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How to Launch Your Career in High Tech Product Management  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Oct 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How to Launch Your Career in High Tech Product Management
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Interview with Kenton Kivestu, CEO of RocketBlocks [Show Summary]
Kenton Kivestu is CEO of RocketBlocks, a firm that provides tools to help you prepare for and nail your Product Manager interviews at high tech firms. In today’s episode, he and Linda discuss the unique challenges of breaking into a product management career in high tech, and how to overcome them. He provides the inside scoop on big name companies like Amazon and Google.

Kenton Kivestu describes the role of a product manager, and offers insight on how to break into this exciting field [Show Notes]
I’d like to welcome back to AST Kenton Kivestu, who was previously a guest on Admissions Straight Talk in episode 188 a little over two years ago. Kenton graduated from UVA with a BA in economics and history in 2006. Upon graduating he joined Google in product development and worked there for 3 years until he moved to Hanover New Hampshire to attend the Tuck School of Business and earn his MBA. He interned at BCG, but returned to mobile product development when he graduated from Tuck in 2011, working in product management at both Zynga and Flurry following his MBA. For the last several years, he has been full-time CEO of RocketBlocks, which has helped applicants land consulting jobs and has expanded into prepping applicants for product management positions.

Since our last interview focused on landing a consulting job, this show is going to focus on product management positions in high tech.

What are the key qualifications in terms of work experience and personal qualities that high tech companies are looking for in PM candidates? [2:32]
Candidates for a PM role tend to run the gamut – could be someone with a computer science degree straight out of undergrad, or an English major coming into the role. Ultimately when you look at what tech companies like Google, Amazon, or Facebook want from a PM, they tend to look at the same set of skills. They want to know that people have a good product sense, and passion and excitement for a product. You need to be excited about what a product looks and feels like, and that you can think about deeply. Some level of tech fluency is important as well since you are working day in and day out with tech people – you need to be able to communicate effectively with them. Some firms like to hire people already with a tech background, but a lot of companies have realized that just because someone has a great tech background doesn’t necessarily mean they will be a great PM. You just need to be able to communicate effectively with software engineers. The third thing is similar to what a lot of companies are looking for. They want people who have strong leadership skills and know how to lead a team, and who can collaborate.

You had a degree in history. How did you prepare for this role? Did you take classes? [5:52]
The Project Manager role has really come into being in the last 20 years. If you did a study of job titles, a small amount would have been PM before then, but now there are thousands of PMs at places like Amazon or Google. I didn’t even know what a PM was until just before my 4th year at UVA – I found out about it from some friends. The job sounded incredible, and what I learned was that to get that job you needed to have a computer science degree. I was bummed that I couldn’t do that with the time remaining, but I wondered if there was another way to make the transition. I had a friend at UVA whose older sister was an early PM at Google. She said if you don’t have a CS degree it’s a nonstarter. However, she encouraged me to join another team and get my foot in the door at Google. So I looked at some other teams that hired people without CS degrees. I joined an operations-focused team and then transitioned.

What was so exciting about the product management role to you? [8:32]
I think product management was really appealing because it felt like it had a really good mix of skill sets that you could apply and be able to see and help something develop from concept stage all the way through building and launching it. The full lifecycle experience was really compelling to me. I had an early inkling that I would like to run my own business someday, and this seemed to have certain aspects of that.

What kind of education is required for a PM position? What’s recommended or preferred? [10:17]
A bunch of different routes are feasible. An MBA is a really good route. Amazon is the most salient example. I think they are the largest hirer of MBAs in the US. It’s a good route if you are coming to PM without a tech background. Obviously individuals with a technical background are valued because they understand the basis of how things fit together and how things work, and presumably can learn the more subtle softer skills to succeed in PM. MBAs have the broader business perspective. The majority of people use the “foot in the door” strategy like I did. Take a role that gives you some exposure to PM, build some credibility, and then make the transition within the company.

What is the product management hiring process typically like? [15:09]
It is almost always a three-round process. With bigger companies they start with a phone screen with a recruiter, not someone within the PM staff. They will screen candidates for credibility – do you have the right type of experience on your resume, will you fit into the company culture, and if they send you on to the next person will they think so too. Round 2 is usually two phone interviews or video interviews, and those will be more content-focused, so a place like Amazon will ask about leadership principles. They will be more product-oriented questions to see if you have good natural intuition. The interviews are typically about 45 minutes to an hour specifically with PMs. The final round is on-site, and with maybe 4-6 interviews. You will get a spectrum of folks to talk to – a glance across the core team – talking to PMs, engineers, designers, evaluating how you would interface with people in these functional areas. They will be checking for your product sense, product strategy, and whether you can back that up with analytics, your tech skills, and culture fit.

You’ve used the term “product sense” several times. Can you explain what that is? [20:06]
Someone will say, “Tell me what Google’s strategy is for chat applications.” It is essentially having strong intuition with product but also business strategy. There is typically a product-oriented question, where they want to suss out if people like thinking about products and thinking about them in an intuitive way – do they understand the consumer, design, colors used, are there too many buttons, or not enough buttons. Essentially, do they have a “Spidey-sense” of what a good product is. Steve Jobs is the quintessential example of this.

What do you think is key to successfully navigating this hiring process, other than what we have already discussed in terms of education, experience, and qualities? [22:24]
The biggest thing aside from the demonstrated core skills is that industry-specific knowledge expected goes up the smaller the company is. With Google, Amazon, or Facebook, they want to hire generalists that will rotate around. If you are interviewing at a smaller company like AirBnB, though, you can’t show up to an interview for a PM and not have much interest in the travel space or hotels/lodging. Those areas are so core to the AirBnB business that it would be a red flag.

What kind of interviews can a job applicant expect for a PM position? [24:58]
You see three types of interviews. The first is a product case interview, similar to consulting, but the orientation and depth is more around building/launching a specific product vs high level business strategy. For example, “We are thinking about bringing Lyft scooters to the Austin market. How would you do it?” The second type is a fit interview, trying to suss out the fuzzier skills – leadership, team, behavioral, and fit questions. The third type is a hybrid of fit and mini-product questions, like, “What is your favorite mobile app and why?” They want to test you lightly.

What are the most common mistakes wannabe product managers make in the application process in general and in the interviews specifically? [27:39]
In the recruiting process recruiters are looking for people who are going to be able to navigate the weird vagaries and challenges of going through this whole life cycle – good at high level strategy and tactical execution. You should see that in the resume, but instead you often see someone trying to prove super deep ability in a technical sense.

Among the leading tech firms, on a high level, how does hiring differ at Google, Amazon, Facebook, Apple, and Netflix? [31:34]
There are a few big differences. Google has the most technical bias in their process. One of the first PMs they hired was not an engineer, and it didn’t work out. They saw the issue as the lack of a technical background, and so decided to stick with tech people. It has changed a bit, but the bias is still there. Facebook used to care more about technical stuff, then they officially said it’s not a key requirement. They tend to hire people with an entrepreneurial mindset. If you don’t have demonstrated experience in that type of area it will be really tough to get a job.

Amazon is the most MBA-friendly of the large tech companies. They approach a lot of problems with here’s a business opportunity, how do we market it, how do we approach it, and then other things fit in below that. If you look at Google’s current product strategy, a lot of it will be around how will we take strengths in AI learning and bake it in. With Amazon, we were a book store, now we have movies, and we do infrastructure for startups – they find a market and see if they can make something work. I am exaggerating a bit, but I think you know what I am saying.

Netflix, has a bias against newer talent. They generally hire folks who already have industry experience, as they believe it leads to a more mature, confident talent base they don’t have to spend time training.

Companies like AirBnB, newer consumer-focused companies, care that PMs have a stronger design sense and can make a product that looks and feels intuitive.

For a long time Apple didn’t have the role of PM. They had people building the product and people selling the product, and the PM is in between, so what is the PM really doing. Historically they had engineering managers and marketing managers. Only recently have they had true product managers.

What is RocketBlocks and how can it help an applicant for a product management position? [38:44]
It is a platform to help people build and hone skills they need to succeed in job interviews. We have a management consulting vertical and product manager vertical. We take the skills companies are testing for and build drills around them to allow students to come in and practice. The whole idea is to be basically a digital gym preparing for your interviews. The driving force is interactive drills, like, “Here is an interview scenario, how would you react,” “Prioritize a roadmap,” or, “Here are two competing user interfaces, compare them, what is good, what’s not.” The idea is to provide organic scenarios you would face in the interview and on the job.

We also facilitate a market of expert coaches who can run you through an hour-long mock interview. We vet and curate that list of experts.

Rocketblocks is a subscription model like a gym. You pay $35/month to use the resource as long as you need it to prepare.

What are your plans for RocketBlocks going forward? [44:56]
We are always adding and curating existing drills on the platform to make better scenarios to prepare. Eventually we will add some new verticals. Other work we will do is refining and going deeper on the type of content and how you interact with the content. The core of what’s there is really helpful to students and we can augment it to provide an even better user experience. The platform can now be used on a tablet or mobile so you can study on the go.

It’s now 8 years since you earned your MBA at Tuck. How has your perspective on that experience evolved? Are you still glad you did it? [47:18]
High level answer is still the same (yes). The value of the network compounds over time as your classmates progress in their careers, and the amount of great people you have access to and can help you out is incredible.

What do you wish I would have asked? [48:01]
Maybe, “What is the most interesting product management interview question you’ve ever heard?” Best I’ve heard recently, is a Google PM walked in with a duffle bag full of physical products and the candidate would have to reach into the bag, pull one out at random and critique it, the deficiencies, how you could make it better. It’s a great test of overall product sense, but maybe a bit intimidating with someone walking in with a giant duffle bag!

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Related Links:

RocketBlocks for Product Management

RocketBlocks for Consulting Interviews

Tuck MBA Application Essay Tips

Get Accepted to Chicago Booth, a free webinar

Accepted’s Admissions Consulting Services

Related Shows:

Building Your Consulting Career, and a Look Back at a Tuck MBA

An Interview with Dartmouth Tuck’s Admissions Director, Luke Pena

From Tuck MBA to Stand-Up Comic and Author

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post How to Launch Your Career in High Tech Product Management [Episode 332] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Harvard Business School Class of 2021 Profile  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Oct 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Harvard Business School Class of 2021 Profile
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Here’s a look at HBS’s Class of 2021 taken from the Harvard Business School website:

  • Number of applications: 9,228
  • Enrolled: 938
  • Countries represented: 71
    United States: 63%

    Asia: 14%

    Europe: 9%

    Mexico, Central & South America: 5%

    Canada: 4%

    Africa: 2%

    Middle East: 2%

    Oceania: 1%

  • Women: 43%
  • International: 37%
  • US ethnic minorities: 27%
  • Average GPA: 3.70
  • Average years work experience: 4.7
  • Percent of class taking GMAT: 80%
    Verbal range: 31-51

    Quantitative range: 38-51

    Total range: 590-800

    Median verbal: 41

    Median quantitative: 48

    Median total: 730

  • Percent of class taking GRE: 20%
    Verbal range: 147-170

    Quantitative range: 145-170

    Median verbal: 163

    Median quantitative: 163

Breakdown of undergraduate majors (137 domestic universities and 155 international universities)

MajorPercent

Economics & Business43%

STEM38%

Humanities & Social Science19%

Breakdown of pre-MBA industry

IndustryPercent

Venture Capital/Private Equity16%

Consulting15%

Financial Services12%

Manufacturing/Industrial/Energy12%

Technology12%

Consumer Products/retail/Ecommerce9%

Nonprofit/Government/Education8%

Healthcare/Biotech7%

Military4%

Services4%

Media/Entertainment/Travel3%

This year’s HBS application volume shows another decline. In the 2016-2017 application cycle, there were 10,351 applications; last year there were 9,866, and this year there were only 9,228. This year’s slight decline does not mean that it’s any easier to get into HBS.

Other items of note:

  • Even more accepted applicants are taking the GRE: 20% in this year’s entering class compared to 15% last year.
  • For the first time in 3 years, the percent of women’s enrollment went up: 43% this year compared to 41% last year.
  • While the percentage of international students remained stable from last year at 37%, the percentage of U.S. ethnic minorities went up from 26% last year to 27% this year.
This year’s takeaway is that HBS continues to be stable in its class makeup. Minor shifts occur, but these are not enough to make any noticeable differences.

Do you need help gaining admission to Harvard Business School or any other top MBA program? Explore our MBA Admissions Consulting Services and work one-on-one with an advisor who will help you GET ACCEPTED.

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Harvard Business School MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• What Does Harvard Business School Want?, a video

What HBS is Looking For, a blog series

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Harvard Business School Class of 2021 Profile appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
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Emory Goizueta Business School MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Oct 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Emory Goizueta Business School MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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Taken together, these essay questions cover a lot of ground: your professional path and plans, your alignment with the program’s core values, and your interpersonal and communication responsiveness. Moreover, this vast ground is covered in few words – the written essays are short, requiring tough decisions about what key points and anecdotes to include and what to leave out. Write simply and directly to pack as much meaning and impact as possible into each word. Not least, ensure your video “personality” aligns with your written “personality.”

Emory Goizueta 2019-2020 MBA application essays
Emory Goizueta essay question #1
Define your short-term post-MBA career goals. How are your professional strengths, past experience and personal attributes aligned with these goals? (300 word limit)

This question challenges you to define your short-term goals in three dimensions: your past experience, your skills, and your unique character. Yet, with only 300 words, you can’t give a comprehensive, detailed delineation of those elements. I suggest discussing one point from each category that is relevant to your goals. The key to making this part of the essay work is specificity, detail, and anecdote – e.g. don’t just say you have a charismatic personality that brings people together; show through a brief anecdote how it lets you be the glue in a rough-and-tumble team. Then discuss directly the relevance of this quality to your short-term goal. The question’s emphasis on short-term goals suggests practicality and concreteness: what (type of) position and in what industry, to achieve what, and why (and, sometimes, where).

Emory Goizueta essay question #2
The business school is named for Roberto C. Goizueta, former Chairman and CEO of The Coca-Cola Company, who led the organization for 16 years, extending its global reach, quadrupling consumption, building brand responsibility, and creating unprecedented shareholder wealth. Mr. Goizueta’s core values guide us in educating Principled Leaders for Global Enterprise. Provide an example of your leadership – professional or personal – and explain what you learned about yourself through the experience. (300 word limit)

I suggest addressing this question as a story (a very succinct story): describe a time you led in a situation of some significance. Walk through it straightforwardly, focusing on your actions. In a final, brief paragraph reflect on what this leadership experience taught you about yourself; don’t list ten things, but rather focus on the one to two most meaningful points.

To select the best topic or experience to portray, look for something that is fairly recent and that has a clear impact. While most people will want to grab this opportunity to showcase their impact at work, it may make sense to select a non-work story if, for example, it reflects a situation or experience that truly distinguishes you in a relevant way and illustrates substantial leadership as well. Think strategically in selecting the topic and choose one that enhances your overall application and adds to the information found elsewhere.

Video essay
Within the application, you will be provided with a question to answer. You will have 30 seconds to gather your thoughts and prepare your answer. You will then have up to 60 seconds to respond to the question. You will be permitted 3 attempts to record your video essay, however each opportunity could present a different question.

You can’t prepare content obviously, but you can prepare approach and presentation. A great way to do that is to practice – literally give yourself questions and video yourself answering. (Even better, see if someone can ask you random questions so you are really prepared for anything without knowing what it is first.) Don’t just stand in front of a mirror or talk into a room for 60 seconds. It feels a lot different to be talking while being videoed – if you’re like most people you’ll really benefit from doing it enough to make it second nature.

Additional information
Should you feel there is an important part of your story missing from your application (e.g., unexplained gaps in work experience, choice of recommenders, academic probation issues), please use this section to provide a brief explanation. We ask that you limit your response to 100 words; responses in bullet point format are preferred.

Use this essay to address any extenuating circumstances. Obviously, be succinct.

Reapplicant essays
Applicants who have applied to Goizueta Business School in the past are required to answer the following questions:

  • Define your short-term post-MBA career goals. How are your professional strengths, past experience and personal attributes aligned with these goals? (300 word limit)
    See tip for Essay 1 above. If your goal has changed since the previous application, explain why.

  • Explain how you have improved your candidacy for Goizueta Business School’s MBA Program since your last application. (250 word limit)
    This is THE key question for all MBA reapplicants. Goizueta just asks it explicitly. See MBA Reapplication 101 for more advice.

For expert guidance with your Emory Goizueta MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to top MBA programs and look forward to helping you too!

Emory Goizueta 2019-2020 MBA application deadlines

Round 1October 4, 2019

Round 2November 15, 2019

Round 3January 10, 2020

Round 4March 13, 2020

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

 

Related Resources:

• Why MBA? a free guide to writing about your MBA goals

• Optional Essays: When and How to Write Them, a short video

School-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Emory Goizueta Business School MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Listen to Admissions Straight Talk for interviews with admissions directors, MBAs, test prep pros, and financial aid sources.
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London Business School Master’s in Management (MiM) Essay Questions, T  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Oct 2019, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: London Business School Master’s in Management (MiM) Essay Questions, Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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The London Business School Master’s in Management application essay questions indicate that the adcom values applicants who, at an early stage in their careers, already have self-understanding and the ability to reflect and self-critique. Why? For people who are just starting their careers and don’t yet have extensive real-world experience to draw on, these qualities will allow them to truly benefit from the program and chart an appropriate path forward.

London Business School Master’s in Management application essays
LBS MiM essay #1
How will the Master’s in Management help you to achieve your academic and professional goals? (600 words)

A simple and sensible approach to this essay is to break it into two main parts, which are integrated in the question:

The first section may be a bit longer than the second, which is fine.

I combine academic and professional goals together because they are not separate for most MiM applicants. Presumably, your professional career plans are at least part of what motivate your academic interest in business. Briefly discuss those career plans as you envision them at this point and explain how and why they inspire you to learn about business through the academic resources and approach. Since the question breaks out academic and professional, do directly address both – academic would refer to your desire to pursue this education specifically through a graduate business program, and professional would refer to your projected professional growth and the education it requires. It would also be fine to discuss a desire for academic refinement and exploration for its own sake; not every academic goal has to be related to professional goals.

In the second section, identify specific aspects of the LBS MiM program that you believe will be particularly helpful and/or important in facilitating and enabling that growth. Don’t just list things, but connect them to learning needs, goals, and/or intellectual interests.

LBS MiM essay #2
During your time as a Master’s in Management student, how will you contribute to the School community? (400 words)

This question is a great opportunity to differentiate yourself and spotlight relevant accomplishments and experience. You can portray yourself as someone who makes an impact by discussing your prospective contributions based on what you have actually done, experienced, and/or learned (and, sometimes, endured…). To identify the best topics, consider drawing from your work or internship experience, personal interests, academic experience, distinctive or unusual aspects of your background, etc. Most people will do best to discuss 3-4 topics, for each describing the given experience and explaining – in specific terms – how it will allow you to contribute to the LBS community. If 1-2 of these are discussed in some detail, you can mention 1-2 more topics with less detail.

Get professional guidance with your LBS MiM application! Check out Accepted’s MiM Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the LBS MiM application.

LBS MiM 2019 – 20 Application Remaining Deadlines

Rolling Early AdmissionsUntil Mid September

Deadline 2October 2, 2019

Deadline 3January 8, 2020

Deadline 4March 4, 2020

Deadline 5April 22, 2020

Late ApplicationsLate applications may be considered but are not guaranteed, and you are advised to apply by the April deadline. Please contact our Recruitment Team if you are considering submitting a late application.

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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After a successful career in business publishing, Cindy Tokumitsu has worked for the past 15+ years with Accepted, every year helping clients get accepted to top MBA, law, and med programs. She is a pioneer in the niche of EMBA application consulting. Want Cindy to help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch with Cindy Tokumitsu.
 

Related Resources:

• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Application Essays, a free guide

Early Career Management and European MBA Programs with Jamie Wright, a podcast episode

What Is the Diversity Essay Question & How Do You Answer It?

Tags: Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post London Business School Master’s in Management (MiM) Essay Questions, Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Listen to Admissions Straight Talk for interviews with admissions directors, MBAs, test prep pros, and financial aid sources.
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog
Follow Accepted on Twitter
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Life at Yale SOM, Google Internship & the Importance of Diversity  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Oct 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Life at Yale SOM, Google Internship & the Importance of Diversity
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Learn how real students navigate their way through the business school admissions process and b-school itself with our What is Business School Really Like? series.

Meet Dan, a Yale SOM student with a background in engineering.
Dan, thank you for sharing your story with us!

I understand your undergraduate degree is in engineering. How does your engineering background fit in with your post-MBA goals?
Dan: I often get asked about the transition to MBA for those with engineering backgrounds. I feel that engineering gives a great base of skills that can be applied in a variety of contexts, including business school. Thinking analytically, working effectively in teams, and problem solving using a data-driven approach are all strengths that my engineering education helped me build. My engineering background inspired a love for working on innovative projects and digging deep into technical solutions. It has also guided me towards my goal of working on impactful, innovative technology.

What was the most surprising aspect of the MBA application process?
Dan: Most surprising was how enthusiastic and helpful all the people I reached out to were. From current students in the clubs to alums in the spaces I wanted to work, I was able to get a great amount of information and feedback. I would recommend reaching out to anyone doing something you are excited about from your programs of interest, and you will likely be positively surprised at the response.

What work experience did you have at the time you applied to business school?
Dan: Going into business school, I had four years of work experience as a Technology Consultant. From this experience, I knew that I enjoyed focusing on user experience, working directly with clients, and collaborating with developers and other technical teammates. I wanted to gain a more well-rounded understanding of business and add more varied work experience, so I decided it would be a good time to apply to business school.

Congratulations on landing an internship at Google! Can you tell us about the application process and your internship experience?
Dan: Thanks! Past the straightforward parts of applying, some useful things I did was think about how and why I use Google products, what past experiences were directly applicable to the role, and how working at Google could fit into my long-term development. After each interview (done over Google Hangouts video-chat), I felt even more excited about the work my interviewers described, and I was fortunate to get the summer role! So far, my internship experience at Google has been shaped by supportive and enthusiastic coworkers, lofty objectives towards impactful goals, and plenty of quirky, Googley fun.

Can you share more about your role as an intern? What does a typical day look like?
Dan: Of course every role is different but happy to explain mine! I am working to improve the support experience for an app. This involves analyzing the user journeys that lead to issues or frustration, recommending courses of action from a support perspective, and coordinating cross-functionally to build product solutions. My typical day involves researching issues and preparing proposals, presenting to stakeholders across the organization for feedback on feasibility and impact, and taking time to grab coffee or lunch with Googlers from across the organization. One of my goals is to meet many people and learn about what they are working on – something that the size and openness of Google is great for!

What is a Yale SOM student ambassador?
Dan: Student ambassadors serve as connection points for prospective students to learn more about the Yale SOM program and what current students are involved in. I am involved or affiliated with the Consortium for Graduate Study in Management (CGSM), the Technology Club, the Data Analytics Club, and the Hockey Club. If any prospective students have questions on those areas or are generally interested in Yale SOM, my contact information is listed on my page and I am always happy to connect!

What is the Consortium for Graduate Study in Management? What are the benefits of membership?
Dan: The Consortium aims to improve the representation and inclusion of traditionally underrepresented minorities in business and leadership. As a prospective applicant who is interested in business school and the mission of the Consortium, one can apply to Consortium schools through their reduced-fee application (cgsm.org). Besides the community and networking opportunities, membership (along with admission) allows you to attend a pre-MBA summit called OP to meet members across all the Consortium member schools and prepare for the transition to business school. At Yale, I have found a great sense of community with my Consortium peers, knowing we all support each other and share the organizational values.

What is your favorite business school course (so far)?
Dan: My favorite course so far has been the Employee Perspective. Going in, I did not expect to be very interested in the ‘human resource management’ class. After learning how to guide an effective people strategy – through job design, organizational structure, alignment of incentives, and more – I found myself excited to learn as much as I could from this class.

What elective courses do you look forward to taking?
Dan: One elective that I am hoping to take is Interpersonal Dynamics. Effective interpersonal relationships and being able to relate to others is essential for leadership in any organization. This course often comes up when I ask alumni for their favorite or most memorable course, and I am excited for the opportunity to try it. I also plan to take classes to strengthen my understanding of strategy, finance, and analytics.

What has surprised you most about your program?
Dan: A significant reason why I chose Yale SOM was the diversity I saw and experienced during my application and interview process. Even so, the depth of diversity has been a pleasant surprise. My classmates have widely varied backgrounds in terms of education, work experience, long-term goals, and more. Though there is still work to be done, the international and minority presence, including our large Consortium class, is a step in the right direction. This diversity creates an incredible environment for learning and inspiration that I am thankful to be a part of.

What are your post-graduation goals?
Dan: Tough question! At a high level, I would love to join an organization where I can contribute to innovative technology solutions, grow my analytical and interpersonal capabilities, and work with great people. These elements are personally important and will help me develop into the type of leader I want to become.

If you could share one message with new MBA applicants, what would it be?
Dan: Research! With the wealth of information from the schools, non-school sources on the internet, and student ambassadors, there are so many ways to learn all about an MBA program. Employment outcomes, life at the program, academics, or anything else you are curious about – please research, ask questions, and get informed before you apply. This will help you write great essays, interview well, and know for yourself if the program is right for your goals.

Do you have questions for Dan? Questions for us? Do you want to be featured in our next What is Business School Really Like? post? Know someone else who you’d love to see featured? Are there questions you’d like us to ask our students in this series? LET US KNOW!

You can learn more about Dan by connecting with him on LinkedIn.

Are you setting out on your own b-school journey? We can help you reach the finish line! Check out our MBA Admissions Consulting Services to team up with an admissions expert who will help you join the ranks of thousands of Accepted clients who get accepted to their dream schools.

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One

Yale Som: Integrated in Its Curriculum, with Its University, and to the World, a podcast episode

Yale SOM MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Life at Yale SOM, Google Internship & the Importance of Diversity appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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How to Use Powerful Details to Create Strong Essays  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Oct 2019, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How to Use Powerful Details to Create Strong Essays
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To really draw your readers into your goal-focused essay, you’re going to want to lay the scene for your future accomplishments. After all, what better way to convince the adcom of your ambitions than to illustrate them in your essay?

First, identify your goal.
When you begin your essay, try showing yourself having reached your long-term goal, rather than merely stating what it is. For example: Are you talking on the phone to clients about your electronics recycling system? Video conferencing with workers in a Southeast Asian outsourcing company? Helping NGOs build professional networks through available connectivity products?

Then, go into detail about what you’re actually doing at this future moment.
Don’t just explain that you’re working as a data analyst, but truly describe what you will look like and what you’re feeling at a particular moment. Where will you be sitting or standing? What will you say? What will happen because of what you say?

Next, draw your reader deeper into your future.
Don’t stop at the snapshot of your workday. What happens next? How have you been able to get to this point? What is the next goal you want to reach?

It is not hard to go from something tangible – a person executing job responsibilities – to an analysis of what that person needs to add to their knowledge bank to reach that career goal.

Finally, show how your background, professional experience, and other activities and achievements provide the framework for this snapshot of the future.
What are your professional and community service activities?
Help the admissions committee members get excited about the way you serve your community and employer by showing scenes of yourself involved in particular activities. Get into the details of your experience by asking yourself some questions:

  • Are you talking with a mentally or physically disabled client?
  • Are you on the phone with a client, vendor, or sponsor for a fundraising event?
  • Are you searching for talent?
  • Are you on a sports team?
  • What does it look like where you are? What are you doing?
  • What are you saying or thinking or feeling and what happens as a consequence of what you have done?
  • What have you learned from the experience?
  • How do you know you learned it?
How has your family and cultural background influenced who you are today?
Show yourself with your family in a typical room or event or show yourself alone and missing them. Or show yourself with them at a time that was definitive for everyone. For example:

  • Who is talking?
  • What is he or she saying?
  • How did the outcome matter to you?
  • What did it teach you?
How would you describe a time you executed a plan?
Start in the thick of it. Describe the scene by asking:

  • Who is doing what? Why?
  • How did you come up with this plan?
  • What is the next step for everyone? What does that look like?
  • What is the impact of your plan’s success?
Are you working on an essay about a time you demonstrated leadership?
Put yourself in the midst of the event where you are the leader and describe what’s going on:

  • Who else is involved?
  • How did you contact them?
  • What did you suggest they do and why?
  • Where were you when you realized you had led successfully?
  • What does this example of leadership tell you about the attributes leadership requires?
How have your experience, activities, and commitments played a role in the evolution of your goals?
Show the committee what the activity requires of you by placing yourself in a scene from that activity:

  • What equipment are you handling?
  • What are the dangers or pitfalls you must avoid?
  • What are you and others saying?
  • What are you hoping for by participating in this activity?
  • What does your participation mean to you and to others?
The value of setting the scene in your goal-oriented essay
Building scenes lets you start your essays without using exposition just to fill the reader in. If after you start the scene, you realize you do need to fill the reader in on some details, you can do so because after you have established the scene, the reader will already be interested in learning more and the exposition will not jar the reader out of the picture.

Explore our Admissions Services and work one-on-one with an expert advisor who will help you mine your experiences and measure your ambitions to create essays that paint the perfect picture of your long-term goals. Learn more about how we can help you GET ACCEPTED.

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By Sheila Bender, writer, poet, former Accepted admissions consultant, and founder of Writing it Real. Want an admissions expert help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!



Related Resources:


5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Grad School Statement of Purpose, a free guide

Application Essay Tip: The Devil is in the Details

Writing a Lead That Pops

Tags: College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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Chicago Booth Class of 2021 Profile  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Oct 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Chicago Booth Class of 2021 Profile
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Here’s a look at the Chicago Booth Class of 2021, taken from the Chicago Booth website:

  • Length of program: 21 months
  • Received job offers within 3 months of graduation: 98.4%
  • Student-led groups: 70+
  • Leadership effectiveness & development (LEAD): 1 required course
  • Number of courses per quarter: 3-4
  • Class size: 593
  • Average GPA: 3.6
  • GPA range: 2.7-4.0
  • Average student age: 28
  • Countries represented: 49
  • U.S. minority students: 27% (Includes U.S. citizens and permanent residents who identify as American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian, Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, or multi-ethnic as a percent of the total class)
  • Gender: Female 40%, Male 60%
  • Average GMAT: 730
  • GMAT range: 610-790
  • Percent of GRE test takers in class: 13%
  • Average work experience: 5 years
Breakdown of undergraduate majors

MajorPercent

Business29%

Economics22%

Engineering20%

Liberal arts15%

Physical sciences9%

Other4%

Breakdown of pre-MBA industry

IndustryPercent

Consulting25%

Financial services21%

Nonprofit/government10%

Technology10%

Other9%

Healthcare8%

Private equity/venture capital8%

Consumer products3%

Energy3%

Accounting2%

Arts/media/entertainment2%

Manufacturing2%

Breakdown of geographic representation

Geographic AreaPercent

United States69%

Asia13%

Central/South America & Mexico11%

Europe3%

Middle East2%

Africa1%

Canada1%

Is Chicago Booth on your list of target MBA programs? Register for our upcoming webinar, Get Accepted to Chicago Booth, to learn the critical steps you need to take to get noticed by the adcom…and get ACCEPTED!

Are you looking for one-on-one expert advice that will help you get your foot in the door? Explore our MBA Admissions Consulting Services and work with an advisor who will guide you to acceptance at your top choice school.

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• Best MBA Programs, a guide to selecting the right one

• Chicago Booth 2019-20 MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines

Forbes 2019 Best Business Schools: Booth Tops the List

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Chicago Booth Class of 2021 Profile appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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How Personal is Too Personal?  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Oct 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How Personal is Too Personal?
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The personal statement serves as a terrific opportunity to share with admissions committees an interesting and unique aspect of your life. How much should you tell, and how much is too much?

When I applied to college, I wrote a personal statement describing some challenging family circumstances I’d had while growing up. I can still remember my best friend warning me that it was too risky, too intense. So I went back to the essay and asked myself: What did I learn from this experience? Does it speak to my strengths and individual qualities, or is it something meant for a therapist’s office or a private journal?

I studied the essay carefully and made sure it gave the reader a good sense of who I really was, and that it wasn’t just about the people in my family. I was careful to focus on what I had learned from these challenges and how the experience had made me a more independent, compassionate person.

I decided to send it in, and I was lucky to get great responses. (In fact, one admissions counselor even wrote me a personal note!) So, in that case, taking the leap was well worth it. But, in some cases, it is not.

What are the adcoms looking for?
All admissions committees want to accept a wide range of interesting, talented applicants. They want – as you would, if you were picking a team of any sort – a diverse group of smart, motivated, innovative, and unique individuals who can come together to create an interesting, richly layered community. They want people with integrity who will get along with others, and they want people who will add to their campus in an endless variety of ways. They also want applicants who are stable and confident, and who have already achieved important things in their lives.

How do you choose a personal, but not too personal essay topic?
Prepare for your personal statement by listing all of the meaningful events in your life. Which experiences really changed you, influenced you, and made you the person you are today?

Good questions you may want to ask yourself include:

  • Did you grow up overseas?
  • Do you speak several languages?
  • Are you from a cultural background that might make you stand out or may have enriched your life in a special way?
  • Do you have a handicap that has in fact made you stronger?
  • Do you love to cook Thai food, run marathons, play the piano?
  • Do you have a passion or interest that might be unusual but gives meaning to your life?
  • What have you had to work really hard at?
Then, mark the ones that helped you learn what you want to do with your life, the ones that led you to clarify your values, even if they are very personal. Ask yourself: Do these experiences make me sound emotionally unstable, ambivalent, or insecure? If so, take them to a therapist, not the admissions committee! But, if your topic has helped you become stronger and wiser, then I’d consider it to be a viable option.

Tips for sharing personal stories
Here are a few tips to further help you determine if your personal statement is too personal or just right for displaying your inner truths and ambitions:

  • Always be honest. Admissions committees can smell exaggeration from a mile away!
  • Don’t give details about your current or past romantic relationships. This is an example of information you can share with your therapist or best friend, but not the adcom!
  • Don’t focus your anecdotes on resentment, anger, or other feelings of ill-will – instead, focus on strength, recovery, and growth – in short, resilience.
  • Emphasize what you learned. You should jump on all opportunities to discuss what you did or what you would like to do with that knowledge or experience, not just on what happened.
If you pass the above criteria, then I’d say go for it. Be yourself. Make it interesting. And tell the truth.

The expert advisors at Accepted can help you with your application essays, from choosing a topic (and making sure it’s an appropriate one!) to putting the final touches and making it ready to submit. Explore our Graduate Application Services and we’ll match you with a personal admissions coach who will help you GET ACCEPTED.

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped applicants gain acceptance to top undergraduate and graduate programs. Our expert team of admissions consultants features former admissions directors, PhDs, and professional writers who have advised clients to acceptance at top programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Yale, Princeton, Penn, Columbia, Oxford, Cambridge, INSEAD, MIT, Caltech, UC Berkeley, and Northwestern.
Want an admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Application Essays, a free guide

Different Dimensions of Diversity, a podcast episode

Proving Character Traits in Your Application Essays

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post How Personal is Too Personal? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Encore: Focus on Fit in Admissions [Episode 334]  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Oct 2019, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Encore: Focus on Fit in Admissions [Episode 334]
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I am taking time off for family this week, and as a result I decided to air an encore of one of our most popular shows ever, Focus on Fit.

I chose it not only because of its popularity, but because the topic is relevant to so many, if not all, specialties. A solid understanding of fit is critical to success in so many parts of the application process, including the essays and interviews, either one of which just may be stressing you at the moment.

If you like this episode, I’d also like to recommend that you download our free guide, Fitting in and Standing Out: The Paradox at the Heart of Admissions. Your application needs to show that you will do both, and that’s the difficult paradox at the heart of admissions. Master that paradox, and you are well on your way to acceptance.

Thanks as always for listening to Admissions Straight Talk. I’ll talk to you again next week! In the meantime, here is Focus on Fit.

For the complete show notes, please check out the original blog post.

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Related Resources:

• Fitting in and Standing Out: The Paradox at the Heart of Admissions

Stand Out or Fit In? 4 Application Strategies to Help You Do Both

Why Cornell Tech was the Perfect Fit for This Londoner

Get Accepted to Harvard Business School

Secondary Application Strategies for Essays That Score Interviews

 Multiple Mini-Interview Webinar

Accepted’s Admissions Consulting Services

Related Shows:

How to Get Into Zucker SOM at Hofstra/Northwell

How to Launch Your Career in High Tech Product Management

Where MedEd Tuition Goes? This Resident Has a Surprising Answer

What Does a UVA Law School Application Reader Look For?

A Bain Consultant-Turned Wharton MBA Starts Her Own Business

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Finding and Articulating Fit with the Booth MBA  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Oct 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Finding and Articulating Fit with the Booth MBA
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The Booth MBA admissions committee focuses on three key dimensions in evaluating applicants:

  • Intellectual fit in terms of ability and motivation to optimize its Curriculum
  • Personal and cultural fit in terms of synergy with its Community
  • Professional fit in terms of past and future Career
This short series of posts will explore each of these 3 C’s and how you can integrate them into your application successfully.

We’ll start with the first one.

Fit with Booth’s curriculum
The renowned analytic rigor of Booth endures – it is part of the University of Chicago DNA. Its curriculum reflects and embodies this quality. While it contains a practical aspect being a professional program, mastering and making the most out of the academics demands intellectual energy and a capacity for sustained analytic work.

Here are the three components of this dimension of fit that Booth identifies and looks for:

  • Academic preparedness.

    Do you have the skills and knowledge to handle the curriculum? For Booth, the academic record is particularly important. It should include relevant quantitative coursework with good grades and demonstrate an appetite for intellectual challenge and exploration. You need a solid and thorough academic foundation to navigate the classroom demands and team projects.
  • Intellectual curiosity.

    Do you relish and are you energized by probing ideas, testing possibilities, pursuing root causes? You’ll manage the challenging curriculum a lot better if you actually enjoy this type of pursuit, if you are driven by genuine curiosity to push those conceptual boundaries. If it’s a grind, you’ll suffer (and might make others suffer too).
  • Communication skills.

    Being intellectually prepared and engaged is great, but as a classmate and team member, you must be able to express your ideas and interact effectively – you need sound communication skills to participate in and contribute to the communal learning.
The Booth website lists some obvious things in your application that address this curriculum fit (e.g. test scores). In addition, it cites some interesting factors the adcom pays attention to: “interest in current affairs” and in areas outside your immediate environment, and “willingness to engage in debate or to ask questions.” Weave these elements into your essays and interview! Ideally with a deft touch; not heavy-handedly. In fact, the 2nd main essay question (“Chicago Booth immerses you in a choice-rich environment. How have your interests, leadership experiences, and other passions influenced the choices in your life?”) is ideally suited to accommodating such a message.

Do you want to ensure that your application demonstrates your fit with Chicago Booth? Do you need help highlighting your strengths and proving that you truly encapsulate the Chicago approach? [b] I would be happy to work with you on your application and guide you to acceptance at Chicago Booth or any other of your top-choice MBA programs. Click here to get started[/b][b].[/b]

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

School-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips

Chicago Booth MBA Class Profile [Class of 2020]

Chicago Booth MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Finding and Articulating Fit with the Booth MBA appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

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Preparing for Your MBA Interview Questions  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Preparing for Your MBA Interview Questions
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You’ve scored your MBA interview invitation. Now what? Practice, practice, practice! You do not want to wing this; the more prep you do before the big day, the more confident you’ll be and the more smooth and seamless your answers will be.

You’ll be asked lots of questions that cover topics like your background, your skills, and your goals. Below you’ll find the most popular MBA interview questions – you may not be asked these exact questions, but they’ll likely come up in one way or another during your interview.

MBA interview question 1: Walk me through your resume.
Reason for asking the question
This question (or some version of it) is very often the first question asked in an MBA interview since it should be a fairly easy question to answer and provides a foundation for the rest of the interview. Here’s what they’re checking: Can you remain focused on answering the question? Are you especially nervous? Can you summarize your work accomplishments succinctly while at the same time providing a narrative about your career progression? All of this information is helpful to manage the interview.

The interviewer has already had the chance to look at your resume, but wants to understand the “why” of it. Your responsibility as the candidate is to highlight some career accomplishments, but primarily to explain the reasoning and motivation for the most significant career moves made.

How to prepare your answer
The answer to this question should be 2-3 minutes long, so once you have chosen the things you would like to highlight, practice your answer several times to make sure you can fit it into that timeframe. The point is not to summarize everything you have done at every job, but to briefly discuss accomplishments and the circumstances surrounding moves from one role to another.

The logical starting point is your graduation from college. Summarize the degree you received and how it made sense to pursue the career you did based on your education. From there, look closely at your jobs. In 1-2 sentences, how would you discuss your time in that role? What was the motivating factor to move from that role to the next one? For your current job, lay out your current responsibilities. While it may be tempting to continue on and also answer “why an MBA” when you get there, just wait until that question is asked.

How to highlight particular circumstances
Situation 1: Worked two years at a consulting firm, then switched to work in marketing at a pharmaceutical company.

“While at ABC Consulting I had an extended engagement with a major pharma company. Working there made me realize the growth and potential of the industry, and I no longer wanted to be an outsider looking in. I wanted to accomplish specific goals of XYZ.”

Situation 2: Worked in operations at a manufacturer, then switched to finance.

“During my time in operations, I worked closely with the finance group in preparing our supply chain forecast. Through that experience, I came to realize that I really loved numbers, and that finance more closely fit with where I saw my career going. I made the case to senior management, and after recognizing my capabilities in the area they found a spot for me.”

Situation 3: Moved up in the organization from analyst to senior analyst to associate.

“I was fortunate to be involved in projects that gave me a lot of responsibility early on and had supportive mentors along the way. This allowed me to be recognized for my contributions and move up in the organization.” [In this type of situation, mentioning a few details of the projects would be appropriate.]

Important things to remember
  • Do not rehash everything on your resume. Remember, the interviewer will have already read through it, and seen several details. They want to understand WHY you have done what you have in your career thus far.
  • Stay focused. Don’t get bogged down in details that the interviewer doesn’t need or want to know. HIGHLIGHT and move on.It’s possible the interviewer might ask “Tell me about yourself” instead. In this case, it is still appropriate to give the details about your work experience, but also to give some background on you. Possible things to share: Where you grew up, interesting information about your childhood/schooling, why you chose to go to the university you did, and why you chose to study what you did. Essentially, by wording the question this way, the interviewer is encouraging you to include more personal details about your life, both current and from the past.
MBA interview question 2: Why this MBA program?
Reason for asking the question
This question gauges the sincerity with which the candidate is approaching the school.

How to prepare your answer
You need to make sure you show that your reasons for applying to the program go well beyond the obvious reputation, location, or network. Your job in answering this question is to convey your sincere enthusiasm for the school. You need to be as specific as possible. Appropriate topics for a convincing response:

  • Unique curriculum necessary to reach your goals
  • Faculty you are excited to learn from
  • School clubs or organizations you are particularly passionate about joining
  • Components of the program that intrigue you – study abroad, entrepreneurship project, etc.
Aspects of your visit to the school (provided you have had the chance to visit) that really got you excited about being a part of the community – classroom environment, conversations with students, admissions officers, or other prospective students.

Important things to remember
  • When preparing your answer, select aspects that are unique to the program, and make sure your answer isn’t one that could be valid for other schools you are looking at. Hopefully this is an easy question for you to answer since you are legitimately excited at the prospect of attending the school.If the school is not a top choice, you still need to do the job of convincing your interviewer that it makes sense to offer you admission, and if admitted there would be a decent chance you would attend. Even if this is a “safety school,” you need to be respectful of the school and interviewer.

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MBA interview question 3: What questions do you have?
Reason for asking the question
This question ensures that you have all pertinent information necessary about the school, as well as to confirm that you have thoroughly researched the program and consequently have thoughtful questions.

How to prepare your answer
This will most likely be your last opportunity to ask questions about the program before you find out the admission decision, so make sure the questions count. Take enough time to consider this prior to your interview since this is perhaps the only question you can be positive will be asked in the interview. Write your questions down if this helps.

You do not want the questions to be procedural in nature, such as, “When will I find out about your decision?” Those types of questions can be asked at the very conclusion of the interview (if necessary), but well after your primary questions. Questions should be well thought out and perhaps give the interviewer pause before answering. After all, the interviewer has had YOU in the hot seat for the last 30 minutes with challenging questions, so you should have some in return!

The best questions are the ones that make the interviewer have to dig deep into their knowledge to answer or might even be ones the interviewer can’t answer then and there. In this case, the interviewer will need to check into a question and get back in touch with you. YES! – one final opportunity to have a connection with someone critical to your admission decision. Thoughtful questions could focus on “big picture” things like school strategy, trends, or specifics related to particular coursework.

Important things to remember
  • Even if you have memorized all the content on the school’s website, visited campus, and already asked (and had answered) all the questions you think you could possibly ever have, you better not have a blank stare, or a simple “None” answer.
  • As a general rule of thumb, plan on asking 2-3 questions (not of the procedural type).
MBA interview question 4: What is your weakness?
Reason for asking the question
This question ensures that you are humble enough to recognize that nobody is perfect, and to measure how introspective you can be in an assessment of yourself.

How to prepare your answer
This question requires some real reflection. Nobody is perfect, yes, but one can always be striving to be one’s best self. In a work context, what areas do you need to develop? Where do you find yourself stuck? Is there a consistent theme that comes up in your annual review – something you need to work on? Jot a few things down as you work on answering this question. Sometimes we don’t want to acknowledge our weaknesses to others – a natural thing!

Once you have identified a few areas for improvement, think about how to portray those weaknesses so they could also be considered strengths. For example, being too detail-oriented might bog you down with too much work, but it ensures you are thorough, leaving no stone unturned. In this particular example, you are overworked, BUT you also have a strong work ethic.

Important things to remember
  • As you detail your weaknesses, be sure you also identify how you are working to improve them.
  • Try to have at least two weaknesses to discuss, and don’t have them be situational, such as, “my network is weak since I am primarily surrounded by IT people.”
MBA interview question 5: Why do you need an MBA?
Reason for asking the question
The interviewer wants to make sure your reasons for getting an MBA match up with what the MBA degree will provide you.

How to prepare your answer
Coming from almost any function, the likely answer to the “Why MBA?” question is that you have a significant amount of depth in a particular field (marketing, finance, IT, engineering), but in order to break free of being labeled as simply a subject matter expert, you need more breadth.

Most people look to get an MBA in order to move into a management role or to change fields. To succeed in management, you need to have an understanding of all functional areas of business, from finance to operations to technology and more. An MBA degree provides the toolbox you need to succeed in management in the shortest amount of time.

For career-switchers, a full-time MBA program provides one of the best opportunities to make that switch. It gives you access to critical coursework, training in “soft skills” and leadership, the all-important summer internship, and more.

Important things to remember
  • This is not meant to be a “gotcha” question, and you should in no way feel threatened by it. The interviewer simply wants to ensure that your expectations for the MBA are in line with what the program delivers. They want to know you are realistic.
  • There is no doubt that adding an MBA degree to your resume will bolster credibility and prestige. You want to make sure you don’t come across as someone only interested in an MBA degree because of the pedigree. That is a big turn off.
MBA interview question 6: How will you contribute to the program?
Reason for asking the question
With this question the interviewer is interested in discerning whether or not you have thought about what you think you will add to the overall MBA experience if you are accepted to the program. The admissions committee is looking to put together a diverse group of people, not just in terms of work experience and ethnic background, but in terms of life experience as well.

How to prepare your answer
In thinking about how to answer this question, you should be considering:

  • What makes you truly unique?
  • In what classes might your work experience be particularly useful to the learning environment?
  • How does your ethnicity, culture, and/or places you have lived inform your view of the world?
  • What personal interests or hobbies might bring an interesting or unique perspective to an activity or aspect of the school?
  • What lasting mark do you intend to make at the school?
Important things to remember
To answer this question in the most productive way, imagine that the admissions committee has to choose between you and someone else with a similar demographic profile and with similar work experience. What will make them choose you?

Additional MBA interview questions
Why are you interested in a general MBA program?[*]Why did you choose your undergraduate major?[*]Describe yourself.[*]What contributions would you make to a group?[*]Name three words or phrases to describe yourself to others.[*]What do you find most frustrating at work?[*]How would your coworkers describe you?[*]Describe a typical work day.[*]Have you worked in a team environment? What were your contributions to the effort?[*]Discuss any experience you have had abroad.[*]How did you choose your job after college?[*]What do you do to relieve stress?[*]It’s two years after graduation, what three words would your team members use to describe you?[*]Describe a situation where you brought an idea forward and it failed.[*]How do you define success?[*]What would you do if a team member wasn’t pulling their own weight?[/list]
You need to nail this interview, and the expert advisors at Accepted can help! Check out our Mock MBA Interview Packages and get the guidance you need to GET ACCEPTED!

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Jen Weld is a former Assistant Director of Admissions at Cornell’s EMBA program. She has an additional 10 years of experience in higher ed and corporate marketing. Want Jen to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

MBA Interview Prep: How to Ace Your Interviews, a free guide

What to Expect at Your In-Person MBA Interview with an Adcom Member

Everything You Need to Know About Preparing for Your MBA Interview

Tags: MBA Admissions

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8 Things MBA Applicants Should Do After Submitting Their Applications  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 8 Things MBA Applicants Should Do After Submitting Their Applications
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Within twelve hours I heard the same question from three clients, so I suppose this question may be on the minds of more than three. The question that may be plaguing you too, is this: “Now that I’ve submitted my applications, what should I do?”

Well, you’re not done yet…
The following are a list of suggestions of what you can do until those interview invitations come pouring in.

  • Continue to learn about each school by speaking with faculty, alumni and students.
    The more information you have the better. Be conscious of their limited time, so be thoughtful with the questions you ask. In addition, you may wind up with an unsolicited endorsement of your candidacy.

  • Conduct more research on your intended goal in anticipation of an MBA interview invitation.
    If, for instance, your intended goal is consulting, read The McKinsey Way or BCG on Strategy. If you are an up and coming entrepreneur, Back of the Napkin or anything by Peter Drucker or Guy Kawasaki. If you are transitioning into marketing, check out Communities Dominate Brands or Marketing Strategy: A Decision-Focused Approach.

  • Attend any events the school may be having (including virtual events).
    Stay involved. Show your interest.

  • Make up for any gaps you may have in your application.
    Go through your resume and transcript to determine if you’re running low on quantitative skills, volunteer work, etc. It may not be too late to make some improvements. Plus, if you end up reapplying next year, you’ll be glad you started on this process early.

  • Boost your work experience.
    Create new opportunities to add revenue, decrease costs, increase efficiency, increase market share, increase shareholder value, increase safety, increase satisfaction (customer or employee) at work.

  • Use your leadership skills with any opportunity you can imagine.
    At work and in your personal life – there’s always room for growth in this area.

  • If you haven’t been doing so yet, begin reading business press.
    You need to understand the jargon, the acumen, and what drives business today.

  • Now sit back and relax!
    Schools receive the largest number of apps in the second round and if they use student readers, the students are on vacation until sometime in January leaving a big bottleneck in the review process. Learn to be patient – a must-have in this process.

Explore our MBA Admissions Consulting & Editing Services for more information on how we can help you GET ACCEPTED.

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By Natalie Grinblatt Epstein, former admissions dean/director at three top business schools. Natalie has reviewed over 70,000 applications, interviewed over 2,500 candidates, and has trained nearly 700 admissions directors and alumni volunteers to select outstanding candidates for admission. Her clients gain admission to top programs including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, MIT, Cornell, Columbia, Berkeley, and NYU. Natalie holds an MBA from Michigan Ross. Want Natalie to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

How to Ace Your Interviews, a free guide

Everything You Need to Know About Preparing for Your MBA Interview

The Morphing and Multiplying MBA Interview

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Duke Fuqua Rattles MBA World with Exciting New Curriculum  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Oct 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Duke Fuqua Rattles MBA World with Exciting New Curriculum
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Interview with Shari Hubert, Associate Dean of Admissions at Duke Fuqua [Show Summary]
Shari Hubert, Associate Dean of Admissions at Duke Fuqua shares great information about major curriculum and programmatic changes the school is going through and why.

Learn about Duke Fuqua’s unique location, curriculum and program offerings [Show Notes]
It gives me great pleasure to welcome back to AST Shari Hubert, Associate Dean of Admissions at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business. Shari earned her BA at Dartmouth and her MBA at Harvard. She worked at several elite companies, and in 2009 became Director of Recruitment for the Peace Corps. In 2012 she returned to the MBA world when she became the Associate Dean of MBA Admissions for Georgetown McDonough. She joined Duke Fuqua as Associate Dean of Admissions in October 2017.

Fuqua has announced a curriculum redesign with three main changes. What are they and how will they affect the class entering in 2020? [1:48]
We are always trying to look for ways to remain relevant, and with the landscape we find ourselves in it is a challenging environment for business right now. There are so many polarizing issues. After talking about the needs of our students, we settled on their need for a greater emphasis on how to develop as a leader who can rally others to move toward a common purpose. The idea of teamwork has always been a part of our culture, and more recently embodied by Team Fuqua, as has the focus on innovation, but we wanted to be very intentional about equipping students with the right skillsets to tackle this new business environment. The curriculum focuses around three themes that are tackled right at the beginning of the first year and then again at the end of first year. The themes are leadership and common purpose, entrepreneurship as a mindset, and technology in business. Right after orientation there is a three-week period with three courses – one is leadership ethics in organizations, the second is entrepreneurship for a lifetime, and the third is focused on technology and ethics. We believe an entrepreneurial mindset is important, regardless of whether or not a student decides to own their own business someday. An owner mentality is very beneficial for resilience and creativity. Business is very complex with the technology transformation over the last few decades. There is no shortage of data, but what is lacking is leadership around making informed decisions with that data. So for us the focus is on building leaders who will be ethical about how to use it.

At the end of the first year there is kind of a capstone course around mobilizing teams for common purpose and the need to have courageous conversations. We do this at the end of the first year as students have built relationships by then and are able to more boldly participate. There is such polarization in the workforce, which is a reflection of society – one can’t seem to disagree agreeably. We look for students who can understand and embrace diversity and difference and this new curriculum equips students with the ability to navigate that and ultimately have a positive impact on society.

How will Fuqua’s Accelerated MBA program work and who is it for? [13:17]
The program is a one-year MBA for those with a Masters in Management (MM) from Fuqua and/or MM from another institution. These are individuals who have studied the core competencies around business and are looking for the additional leadership credentialing but in a way that is accelerated. Some want to continue down the business path, and it is beneficial to alumni of our MM who have taken much of our core, have work experience, and want to take their career to the next level. It also shows our commitment to lifelong learning to our alums – we already offer free exec ed courses to alumni. The MM degree is much more widespread in Europe and we are looking at that and others who might want to layer on with a U.S. MBA degree. It’s a great option in an accelerated format, and is unique from other accelerated MBAs as you must have the MM already. Our students start the same time as our daytime students, with the main difference being our accelerated students take electives with second years whereas the first years are taking the core. We anticipate them going back into their previous jobs or similar job functions, as they are not making a full-scale change in career since there is no internship opportunity.

Will applicants who have a BBA be eligible for it? [15:54]
BBAs do not qualify for it because the accelerated program essentially is part of the daytime MBA program. It is for those who have already taken the masters-level core courses, which our MM students have, and can then go deeper in the electives.

Duke is extending the Management Science and Technology Management (MSTeM) track to its MMS program. Can you describe this track? Is it a STEM program for visa purposes? [19:16]
This track essentially offers the MMS core plus courses that are data analytic in nature. Students in the track take three electives – one is R programming, another is a technology in business course, and the third is a business analytics course. They take the courses in summer or every Wednesday when we don’t typically have classes. There is no additional application for the track, but there is additional cost. At the end the graduate qualifies for OPT if they go into a career that is STEM qualifying, so provides an opportunity to stay in the US. Folks doing the MMS at Duke Kunshan can take the courses, but don’t get the OPT.

What do you wish more people knew about Fuqua? [24:23]
Unless you are able to come here and visit us, people have misconceptions about our existence here in Durham. Durham is a wonderful place – a community that is vibrant and growing, a mid-size city, a great climate, and with no compromise on access. 60% of our daytime graduates last year ended up on the west coast or mid-Atlantic/Northeast. Fuqua is a wonderful supportive community, and Durham is not as well understood and known. Fuqua is the only top 10 school in a top 10 city. There are wonderful restaurants, culture, and 150 multinational Fortune 100 companies in our backyard, which provides great opportunities for speakers, internships, practicums, etc., to leverage what students are learning in the classroom. There is not a great appreciation for that unless you come here.

One of the more distinctive features at Fuqua are its two concentrations related to energy management: Energy and Environment, and Energy Finance. Can you touch on those? [26:50]
Students want to combine the tools of business and apply them to big challenges, and energy and sustainability top the list. These concentrations allow students to get specialized expertise to be more equipped and competitive in the marketplace to navigate the unique issues. Courses are very interdisciplinary and experiential, and can be taken at Fuqua, Nicholas School of the Environment, and Sanford School of Public Policy. There are lots of different ways to satisfy the concentration, including as a consultant to an energy company. In terms of careers for those with the skill set, Tesla and Sunpower are recruiters, and also there are opportunities in sustainability job functions at places like Nike, Amazon, and Facebook. We have a dedicated sector director in the career services office to help in this space.

We have also partnered with a group of 17 MBA schools with students participating in a summit called Climate Cap focused on climate, business, and capital. How do you prepare students to mitigate risk and take advantage of opportunities in the area of climate change? The idea is to be thinking about social and environmental responsibility.

We also have a dual degree with Nicholas School – it’s a three-year degree with an MBA and masters in environmental management. Students do their first year at Nicholas, second at Fuqua, and blend the third year.

What is the biggest challenge applicants face in presenting a compelling case for acceptance at Duke Fuqua? [31:31]
For some, depending on their background, they may have had limited exposure to diversity and inclusion, or how to demonstrate commitment to diversity and inclusion. We encourage applicants to explain how they have worked on diversity or can demonstrate the potential or desire to wanting to be open to inclusion and diversity.

What do you see coming down the pike for the MBA program at Fuqua? MBA education in general? [37:27]
We will always be trying to remain relevant and there may be differences in how we deliver content. We have a lot to get prepared for with this incoming class – the accelerated MBA has put a lot on our plate! More generally, I would expect to see more flexible and shorter duration programs as people look a lot harder at the investment, time away from the work force and the trade off. Depending on how you define it, “on the cusp of recession,” that will define it as well.

What would you have liked me to ask you? [41:13]
There is a lot of great news on the gender front with increases in women in our programs. At Fuqua we have about 48% women overall across programs. We are so excited to see that, and we will continue to support women in applying and also while here. I am really encouraged about what I see inside the community. We are a big supporter of the Forte Foundation and have seen a big increase in the type of scholarships given. Across the programs we have over 230 Forte Fellows at Fuqua, and we want to ensure women feel like they belong here and have the opportunity and access they need to succeed.

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Related Links:

Duke Fuqua Admissions

Getting to Know Each Other Through 25 Random Things by Shari Hubert

Accepted’s Duke Fuqua MBA Application Essay Tips

Journey to Duke Fuqua: Marine-Turned-MBA, Entrepreneur, and Dad

Accepted MBA Admissions Services

Related Shows:

Get a Kellogg MBA: An Interview with Dean of Admissions Kate Smith

A Bain Consultant-Turned Wharton MBA Starts Her Own Business

Meet Duke Fuqua’s New MBA Admissions Director, Shari Hubert

Michigan Ross’ Brand-New Online, Part-Time MBA

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The post Duke Fuqua Rattles MBA World with Exciting New Curriculum [Episode 335] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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How to Get Started on Your Personal Statement with One Easy Technique  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Oct 2019, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How to Get Started on Your Personal Statement with One Easy Technique
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Okay, you’ve calmed down after your initial essay-writing anxiety, and you still don’t know where to begin. How do you capture your whole life in the meager number of characters allotted?

What is clustering?
Whether you’re feeling stuck or feeling overwhelmed by all the ideas bouncing around in your head, a stellar technique to start with is called clustering, also known as mind mapping. Clustering is a visual form of brainstorming that allows you to free associate around a chosen topic. Although it can seem random on the surface, it usually reveals deep connections. It’s perfect for excavating the personal experiences you’ll want to draw on to enliven your essay.

How to make a cluster (or mind map) for your personal statement
  • Step 1: 10 seconds
    Take a blank sheet of paper, write your name in the middle of it, and draw a circle around it. Alternatively, you could use one of the many online mind mapping programs, some with free trials, or even a large drawing pad.

  • Step 2: 5-10 minutes
    Free associate from your name, writing down words as they come (include feelings, ideas, memories, experiences, accomplishments, sensations – anything goes). Create a new branch or cluster for each new theme that emerges, using lines to connect the words. Most people experience an “aha moment” after about 7 minutes.

  • Step 3: 5 minutes
    Review your cluster and write for 5 minutes to synthesize your findings. What do you notice? Any patterns? Surprises? What items are you passionate about? You might want to go back and highlight areas you believe will be useful for your personal statement.

Total time invested: 10-20 minutes
A painless, quick exercise, and it’s likely that you’ve uncovered a theme for your essay along with a wealth of supporting examples!

Do you need guidance as you make your way through the brainstorming, writing, and editing stages of your application essay or personal statement? Our expert advisors can help! Work one-on-one with your personal consultant and create an essay that truly presents you at your very best, an essay that impresses the adcom and helps you GET ACCEPTED. Explore our services for more information.

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped applicants gain acceptance to top undergraduate and graduate programs. Our expert team of admissions consultants features former admissions directors, PhDs, and professional writers who have advised clients to acceptance at top programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Yale, Princeton, Penn, Columbia, Oxford, Cambridge, INSEAD, MIT, Caltech, UC Berkeley, and Northwestern.
Want an admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Grad School Application Essays, a free guide

• The Miraculous 15-Minute ROUGH, ROUGH Draft

First Drafts of Personal Statements: Let Yourself Go

Tags: College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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Chicago Booth Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Oct 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Chicago Booth Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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Chicago Booth EMBA gives you just one mandatory essay, but with ample space to make your case holistically. This approach to the essay question indicates that they are looking for people who can organize their thoughts, build a credible and compelling case for their candidacy, and maintain an extended yet focused discussion. The Booth EMBA adcom clearly puts value on verbal expression for its students, both during the program and as an indicator of success later in their careers. Give yourself time to develop and refine your essay accordingly.

Chicago Booth Executive MBA application essays
Chicago Booth Executive MBA essay #1
Why are you seeking an MBA from Chicago Booth and what unique knowledge and experiences do you hope to contribute to the program? (maximum 2 pages, 12 pt. Times New Roman)

The question zeroes in on the elements directly relevant to the adcom, and also allows you to elaborate within those parameters. Considering the pivotal role this one required essay plays in your application, the key challenge to making it shine is making good decisions about the following four elements:

• Within the overall space allowance, how much space should you allocate to each part of the question?

It will vary person to person. For example, a person who has her own company will require some “backstory” for context setting before discussing future plans, so she would allocate more space to goals than someone who is rising up the ladder at well-known McKinsey. Someone with atypical goals will need to spend more time clarifying why he wants the Booth MBA than a more conventional applicant will. Analyze your own case and block out the essay accordingly.

• You have to discuss your professional goals in order to explain why you are “seeking an MBA from Chicago Booth,” but how to present them?

Since EMBA programs are part-time, an ideal place to start is your current work: what do you want to achieve and how do you want to grow during the years in the program? (This has the added benefit of giving the adcom a view of what you’ll bring to the table based on this work.) From there, move on to your goals for the 5-year period following graduation – give the most detail here; make it really concrete. Then sketch your longer-term career vision/plans, necessarily less detailed.

Finally, explain how each of these career/goals phases require skills, knowledge, and perhaps relationships derived through the Booth EMBA.

• How should you structure this relatively long, complex essay?

Simply and straightforwardly is usually best. Start with your current/immediate goals. (If you need to provide some backstory for context, as noted above, do so as succinctly as possible.) Then progress through your goals. Next, discuss why you need the Booth EMBA now, connecting your reasons to the previously stated goals. Finally, present your contributions.

• What “unique knowledge and experiences” should you talk about?

Select two to four, and for at least two, give concrete examples. For all, discuss relevant insights – after all, that’s what you’re really bringing, not just the fact of having done something. To select the best examples, consider what aspects of your experience would be interesting and/or useful to the Booth EMBA cohort and give them fresh insight or perspective. These experiences could be related to industry, function, geographic/global experience, a formative personal experience, a particularly meaningful extracurricular (community or other non-work) involvement, etc. Choose points that expand the reader’s understanding of you, things they won’t necessarily glean from your resume.

Chicago Booth Executive MBA essay #2 (optional)
If there is anything else you would like the Admissions Committee to know about you, please share that information here. (maximum 1 page, 12 pt. Times New Roman)

This question invites you to present new material that will enhance your application, as well as to explain anything that needs explaining (e.g., gap in employment, choice of recommender if not using a direct supervisor, etc.). As far as enhancement points, there should be a clear value to the information you’re sharing – and it should not be content that more appropriately belongs in the main essay (contributions of unique knowledge and experiences).

Chicago Booth Executive MBA essay #3 (reapplicants only)
Please give us an update on your professional, academic, and community activities since your previous application and highlight what you have done to strengthen your application. (maximum 1 page, single spaced, 12 pt. Times New Roman)

Whatever developments you discuss, for each, describe the situation/experience concretely and clarify the impact you had. Also clarify how it demonstrates growth (i.e. not just “another” achievement), and why it makes you a stronger candidate.

For expert guidance with your Chicago Booth EMBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to Chicago Booth’s EMBA program and look forward to helping you too!

Chicago Booth 2019-20 Executive MBA application deadlines

Early DeadlineOctober 2, 2019

First DeadlineDecember 2, 2019

Second DeadlineFebruary 3, 2020

Final DeadlineApril 1, 2020

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Ace the EMBA: Expert Advice for the Rising Executive, a free guide

Finding and Articulating Fit with the Booth MBA

School-Specific EMBA Application Essay Tips

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Chicago Booth Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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INSEAD Master’s in Management (MIM) Essay Questions, Tips & Deadlines   [#permalink]

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New post 27 Oct 2019, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: INSEAD Master’s in Management (MIM) Essay Questions, Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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One of the top European business schools has this year joined the MIM market. Enter stage right INSEAD with its new Master in Management. Currently accepting applications for its 2020 intake, INSEAD’s entry into the pre-experience market is a signal that there’s not only a demand for this early career degree, but there’s much traditionally MBA and EMBA focused schools can gain from having the recent graduate student segment on their campuses.

Although the INSEAD MIM offers a different course offering and structure than its more established MBA, as one would expect, they are looking to recruit students who value their values and who have ambitious goals. INSEAD is known as ‘The Business School for the World’, and in their MIMs they’re hoping to find business students who have an interest in the world around them, and a desire to contribute to it. As one might expect, they’ve put an emphasis on the internationalism of the programme, which offers “…a truly global experience…with international classmates…[and the chance to] travel across continents…”. They are looking to build a “dynamic and diverse student body” and want to see students who thrive in such an environment. Unsurprisingly, international motivation is one of the key admissions criteria, along with academic performance and ability to contribute.

The application requires three ‘getting to know you’ essays, all of which have a word limit. Do take careful note of the guidance provided about this:

“Respecting this word limit is an important exercise to see how you express your ideas in a concise way…”

Don’t let the limited word count give you a false sense of ease – it’s much trickier to give an overview of your career ambitions in 100 words than it is in 500, so clarity and brevity are key.

INSEAD Master’s in Management application essays
INSEAD MIM essay #1
How would you introduce yourself? (Maximum 200 words)

This has the potential to be a fun question as it’s your chance to tell the admissions committee what’s unique and interesting about you and to display your personality. This question gives you the opportunity to introduce who you are outside of what’s on your CV, so make sure not to repeat what they already know about you from the application form. Think about approaching this as you might do a speed dating event where you have only a few minutes to convince the person sitting across from you that you’re interesting, well-rounded, and with a lot to contribute to the conversation (no pressure!).

INSEAD MIM essay #2
Tell us what you have been doing since graduating from secondary education and what motivated your choices? (Maximum 200 words)

This is a tricky question as it requires you to reflect on what you’ve been doing since starting your university studies. The admissions committee will want to understand the thought process behind the decisions you’ve made during this time, and the drivers that have propelled you to pursue your path. Make sure not to use this question as a space to rehash your entire CV, but rather an opportunity to explain the reasoning behind pivotal choices. Have your decisions been strategic and part of a bigger plan? Have you been good at taking up opportunities as they come? Your answer will help the admission committee be able to connect the dots and understand you better.

INSEAD MIM essay #3
Share your short and long-term career aspirations with a MIM from INSEAD. (Maximum 100 words)

INSEAD is clear about the type of leader they’re looking for. They want “…leaders who transform business and society” and consider MIMs “the next generation of well-rounded, agile-thinking and innovative individuals who are ready to make a positive impact in today’s society.” When presenting your career goals, think about whether you are or want to be this person, and if so, how you will go about doing that. With only 100 words to use this answer needs to be succinct. Use the space to indicate your target companies/industries and roles, the motivation behind these ambitions, and the impact you hope to have. Make sure to provide thoughts on how specifically the INSEAD MIM will support your goals – this could include specific courses, extracurricular activities, or something around the community/network. But remember, be specific.

INSEAD MIM essay #4 (optional)
Is there anything else that was not covered in your application that you would like to share with the Admissions Committee?

Use this question only if you have vital information about your candidacy that you haven’t been able to include elsewhere in your application. Examples of acceptable material include providing context for low grades/test score or a gap in your education history. Steer clear of using this space to reiterate how passionate you are about the INSEAD MIM or how you’re the perfect fit. If you’ve done your job well through the rest of the application, they’ll already know this.

Programme Director Thibault Seguret and Global Director of Admissions & Financial Aid Virginie Fougea make it clear they want you, the applicant, to “be yourself”. So they’re looking for genuine, personal, unmanufactured insights into who you are as a person and what you’ll bring to your MIM class and the INSEAD community. Don’t write what you think the admissions committee wants to hear, write what is truthful – your truth – and give them a taster to who you are, and who you want to be with the help of the INSEAD MIM degree.

Unsure of how to illustrate your narrative or make sure it has the impact you want it to have? Get in touch with one of our admissions consultants to discuss how they can help you tell your story.

For professional guidance with your INSEAD MIM application, check out Accepted’s MIM Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the INSEAD MIM application.

INSEAD MIM 2019 – 20 application deadlines for September 2020 intake

Round 1October 9, 2019

Round 2December 11, 2019

Round 3February 12, 2020

Round 4April 15, 2020

Round 5June 3, 2020

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Jamie Wright has more than eight years of recruitment and admissions experience at London Business School, and is the former Admissions Director for Early Career Programmes at LBS. Originally from the U.S., Jamie is now based in London. Want Jamie to help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch with Jamie Wright.
 

Related Resources:

• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Application Essays, a free guide

Early Career Management and European MBA Programs with Jamie Wright, a podcast episode

INSEAD Announces New 10-Month Master’s in Management (MIM) Program

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post INSEAD Master’s in Management (MIM) Essay Questions, Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Yale School of Management Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 –  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Oct 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Yale School of Management Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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Yale School of Management’s Executive MBA fully reflects the character of the SOM and more broadly of Yale University: strong, vibrant community; holistic perspective; intellectual vigor; and real-world engagement and impact. Yale EMBA’s unique “areas of focus” approach is central to its identity, and while it may not be for everyone, for the right people, it will be perfect. Make sure you are in the latter category before applying – and, if you are, allow this approach to organically drive your application. Carefully review the website, read the blog, and, if possible, interact with the adcom by visiting the school and/or attending an info session. I strongly recommend obtaining the offered pre-assessment. These efforts should inform your essays and will help you convey fit.

Yale School of Management Executive MBA application essays
Yale SOM EMBA essay #1
What is your motivation for applying for an Executive MBA at this point in your career? Please discuss your alignment with your chosen area of focus, your interest in the Yale SOM MBA for Executives program and your personal and professional goals. (500 words maximum)

Starting off the question with why-now indicates that timing is so important to the adcom—this program should help you at a pivotal career moment, to make some significant advancement or transition—launch or leap… It also requires you to show how you evaluate and interpret your career trajectory. Of course, fundamentally, your whole application in aggregate should answer this question. But, in this essay, address it explicitly.

Yale’s EMBA program is unusual in its emphasis on “areas of focus.” In the essay, integrate your reason for selecting your area of focus with your discussion of goals and how the Yale EMBA will help you achieve them.

With only 500 words to answer this multi-part question, keep the structure simple. A straightforward, effective way to structure it is to start with your professional goals, including both “what” (industry, function, positions, perhaps geographies) and “why” (what motivates these goals, what footprint do you hope to have)—including “why now” in this part of the discussion.

The question has an interesting twist in asking about your personal goals. These can be personal growth areas and/or explorations you wish to make for personal interest. They may or may not be directly connected to your professional goals. Most people will, understandably and appropriately, devote more space to the professional goals. But DO discuss personal goals as well. This part of the question aligns with Yale’s holistic perspective and is important for fit.

In discussing how the program will benefit you, be specific: describe what skills and knowledge you seek, and how the program will provide it. Yale’s “areas of focus” approach is unique; make your essay convey how and why this approach is ideal for your needs.

Yale SOM EMBA essay #2
Cite a statistic that you find shocking. As a leader for business and society, what actions could you take to address this challenge, and what would be your guiding principles and values? (500 words maximum)

You might reasonably think that you should choose a statistic strategically linked to your career goals in some way. Or that will show some distinctive area of knowledge or experience you possess. Well, maybe. Or maybe not.

Just picking some random statistic that you really did find shocking when you heard it might be a bit scary for an MBA essay. I’ve seen it work. Why? Think about Yale SOM’s intellectual dimension. They appreciate people who are open to intellectual exploration and find interest in the world around them. In this question, the Yale SOM adcom is truly interested in the quality of your thinking and your curious nature, not just how advantageously you can portray your existing interests.

Use and write from the perspective of “leader for business and society” when you discuss prospective actions to take in addressing the challenge that arises from (or leads to) the shocking statistic. (And in citing “leader for business and society” the adcom clearly indicates an important aspect of “fit” they are looking for.) With that framework, you clearly must identify actions that involve mobilizing people beyond yourself and friends/family. While your actions, if described with meaningful specificity, will naturally reflect your “guiding principles and values,” still address this part of the question explicitly, with at least one sentence describing how they do.

Optional information
If any aspect of your candidacy needs further explanation (unexplained gaps in work experience, choice of recommenders, academic performance, promotions or recognitions, etc.), please provide a brief description here. (200 words maximum)

Use this space if you have an extenuating issue to address or a point that needs clarification. It is not an invitation to write a whole new essay that goes beyond providing context.

For expert guidance with your Yale SOM EMBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to Yale SOM’s EMBA program and look forward to helping you too!

Yale SOM Executive MBA application deadlines for 2019-2020

Round 1October 30, 2019

Round 2January 30, 2020

Round 3March 30, 2020

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• Ace the EMBA: Expert Advice for Rising Executives, a free guide

Yale SOM’s EMBA Program, a podcast episode

Yale Som: Integrated in Its Curriculum, with Its University, and to the World, a podcast episode

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Yale School of Management Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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All Your Questions About MIT Sloan – Answered!  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Oct 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: All Your Questions About MIT Sloan – Answered!
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Are you suffering from b-school information overload? Have you found resources that are helpful, or is all of that random material out there just stressing you out? What if you could immediately get your individual questions answered authoritatively – by Dawna Levinson, Assistant Dean of Admissions at MIT Sloan?

On November 14th at 10am PT/1pm ET, we’ll be hosting an online AMA (Ask Me Anything) with Dawna of MIT Sloan. She’ll provide an overview of the application process and will share her expert advice on what MIT Sloan is looking for in a successful application, and then she’ll take your questions – live! Accepted’s CEO Linda Abraham will moderate the conversation.

If you’re planning to apply to MIT Sloan, this is your chance to get the inside scoop. Come with your questions and come ready to learn from other people’s questions.

The AMA is free, but you must register to reserve your seat.

Register Now:

hbspt.forms.create({

portalId: “58291”,

formId: “df6cc7ef-7c38-43fa-bb62-c3828c2cdebd”,

goToWebinarWebinarKey: “3753387852046061325”

});

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post All Your Questions About MIT Sloan – Answered! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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From Biomedical Research to Kellogg MBA: A Non-Traditional Business Sc  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Oct 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: From Biomedical Research to Kellogg MBA: A Non-Traditional Business School Journey
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Learn how real students and recent grads have navigated their way through the business school admissions process and b-school itself with our What is Business School Really Like? series.

Meet Mandar, a Kellogg grad and former biomedical researcher.
Mandar, thank you for sharing your story with us!

We’d like to get to know you better! Can you please share 3 unusual or surprising things about yourself?
Mandar:

  • The first time I played baseball, my cricket instincts kicked in and I ran straight towards the pitcher with the bat in hand. I have never seen a pitcher so afraid.
  • I was part of a drag racing team in Mumbai and dream of driving “Tokyo Drift” style in Japan one day. My wife does not approve.
  • I wore hazmat suits for extended periods of time and have worked with lethal infectious agents.
Congratulations on your recent graduation from Kellogg’s Evening and Weekend Program! Can you share a bit about the structure of the program and its unique features? Is it an MBA or an EMBA program?
Mandar: Thank you! I graduated from Kellogg School of Management in the Evening and Weekend Program. It is just like a full-time MBA except you can finish the program at your own pace while working full-time. The program offers a traditional and accelerated route where a few courses can be waived based on the student’s experience.

I was enrolled in the traditional program which offers classes on evenings or weekends. I took the majority of my classes in the evenings. Kellogg provides brain food and coffee at the Kellogg Table before class starts at 6pm! The Table is popular for networking and catching up with classmates, friends, and all the community members.

What attracted you to this program in particular?
Mandar: This program was particularly attractive for me as it allows the flexibility to complete the course at my own pace. I also enjoyed the ability to take key learnings from class and apply them to my workplace in real time.

I understand you have an MA in biology, and substantial professional experience in drug and vaccine research. Can you share a bit more about your professional background? How was an MBA the next step for you?
Mandar: I graduated with an MS in Biology back in 2010 and started working for IITRI- a nonprofit organization that supports the biopharmaceutical industry to develop new medicines and drugs. At IITRI, I led a team of 12 direct reports responsible for 6 laboratories in the microbiology and molecular biology division.

However, a few years into lab work at a nonprofit, I felt my naïve optimism being tested. I learned that despite the potentially powerful and global benefits of drug research, it will always rely on obtaining grants, publishing research papers, and fighting for a steadily declining supply of government research dollars.

When I began lab work, I had been so excited by the scientific aspects of our work that I failed to consider its economic or logistical viability. Hence, to become an effective leader in my industry, I realized an MBA was the right next step for me.

You are a graduate of the HBX CORe program (Harvard Business School). Why did you choose to participate in this program, and what was your experience there?
Mandar: HBX CORe program from Harvard Business School is a certificate program on the fundamentals of business comprised of three courses – Business Analytics, Economics of Managers, and Financial Accounting. Coming from a non-traditional background, HBX CORe helped me to get a headstart on the business side of things. The program allowed me to understand the power of case studies and helped me connect the dots between my education and the world of business.

Since it had been many years since you were in school (excluding your time at HBX CORe), was it difficult adjusting back to school life?
Mandar: I was a little nervous starting school again, especially with full-time work. However, a lot of students at Kellogg come from diverse backgrounds and we all helped each other acclimate to the new school life.

What was it like balancing intense work and school responsibilities?
Mandar: It was a hard reality to say goodbye to social life. Just kidding, I would say it took a quarter or two to balance the work-life-school balance but I achieved it by being transparent on my time to all the stakeholders in the community.

As a student, where was your favorite place on campus or nearby to study?
Mandar: Wieboldt Hall in downtown Chicago! Occasionally we would go to Stan’s Donuts or Timmy’s (Timothy O’Toole’s).

What about extracurriculars? What activities did you participate in before and during business school?
Mandar: I love to hike and climb mountains. Before school, my wife and I summited Mount Agung in Bali, Indonesia. During school, I visited a few countries (Japan, Chile, Kenya, and others) to learn about the local culture and hike! In Kenya during business school, my classmates and I helped a nonprofit organization whose objective is to halve neonatal mortality in sub-Saharan Africa in 4 years, through launching and sustaining usage of a comprehensive bundle of 17 medical technologies.

What have you been up to since graduation?
Mandar: I took a nice 2-month vacation in French Polynesia and New Zealand after graduation! Since then, I have started working for Accenture as a Senior Strategy Consultant helping clients solve their toughest problems across all industries.

On a practical level, how did you make your career switch happen? What recruitment opportunities did your program provide?
Mandar: Kellogg facilitates on-campus recruiting where many companies across industries come to campus. I received my offer from Accenture through on-campus recruiting.

The other avenue is off-campus recruiting which is student-led, leveraging the vast Kellogg alumni network.

Do you plan to utilize your bio-research background in your post-MBA career?
Mandar: I ask that question to myself every day. I plan on staying in the complex healthcare industry, but I am open to other functions within the industry.

Do you have any advice for MBA applicants interested in making a career change?
Mandar: It is never too late to change your career! Most of us have a preconceived notion of MBA programs selecting candidates only with traditional backgrounds. It is simply not true. I would advise MBA applicants to follow their passion and start networking with people who have managed to change careers successfully.

Do you have questions for Mandar? Questions for us? Do you want to be featured in our next What is Business School Really Like? post? Know someone else who you’d love to see featured? Are there questions you’d like us to ask our students in this series? LET US KNOW!

You can learn more about Mandar by connecting with him on LinkedIn.

Are you setting out on your own b-school journey? We can help you reach the finish line! Check out our MBA Admissions Consulting Services to team up with an admissions expert who will help you join the ranks of thousands of Accepted clients who get accepted to their dream schools.

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Why MBA? a free guide to writing about your MBA goals

Get a Kellogg MBA: An Interview with Dean of Admissions Kate Smith, a podcast episode

MBA Admissions Advice for Career Changers

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post From Biomedical Research to Kellogg MBA: A Non-Traditional Business School Journey appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
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Identifying and Articulating Fit with the Booth MBA: How Will You Cont  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Nov 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Identifying and Articulating Fit with the Booth MBA: How Will You Contribute to the Booth Community?
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The Booth MBA admissions committee focuses on three key dimensions in evaluating applicants:

  • Intellectual fit in terms of ability and motivation to optimize its Curriculum
  • Personal and cultural fit in terms of synergy with its Community
  • Professional fit in terms of past and future Career
This short series of posts will explore each of these 3 C’s and how you can integrate them into your application successfully.

You can find the first one here. Now I’ll address the second dimension of fit with Booth MBA.

Fit with Booth’s community
On its website, the Booth admissions committee lists numerous qualities that it seeks and evaluates regarding fit with community: leadership, collaboration/teamwork, respect for others, philanthropic inclination, ability to contribute to the school/culture, and individual perspective.

That’s a long and broad list. Here are some tips on how to consider it and use it to guide your application.

  • It would be a mistake to strive to highlight each of these elements equally in your application. Assuming you are a fundamentally qualified Booth applicant, your candidacy overall will naturally or organically reflect these points. Do, however, check your application to ensure they are all represented – it’s fine if some are relatively brief. It’s natural that some will be more in-depth and significant than others.
  • In your application, do zoom in on a couple of those factors on this list where you really shine—go in depth and let your individuality (as a leader and/or collaborator and/or philanthropist etc.) stand out. Has brilliant, nuanced collaboration fueled your career success? Has your leadership been tested and tempered through a major professional challenge with lots at stake? Does your life or career give you a distinctive perspective on an industry, on personal values, on organizational culture? Detail it through example and anecdote (in essays and possibly in interview). This means, basically, not trying to be “everything to everybody” in the application but rather taking a stand regarding your identity and your candidacy.
  • The above advice is based in part on the fact that many (even most) of those items on the list are inter-related. For example, to be an effective collaborator necessarily involves respect for others. Philanthropic tendency, perhaps counter-intuitively, often pushes people to assume leadership roles. An individual perspective will inherently engender contribution to the school/culture and community.
Keep in mind that there is qualitative assessment of your activities. For example, in the application, the adcom reviews not only what activities you participate in, but seeks “long-term involvement,” “continued involvement” (with prior academic institutions) and “a sense of passion regarding social, community, or political issues.” This brings both opportunity and warning:

  • Opportunity: if you have enduring, committed involvement in some way, DO highlight that commitment; make sure the adcom will see it!
  • Warning: Do not try to “pump up” infrequent or short involvement and make it into more than it really is; the adcom will see through the smokescreen, and your effort can backfire, undermining rather than enhancing your candidacy. Instead, focus on those elements where, as noted above, you really do shine!
Do you want to ensure that your application demonstrates your fit with Chicago Booth? Do you need help highlighting your strengths and proving that you truly encapsulate the Chicago approach? [b] I would be happy to work with you on your application and guide you to acceptance at Chicago Booth or any other of your top-choice MBA programs. Click here to get started[/b][b].[/b]

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

School-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips

Finding and Articulating Fit with the Booth MBA Curriculum

Chicago Booth MBA Class Profile

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Identifying and Articulating Fit with the Booth MBA: How Will You Contribute to the Booth Community? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Linda Abraham
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Identifying and Articulating Fit with the Booth MBA: How Will You Cont   [#permalink] 01 Nov 2019, 09:01

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