americans in business. Members and fellows do not have to belong to these groups. Thus, membership is no longer race-based, but rather mission driven. Applicants must also demonstrate the ability to succeed in an MBA program.

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Consortium member benefits
Like the undergraduate Common Application, candidates can apply to up to six Consortium schools with only one application for a fraction of the cost the candidate would incur applying to each of these schools separately. The catch: the candidate must rank the schools. Having just attending a Consortium recruiting event, the admissions representatives on the panel suggested that candidates rank the schools from the most preferred to the least preferred. However, in order to obtain a fellowship, I believe there is a strategy involved in the ranking.

To be sure, Consortium membership assures the candidate of access to the orientation and corporate partners. In fact, many candidates receive internship offers prior to the start of school. Membership, however, does not guarantee admission to the schools of choice, nor does it guarantee a full-tuition fellowship.

To summarize the benefits:

  • Applicants can use a single application for up to six schools at one low cost.
  • Members gain access to a vast alumni network of 20 schools that includes mentorship from Consortium alumni (formal or informal).
  • If selected as a member, students gain access to corporate sponsors at orientation.n
  • If selected as a fellow, students receive full tuition and stipend.
To learn more about applying through The Consortium and the strategy behind the rank order, please contact me for a consultation. Moreover, Accepted will offer Consortium applicants a special coupon code for 10% off all purchases of $2000 or more for services to help you apply through The Consortium. The best deal in town just got even better.

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By Natalie Grinblatt Epstein, former admissions dean/director at three top business schools. Natalie has reviewed over 70,000 applications, interviewed over 2,500 candidates, and has trained nearly 700 admissions directors and alumni volunteers to select outstanding candidates for admission. Her clients gain admission to top programs including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, MIT, Cornell, Columbia, Berkeley, and NYU. Natalie holds an MBA from Michigan Ross. Want Natalie to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid In Your MBA Application Essays, a free guide

School-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips

Approaching the Diversity Essay Question

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Applying for Your MBA Through The Consortium: Best Deal in Town appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Listen to Admissions Straight Talk for interviews with admissions directors, MBAs, test prep pros, and financial aid sources.
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Last Chance to Save Big on MBA Application Services!  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jun 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Last Chance to Save Big on MBA Application Services!
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It may seem like it’s too early to be thinking about your business school applications, but deadlines will be here before you know it, and you don’t want to be playing catch up with a low GMAT score, a poorly thought out essay, or the discovery that a recommender doesn’t have time to write your letter.

Putting together a top-notch MBA application takes significant time and energy, and it is never too early to start the process. From our experience coaching thousands of applicants to business school admissions success, we know the gift of time. Having the luxury to craft essays over a series of weeks or months as opposed to days can make a huge difference in quality – the opportunity to write an essay, put it away, and reflect on it later is extremely valuable.

To encourage you to give yourself that gift of time in the application process, we are offering a 10% discount on all non-rush Business School Admissions Services through, Thursday June 20. Use coupon code GETSTARTED at checkout to save, and let the admissions experts at Accepted help you put together your best application package!

You can do this. We can help.

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Note: The coupon can’t be combined with another offer, is for non-rush orders only, and can only be used once.

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Last Chance to Save Big on MBA Application Services! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Listen to Admissions Straight Talk for interviews with admissions directors, MBAs, test prep pros, and financial aid sources.
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Follow Accepted on Twitter
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Michigan Ross MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jun 2019, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Michigan Ross MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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The Michigan Ross MBA program is thriving. Its graduates are getting jobs throughout the United States and the world. Here are a few of the stats:

  • 94% of 2018 grads had at least one job offer within three months of graduation.
  • Per Poets & Quants, Amazon is the top employer of Ross grads, and their 2018 Employment Report shows that consulting and tech snagged over 50% of all Ross MBAs.
  • The average GMAT score for the entering class of 2018 was 720, climbing from last year’s average of 716, which followed a dramatic 8 point increase for the 2017 entering class.
  • Average GPA moved up a notch from 3.46 to 3.48
Despite these fantastic results, Ross has the highest acceptance rate of any program in the US News Top 10: For the entering class of 2018, 27.1% of applicants were accepted, and in terms of Accepted’s Selectivity Index Ross placed #16.

All this means that the Michigan Ross MBA program is a fantastic option that is easier to get into than other top programs.

Michigan Ross 2019-20 MBA application tips
Ross kept the basic structure the same as last year and changed only one of the short answer questions. It still has the short answer questions with a little bit of choice to them. These short answer questions give you the means to paint a unique, multi-dimensional picture of yourself. Keep that goal in mind as you respond. You don’t have to be something you’re not, but you can certainly use these questions to provide context for events described elsewhere and different perspective on who you really are. Remember, the application is a way for the admissions committee to meet you.

The career goals essay has some minor and insignificant changes to the wording.

Michigan Ross MBA application short answer questions
Select one prompt from each group of the three groups below. (Choose one from each group; 100 words each)

While I wish Ross would have given you more room to answer these questions, make the most of what you’ve got. The first question you’re going to have to ask yourself is “Which prompts should I respond to?” Answer the question in each group that is easiest for you to answer and that allows you to present events and experiences that complement each other and the information provided in other parts of the application. You want to minimize repetition and overlap.

Ross hasn’t labeled the groups thematically. It seems to me that Group 1 is an opportunity for you to talk about something you’re proud of — a contribution you made or an achievement. Group 2 relates to handling a difficult experience or situation. And Group 3 is about you interacting with others. Again, choose the individual questions that allow you to present yourself best. All three groups ask for a behavioral response, where you discuss one experience or situation and reflect on it. You don’t have room for more.

Think a lot about what you want Ross to know about you as you choose the questions to answer. The question tells you what they want to know. Now answer it in such a way that allows you to tell them what you want them to know.

Group 1

  • I want people to know that I:
  • I made a difference when I:
Group 2

  • I am out of my comfort zone when:
  • I was humbled when:
Group 3

  • I was aware that I am different when:
  • I was challenged when:
The last prompt is the new one and broader than the related prompt last year.

Given the 100-word limit on each response to these behavioral questions, describe the incident or situation and succinctly analyze it in terms of the prompt. For example, why do you “want them to know” about X (Group 1, #1) or why were you humbled or out of your comfort zone for Group 2.

Michigan Ross MBA application essay questions
Ross MBA essay #1
Michigan Ross is a place where people from all backgrounds with different career goals can thrive. Please share your short-term career goal. Why is this career goal right for you? (300 words)

Ross is very clear in what it’s asking for with this MBA essay question: Your short-term career goals and the reasons (and experiences) that make this goal right for you.

The question is pretty straightforward. The word limits, however, will make it difficult to go into any depth. You could start with a “day in the life” that you foresee immediately after your MBA and discuss how you developed this vision for yourself. Given Ross’ strong behavioral approach I’d focus on a pivotal experience that shaped your goals. The experience could also reflect your fitness for your goals once you earn a Ross MBA.

Alternatively, you could start your application essay with an achievement or challenge that you faced and how it has influenced your goals. Tell the story of that experience and how it influenced your short-term MBA goals.

Ross MBA essay #2 (Optional statement)
This section should only be used to convey information not addressed elsewhere in your application, for example, completion of supplemental coursework, employment gaps, academic issues, etc. Feel free to use bullet points where appropriate.

Use this statement if necessary to provide context surrounding circumstances that effected your performance or that may lead admissions readers to the wrong conclusion about your abilities.

Ross doesn’t provide a word limit, but keep it short.

For expert guidance with your Michigan Ross MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to Michigan Ross’ MBA program and look forward to helping you too!

Michigan Ross 2019-20 Application Deadlines:

Application Deadline
Decisions Released

 Round 1
September 30, 2019
December 18, 2019

 Round 2
January 6, 2020
March 18, 2020

 Round 3
March 30, 2020
May 8, 2020

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted. Linda earned her bachelors and MBA at UCLA, and has been advising applicants since 1994 when she founded Accepted. Linda is the co-founder and first president of AIGAC. She has written or co-authored 13 e-books on the admissions process, and has been quoted by The Wall Street Journal, U.S. News, Poets & Quants, Bloomberg Businessweek, CBS News, and others. Linda is the host of Admissions Straight Talk, a podcast for graduate school applicants. Want an admissions expert help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your MBA Application Essays, a free guide

Interview with the Michigan Ross Admissions Directors, a podcast episode

Michigan Ross’ Brand-New Online, Part-Time MBA, a podcast episode

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Michigan Ross MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Life at USC Marshall as a Future Investment Banker  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jun 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Life at USC Marshall as a Future Investment Banker
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Learn how real students navigate their way through the business school admissions process and b-school itself with our What is Business School Really Like? Series.

Meet Paolo, a student at USC Marshall with an interest in investment banking.
Thank you Paolo for sharing your story with us!

How did you know you would be a good fit for investment banking?
Paolo: I have always been someone who loves to learn and continue to challenge myself. This intellectual curiosity goes beyond finance and is one of the main drivers in my decision to pursue an MBA.

I know that investment banking is very merit-based and senior professionals trust you and give you more responsibility when you demonstrate your capabilities. I knew I would be a good fit because I am someone who is always looking to improve and am not someone who becomes complacent.

Additionally, my friends who are in banking and everyone I have talked to are equally as driven and motivated. I strongly believe that you tend to adopt characteristics of people around you, and I want to be in an environment where people are always striving to be better.

Did you encounter any bumps along the road to business school acceptance? How did you identify and address any issues?
Paolo: The aspect of the application process that took the most time was crafting my personal statements. With so much to say but to be subject to a word limit, I found myself revisiting and refining my story several times to make sure that I was conveying my story while making sure to address all the key points in the essay prompts.

At first, I sought several outside opinions on how to strengthen my essays. As I went through the process, I found that every person I asked had different ideas and various changes that I was actually taking a few steps back rather than making progress with my statements.

I think the most challenging part was reaching the point where I stopped reaching out to people, take all the useful feedback I received to that point, but ultimately move forward and feel truly comfortable with my own voice.

I understand you started USC Marshall already knowing you wanted to pursue investment banking after graduation. How is Marshall a good fit for someone with IB aspirations?
Paolo: Although Marshall is not known for being a target school for finance, the USC network is such a valuable resource for recruiting. USC touts the strength of the “Trojan Network” and I can honestly say that it lives up to the reputation. Based on my experience, bankers from USC are even more helpful throughout the process because they want to see more Trojans in investment banking and grow our presence in this community.

What has surprised you the most about business school so far?
Paolo: I was very surprised at how time-consuming all the non-academic events are. Within the first couple weeks of school, I found myself running around from club events, networking happy hours, and all social events trying to meet first and second years.

It really is a delicate balance and you realize that time goes by so fast and that you really want to make the most of every moment at school. Once you get in the groove, it was easier to prioritize the group projects, recruiting activities, and the social outings. That’s when you start to really enjoy business school. I still can’t believe that I’m halfway done with my MBA!

What do you like the most about USC Marshall? What could be improved?
Paolo: My favorite part about Marshall is our smaller class size. I can confidently say that I know almost everyone in my class and have socialized with them at some point during the first year. USC really sells that Trojan network and I now realize why USC alums are so eager to help. My experience with my friends and colleagues at Marshall has been nothing but incredible.

Although USC has definitely taken steps to address Diversity & Inclusion, I think Marshall could offer more courses or integrate this growing subject of interest with the curriculum.

The program office’s openness to feedback is also a great sign of Marshall’s dedication to keep improving and making the program better for future students.

What recruitment opportunities are available at Marshall?
Paolo: Because of the efforts of USC Marshall career center and alumni in finance and investment banking, particularly on the west coast, more and more banks are coming on campus for presentations and recruiting events. Marshall’s finance club organizes a roundtable in the fall where several banks in LA and San Francisco attend and speak about the internship opportunities available. Some banks visit campus while others host Days on the Job that consist of a presentation and a chance to network with the bankers as well as the recruiting team. Finally, Marshall also organizes treks to New York and San Francisco where students have the chance to visit several offices outside of LA and meet alumni and other important contacts for the recruitment process.

When and why did you reach out to Wall Street Mastermind?
Paolo: As someone who was really focused on one career track, I wanted to put myself in the best position to succeed in recruiting. In addition to the resources available on campus, I wanted to find an extra edge to help differentiate myself from other candidates. I reached out to Sam at Wall Street Mastermind in the middle of my recruitment process to identify ways to better approach each opportunity and maximize my chances at landing an internship.

What services have you received from Wall Street Mastermind? How does this program complement the MBA curriculum?
Paolo: From Wall Street Mastermind, I got a completely customized program to fit my profile. Sam worked with me one-on-one and helped strengthen each bullet point of my resume. We also addressed specific aspects of the interview process in order to highlight my strengths.

I think the Wall Street Mastermind is a great complement to the MBA curriculum because most of the skills taught at school aren’t specific to investment banking. Sam’s program builds on the best general practices taught at business school and takes it one step further by focusing on specific skills needed for investment banking.

What aspect of the WSMM program did you find most helpful?
Paolo: The most helpful part of the Wall Street Mastermind program was Sam’s unique insight as someone who has worked at a leading investment bank and been part of the recruiting team. To receive immediate feedback and hear about the nuances bankers look for in a resume and during the interview process was something that was invaluable and ultimately guided my whole recruiting process.

Did you participate in mock recruitment interviews with WSMM? Did you find them to be similar to your real interviews?
Paolo: Yes, Sam is very hands-on and is involved in every step of the process. We did both behavioral and technical mock interviews throughout the program and continually gave me feedback. Sam is constantly looking for ways to improve the program and our interviews were as close as it gets to the real interviews that I went through.

More about interviews: Were you ever asked a question during an internship interview that caught you off guard?
Paolo: As much as we tried to prep for every possible scenario, it is impossible to anticipate every question. Although some of the exact questions weren’t in the typical interview guides used by candidates, Wall Street Mastermind made sure that I was well-prepared for every interview and that I could tailor my story and strengths to different questions and scenarios. Ultimately, there wasn’t a question that I didn’t feel well-equipped to answer.

Where will you be doing your summer internship?
Paolo: I will be joining RBC Capital Markets in San Francisco for the summer.

Congratulations! What’s your secret?
Paolo: Thank you! It was a long journey, but I am very glad to have gone through it and have learned everything along the way. Honestly, there is no secret. I just tried to put myself in the best position to succeed – whether it is taking advantage of the resources on campus or utilizing external programs such as Wall Street Mastermind.

Investment Banking recruiting requires persistence and determination to push through even when prospects seem bleak. I approached the process with a mentality that there were elements that were out of my control and that I should focus on the ones that I could. Whether that is networking with more people, refining my technicals, or doing more mock interviews, these are completely in your control and that is your decision if you want to constantly improve.

Any advice for undergrads, MBA students or early-career professionals who hope to break into IB?
Paolo: It is never too early to start networking. Investment banking recruiting is such a people-driven process that the more connections, the higher chance you have to be successful. Although the quality of connections is more important than the quantity, having a head start gives you a chance to achieve both.

Do you have questions for Paolo? Questions for us? Do you want to be featured in our next What is Business School Really Like? post? Know someone else who you’d love to see featured? Are there questions you’d like us to ask our students in this series? LET US KNOW!

You can learn more about Paolo by connecting with him on LinkedIn.

Are you setting out on your own b-school journey? We can help you reach the finish line! Check out our MBA Admissions Consulting Services to team up with an admissions expert who will help you join the ranks of thousands of Accepted clients who get accepted to their dream schools.

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more.  Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Ida Valentine: Investment Banker, Inspirational Speaker, HBS 2021, a podcast episode

USC Marshall’s Kellee Scott: Don’t Be Rigid, Boring or Tedious! a podcast episode

USC Marshall MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Life at USC Marshall as a Future Investment Banker appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
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Duke Fuqua MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jun 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Duke Fuqua MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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Leadership, teamwork, ethics, and a global approach to business are essential elements of the Duke Fuqua MBA, which is why you’ll need to make sure you express your passion for these qualities in your application essays. Impress the Fuqua adcom by positioning yourself as an innovative leader and team player, as someone who can see the big picture, work collaboratively, and shape global business.

My Duke Fuqua MBA essay tips are in blue below.

Duke Fuqua 2019-20 MBA application essay instructions
You’ll need to provide your thoughts on three short-answer questions and two essays as part of your application.

Instructions for all written submissions:

  • Responses should use 1.5-line spacing and a font size no smaller than 10-point.
  • Do not repeat the question in the document you upload with your application.
  • Respond fully and concisely.
  • Length requirements vary by question and are detailed below.
  • Responses must be completed before submitting your application.
All submissions are scanned using plagiarism detection software. Plagiarism is considered a cheating violation within the Honor Code and will not be tolerated in the admissions process.

Duke Fuqua required short-answer essay questions
Instructions: Answer all three of the following questions. For each question, respond in 500 characters only (the equivalent of about 100 words).

  • What are your short-term goals, post-MBA?
    State what you see yourself doing immediately after you earn your MBA in terms of function and industry. If location or geography are important to your goal, include them. If you know the type of companies you would like to work for, you can include that information too, but don’t say you want to work for Company X, unless Company X is sponsoring you. Without sponsorship, a “Company X” answer is probably too narrow, but saying you would like to work for a firm like Company X would work.

  • What are your long-term goals?
    Your long-term goals should flow logically from your short-term goals. They can be fuzzier both in terms of direction and timing. But you should have them. They can, but don’t have to, include larger aspirations and present a broader perspective on where you are headed. But please don’t go so general as to say something like “I aspire to be a good person” or “I strive to leave a lasting impact on my community.” Nice sentiments, but way too vague.

  • Life is full of uncertainties, and plans and circumstances can change. As a result, navigating a career requires you to be adaptable. Should the short-term goals that you provided above not materialize what alternative directions have you considered?
    What’s your Plan B? If you can’t get a job at a leading strategy consulting firm – your first choice – what do you want to do? If Plan A is investment banking, what’s Plan B?

    Plan B should relate to Plan A and have the potential to prepare you for the achievement of your long-terms goals almost as well as Plan A. It should also be something that the Duke MBA will prepare you for.

Duke Fuqua MBA essay #1 (25 random things about yourself)
Instructions: Present your response in list form, numbered 1 to 25. Some points may be only a few words, while others may be longer. Your complete list should not exceed two pages.

For context: Fuqua believes different types of people, points of view, and experiences bring out the best in everyone. And above all, we place a premium on succeeding while making a positive impact on businesses, organizations, and the world. These ways of thinking set the Duke MBA experience apart, and this concept extends beyond the student body to include faculty, staff, and administration. When a new person joins the Admissions team, we ask that person to share with everyone in the office a list of “25 Random Things About Yourself.” As an Admissions team, we already know the new hire’s professional and academic background, so learning these “25 Random Things” helps us get to know someone’s personality, background, special talents, and more.

In this spirit, the Admissions Committee also wants to get to know you – beyond the professional and academic achievements listed in your resume and transcript. You can share with us important life experiences, your likes/dislikes, hobbies, achievements, fun facts, or anything that helps us understand what makes you who you are. Share with us your list of “25 Random Things” about YOU.

Have some fun with this list. It certainly allows a more creative approach than permitted by most essay prompts. Note that the question asks you to go “beyond the professional and academic achievements listed in your resume and transcript.” So you can list your Pez collection or perhaps your brief membership in a rock band, or the fact that you took violin from ages 6-18, or your membership in a gospel choir, or your volunteer work in a hospital, your needlepoint, your favorite recipe or photo. Gosh – the list is endless. Just let it reflect you. Think of this list as an introduction to potential friends.

For more insight into this question and the motivation behind, please read Megan Overbay’s, the former Director of Admissions, advice. Yes, it’s old, but I believe you will find it helpful. And very friendly. For even more ideas, check out Associate Dean for Admissions Shari Hubert’s 25 Random Things or these examples from different Fuqua students.

Duke Fuqua MBA Essay #2 (The Fuqua community and you)
Instructions: Your response should be no more than two pages in length.

Fuqua prides itself on cultivating a culture of engagement. Our students enjoy a wide range of student-led organizations that provide opportunities for leadership development and personal fulfillment, as well as an outlet for contributing to society. Our student-led government, clubs, centers, and events are an integral part of the student culture and are vital to providing you with a range of experiential learning and individual development experiences.

Based on your understanding of the Fuqua culture, how do you see yourself engaging in and contributing to our community, outside of the classroom?

Do your homework about Fuqua (and yourself) before responding to this question. What activities and groups appeal to you? How do you see yourself participating? Making a difference? Imagine how you would participate and sometimes lead. While you can reference similar activities in the past, keep the focus of this essay on what you would do at Fuqua.

One approach to responding to this question: Address a letter to a close friend or colleague and tell them how you would contribute to this very participatory culture. That letter could morph into this essay.

Duke Fuqua MBA Essay #3 (Optional – tell us more)
If you feel there are circumstances of which the Admissions Committee should be aware (such as unexplained gaps in work, choice of recommenders, inconsistent or questionable academic performance), please explain them in an optional essay.

Please do not upload additional essays or additional recommendations in this area of the application, and limit your response to one page.

Why isn’t your current supervisor writing your rec? Why is there a six-month gap on your resume? Why did your grades dip during the first semester of your senior year? What are your responsibilities while working for a family business after having left a prestigious investment bank, and why did you make the change? Answering any of those questions (but not all) could be the topic of your optional essay.

For expert guidance with your Duke Fuqua MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to Duke Fuqua’s MBA program and look forward to helping you too!

Duke Fuqua 2019-20 MBA Application Deadlines

Submission Deadline
Decisions Released

 Early Action
September 19, 2019
October 28, 2019

 Round 1
October 14, 2019
December 18, 2019

 Round 2
January 6, 2020
March 19, 2020

 Round 3
March 11, 2020
April 20, 2020

Applications must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Standard Time on the application date.

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted. Linda earned her bachelors and MBA at UCLA, and has been advising applicants since 1994 when she founded Accepted. Linda is the co-founder and first president of AIGAC. She has written or co-authored 13 e-books on the admissions process, and has been quoted by The Wall Street Journal, U.S. News, Poets & Quants, Bloomberg Businessweek, CBS News, and others. Linda is the host of Admissions Straight Talk, a podcast for graduate school applicants. Want an admissions expert help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Application Essays, a free guide

Journey to Duke Fuqua: Marine-Turned-MBA, Entrepreneur, and Dad, interview with a current Fuqua student

Meet Duke Fuqua’s Associate Dean of Admissions, Shari Hubert, a podcast episode

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Duke Fuqua MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

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Stanford GSB MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jun 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Stanford GSB MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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In terms of its application, Stanford is once again re-using its essay questions. And there’s good reason for the recycling: These are excellent questions that succinctly get to the heart of what Stanford wants to know about you. They are not easy questions, but they are thoughtful, probing ones.

Stanford GSB has also added a new, optional short answer question to its application.

Stanford gives a lot of advice and guidance on its website as to what it’s looking for in the essays. You should access that advice in addition to reviewing my suggestions below.

My Stanford GSB Essay tips are in blue below.

Stanford GSB 2019-20 MBA application essay questions
Essays help us learn about who you are rather than solely what you have done. Other parts of the application give insight to your academic and professional accomplishments; the essays reveal the person behind those achievements.

We request that you write two personal essays.

In each essay, we want to hear your genuine voice. Think carefully about your values, passions, aims, and dreams. There is no “right answer” to these questions—the best answer is the one that is truest for you.

Stanford MBA essay A: What matters most to you, and why?
For this essay, we would like you to reflect deeply and write from the heart. Once you’ve identified what matters most to you, help us understand why. You might consider, for example, what makes this so important to you? What people, insights, or experiences have shaped your perspectives?

This superficially straightforward question has been Stanford’s first for at least the last seventeen years, but it is actually one of the most difficult, if not the most difficult MBA essay questions to answer. Superficial responses will fail. The prompt demands introspection. Before you put finger to keyboard or pen to paper, really reflect on what you value, how you have acted upon those principles, and why you live by them. Stanford’s advice urges reflection. The question requires it.

When I reflect on our many successful Stanford clients, initiative in the face of need is the common thread among them. They are always the ones who showed, especially in Essay A, that they do not turn away when they see a problem or need for action. They grab the initiative when faced with an opportunity to contribute. They are comfortable expressing emotion and their values, and their actions reflect both, but particularly the latter. Think purpose-driven, principled lives and leadership.

More than anything else, initiative and self-awareness characterize the successful Stanford MBA applicant. Implication: You have to know your values and those times you have acted upon them. Yes I wrote that a few seconds ago, but it bears repeating. Climbing Mt. Everest or suffering from terrible social ills is not a requirement of admission, but you do have to know the person occupying your skin.

Stanford MBA essay B: Why Stanford?
Describe your aspirations and how your Stanford GSB experience will help you realize them. If you are applying to both the MBA and MSx programs, use Essay B to address your interest in both programs.

Now that question is succinct, and really says what they want to know.

Two pieces of information are required to answer this question well: A clear MBA goal and an in-depth understanding of Stanford GSB’s curriculum. (Folks: It’s not just the ranking, brand, or location.)

This question is a variation of a standard MBA goals question. For this forward-looking question, discuss why you want an MBA. The best way to do so is in terms of your desired post-MBA professional direction. Then explain how Stanford’s program specifically will help you travel down that path.

Do your homework. You need to know what are the distinctive characteristics of the Stanford MBA program or you simply can’t answer the question. Understand the flexibility inherent in Stanford’s curriculum, its integrated approach to management education, its entrepreneurial culture, and how all these elements (and others) will help you learn what you need to know to realize your aspirations. Recognize that the curriculum allows for personalization based on your goal and your past experience, specifically your previous business education.

Please do NOT write that you want to attend Stanford because of “the flexibility inherent in Stanford’s curriculum, its integrated approach to management, its entrepreneurial culture….” That phrasing is too general for your specific reasons (and besides the Stanford adcom can google the phrase if they see it too often and see that you found it here). Go deeper and be more distinctive in your writing so that you really tie your goals to different facets of Stanford’s MBA program.

Length

Both essays combined may not exceed 1,150 words. We recommend up to 750 words for Essay A and up to 400 words for Essay B. We often find effective essays written in far fewer words.

Formatting:

  • Double-spaced
  • Number all pages
  • Upload one document that includes both essays
Be sure to save a copy of your essays, and preview the uploaded document to ensure that the formatting is preserved.

Stanford MBA optional short-answer question
The two required essays shed light on who you are and how you imagine Stanford will help you achieve your aspirations. We are also interested in learning about the things you have done that are most meaningful to you. In this section, we provide an optional opportunity to go beyond your resume to discuss some of your contributions more fully.

Please do not include your short-answer response in your essays upload; use the text boxes provided in the application.

Optional short-answer question
Think about times you’ve created a positive impact, whether in professional, extracurricular, academic, or other settings. What was your impact? What made it significant to you or to others? You are welcome to share up to three examples. (Up to 1500 characters, approximately 250 words, for each example)

I think this question gets to the heart of the initiative, impact, and leadership we’ve seen in successful Stanford applicants. It gives you more opportunity to show those times when you’ve made a difference.

While the question is officially optional, Stanford wants people of impact. Show the Stanford GSB that you are that kind of person. All the essays should lead Stanford to that conclusion.

Using a CAR approach with each example would be very effective for these short responses:

Challenge: What was the situation or issue you were addressing?

Action: What did you do?

Result: What was the impact of your actions on you and others and why does it matter?

Given the character limit, you will need to be concise.

For expert guidance with your Stanford GSB MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to Stanford’s MBA program and look forward to helping you too!

You can also register right here for our upcoming (free!) webinar, Get Accepted to Stanford GSB:

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted. Linda earned her bachelors and MBA at UCLA, and has been advising applicants since 1994 when she founded Accepted. Linda is the co-founder and first president of AIGAC. She has written or co-authored 13 e-books on the admissions process, and has been quoted by The Wall Street Journal, U.S. News, Poets & Quants, Bloomberg Businessweek, CBS News, and others. Linda is the host of Admissions Straight Talk, a podcast for graduate school applicants. Want an admissions expert help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• Why MBA?, a free guide to writing about your MBA goals

What is Stanford GSB Looking For?

Stanford MBA Class of 2020 Profile

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Stanford GSB MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Listen to Admissions Straight Talk for interviews with admissions directors, MBAs, test prep pros, and financial aid sources.
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A Conversation About Today’s MBA Marketplace  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jun 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: A Conversation About Today’s MBA Marketplace
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Interview with Marco De Novellis, editor at BusinessBecause [Show Summary]
In today’s podcast, we hear from Marco De Novellis, the editor of BusinessBecause, a company that takes seriously the approaching of being a “champion of applicants,” educating them about everything they need to know about the MBA application process and how to approach it. Marco shares his unique insights into the state of MBA education outside the U.S., as well as his feelings about rankings. Along the way he shares tips on how to present yourself as an applicant and the trends happening in business education.

BusinessBecause: Free information and advice for b-school applicants [Show Notes]
We have today a keen observer of the bschool scene since our guest, Marco De Novellis, is the editor of BusinessBecause. After graduating from the University of Leeds, Marco joined BusinessBecause as a Journalist and Community Manager in 2015, where he has worked ever since. Since 2017 he has been the Editor at BusinessBecause and more recently the host of The Business School Question podcast. Along the way he also wrote a book about alumni of the Cheung Kong Graduate School of Business in Beijing and wrote for QS, TopMBA.com and AACSB.

Marco, how did you get your start on the bschool beat? [1:57]
I sort of fell into it. I studied history so writing has always been a passion of mine. In university I wrote for the school paper and then did freelance. When I graduated I interviewed with a small startup in Central London and I was lucky enough to get the job. It was quite a small business when I started, having begun in 2009. There were 4-5 people when I joined and now it is 15 of us. It has been great to be on this journey which has developed my career, as I am now the editor. I grew into the role and got to know the business school industry from there. We are dedicated to graduate management education, so writing content for anybody looking at business school. There are loads of options for stories to cover, since practically everything links back to business education.

You have also written extensively about China, specifically a book about alumni at the Cheung Kong Graduate School of Business (CKGSB) in Beijing. How did that book come about? [5:03]
CKGSB is China’s leading business school (the founder of Alibaba is an alum), but not many people know about it outside of China. I saw a statistic that graduates collectively lead 1/5 of China’s biggest brands. They really wanted to do more than the standard brochure to show the benefits of studying in China for international students. They approached me and asked me to write it which was an honor but also a big task. I interviewed about 25 alums from the school and some I met in person, delving into their personal stories, why they decided to go to China, and what they learned from it.

What are some of the challenges that Chinese business schools face that European or U.S. business schools don’t face? [8:12]
The biggest one is the struggle to attract internationals. The U.S. is experiencing that now to a certain extent with the current political climate, but this is a constant issue for Chinese schools. In some cases it is as simple as a communications issue, as they have never had to market internationally with such a huge base already in China. They now need people to be pioneers to take the step to study there. The idea of government intervention is a bit of an issue as well – there has been a clamp down on EMBA programs recently. There was this idea that EMBA programs were elite networking clubs for members of the communist party so there was a law put in place that students had to pass national entrance exams to attend. Bottom line, they have huge opportunities, with more candidates showing a preference towards Asia, and China overall becoming more international and developed. It’s also an exciting market for entrepreneurship – in China they have a special startup visa for anyone who registers their own company.

What are some of the most interesting trends you see in biz ed today? [11:40]
There is a lot going on! There is disruption in any industry, but what I see is more programs going online, and then the disruption outside the sector, like Amazon and Alibaba getting involved in learning. There is also a shift away from MBAs to more specialized masters. One trend that really interests me is the changing market. 10-15 years ago the FT rankings were dominated by U.S. schools, but now you are seeing more Asian and European programs. While numbers of people applying are pretty consistent (about 290K), the data shows that there is a long term shift away from the U.S. This has been exacerbated by the political situation, but has been brewing for a while, with it being more difficult to find jobs in the U.S., and long term visa problems. Also there is increasing sophistication outside the U.S. – you are seeing the Chinese economy develop with a growing middle class with spending power and so many businesses booming. Another trend is how the industry is shifting towards responsible management. More people want to make an impact, start their own businesses, and that is starting to be reflected in terms of how they are teaching students and what they work on. Some accreditations are rewarding schools on sustainability and impact which is new, but a long time coming.

What are the implications of those trends for applicants? [16:24]
It is positive for applicants because there is so much choice and so many programs out there, but that is also confusing, too. Choosing the right school is more challenging. Individual career goals are (or should be) more important as opposed to the best named business school. If you want to work in China, do an MBA in China. Schools nowadays are really having to push themselves to market themselves to applicants. Business schools used to select applicants, but now applicants are selecting the schools, to a certain extent.

How has the acquisition of BB by GMAC just about one year ago changed BB? [18:45]
It has been really positive for us. The core of what we do as a publisher hasn’t changed. We are independent and still operate as a startup. Having GMAC behind us is great – it is expanding our coverage, and we are always expanding our team and recruiting. Our content sits on MBA.com and the visibility is amazing. I am excited about working more with GMAC on the data. Later this year we’ll be looking at doing a report on the most popular countries for applicants, looking at shifts and trends and about candidate preferences. On the more business school side we do content marketing campaigns for some of the top schools which is great for exposure.

What is BB’s distinctive niche in the graduate management educational scene? [21:34]
Our content is very people-focused. We think of ourselves as storytellers. The China book, for example, shared individual stories of alumni to inspire others to apply. We are also truly global in terms of our audience, covering the world. We are also not a news site. We take more of a helicopter view. For example, INSEAD is starting a masters in management, and rather than report on just that we had an interview with the director of the program. We take a “champion of applicants” approach, supporting them on their journey to business school.

MBA-dom is filled with rankings. What are the strengths and weaknesses of rankings as a whole and the specific rankings you report on? [24:18]
They are incredibly useful in terms of the data, but the obvious limitation is you can’t just look at a ranking and take it as gospel. These are journalistic models designed to be different so one publication stands out from another. You have to look into the methodology, which shows the flaws of the process. Starting with Financial Times, which gives huge weight to an alumni survey, how can you trust data from the alumni of a school – they wouldn’t want to damage their own brand by saying the school they went to was awful, being left with something less than ideal on their CV. I will say with FT they do send in an audit team to make sure the information is correct, which is heartening. The more general point is the overwhelming focus on salary data. Across school rankings the emphasis is on jobs data with a lot of weight put on that, which is a problem in terms of a country where the wages are lower. This could also detract from recruiting women as they are paid less in certain industries, so it’s all pretty murky. Business school students are also not as focused on earning high salaries as they have been in the past. Many people are interested in non-profits rather than getting jobs at finance or consulting firms. Changes are coming with regards to that, and you can see how rankings can really be exploited or misguided with scandals, with schools sometimes being kicked out of rankings. Also, how can you trust a ranking with big name schools not taking part in it – there needs to be a big disclaimer on those rankings. The report at World Economic Forum this year for the first time really criticized the focus on salary data. FT has introduced CSR in rankings this year, and may possibly be changing methodology overall for the first time, so it will be interesting to see what happens there.

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Can you tell us about your podcast The Bschool Question? [35:28]
In each episode we discuss one industry question with an expert or panel for each episode, like: Is an MBA worth it? Should you go to the U.S. for your MBA? Do women work harder than men? The content is directed at prospective students.

Do you have any last minute words of wisdom for applicants? [37:43]
I’d like to come back to the point that applicants get very worked up about the application process and often try to paint a picture of themselves that they think business schools might like to hear – that they received all As, they are a type A personality, scored 800 on the GMAT, etc., when in reality business schools want diverse profiles and people with interesting things in their background. The notion there is a school for everyone is really true. What makes you unique as an applicant is much more important than the highest GMAT score. Telling your true story is the most important. The admissions committee are real people, too, and if they can’t get a sense of your personality, it is more difficult for them to relate to you.

What would you have liked me to ask you? [41:41]
I wondered if you would ask if I was considering an MBA. If anyone wants to finance mine I’d be happy to do it. Writing so much about the industry and seeing the benefits certainly piques my interest. I’ve said so much about it I feel like I should do one by now. It can do so much for you, but cost is an issue, and I like my job. From a liberal arts background it is sometimes hard to see how it can fit, but as you progress in your career you can see how those skills become much more important.

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How to Leverage an HBS Education: The Story of LeverEdge
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Dartmouth Tuck MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jun 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Dartmouth Tuck MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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Under Pena’s leadership, Tuck has developed a very purposeful process focused on admitting people who meet its four criteria, summed up as: smart, nice, accomplished, and aware. The criteria match my understanding of the Tuck community, and also are relatively easy to grasp. Once Tuck established and defined these criteria, it designed its application process to unearth the qualities it is seeking in candidates.

For more information on the Tuck criteria and the application process, please review:

While most schools so far have made few or no changes to their applications this year, Tuck has made significant changes. Last year Tuck required two essays with a maximum length of 500 words. This year, it is asking for three required essays with a maximum length of 300 words. Essay questions #1 and #2 are entirely new. In addition, Tuck has done away with last year’s short-answer questions. The optional and reapplicant essay questions are unchanged.

My Dartmouth Tuck MBA essay tips are below in blue. Remember, concision is the name of the game.

Dartmouth Tuck MBA Application
Your essays are an opportunity to articulate your candidacy for Tuck. The best responses are clear, succinct, forthright, thoughtful, genuine, and so distinctly personal that only you could have written them. We expect that your essays are completely accurate and exclusively your own. Use of essay writing services violates Tuck’s admissions policies.

Tuck MBA Application Essay #1
Tuck students can articulate how the distinctive Tuck MBA will advance their aspirations. Why are you pursuing an MBA and why Tuck? (300 words)

What distinctive aspects of the Tuck MBA experience will help you realize your post-MBA goals? What motivates you to apply to Tuck and would compel you to accept an offer of admission? That’s really what they want to know. And those elements of the program need to be associated with your aspirations.

In terms of structuring a response, you can start with your aspirations, which should lead directly to your reasons for pursuing an MBA. Then show how Tuck is perfectly suited to propel you towards your vision of your future. Focus on the distinctive aspects of Tuck’s program.

Tuck MBA Application Essay #2
Tuck students recognize how their individuality adds to the fabric of Tuck. Tell us who you are. (300 words)

This is a big question with not a lot of words to answer it in.

Think about aspects of you and your life that reflect your individuality and aren’t reflected in other parts of the application or in other essays. Choose the most important elements and spotlight them in this essay.

There are so many different ways to approach the response that I’m not going to suggest a structure. I do urge you to think deeply about what makes you You. Also, deliberate carefully and select those experiences and attributes that you want to highlight for Tuck.

If your transcript and test score show you’re smart and your resume shows you’re accomplished, Essays #1 and #2 will show how aware you are.

Tuck MBA Application Essay #3
Tuck students invest generously in one another’s success even when it is not convenient or easy. Share an example of how you helped someone else succeed. (300 words)

And this essay will address “niceness.” FYI: The “even when it is not convenient or easy” part was added this year.

This question asks you to provide one experience that shows you contributing and supporting someone else’s success. Your assistance could be on or off the job.

While Tuck hasn’t given a timeframe, I would recommend that you go back not more than two years and certainly not more than four years.

A CAR approach will work well here:

  •  Challenge both for you and the beneficiary
  •  Action
  •  Result
Keep it specific and concrete or you will blend in with others writing in generalities. Your empathetic, helpful response to the other party’s situation is key. Set the scene by describing the situation. How did you help the other party succeed? What were the challenges you both faced? What were the results?

Tuck MBA Application Essay #4 (Optional)
Please provide any additional insight or information that you have not addressed elsewhere (e.g., atypical choice of evaluators, factors affecting academic performance, unexplained job gaps or changes). Complete this question only if you feel your candidacy is not fully represented by this application. (300 words)

If you have any of the elements mentioned in Tuck’s question, by all means, address them here. You do NOT want the admissions committee guessing or assuming wrongly when they come across something anomalous.

If you feel your application represents your candidacy well, don’t feel compelled to respond to the optional essay. If you believe, however, that your application is missing key elements of your story, then briefly include them here. If your application is missing critical context, succinctly add it here. Whether it’s a challenge that you’ve faced or a hardship overcome or another context for what you’ve achieved that will help the admissions committee appreciate your candidacy, include it.

But don’t waste their time with drivel or material that’s elsewhere in your application. Doing so would reveal a definite lack of judgment, and in Tuck terms, awareness.

Tuck MBA Application Essay #5 (to be completed by all reapplicants)
How have you strengthened your candidacy since you last applied? Please reflect on how you have grown personally and professionally. (300 words)

This is a straightforward MBA reapplication question. It is critical that every reapplicant be able to answer it for every school they are reapplying to: What has changed that would compel Tuck to admit you this year?

For expert guidance with your Dartmouth Tuck MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to Dartmouth Tuck’s MBA program and look forward to helping you too!

Dartmouth Tuck 2019-20 Application Deadlines

Application Deadline
Decisions Released

 Round 1
October 7, 2019
December 12, 2019

 Round 2
January 6, 2020
March 12, 2020

 Round 3
March 30, 2020
May 7, 2020

Round 1 Consortium*
October 15, 2019
December 12, 2019

Round 2 Consortium*
January 5, 2020
March 12, 2020

Applications are due by 5:00pm EST

*Prospective students who are applying to Tuck through The Consortium will receive two decisions; one from Tuck regarding their admission decision and a second from the Consortium regarding their membership decision.

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions, and deadlines.***

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted. Linda earned her bachelors and MBA at UCLA, and has been advising applicants since 1994 when she founded Accepted. Linda is the co-founder and first president of AIGAC. She has written or co-authored 13 e-books on the admissions process, and has been quoted by The Wall Street Journal, U.S. News, Poets & Quants, Bloomberg Businessweek, CBS News, and others. Linda is the host of Admissions Straight Talk, a podcast for graduate school applicants. Want an admissions expert help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Why MBA?, a free guide to writing about your MBA goals

An Interview with Dartmouth Tuck’s Admissions Director, Luke Pena, a podcast episode

• 3 Tips for Showing Strengths in Your Application Essays

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Dartmouth Tuck MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Welcome to the Team, Rachel Slutsky!  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jun 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Welcome to the Team, Rachel Slutsky!
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We’re excited to welcome Rachel Slutsky to the Accepted team!

Rachel’s academic and admissions experience
Rachel has spent the last seven years as an academic editor, as an editor for an MBA admissions firm, as a freelancer, and as a university-affiliated writing consultant. She has also served as a college writing tutor at Yeshiva University and as a graduate writing tutor at Harvard. Rachel has helped students apply to MA programs in public policy and to postdoc programs in mathematics, and has herself successfully applied for many grants and fellowships. When not guiding Accepted’s clients, she is writing her dissertation in a fully-funded doctoral program at Harvard University.

You can work one-on-one with Rachel Slutsky
Rachel believes that “everyone needs an editor” – whether you are an experienced writer or someone just starting in their academic career. She loves helping her clients find their voices and tell their authentic story. She would like to help YOU find your authentic voice and submit compelling essays that highlight your achievements and dreams.

We’re thrilled to have her join our team!

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped applicants gain acceptance to top master’s and PhD programs. Our team of admissions consultants features former admissions directors, PhDs, and professional writers who have guided our clients to acceptance at top programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Princeton, University of Chicago, UC Berkeley, Columbia, Cambridge, Oxford, McGill, HKUST, and many more.  Want an admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Tags: Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

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Wharton Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019-20]  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jun 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Wharton Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019-20]
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The Wharton EMBA adcom, through its three required questions, expresses its values and its interest in a relationship with students who share those values. Each of the questions highlights a different facet of this relationship. Respecting, recognizing, and responding to that vision through your essays will be the key to a successful application.

  • Essay question 1 focuses on your goals and Wharton’s important role in helping you achieve them.
  • Essay question 2 invites you to share your understanding of Wharton broadly and delineate your fit with Wharton’s culture and community.
  • Essay question 3 seeks confirmation that you understand in practical terms what a commitment to attending the program involves.
My tips for answering Wharton’s EMBA essay questions are in blue below.

Wharton Executive MBA application essays
Wharton Executive MBA essay #1
What are your career objectives and how will the Wharton MBA Program for Executives contribute to your attainment of this objective?(750 word limit)

An effective (and natural) way to start is to briefly sketch your current career situation to set the context. You can then progress to detailing your future goals – in doing so, clarify how each step leads to the next or builds on the previous one, creating an organic flow. In describing your goals at any given point, indicate why you are taking that step or pursuing that role; this “why” is what truly animates your goals, elevating them from explanation to a story. Put more detail into the roles you plan immediately post-MBA and the several years following; longer-term goals need less detail, but they still should show a clear direction.

In discussing how the program will benefit you, describe what skills and knowledge you need at specific future roles/positions and how the program meets those needs. Also refer to the structure and special features of the program, detailing how they will support you and your goals.

Structurally, there are three approaches to this part: (a) weave in the “Why Wharton?” details after each goals phase, (b) have a separate “Why Wharton?” paragraph containing this entire discussion holistically, or (c) a mix of (a) and (b), adding some specific “Why Wharton?” points into the goals section and then an additional paragraph with more encompassing “Why Wharton?” points. All three work; use the one you find most natural.

Wharton Executive MBA essay #2
In his groundbreaking Ted Talk “Are You a Giver or a Taker?” Adam Grant describes three primary personality types in the workplace: givers, takers, and matchers. Based on your understanding of yourself and our program, how do you intend to give and take as a student at Wharton? (750 word limit)

First, listen to the Ted Talk, and consider how to ground your essay in its concepts of givers, takers, and matchers. As you write, if you are comfortable doing so, occasionally refer to the talk and integrate it into your discussion – doing so conveys engagement with the ideas that are clearly important to the Wharton EMBA adcom.

This question focuses on Wharton as a community and culture, on you as a person, and on the dynamic relationship that can form between you and Wharton (the pivotal phrase is “your understanding of yourself and our program”). Professional factors should certainly be the key components of your answer, but there may be community, social, and personal facets of your life where you and Wharton intersect, and you can draw on those as well.

Caution: don’t spend the whole essay explaining how you will give and take in the future as a Wharton student – rather, to be as credible, interesting, and substantive as possible, root this essay in your experience. SHOW the adcom how you will give and take (and match) by providing examples and anecdotes of this experience, and then link that experience to your planned/desired future involvement as giver/taker/matcher at Wharton.

A further benefit of using example and anecdote to make your points is that it gives you an opportunity to strategically showcase aspects of your life and experience that distinguish you and/or enhance your application.

Wharton Executive MBA essay #3
Given your already demanding job and the desire to remain committed to important family and personal obligations, how do you plan to handle this additional demand on your time once you enroll? (500 word limit)

This straightforward question deserves a straightforward answer. Discuss the accommodations you will make at work, such as delegating more, adjusting travel schedules, etc. Don’t mention every single thing you can think of – focus on the most significant two or three adjustments.

Also address your personal responsibilities and how you will meet them with this additional significant demand on your time and energy; even acknowledging that you’ll have less time at the playground with your toddler or mentioning the support of your significant other will show that you’re facing this issue squarely. If you’ve already successfully balanced school and working full time, definitely mention it.

Wharton Executive MBA essay #4 (Optional)
Please explain any extenuating circumstances of which the Admissions Committee should be aware (e.g., unexplained gaps in your work experience, choice of recommenders, inconsistent academic performance). You may also take this opportunity to share other defining aspects of your life that the Admissions Committee would not otherwise have learned from your application or resume. (500 word limit)

You can use the optional essay not just to explain a problem (low GMAT, employment gap) but also to present new material that will further illuminate your candidacy. However, if you do the latter, use good judgment and make sure your points are germane to and truly enhance your application. For structuring the essay, first, succinctly explain any points that need explaining. Then, if there is some additional content, write about it succinctly.

For expert guidance with your Wharton EMBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to top EMBA programs and look forward to helping you too!

Wharton EMBA application deadlines for 2019-20:

Application Deadline
Decision Release Date

Round 1
December 4, 2019

(11:59 p.m. PST)
January 22, 2020

Round 2
February 5, 2020

(11:59 p.m. PST)
March 25, 2020

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Ace the EMBA: Expert Advice for the Rising Executive, a free guide

School-Specific EMBA Application Essay Tips

EMBA Programs and the GMAT

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Wharton Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019-20] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
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Kellogg Executive MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jul 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Kellogg Executive MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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Kellogg’s 2 required EMBA application essay questions present a paradox: they’re straightforward and complex. Together, they draw out a fully rounded view of you as a person and as a professional, what you’ve done and how you think and perceive the world. To the extent possible, ground your essays in detail and concrete experience, and use reflection as the thread weaving those details and experiences into a vivid whole.

Essays 1 and 2 together should amplify and resonate with each other. They should be neither redundant nor discordant. Before or while drafting them, consider them as a whole. While they must each succeed as a separate statement, to do you the most justice they also should work together as parts of a dynamic whole.

Kellogg Executive MBA 2019-20 Application Essays
Kellogg EMBA Essay #1
What do you want to achieve in your professional life? What have you already done to get there and how do you think Kellogg can help you? (approximately 450 words)

“What you want to achieve” means your career vision; therefore, discuss the impact you hope to have. Support this vision by describing your goals in specific terms: likely positions, which company or companies, desired location, and some related context, e.g. anticipated challenges you or your organization may face, your take on industry trends and how they affect your goals, and so forth. Then connect the dots: explain how this stated path will enable you to achieve the vision.

In asking what you have already done to pursue these goals, the adcom is essentially seeking evidence that you are truly committed to this career path. Answering this part allows you to show that you are proactive, strategic, and resourceful. Don’t cite everything you’ve done in this regard, but rather identify the 2-3 most important experiences – and what you gained from them. In discussing why Kellogg will be the next important step on that path, link the resources of the Kellogg EMBA to the specific learning and professional needs arising from your planned path. (And keep in mind essay 2, to avoid redundancy.)

Kellogg EMBA Essay #2
Values are what guide you in your life and work. What values are important to you and how have they influenced you? (approximately 450 words)

This question aims right at the heart of who you are, and that is what Kellogg cares about (and always has). The goals (in essay 1) may be great, but here is the context for them.

The practical aspects of answering this question: First, note that it says “values” – plural. So, you must discuss at least two. But with only 450 words and the need for some elaboration, don’t offer a list of admirable values. Select the top 2-3 that at this point in your life are most compelling to you – and that are somewhat different – e.g. don’t use empathy and compassion as two different values, considering their similarity and overlap.

Of course, “values” is an abstract term, but avoid an abstract (mind-numbing) discourse. Instead, in answering how the values have influenced you, base it on your actual experience. That needn’t mean dramatic things; reading a book can change your life – you just have to make it come alive to the reader if that’s the case. This approach will both enhance the credibility of your essays and make a memorable read for the adcom.

Last but not least, I do suggest presenting examples/anecdotes here that are not work related; it’s fine to discuss work and link some of the discussion to it, but work should not be the focus of this essay. The question suggests a more holistic approach.

Kellogg EMBA Essay #3 (Optional)
If needed, use this section to briefly describe any extenuating circumstances (e.g. unexplained gaps in work experience, choice of recommenders, inconsistent or questionable academic performance, etc.).

This question explicitly limits the potential topics to extenuating circumstances, so don’t use it to further market yourself by presenting new material to enhance your application. If you do not have extenuating circumstances, do not write the essay. If you do need to provide such information, do it succinctly and straightforwardly.

If you would like professional guidance with your Kellogg Executive MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Package, which includes advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Kellogg EMBA application.

Kellogg Executive MBA Application Deadlines for January 2020 Start, Evanston, IL & Miami, FL

Round 1 
August 21, 2019

Round 2 
October 9, 2019

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Tips for Executive MBA Reapplicants

5 Key Elements for Your Executive MBA Application, a short video

School-Specific Executive MBA Essay Tips

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Kellogg Executive MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Columbia EMBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jul 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Columbia EMBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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The first 2 Columbia EMBA essay questions ask you to project into the future, both near and long term – they address what you hope, plan, want, and expect. The third essay question probes your perspective and values – it shows the adcom’s interest in getting to know you (in a very succinct way!).

In these essays, a potential pitfall, given the non-anecdotal questions, is to write generic, abstract “stuff”: ideas, thoughts, buzz words, admirable sounding ideals/objectives. However, even though not specified in the questions, grounding these essays in your experience is the key to making them credible and dynamic.

This approach will enable you to create a vivid, meaningful picture of your candidacy. Considering the scant opportunity to discuss past professional achievements in the essays, your resume carries all the more weight in the Columbia EMBA application – attend to it accordingly.

Columbia Executive MBA short-answer question
What is your immediate post-MBA professional goal? (50 characters maximum)

Examples of possible responses: 1) “Work in business development for a media company.” 2) “Join a strategy consulting firm.” 3) “Launch a data-management start-up.”

As their examples show, a factual phrase or bullet will suffice; no need to use a whole sentence. Do include key details.

Columbia Executive MBA essay questions
Columbia EMBA essay #1
Through your resume and recommendations, we have a clear sense of your professional path to date. What are your career goals over the next 3-5 years, and what, in your imagination, would be your long-term dream job? (500 words)

This question helps you avoid a common, reflexive pitfall: summarizing your career before discussing goals. Yes, goals need a context – and a sentence (or at most two) up front about your current situation can work as a “launch pad” for presenting your goals. CBS is always interested in elaborated career goals, in this case specifying your short-term, 3-5 year, goals. So, give solid detail about the role(s) you plan during these years: position, type of company, scope of accountability, what you want to accomplish, and why you want to pursue this path – this “why” is the key to moving the readers from professional interest to caring about you and your goals.

Your longer-term “dream job” needs less detail and should of course reflect some reasonable trajectory from the earlier role. The wording of “dream job” instead of “long-term goal” plus “in your imagination” provides an invitation (even encouragement) to be open, to “go for it.” Put some heart and risk into this future vision and think beyond just practical considerations. If it’s a dream job, it should be ambitious in a way that is meaningful and enticing to you. Make the reader feel your excitement.

There is no request to explain “why Columbia” in the question, but it would be fine to add a sentence or two about what is truly compelling to you about the program, if you have something thoughtful and insightful to say in this regard.

Columbia EMBA essay #2
Columbia Business School’s Executive MBA will challenge you by offering a rigorous academic experience, global exposure through the international seminar, and the opportunity to immediately apply what you learn to your career. How will you approach balancing the demands of the program with your professional and personal life while you are in school? (250 words)

Discuss the accommodations you will make at work, such as delegating more, adjusting travel schedules, etc. Focus on the most significant two or three adjustments.

Also address your personal responsibilities and how you will meet them with this additional demand on your time and energy; include 1-2 specific changes (probably, sacrifices), e.g. acknowledging that you’ll have less time at the playground with your toddler or mentioning the support of your significant other.

If you’ve already successfully balanced school and working full time, mention it. Nothing is better than actual evidence that you can juggle a demanding schedule.

Columbia EMBA essay #3
Who is a leader you admire, and why? (250 words)

The tendency might be to “strategize” to pick the “right person” to discuss – although perhaps counter-intuitive, I’ll advise instead to first identify a few leaders you really do admire – and from among them, choose to write about the one that most engages you personally, intellectually (and perhaps spiritually and/or politically and/or socially…). In other words, have confidence in your own values and perspective. That confidence will shine through and power the essay.

Now, WHY do you admire this person? Root this part of the discussion in your own experience, don’t just make it an abstract explanation. Let it reveal something about you. Don’t be timid. Feel free to take a stand if the topic requires. Most important, how has it informed (and how is it informing) your development as a leader?

Columbia EMBA essay #4 (Optional)
An optional fourth essay will allow you to discuss any issues that do not fall within the purview of the required essays.

This question invites you to present new material that will enhance your application, as well as explain anything that needs explaining (e.g., gap in employment, choice of recommender if not using a direct supervisor, etc.). As far as non-necessary points, since you are making the adcom read more than is required, there should be a clear value to the information you’re sharing. Finally, keep it short.

For expert guidance with your Columbia EMBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to Columbia’s EMBA program and look forward to helping you too!

Columbia Executive MBA 2019-20 MBA Application Deadlines

Program Name
Entry Date
Application Deadline

EMBA-Americas
January 2020
October 23, 2019

EMBA-New York Saturday
May 2020
Early: January 8, 2020

Final: February 19, 2020

EMBA-New York Friday/Saturday
August 2020
Early: March 18, 2020

Final: May 27, 2020

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

School-Specific EMBA Application Essay Tips

Meet Dr. Nadia Afridi, Plastic Surgeon, Recent Columbia EMBA, and Mom, a podcast episode

The MBA Menu at Columbia Business School, a podcast episode

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Columbia EMBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Columbia Business School Welcomes New Dean  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2019, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Columbia Business School Welcomes New Dean
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Columbia University announced last week that Professor Costis Maglaras, 49 years old, has been appointed the sixteenth dean of Columbia Business School and will begin his term on July 1, 2019. Professor Maglaras has been part of CBS for more than 20 years, and was the David and Lyn Sulfen Professor of Business. It is noted that Maglaras may be one of the only deans of an important business school without a graduate degree in either Economics or Business. He is succeeding Glenn Hubbard, who has been dean for the past 15 years. Dr. Hubbard will resume his position on CBS’s faculty as the Russell L. Carson Professor of Finance and Economics.

Applying to CBS? Check out our essay tips:
Columbia Business School MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]

An accomplished career
Professor Maglaras received his BS in Electrical Engineering from Imperial College, London, and his MS and PhD in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University. He joined CBS’s faculty after completing his education in 1998. Professor Maglaras has held several important positions at Columbia: Director of the PhD Program 2011-2017; Chair of the Decision, Risk, and Operations Division 2015-2018; and has been a member of the Executive Committee of Columbia University’s Data Science Institute since 2016. He was the recipient of the 2013 Dean’s Award for Teaching Excellence for the Managerial Statistics course and the 2018 winner of the Dean’s Award for Innovation in the Curriculum for designing and starting the School’s Technology and Analytics curriculum.

Professor Maglaras has advised 18 doctoral students in the areas of business and engineering and applied mathematics. A number of his previous students have gone on to leadership positions in academia and industry. He has authored numerous research articles on diverse subjects including theory and application of stochastic modeling in queuing networks, service systems, quantitative pricing and revenue management, and quantitative finance. Most recently, his research has concentrated on two areas: (a) modern financial market microstructure and quantitative trading and (b) data analytics.

Growing the school’s digital and analytics footprint
Professor Maglaras initiated CBS’s Technology and Analytics curriculum, which was the first group of courses created to assist students to develop actionable insights based on big data. The courses in this curriculum are the most popular at CBS.

He was influential in the creation and inauguration of Columbia’s Master of Science in Business Analytics, a joint program of CBS and Columbia Engineering. Students who graduate from this program are prepared to take positions as leading business analysts and data scientist in the areas of financial and professional services, consulting, technology, and advertising and media.

Looking toward the future
Columbia Business School is looking forward to moving into its new home on Columbia University’s Manhattanville campus in 2022. Highlights of the Henry R. Kravis Building and the Ronald O. Perelman Center for Business Innovation include open areas that foster collaboration across disciplines and expedite social interactions and include flexible classrooms with the newest technology, specific areas for recruiting, events, and networking, as well as a welcome center for alumni.

Although there has been a small decline in applications (2.6% in the 2018-2019 admissions season), that still translated to 6,029 applicants competing for 756 places in the full-time MBA program. According to Poets & Quants, Columbia’s enrollment is the third largest among the prestigious global business schools, with only Harvard and Wharton ahead of it.

Professor Maglaras sees CBS in a position of leadership in tackling the challenging and quickly changing needs of business in the digital future. “We have a strong foundation, and thanks to the intellectual leadership of our faculty, a diverse and engaged alumni population, a position as part of a world-renowned university and a location in the most dynamic business center in the world, Columbia Business School will be the preeminent institution to prepare our students for lifelong career success in the digital future,” he says. “I look forward to building on the School’s incredible trajectory thus far; realized more fully with our transformative move to the Manhattanville campus.”

For more information on Columbia Business School and how we can help you get accepted, check out our catalog of MBA Admissions Services.

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Ask Me Anything, a webinar discussion with CBS’s Director of Admissions Emily French Thomas

Columbia Business School Application Essay Tips & Deadlines

The Applicants That Stand Out at Columbia Business School

Tags: MBA Admissions

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Yale SOM MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jul 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Yale SOM MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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The application has little change from last year. As applicants have done for the last few years when applying to Yale SOM, you need to make the most of its single required essay, but you also need to take the time to make every box in the application a home run. They are not afterthoughts. Your job descriptions and activity history are very important. Write and edit them carefully. Focus on achievements. Quantify when possible and keep in mind Yale’s commitment to “educating leaders for business and society.”

My tips are in blue.

Yale SOM essay question
Describe the biggest commitment you have ever made. (500 words maximum)

The question evolved from a conversation with Professor of Organizational Behavior Amy Wrzesniewski, who noted, “Reading about future plans is helpful, but actions speak louder than words.” In your response, we are looking to learn about how you have approached a particular commitment, whether personal or professional, and the behaviors that support it. You should be less concerned about what we want to hear and instead focus on being honest with yourself in selecting and describing the commitment that has been most significant to you.

The question is based not only on the stated premise that actions speak louder than words, but on the additional premise that past behavior predicts future behavior.

You want to show that you are a person who follows through on commitments. So when did you make a commitment and follow through? Do you make big commitments? What are the results? What impact have you had as a result of your biggest commitment?

An anecdotal response, telling the story of the commitment you made, could be very effective. What was the challenge or problem that triggered the commitment? How did you follow up? What was the outcome and why is it significant? Did you successfully solve that initial problem or achieve your goals in meeting that challenge?

You can start with the moment of challenge or the moment of triumph. If you choose the latter, then go back, provide context, and tell your story of commitment, resolve, hurdles overcome, and challenge handled. If the impact has lasted – on you and others – succinctly include that part of the story too.

Yale SOM application video component
Yale also has a video component to its application. The questions are not posted ahead of time and they vary from applicant to applicant. The key element to preparation here is practice. Practice talking into a webcam without feedback from another human being. Practice the 60-90 second time frame. Rehearse answers to typical interview questions in this format. Remember the STAR (Situation – Task – Action – Result) or CAR (Context/Challenge – Action – Result) framework in structuring your answers.

Yale suggests that you practice via Skype with a friend, but have your friend turn off their webcam and just provide feedback at the end of your response. I also suggest you put a smiley face somewhere so you can see it and remind yourself to smile. Image

For expert guidance with your Yale SOM MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to Yale SOM’s MBA program and look forward to helping you too!

Yale SOM 2019-20 MBA application deadlines

Application Deadline
Decisions Released

 Round 1
September 10, 2019
December 4, 2019

 Round 2
January 7, 2020
March 24, 2020

 Round 3
April 14, 2020
May 19, 2020

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted. Linda earned her bachelors and MBA at UCLA, and has been advising applicants since 1994 when she founded Accepted. Linda is the co-founder and first president of AIGAC. She has written or co-authored 13 e-books on the admissions process, and has been quoted by The Wall Street Journal, U.S. News, Poets & Quants, Bloomberg Businessweek, CBS News, and others. Linda is the host of Admissions Straight Talk, a podcast for graduate school applicants. Want an admissions expert help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your MBA Application Essays, a free guide

Yale Som: Integrated in Its Curriculum, with Its University, and to the World, a podcast episode

How Can You Show Passion in Admissions?

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Yale SOM MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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All About the IELTS  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jul 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: All About the IELTS
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Interview with Ben Worthington, Creator of IELTSPodcast [Show Summary]
Ben Worthington is an IELTS master, and he talks in great detail about the various sections of the test and how to prepare for them, as well as what to do if you can’t seem to break out of the score slump you are in. He also shares some details about his IELTS Podcast.

All About the IELTS [Show Notes]
Our guest today is Ben Worthington. Ben hails from northern England, but has lived in different parts of the globe. In 2006, he started teaching English as a second language. In 2012 he launched the IELTS Podcast to help students ace that exam. Today the IELTS Podcast provides free resources and three different levels of paid courses. Let’s learn more about the IELTS Podcast and get some expert tips on how to succeed with the IELTS exam. That score is critical if you are applying to English language universities and graduate programs, and you’re worried that English fluency, or the lack of it, could prevent your acceptance.

How did you get into IELTS prep? [2:00]
I used to be an English tutor in Spain, and then drifted into teaching English there. I started off doing classes with teenagers and then did business students, but eventually I found my niche with IELTS. I enjoy preparing students for that – it’s more of a challenge and there are more motivated students.

Can you give us an overview of the IELTS exam? [3:16]
It stands for the International English Language Testing System and was developed in Australia in the 1970s to test students’ English abilities. The British Council got involved and it became the IELTS test and now is used not only for getting into university in Australia, the UK, and Canada (also being more accepted in the US), but can also be used on visa applications as well.

There are four parts to the IELTS – speaking, listening, reading, and writing. On the listening and reading sections you can get between 0-40 points. There are 40 questions there, and you are either ticking the boxes, completing the sentence, or answering a multiple choice question. The speaking and writing sections are marked by an examiner – the speaking portion is in front of another person in three parts – part 1 is softer questions to get the student relaxed to give the best illustration of their ability. In part 2 you get a cue card with a prompt like, “Describe a childhood friend” – how you met them, what you liked to do with them, etc. You have two minutes to prepare your talk and then you talk about the points on the cue cards. Part 3 is follow up questions from the examiner to that, like, “Why do you think friendship is important?” – more abstract. For writing there is a general test and academic test. For the general portion in task 1 you have to write a letter – maybe a cover letter, letter to a friend, etc. For task 1 in the academic piece you have to describe something like a flow chart. Part 2 for both tests is taking a side or arguing both sides of an issue like democracy or climate change, which can be a real challenge. The test looks at skills beyond just the language.

Who should take the IELTS, the TOEFL or the PTE? [10:41]
Do some practice tests on each one and go for the one that resonates with you the most.

Can you tell us about the scoring? What is a good band? [11:54]
Generally speaking most places are looking for a 7, however if Canada needs a lot of computer engineers they might lower it to meet the quotas. Also, a really prestigious university can ask for 8 across the board.

Do people from different regions of the world have more difficulty with specific sections of the exam? [14:01]
What I am seeing is generally countries that are more open culturally like Latino, Spanish, or Italian countries have less difficulty with the speaking portion. Broadly speaking people from Asian countries don’t really excel in the speaking part because they are often quite nervous about losing face.

In 2010 IELTS released the last statistics about all the countries and which scored the highest and lowest, and those highest across the board were the countries you’d expect – Scandinavia, Germany, the Netherlands, and at the lower end, less developed countries.

When do you recommend people start preparing for the test? How much time do people typically need? [16:48]
It depends on the ability of the student. A Swedish or German student might be around 6.5 already based on their previous education, so maybe they can get to a 7 in a month just by getting familiar with the exam, and adapting their writing to a more academic style. But if a student is just barely getting a 6 or 6.5 and they want to get to a 7, they need at least 2-3 months.

What does the IELTS Podcast offer in the way of prep for the IELTS? [18:29]
I started by interviewing a lot of other tutors, as I did struggle a bit when I was getting into it, and I realized I could keep on learning from the experts and help a lot of students as well. I started by asking about common areas where students have issues. Sometimes we have a pronunciation expert, or feature someone with a very specific body of knowledge to share. Eventually I started my own episodes talking about paragraphing or punctuation – like a 30-minute tutorial. Overall it has really expanded, as we now offer an essay correction service and have a YouTube channel.

What courses do you offer? [20:25]
We started with essay correction and then it evolved into a PDF which had everything I was saying, so we built up the writing course from the all corrections we were doing, which just made sense. We also did tutorials. The main course is the writing one, which includes essay corrections and a guarantee to a band 7 or you get a refund. We also have a course on speaking confidence, and one on reading. We haven’t really developed the listening one as students don’t really seem to need that.

Do you have any free resources for IELTS prep? [22:12]
Yes. On our site there is a jumbo PDF to download that is full of sample essays, strategies, sample questions, and you can use that to get started, and also get on the email list as we send out tips and links every couple days.

What are your top tips? [23:28]
My favorite one is to maximize prep time on the areas where you are losing points. Figure that out by taking a few practice exams and see what areas are consistently weak. Then zoom in on those areas and focus your studies there until you can get to your target score.



What would you have liked me to ask you? [37:35]
In preparing for the exam, give yourself time. What I see so many times is a student saying I’m going to take the exam in two weeks. They won’t get the score they want, and they’ll take it again and again and again, thinking maybe they’ll get lucky. Instead they get stuck at 6.5. Doing test after test after test is just not good for so many reasons – it’s nerve-wracking, expensive, and time consuming. There is a much healthier way to do this. Take a step back, find the weak points, and work on those particular sections. Don’t do a 13-hour study session with 20 coffees and have that be it for the week – do an hour a day. Be kind to yourself and give yourself the time and patience to improve, as it will be a much more enjoyable experience.

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Related Links:

The IELTS Podcast

IELTS Essay Correction

Online IELTS Course

IELTS Vocabulary

Accepted’s Admissions Consulting Services

Related Shows:

NYU Stern’s New Online Masters in Quantitative Management

Interview with Jon Hodge

Exploring London Business School’s Master’s in Analytics and Management

Getting Accepted to U.S. Universities from Abroad

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

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UCLA Anderson Executive MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 –  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jul 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: UCLA Anderson Executive MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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For its essay questions, the UCLA EMBA adcom is bucking the “less is more” trend in terms of length. The two main essays are both a hefty 750 words, long enough to allow – indeed to require – in-depth exposition, reflection, analysis, and description. These two questions together cover past, present, and future, in that order. Essay 1 addresses the past by asking for a particular story, and essay 2 addresses the present and future by asking about why now is the right time for you to be pursuing this degree. The questions indicate that the adcom believes the personal informs the professional; who you are defines your career and your work. Consequently, who you are as a person matters.

It helps to see these essays as two phases of a continuum:

  • In essay 1, portray qualities, skills, and experience(s) that support your goals.
  • In essay 2 show that your future plans fulfill the mission and purpose of the character portrayed in essay 1.
UCLA Anderson Executive MBA Application Essays
My tips are in blue below.

UCLA EMBA Essay #1
Legendary UCLA basketball Coach John Wooden once said that one’s leadership is derived from one’s character. Please provide an example of a time when your own leadership was at its best. (750 words max)

There are two key words in this question: leadership and character. The implication in the latter word is that UCLA seeks applicants who not only have the requisite track record of leadership and impact that is commonly sought by top EMBA programs, but also gravitas, depth as a human being. Your chosen example should include leadership/impact and gravitas/depth.

You can select a topic for this essay either from your work experience or outside it – but keep the phrase “at its best” on your radar. What does “your leadership at its best” mean to you? This point reflects your character. For most people, I suggest going with a professional example in order to give the adcom a glimpse of you in your work environment, handling important and high-stakes situations. Go with a non-work example if it has some specific strategic value for your application. Also, use a relatively recent experience if possible, to allow the adcom to see the person who will show up in the classroom.

Let the story itself carry most of the weight in the essay – depict not just the story of leadership but how you inspired others to follow due to your character, example, and leadership style. At the end of the essay, write a short concluding paragraph explicitly summarizing why this is you as a leader at your best.

UCLA EMBA Essay #2
Why is this the best time for you to pursue your MBA? (750 words max)

This is a unique take on a goals essay – 750 words essentially zooming in on “why now?” In many goals essays, you’ll cover this point in one sentence. Here, given the length, present “why now” in both a micro and macro view.

The micro view looks at the particulars of your current situation – your current responsibilities and challenges and likely immediate next step. This part should position you at the right experience, responsibility, and decision-making level for a competitive EMBA, and the next step should be a role for which the EMBA learning is either essential or at least a clear asset.

The macro view looks at the longer-term career vision and the continuum of your career from past to future. Within that continuum, why is now the pivot point where you should make the investment of time, effort, and (most likely) money? How will the Executive MBA propel you forward not just for the next step but for the long term?

In describing your goals, indicate why you are planning that step. For shorter-term goals, detail specific positions, company, scope of responsibilities, and desired impact (i.e. what your desired “footprint” would be). Longer-term goals need less detail, but they should present a clear direction, building on the earlier roles.

The question does not ask you why you are choosing UCLA’s EMBA, but you can add a brief discussion of this point. If you do, be specific: describe how the program meets your key learning needs; refer to the features of the program that are most important to you.

UCLA EMBA Essay #3 (For reapplicants)
Please describe your career progress since you last applied and how you have strengthened your candidacy. Include updates on short-term and long-term career goals. (750 words max)

As a reapplicant, you should show growth from the previous application. Discuss professional developments such as promotions, awards, and new projects, as well as any significant community involvements and/or educational endeavors. Describe the activity/experience and note its positive impact if any. Try to include an anecdote for at least 1-2 of the activities discussed – given the word allowance, you have room for some detail. Finally, be selective and present only those activities that are relevant and enhance your application and candidacy in some way.

In the goals update, if the goals are still the same, mention developments that further prepare you for those goals (skills/knowledge gained, broadened network, etc.). If you have refined or revised your goals in some way, explain why and make a strong case for why you now are pursuing this altered path.

For expert guidance with your UCLA Anderson Executive MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to top business schools and look forward to helping you too!

UCLA Anderson EMBA 2019 – 2020 Application Deadlines

Application Deadline

Round 1
December 1, 2019

Round 2
February 1, 2020

Round 3
March 1, 2020

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Top Executive MBA Essay Questions: How to Answer Them Right, a free guide

5 Key Elements for Your Executive MBA Application, a short video

EMBA Programs and the GMAT

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post UCLA Anderson Executive MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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UC Berkeley Haas EMBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: UC Berkeley Haas EMBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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These Haas EMBA essay questions reflect the larger Haas (and, even further, Berkeley) community and culture: they draw out the multi-faceted individual. Your professional goals and your prospective fit with the Haas EMBA program are expressions of, and extend from, that core individuality. Even though part-time, the EMBA program, again reflecting Haas culture, is intense in terms of student engagement, community mindset, and transformation both personal and professional. Therefore, your essays must together personalize your candidacy, showing someone who is “comfortable in their skin” and who will be a distinctive contributor within the program and beyond.

UC Berkeley Haas EMBA application essays
Berkeley EMBA essay #1
What are your short term career goals (3 to 5 years)? What are your long term career goals (10+ years)? Describe your plan to meet these goals. Why is this the right time for you to undertake the program? (250 words max)

Given the short word limit, get right to the point. Start by discussing your intended short-term career step(s) that will align with the specified time frame. Key details to include are position/role, company/industry, possibly geography, and expected scope of responsibilities. In addition – to excite the reader about your goals – note why you are taking this step and how this role fits into your overall career vision. Consider opening the essay with an enticing point or two about this short-term goal and/or this “why” message.

Your long-term career goals will appropriately and necessarily be less detailed and should include the “vision” element. E.g., if you aim to become CIO of a healthcare enterprise, indicate what draws you to this goal; what you want your footprint to be.

Address “why now” explicitly; a sentence will often suffice. Reflecting on what this program will be a bridge from and to can bring your motivations into focus. Ideally, you will also incorporate a specific point or two about the program’s benefits here, beyond just EMBA generally.

Berkeley EMBA essay #2
Tell us about yourself. Please provide a personal essay that helps the reader get to know you better, giving insight into your character and values. (750 words)

This essay is both specific – the question clearly indicates a non-work focus and a topic (or topics) that reflect fundamentally who you are; and broad – those criteria still offer great leeway in topic selection. The significant length allotted underscores the importance the adcom gives to this essay. They give you space, and they expect something substantial in return. To deliver that substance, ground your essay in your actual experience – stories. Show how this experience shaped and/or expresses your values and character.

Let’s break this essay down into a few key components.

  • Topic selection. Great topics could include aspects of your cultural background, family life, formative experiences growing up or earlier in your adulthood, relationships, personal hobbies and/or interests, etc. How many topics? Most people will discuss 2-3, but there’s no right or wrong. You could make – and I have seen – one single topic in great depth and detail work. On the other hand, more than 3 may not be advisable because (a) lots of topics tend to create a blur; and (b) there won’t be room for enough detail to make them meaningful.
  • Structure. You could present each topic and include the reflection on character and values after each. Or, you could present the topics/anecdotes consecutively and then have a longer reflection section afterward integrating the points from different stories.
  • Reflection. Discussion of character and values will be relatively short, if you have ideally used anecdote to make your point. If you did, the reader will actually see the character/values in the story. In the discussion part, connect the values/character with the experience and add a sentence or two further elaborating with insight. The quality of this insight is the heart of this essay.
Caution: while you want to show you are a fine human being, the points don’t all have to be about how you want to give back or contribute positively to the world. Dig deep.

For expert guidance with your UC Berkeley Haas EMBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to top EMBA program and look forward to helping you too!

Berkeley EMBA application deadlines for 2019-20

Submission Deadline

Round 1
December 3, 2019

Round 2
February 5, 2020

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Why MBA, a free guide to writing about your MBA goals

• School-Specific EMBA Application Essay Tips

How Do You Deal with Criticism? MBA Admissions Committees Want to Know

Last updated on July 11, 2019.

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post UC Berkeley Haas EMBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Data Analytics Master’s Programs: What Do They Want in Applicants?  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2019, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Data Analytics Master’s Programs: What Do They Want in Applicants?
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In the last five years, and driven by the tremendous growth of data gathered by companies and institutions across all industries, we have experienced a sharp rise in demand for data analytics jobs, and with that, the birth and expansion of master’s programs in data analytics, business analytics, and data science at many universities. Applications to these programs have soared, and programs are becoming more selective with every application cycle.

If you are interested in applying to an analytics program, one of your first questions should be: “What are these programs looking for in applicants?”

5 qualities to highlight in your data analytics master’s application
As a graduate admissions consultant at Accepted, I have guided many applicants to a successful admission to top data analytics, business analytics, data science, and other similar programs. Based on that extensive experience, I have compiled a list of the 5 top qualities that you need for a winning application:

  • Analytical aptitude
    Data analytics programs are heavily quantitative. Applicants aspiring to these programs must demonstrate analytical aptitude, as well as a desire to work with numbers. As most of your coursework will be quantitative, if you don’t enjoy math you will most likely not be a good fit for these programs. How can you demonstrate your analytical aptitude? I have had clients describe their success in math from early on in life as well as their ability to understand and work well with data as an adult. They can demonstrate that comfort with numbers through their transcript or professional experience and responsibility.

  • Quantitative background
    Most programs prefer – and some programs require – applicants coming from a quantitative or STEM undergraduate background, or at least to have some advanced quantitative courses under their belt. What if you don’t have a quant background? There are still smart strategies you can follow, which I will discuss in my next post, What If I Want to Study Data Analytics but Don’t Have Relevant Experience or a Quantitative Degree?

  • Computer programming knowledge
    Many of these programs will require at least some basic knowledge of computer programming (R, C+, Python, SQL, etc.). Because each school is quite different in its requirements, it’s important that you research the specific schools you are interested in and find out what programming, querying, and statistical language they prefer. Even if you do not have a computer science degree, you can still take those courses online through extension programs, Coursera, EDX, and similar sources, in order to meet the programs’ application requirements.

  • Related work experience
    While many programs are open to applicants straight from undergrad, they tend to give preference to applicants who have had internships or experience in data analytics fields, or at least some experience working with data of any kind.

  • Relevant goals
    Given the competitiveness of these programs, admissions committees want to bring in applicants who know why they are interested in data analytics. Don’t let the hype of data analytics blind you. Think about a realistic goal you want to pursue after graduation, a position in a company that could be a good fit for you, the industry where you would like to work, and why you want to pursue that goal. Then, think about where you see yourself career-wise 5 and then 10 years down the road. Your goals, and particularly your short-term goal, are a key component of your application and should not be taken lightly.

Providing what the adcom is looking for will help you get ACCEPTED
Applying to data analytics programs can be very competitive, but if you have the analytical background, some related work experience, and a compelling story as to why you want to pursue data analytics, data science, of business analytics, you will be ready to secure admission to a top program.

Work one-on-one with an expert advisor to ensure that your data analytics master’s application presents you in the most compelling, impressive way possible. Explore our Graduate Admissions Consulting & Editing Services for more information on how we can guide you to acceptance at your top-choice master’s program!

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Esmeralda Cardenal is a Former Associate Director of Admissions at Yale SOM, Director of MBA Admissions at MSU Broad, and consultant at Cardiff Business School in the UK. Since 2014, she has guided Accepted clients to acceptance in various graduate programs including MBA and master's in finance, business analytics, data science, sustainability, and public policy. Want Esmeralda to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

NYU Stern’s New Online Masters in Quantitative Management, a podcast episode

Exploring London Business School’s Master’s in Analytics and Management, a podcast episode

The Rise of Masters Programs in Data Analytics and Related Fields

Tags: Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post Data Analytics Master’s Programs: What Do They Want in Applicants? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Listen to Admissions Straight Talk for interviews with admissions directors, MBAs, test prep pros, and financial aid sources.
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Data Analytics Master’s Programs: What Do They Want in Applicants?   [#permalink] 11 Jul 2019, 10:01

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