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UVA Darden Executive MBA Application Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Dec 2019, 13:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: UVA Darden Executive MBA Application Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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Darden’s website is very user-friendly in terms of support for developing your application overall and your essays specifically. I can’t top it, so I’ll present a couple of key points from it that I consider essential to successful Darden EMBA essays. First, “An effective application is one that leaves our Admissions Committee thinking, ‘This is someone we want to learn more about.’” After determining that you are qualified, which they will do based on your transcripts and work history, they are still looking for that something extra – something to engage, fascinate, entice them. Of course, your resume, recommendations, and even transcripts might make them want to learn more about you. But the essays are where you can and should grab them.

Second, that website provides succinct, on-target advice for how to effectively address the application’s short essays (and indeed it’s advice that I give clients for almost any essay): “When crafting your responses, think about the narrative you are trying to advance with your application… we encourage you to think of it as a story-telling exercise.” In other words, the essays as a whole should (a) enhance and enliven the impression of your candidacy and (b) make you stand out as a unique, interesting, dynamic individual – potentially a valuable contributor to the program. All the explanation in the world won’t do this, but a powerful story will. View these short essays as facets of a robust picture – each must be a strong stand-alone statement, while also resonating with the others.

Darden Executive MBA 2019-20 application essays
Darden EMBA essay #1
Tell us what you would want your learning team to know about you – personal, professional or both. (100 words)

This question is essentially an elevator pitch. By asking you to address the learning team, the adcom can gauge how well you understand and connect with your peers, a critical point for a program that is small and close-knit. At the same time, there’s a second audience: the adcom. It’s like they’re “observing” you interact with your peers. So, pay attention to tone and expression – make it clear that you’re “talking to” your EMBA peers. But also, consider substance: while you will naturally include professional points of interest, you can also include some personal factors that are particularly relevant. This short essay captures both content that “frames: your profile and your Social IQ.

Darden EMBA essay #2
Darden strives to identify and cultivate responsible leaders who follow their purpose. Please provide an example of a situation in which you have made a meaningful impact. (200 words)

This question is a great opportunity to show that you are a person of significant impact, a person who leaves a mark. It’s also a chance to let the adcom see you in action, performing at a high level with significant stakes. Most people will select a story from work, and I suggest something fairly recent, if possible, to show what you will be bringing to the EMBA table. Tell the story straight, and end by detailing clearly the meaningful impact. By the way, “meaningful” indicates something beyond big numbers. It should involve some constructive change that has occurred (to an organization, to some people, to a community, etc.). So, if a big number is part of it, e.g. a record-breaking transaction completed by your team, discuss also the positive effect on the team and/or team members, what it means for your department or organization, etc.

Darden EMBA essay #3
Diversity and inclusion are critical to our mission and they work best when they are an integral and celebrated part of our community. (Diversity stands with ethics, integrity, and academic excellence, as a cornerstone of University culture. The University promotes an inclusive and welcoming environment that embraces the full spectrum of human attributes, perspectives, and disciplines. When people of different backgrounds come together, they exchange ideas, question assumptions including their own, and broaden the horizons for us all. A University of Virginia community rich in diversity affords every member equal respect and provides a forum for understanding our differences as well as our commonalities.) Share a time in which you engaged with a perspective, identity, community, or experience that was different from your own and how it impacted your worldview. (200 words)

Another story – and this one can be from any area of your life. The keys to making this essay shine are (a) selecting a situation that really affected you and how you see things, and (b) being frank about your growth and new insight – presumably, you had something to learn from the situation, something you didn’t already understand or perceive or know. Let your story show your curiosity and your openness to engage with people who are different from you. Do not just say this experience influenced your worldview; rather, show through example how it did so.

Darden EMBA essay #4
What is your short-term, post-MBA career goal and why? (150 words)

Give the facts: what position(s), company or types of company, industry, location, expected scope of accountability. As for why – this is your motivation. What draws you to this path? And what do you hope to achieve in terms of external impact, what do you hope your footprint will be?

If you would like professional guidance with your UVA Darden Executive MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Package, which includes advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Darden EMBA application.

Darden Executive MBA application deadlines
CHART

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
Related Resources:

Why MBA, a free guide to writing about your MBA goals

3 Tips for Highlighting Your Strengths in Your Application Essays

School-Specific Executive MBA Essay Tips

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post UVA Darden Executive MBA Application Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

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Cornell EMBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Dec 2019, 09:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Cornell EMBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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The Cornell Executive MBA Program has three required essay questions, and the word count for all three is short. While no one is going to be counting individual words, the short word count guideline is a clear indicator that you should work on clarity of thought with all of your answers. Cornell interviews every applicant to its program, so if you are concerned that the essay format doesn’t give you enough opportunity to share everything you want to, rest assured you will have the opportunity to discuss them further in the interview.

Cornell EMBA Application Essays:
Cornell EMBA Essay #1
In a concise statement, tell us why you are seeking an MBA. Specifically, what are your short and long-term career goals? And how will an MBA earned through an Executive MBA program at Cornell University help you achieve your goals? (400 words max)

You first want to identify why you feel you need an MBA, linking your past/current career experience with your short and long term goals and what about an MBA degree will allow you to achieve them. Then you need to relay “Why Cornell?” and “Why EMBA?” For the former, be convincing about the reasons Cornell is the best choice for you, and show you have done your homework – “location” and “reputation” won’t cut it. The admissions committee wants to know what you anticipate the program will be like, what you will get out of it, how the program fits with your career vision, and what the entire experience means to you as a person. For the latter, by making the choice to apply to an Executive MBA program, you are of course signaling you will keep your job while going to school. Indicate why that format is the best fit.

Cornell EMBA Essay #2
Describe your first experience as a leader in a professional setting, and your current leadership role. Explain how your first experience in a leadership position influenced your style and how you act as a leader today. (400 words)

This essay wants you to showcase how you have grown as a leader, built upon strengths, and learned from mistakes. Perhaps your leadership style was influenced by a mentor or someone you admire, or perhaps it came from seeing someone lead with a style you were determined NOT to emulate. Explain what you learned from that very first experience, what you decided to continue doing as you moved forward in leadership roles, what you decided to stop doing, and how you evolved your style over time. You don’t need to have direct reports to successfully answer this question – leadership comes in many forms in a professional setting, and no doubt you have had the chance to exhibit it at some point – so don’t worry if that is the case.

Cornell EMBA Essay #3
What else would you like us to know? Please use this statement to address potential concerns such as gaps in employment or prior academic difficulties. You can also use this statement to highlight any achievements or significant life events that are not included elsewhere in the application. (250 words)

If there are flaws in your application, they will be noticed. You want to be in control of the narrative of those blemishes rather than letting admissions committee members draw their own conclusions – they are much easier to address upfront than in an interview situation. Be as honest and direct as possible. Keep in mind the admissions committee members are human, too, and they have flaws as well! If you opt to share additional accomplishments, make sure they truly add to your application and the type of student you will be, so that the additional information enhances your candidacy rather than comes across as bragging.

For expert guidance with your Cornell EMBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to Cornell’s EMBA program and look forward to helping you too!

Cornell Executive MBA Americas
We review applications on a rolling basis. Candidates are encouraged to submit their applications once they are complete, with a few important dates to consider:

Priority Consideration DeadlineDecember 31, 2019

Expedited Decision DeadlineMarch 31, 2020

Application DeadlineMay 15, 2020

Cornell Executive MBA Metro NY
Applications are currently being accepted for the Class of 2022; classes will begin in late July, 2020.

We accept applications on a rolling and space-available basis, with a few important dates to consider:

Early Application DeadlineNovember 1, 2019

Priority Scholarship DeadlineMarch 1, 2020

Final Application DeadlineMay 1, 2020

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Jen Weld is a former Assistant Director of Admissions at Cornell’s EMBA program. She has an additional 10 years of experience in higher ed and corporate marketing. Want Jen to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your MBA Application Essays, a free guide

3 Key Ways to Stand Out Through Your EMBA Essays

School-Specific EMBA Application Essay Tips

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Cornell EMBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Listen to Admissions Straight Talk for interviews with admissions directors, MBAs, test prep pros, and financial aid sources.
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Yale School of Management Receives Its Largest Gift Ever of $100 Milli  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Dec 2019, 09:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Yale School of Management Receives Its Largest Gift Ever of $100 Million
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According to the Yale School of Management (SOM) website, the $100 million gift from the Broad Foundation will be used to develop research, teaching, and policy initiatives that will make the top leaders in America’s public school systems more effective. The Broad Center at Yale SOM will create a tuition-free master’s degree program for promising educational leaders, advanced leadership training for top school system administrators and CFOs, and a far-reaching research enterprise with the goal of putting together the foremost collection of data on public education leadership.

More about the Broad Center
The program will start in 2020. Yale anticipates enrolling 35 students in the master’s program as well as an additional 30 students in non-degree summer leadership training programs (according to a Poets & Quants article on the topic).

The Broad Foundation has been investing in public education for the past 20 years. Foundation management believes that district leaders need the skills to excel, inspire, and empower people in their organizations. Yale SOM’s Broad Center will become the epicenter for the creation of new ideas about how skilled management systems can positively affect schools, students, teachers, administrators, and communities throughout the U.S. The Center’s work will emphasize equity and inclusion in the areas of research and teaching in order to address challenges and create new prospects for underserved students. The Center will benefit from input of management and business academics and the resources of Yale University.

To learn more about Yale Som, check out our podcast interview with Bruce DelMonico, Assistant Dean and Director of Admissions:

Yale MBA: The Inside Scoop on The Essay, Videos & Behavioral Assessment [Episode 338]

 

According to Dean Kerwin K. Charles, “We are simply awed by the generosity of The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation… Those outside our community may be surprised to see a business school dedicate a major program to public education, but this is exactly the type of issue our school has always cared about – one where leadership informed by systemic thinking, rigorous analysis, and compassion can make a real difference for communities. We share this core vision with The Broad Foundation, and I am excited to see how the strengths of this school and the strengths of The Broad Center can combine to help us realize it.”

Yale SOM has produced thousands of business leaders in fields that impact society at large and strives to train leaders who will have the tools to help bring about social progress. The Broad’s gift will allow Yale SOM to establish new faculty positions for top social science researchers in education as well as a research infrastructure that will benefit everyone interested in the field.

Are you applying to Yale SOM or another top-tier business school class? We can help! Explore our MBA Consulting & Editing Services and work one-on-one with an advisor who will help you GET ACCEPTED!

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Yale MBA: The Inside Scoop on The Essay, Videos & Behavioral Assessment, a podcast episode

Yale School of Management MBA Class of 2021 Profile

Life at Yale SOM with Goals of Serving the Underrepresented Community

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Yale School of Management Receives Its Largest Gift Ever of $100 Million appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Listen to Admissions Straight Talk for interviews with admissions directors, MBAs, test prep pros, and financial aid sources.
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Kellogg MBA Class of 2021 Profile  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Dec 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Kellogg MBA Class of 2021 Profile
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Here’s a look at the Kellogg class of 2021 profile, taken from the Kellogg website.

  • Class size: 474
  • Average age: 27
  • Work experience average: 5 years
  • Work experience range (middle 80%): 3.5-7
  • Women: 43%
  • International students: 32%
  • U.S. minority students: 26%
  • Average GPA: 3.6
  • GMAT average: 730
  • GMAT range: 620-780
Undergraduate majors

MajorPercent

Economics/Business49%

STEM29%

Humanities24%

Industry background

IndustryPercent

Consulting27%

Financial Services19%

Tech/Communications14%

Other13%

Government/Education/Nonprofit8%

Health/Bio5%

Consumer Products4%

Energy4%

Manufacturing3%

Military3%

Watch: Kate Smith, Assistant Dean of Admissions & Financial Aid at the Kellogg School of Management talks about the type of applicants that Kellogg is looking for:

Heads up! R2 deadlines are quickly approaching. Working with one of our consultants will help ensure that you get ACCEPTED – whether you’re applying to Kellogg or any other top-tier MBA program. Learn more here.

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

The Ultimate Guide to Becoming a Competitive MBA Applicant, a free guide

Get a Kellogg MBA: An Interview with Dean of Admissions Kate Smith, a podcast episode

From Biomedical Research to Kellogg MBA: A Non-Traditional Business School Journey

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Kellogg MBA Class of 2021 Profile appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Listen to Admissions Straight Talk for interviews with admissions directors, MBAs, test prep pros, and financial aid sources.
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog
Follow Accepted on Twitter
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MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
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Joined: 20 Apr 2003
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UVA Darden Executive MBA Application Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Dec 2019, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: UVA Darden Executive MBA Application Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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Darden’s website is very user-friendly in terms of support for developing your application overall and your essays specifically. I can’t top it, so I’ll present a couple of key points from it that I consider essential to successful Darden EMBA essays. First, “An effective application is one that leaves our Admissions Committee thinking, ‘This is someone we want to learn more about.’” After determining that you are qualified, which they will do based on your transcripts and work history, they are still looking for that something extra – something to engage, fascinate, entice them. Of course, your resume, recommendations, and even transcripts might make them want to learn more about you. But the essays are where you can and should grab them.

Second, that website provides succinct, on-target advice for how to effectively address the application’s short essays (and indeed it’s advice that I give clients for almost any essay): “When crafting your responses, think about the narrative you are trying to advance with your application… we encourage you to think of it as a story-telling exercise.” In other words, the essays as a whole should (a) enhance and enliven the impression of your candidacy and (b) make you stand out as a unique, interesting, dynamic individual – potentially a valuable contributor to the program. All the explanation in the world won’t do this, but a powerful story will. View these short essays as facets of a robust picture – each must be a strong stand-alone statement, while also resonating with the others.

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Darden Executive MBA 2019-20 application essays
Darden EMBA essay #1
Tell us what you would want your learning team to know about you – personal, professional or both. (100 words)

This question is essentially an elevator pitch. By asking you to address the learning team, the adcom can gauge how well you understand and connect with your peers, a critical point for a program that is small and close-knit. At the same time, there’s a second audience: the adcom. It’s like they’re “observing” you interact with your peers. So, pay attention to tone and expression – make it clear that you’re “talking to” your EMBA peers. But also, consider substance: while you will naturally include professional points of interest, you can also include some personal factors that are particularly relevant. This short essay captures both content that “frames: your profile and your Social IQ.

Darden EMBA essay #2
Darden strives to identify and cultivate responsible leaders who follow their purpose. Please provide an example of a situation in which you have made a meaningful impact. (200 words)

This question is a great opportunity to show that you are a person of significant impact, a person who leaves a mark. It’s also a chance to let the adcom see you in action, performing at a high level with significant stakes. Most people will select a story from work, and I suggest something fairly recent, if possible, to show what you will be bringing to the EMBA table. Tell the story straight, and end by detailing clearly the meaningful impact. By the way, “meaningful” indicates something beyond big numbers. It should involve some constructive change that has occurred (to an organization, to some people, to a community, etc.). So, if a big number is part of it, e.g. a record-breaking transaction completed by your team, discuss also the positive effect on the team and/or team members, what it means for your department or organization, etc.

Darden EMBA essay #3
Diversity and inclusion are critical to our mission and they work best when they are an integral and celebrated part of our community. (Diversity stands with ethics, integrity, and academic excellence, as a cornerstone of University culture. The University promotes an inclusive and welcoming environment that embraces the full spectrum of human attributes, perspectives, and disciplines. When people of different backgrounds come together, they exchange ideas, question assumptions including their own, and broaden the horizons for us all. A University of Virginia community rich in diversity affords every member equal respect and provides a forum for understanding our differences as well as our commonalities.) Share a time in which you engaged with a perspective, identity, community, or experience that was different from your own and how it impacted your worldview. (200 words)

Another story – and this one can be from any area of your life. The keys to making this essay shine are (a) selecting a situation that really affected you and how you see things, and (b) being frank about your growth and new insight – presumably, you had something to learn from the situation, something you didn’t already understand or perceive or know. Let your story show your curiosity and your openness to engage with people who are different from you. Do not just say this experience influenced your worldview; rather, show through example how it did so.

Darden EMBA essay #4
What is your short-term, post-MBA career goal and why? (150 words)

Give the facts: what position(s), company or types of company, industry, location, expected scope of accountability. As for why – this is your motivation. What draws you to this path? And what do you hope to achieve in terms of external impact, what do you hope your footprint will be?

If you would like professional guidance with your UVA Darden Executive MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Package, which includes advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Darden EMBA application.

UVA Darden Executive MBA 2019-20 remaining application deadlines

Application deadlineDecisions released

January 10, 2020January 31, 2020

February 10, 2020February 28, 2020

March 10, 2020March 27, 2020

April 10, 2020April 30, 2020

May 10, 2020May 29, 2020

June 10, 2020June 23, 2020

June 25, 2020July 8, 2020

Note from the website: At UVA Darden, we offer monthly deadlines – from September through June. Each deadline functions as a discrete round – with a target interview period, decision release date and deposit deadline. All deadlines are focused on our class starting this August.

Which deadline is right for you? Our general advice is to apply as soon as you feel like you can put together a strong application. With each passing deadline, fewer seats in our class will be available, and we will have less scholarship money to award. Most applicants will apply between September and April. However, we have monthly deadlines to provide you maximum options.

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

School-Specific Executive MBA Essay Tips

3 Tips for Highlighting Your Strengths in Your Application Essays

5 Key Elements for Your Executive MBA Application

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post UVA Darden Executive MBA Application Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Listen to Admissions Straight Talk for interviews with admissions directors, MBAs, test prep pros, and financial aid sources.
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog
Follow Accepted on Twitter
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User avatar
P
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
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HKUST MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Dec 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: HKUST MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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Applicants seeking an MBA with high placement rates throughout Asia may find HKUST the perfect fit for their needs. HKUST offers two options for its MBA: a 16-month option that offers hopeful career switchers the opportunity to hold an internship in their target industry and even an experience in an exchange program abroad, and a 12-month accelerated version for students with more experience and/or who plan to return to their current employer/industry.

The Financial Times ranks HKUST #18 in the world, 74% of the class successfully changes functions following the MBA, and 71% changes industries. Thirty-seven percent of the latest graduating class found roles in the financial industry (20% Investment Banking/M&A Advisory, 5% Private Equity, and 12% Other Finance) upon graduating, with respectable numbers also entering the consulting (12%) and Technology (15%) industries. In terms of job functions, HKUST graduates thrive in finance roles (36%), general management (15%), and sales and marketing (17%).

Once again, the HKUST application essays have stayed the same this year. My tips are below in blue.

HKUST MBA application essays
HKUST MBA essay #1
The HKUST MBA mission is to inspire and transform individuals to be future business leaders for Asia and the world. We embrace diversity, and are looking for ambitious and open-minded candidates with a passion to contribute. It is the first day of orientation. Please introduce yourself to your classmates, highlighting what drives you in your personal and professional life. (500 words)

The small class of around 100 students hails from over 20 countries, with 96% of the class coming from outside of Hong Kong. Since HKUST strives for diversity throughout this small group, each applicant must demonstrate a unique perspective and experiences. If your professional background is in a heavily represented group – IT or finance for example, then I highly recommend highlighting not only your most exceptional professional experience in this essay but also the personal qualities, extracurricular involvement and values that differentiate you. When in your professional or personal life have you demonstrated an open mind and contributed? These will prove your potential at HKUST.

HKUST MBA essay #2
Tell us about your post-MBA goals and based on that, why is the HKUST MBA the ideal program for you and how do you plan to engage and enrich our community? (500 words)

This is a traditional goals essay with a twist of tying those goals to your future engagement and enrichment of the HKUST community. The admissions office is making it clear that they expect to hear how you will enhance the education of your peers. What aspects of the program will you be able to contribute to most and how will your fellow classmates benefit?

For expert guidance with your HKUST application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to top MBA programs and look forward to helping you too!

HKUST MBA 2019-20 remaining application deadlines

Round 2January 15, 2020

Round 3March 18, 2020

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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By Jennifer Bloom, admissions consultant at Accepted for 20 years and Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW). She is an expert at guiding you to produce application materials that truly differentiate you from the rest of the driven applicant pool. If you would like help with your application, Jennifer can suggest a number of options that work with any budget. Want Jennifer to help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• Why MBA, a free guide

Different Dimensions of Diversity, a podcast episode

What Should You Do If You Belong to an Overrepresented MBA Applicant Group?

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post HKUST MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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University of Washington Foster School of Business MBA Essay Tips & De  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Dec 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: University of Washington Foster School of Business MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
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Are you seeking an MBA program with a strong record of job placement in the technology industry? Then the University of Washington Foster School of Business may make an excellent choice for you. In fact, with 99% of Foster’s MBA graduates employed within 3 months of graduation, Foster ranks #1 in post-MBA employment of all U.S. programs.

A full 60% of the class of 2018 joined the Technology industry after graduation. Next in magnitude is the Consulting industry with only 16% of the class of 125 students landing these roles. Functionally, graduates tend toward marketing/sales – 41% of the class, finance/accounting – 22% of the class, and consulting (including consulting roles outside of the consulting industry) – 20% of the class. Yes, Foster is a somewhat regional school as 81% of graduates stay in Washington State after graduation, but that also means that there is a strong local alumni network in Washington’s startup and technology ecosystem – think Amazon and Microsoft – where many of its 54,000 alumni are concentrated.

Foster has two required and one optional essay. My tips are below in blue.

University of Washington Foster School of Business application essays
Foster MBA essay #1
Tell us your ideas about what lies ahead for you in your career. What are the gaps or deficiencies currently preventing you from pursuing these potential career paths? How do you plan to use your time in the Foster MBA program to fill these gaps and advance your career? (750 words maximum)

This is a nice amount of space to explain what you’ve gained so far in your career and what you need to learn to reach your career goals. As with any goals essay, make sure to show the connection between your future goals and the career you have established thus far. At least half of this essay should discuss the gaps/deficiencies in your knowledge and skills and how Foster’s curriculum and activities will fill them.

Foster MBA essay #2
Please tell us about an experience that inspired or confirmed your decision to pursue the MBA. (500 words maximum)

The experience that you share in this essay not only has to have inspired you to pursue the MBA, it needs to inspire the admissions committee to want to meet you! Experiences in which you have stepped out of your comfort zone to lead new initiatives and make exciting impacts will demonstrate that you have the potential to thrive at Foster and in your future career.

Foster MBA essay #3 (optional)
Please include this essay if you have additional information you believe would be helpful to the admissions committee in considering your application. (500 words maximum)

Most people cannot be summarized in two essays. If that is the case for you, then you should consider submitting this additional, optional essay. Obviously, you can use this space to explain a gap or GMAT/GPA weakness, but if you do so, I recommend sharing some additional information to assuage any of the Admissions Committee’s concerns. For example, if your Verbal GMAT score is lower than you would have liked, you might consider sharing an example of your strong communication and presentation skills to counterbalance that weakness.

Resume
Title your resume with your full legal name, mailing and email address. Outline your work experience in reverse chronological order. Be sure to include company name, a brief description of the organization (or a web address), your job title, and detailed information about your responsibilities and achievements.

Feel free to use up to three pages for your resume, and include all significant work experience since graduating from high school. Include educational background as well as your activities and community involvement [and noted elsewhere in the application: awards, honors, certificates or other forms of recognition (academic, community, military etc.) you have received].

This is one of my favorite parts of the Foster application. You cannot fit all of your achievements into your application essays or the little text boxes in the application, so go ahead and share details of your accomplishments in your resume. The three-page limit allows you to describe the challenges you overcame and impacts you made in each professional role and in the community.

Video Interview
All applicants will be asked to submit a video interview, and will receive an email within 3-4 business days after the application deadline to which they applied with instructions on recording the video interview. The video interview allows us to get to know you better and to assess your communication skills and your ability to think on your feet as we review your application and consider your candidacy.

Once applicants receive the video interview invitation via e-mail, they will have approximately one week to complete this requirement. The email will provide instructions on recording the video interview. Applicants can test their video and sound before recording their video interview, answer practice video interview questions, and ask for technical support if needed within the video interview system. The email instructions will include the deadline to submit the video interview, and applicants must complete this requirement in order for their application to remain under review.

The video interview must be submitted in order for the application to be reviewed. Applicants will be contacted if they are selected for an admissions interview later in the application review process.

A growing trend in MBA admissions is this addition of online automated video interviews to complement the picture an applicant presents of himself/herself in his/her written application. Questions are randomly generated from hundreds in a database and are not in any way linked to the content of your application. You may be asked to describe your strengths and weaknesses, for example, or tell about a recent project you initiated at work or even what you do in your free time. You will have 90 seconds to respond and can even press the space bar to stop recording if you finish your response in advance of that limit.

The purpose of the video exercise is, as Foster says, to see how you “think on your feet.” However, it also gives the Foster admissions committee a chance to assess your presence and delivery. The admissions office will be judging your ease of speech and personality more than they will be seeking signs of your drive or measuring your ambition during the video exercise. Since more employers are using video as a screening tool, Foster also wants to see how you will appear to a potential employer.

For expert guidance with your Foster application, check out Accepted’s MBA Application Packages, which include comprehensive guidance from an experienced admissions consultant. We’ve helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to top MBA programs and look forward to helping you too!

University of Washington Foster School of Business MBA 2019-20 remaining application deadlines

Round 2January 8, 2020* (11:59pm PDT)

Round 3March 17, 2020 (11:59pm PDT)

*Priority deadline for Forté Fellowships and merit based financial aid.

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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By Jennifer Bloom, admissions consultant at Accepted for 20 years and Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW). She is an expert at guiding you to produce application materials that truly differentiate you from the rest of the driven applicant pool. If you would like help with your application, Jennifer can suggest a number of options that work with any budget. Want Jennifer to help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Why MBA?, a free guide to writing about your MBA Goals

13 MBA Resume Tips to Help You Get Accepted

How to Practice for a Video Interview or Essay

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post University of Washington Foster School of Business MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Stanford MBA Class of 2021 Profile  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Dec 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Stanford MBA Class of 2021 Profile
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Here’s a look at the Stanford MBA Class of 2021 profile, taken from the Stanford Graduate School of Business website.

  • Total applicants: 7,342
  • New students: 417
  • Women: 47%
  • International: 43% (as of September 16, 2019)
  • U.S. minority: 27% (includes US permanent residents and US dual citizens)
  • Years of work experience: 0-14 (range)
  • Years of work experience: 4.6 (average)
  • GMAT range: 600-790
  • GMAT average: 734
  • GRE Verbal range: 149-170
  • GRE Verbal average: 165
  • GRE Quantitative range: 157-170
  • GRE Quantitative average: 165
  • Percent of class taking GRE: 19%
  • TOEFL (internet-based) range: 105-120
  • TOEFL average: 114
  • US institutions: 80
  • Non-US institutions: 80
  • Countries (including US): 66
  • Advanced degree holders: 14%
  • GPA average of advanced degree holders: 3.7 (on 4.0 scale)
Undergraduate majors

Undergraduate MajorPercent

Humanities/Social Sciences50%

Engineering/Math/Natural Sciences33%

Business17%

Previous industry experience

IndustryPercent

Organizations Represented

297

Consulting20%

Investment Management/Private Equity/Venture Capital19%

Technology14%

Government/Education/Nonprofit10%

Consumer Products & Services8%

Financial Services7%

Arts/Media/Entertainment5%

Healthcare5%

Other4%

Clean Tech/Energy/Environmental3%

Manufacturing3%

Military3%

Trying to submit by those R2 deadlines?
Are you planning on applying to Stanford Graduate School of Business or another top-tier b-school? Round 2 deadlines are right around the corner! Check out our MBA Admissions Consulting & Editing Services and work one-on-one with an expert consultant to create an application that will get you ACCEPTED!

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Stanford GSB MBA Application Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]

Show Intellectual Vitality to Get into Stanford GSB, a short video

Understanding Stanford GSB’s Interest in Personal Qualities and Contributions

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Stanford MBA Class of 2021 Profile appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
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INSEAD Announces Opening of First Permanent North American Facility  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Dec 2019, 09:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: INSEAD Announces Opening of First Permanent North American Facility
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According to their website, INSEAD will be opening the INSEAD San Francisco Hub for Business Innovation in 2020. The downtown San Francisco facility will join campuses in Europe (Fontainebleau), Asia (Singapore), and the Middle East (Abu Dhabi), ensuring INSEAD’s position as a global program.

Students at INSEAD’s San Francisco program will benefit from INSEAD’s decades of working with international executives and organizations around the world. The inaugural programs will be Transition to General Management, International Directors Programme, Integrating Performance and Progress, Blue Ocean Strategy, Leading Digital Transformation and Innovation, and The Future of AI. The Hub will also hold specially designed programs for U.S. and international companies.

More about the new hub
INSEAD sees the Hub as more than just an educational center. It will be a place for establishing new contacts through events organized in conjunction with corporate partners, alumni, and visiting faculty.

According to INSEAD Dean, Ilian Mihov, “From our origins in postwar Europe, INSEAD has distinguished itself in bringing together diverse people and perspectives to drive learning and build bridges as we develop responsible business leaders. Coming to North America opens an important new chapter in this journey. We are deeply grateful to our many alumni donors who made possible the transformation of this historic building into a state-of-the-art facility for learning and exchange.”

Peter Zemsky, Dean of Innovation oversaw the development of INSEAD’s San Francisco Hub for Business Innovation. “As tech innovation goes global, business leaders everywhere need to rapidly transform their strategies and organizations. At the same time, tech leaders need to adapt to the drastically shifting expectations about the impact of their products on societies worldwide. INSEAD is uniquely placed to facilitate this learning through our global faculty and network.”

More about INSEAD
INSEAD has had many firsts in their 60-year history:

  • First international business school outside the U.S.; it opened in 1959
  • First business school to offer a one-year MBA program
  • First business school to offer executive education based on the needs of individual companies
  • First business school with complete campuses on multiple continents
  • First and only business school to have a “triple first” in rankings – MBA, Executive MBA (Tsinghua-INSEAD EMBA), and Single School Executive MBA (INSEAD GEMBA) in the Financial Times ranking in 2016.
Are you thinking of applying to INSEAD’s new program? We can help! Explore our MBA Admissions Consulting & Editing Services and work one-on-one with an advisor who will help you GET ACCEPTED!

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

What’s New at INSEAD, a podcast episode

What INSEAD is Looking For

INSEAD MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post INSEAD Announces Opening of First Permanent North American Facility appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Encore: Toronto Rotman MBA: The Spike Factor  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Dec 2019, 12:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Encore: Toronto Rotman MBA: The Spike Factor
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In honor of the busy holiday and admissions season, we are presenting an encore of the most popular MBA interview of 2019, my interview with Toronto Rotman’s Director of Admissions and Recruitment, Imran Kanga.

Obviously if you are interested in earning your MBA at Toronto Rotman, this interview is a must-listen. However, Imran’s discussion of what Rotman calls the “spike factor” has value to any MBA applicant trying to show how they can add a distinctive something to their MBA’s class.

I also want to take this opportunity to thank you for listening to Admissions Straight Talk and wish you a Wonderful Holiday Season and a Happy, Healthy and Prosperous New Year, a new year filled with the realization of your educational and professional dreams, and of course acceptances.

For the complete show notes, please check out the original blog post.

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, MBA Admissions

The post Encore: Toronto Rotman MBA: The Spike Factor [Episode 344] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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London Business School Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 20  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Dec 2019, 11:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: London Business School Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]
[img]https://blog.accepted.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/London-Business-School-2019-20-EMBA-essay-tips-and-deadlines.jpg[/img]
[url=https://reports.accepted.com/MBA/Top-Executive-MBA-Programs][img]https://blog.accepted.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/London-Business-School-2019-20-EMBA-essay-tips-and-deadlines.jpg[/img][/url]

The [url=https://www.london.edu/masters-degrees/executive-mba-london/apply#Admissions-calendar]LBS EMBA[/url] program goes beyond delivering necessary skills for senior managers; it is for managers who have a dynamic sense of their future and a willingness to change and grow; people who are open to being inspired. At the same time, the program reflects, and the adcom seeks in applicants, a practical perspective. You know what it takes to get things done. Your essays should mirror and convey this dual aspect: openness, excitement and creativity alongside real-world effort, understanding, and achievement.

London Business School Executive MBA application essays
LBS Executive MBA essay #1
How will the Executive MBA help you achieve your career objectives? (500 words maximum)

You may want to start by discussing your current career situation to set the context, and clarify how the MBA education will enable you to achieve your [url=https://blog.accepted.com/the-goals-essay-writing-nitty-gritty/]immediate goals[/url]. You can then naturally move on to your future goals sequentially. Give more detail in the roles you plan immediately post-MBA and the several years following; this time frame should comprise the bulk of your goals discussion. These details should include position, company, likely responsibilities and scope of accountability, perhaps adding in some interesting points such as possible challenges or trends you’ll encounter.  Longer-term goals need less detail, but they still should present a clear direction. In describing your goals at any given point, indicate [b]why[/b] you are taking that step.

In discussing how the EMBA will benefit you, be specific: identify what skills and knowledge you need, and how the program meets those needs. While the question asks about EMBA broadly, it would be great to refer to specific aspects of the LBS EMBA curriculum, structure and/or special features of the program, detailing how they will support you and your goals.

Ideally, in presenting your goals, you’ll incorporate both of the qualities noted in the introduction above – a sense of dynamism, vision; and a concrete, practical plan or dimension.

LBS Executive MBA essay #2
What was your response to a piece of feedback that you have received regarding an area of weakness? (500 words maximum)

The adcom wants to see how frankly you [url=https://blog.accepted.com/mba-admissions-committees-want-know-deal-criticism/]portray the feedback[/url] and your own shortcoming, and how insightfully you contextualize your experience. Secondarily, it’s about change –did you grow and change as a result of the feedback?

This essay will be most compelling and engaging if written as a story. Start right in with the story’s setting – where, who, when (ideally make it recent enough so it shows that you handle serious responsibility and long ago enough so that you can show you responded seriously and improved as a result of the feedback). Then progress through the story, highlighting not just what you and the other party said and did, but also your thinking as the story progresses. Finally, give a short example of how you have applied this feedback (or your learning from this feedback experience) subsequently – in other words, how you grew.

LBS Executive MBA essay #3
Please choose ONE essay from the following two options: (500 words maximum)

If you could choose any three people who have ever lived to join you in your ideal Executive MBA study group, who would they be and why?

[b]OR[/b]

How would you contribute to the London Business School community as an alumnus?

If the first two questions are rooted in real-world, concrete experience, this question urges you to “play” a little and use your imagination, wit, creativity, and possibly broader passions in answering.

[url=https://blog.accepted.com/how-to-choose-x-number-of-essay-questions-to-answer-from-y-number-of-choices/]Which should you answer?[/url] Both are equally good; it depends on you.  The first invites you to “dream” a bit and convey your broader passions. The second invites you to express these broader passions, as well as experiences and personal qualities, in the practical context of projected real contributions.

So, back to the choice: If one of these questions naturally strikes a chord with you, engages you, and you have an idea for it that you like, it’s a good indication to use that question. Go with it!  BUT, do apply some objective, focused analysis as well. Ensure that your content truly illuminates you in some new and fresh way relevant to the application, and use detail and example to make your essay credible and vivid.

Another approach is strategic. If your imagination isn’t tickled by these questions, instead analyze and plan. What relevant and interesting aspects of your profile aren’t yet portrayed (or portrayed adequately) in the application? Identify one or two such points, and work back from that to find suitable topics for one of the two questions.

Random pitfalls:

[list]
[*]If you choose the first question, please don’t use very obvious or overly angelic people (I’ve seen this essay answered with Gandhi and Mother Teresa more often than I can believe over 15 years.) Rather, discuss people who show your creative thinking and/or are personally meaningful to you.[/*]
[*]If you choose the second question, [url=https://blog.accepted.com/4-ways-show-you-will-contribute-future/]don’t turn the essay into a recitation of future good intentions[/url]. Root your prospective contributions in your actual experiences, insights, commitments, and interests, and include some anecdotes and examples to lend both credibility and interest.[/*]
[/list]
[b]If you would like professional guidance with your LBS Executive MBA application, check out Accepted’s [/b][url=http://www.accepted.com/mba/services/application-packages?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=emba_essay_tips&utm_source=blog][b]MBA Application Package[/b][/url][b], which includes advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the LBS EMBA application.[/b]

London Business School EMBA deadlines for September 2020 intake

Deadline 1February 25, 2020

Deadline 2March 24, 2020

Deadline 3April 28, 2020

Deadline 4June 2, 2020

Deadline 5July 1, 2020

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

[url=https://cta-redirect.hubspot.com/cta/redirect/58291/a7023970-b3f6-4a4c-8844-194bd93baf6d][img]https://no-cache.hubspot.com/cta/default/58291/a7023970-b3f6-4a4c-8844-194bd93baf6d.png[/img][/url]

[img]https://blog.accepted.com/cindy-tokumitsu-accepted-consultant/[/img]
Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. [url=https://www.accepted.com/service-request-cindy?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=blog_bio_cindy&utm_source=blog][b]Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch![/b][/url]
 

[b]Related Resources:[/b]

• [url=https://reports.accepted.com/mba/why-mba]Why MBA[/url], a free guide

• [url=https://blog.accepted.com/the-expanded-executive-mba-profile/]The Expanded Executive MBA Profile[/url]

• [url=https://blog.accepted.com/mba-admissions-committees-want-know-deal-criticism/]How Do You Deal with Criticism? MBA Admissions Committees Want to Know[/url]

Tags: [url=https://blog.accepted.com/category/mba-admissions/]MBA Admissions[/url]

The post [url=https://blog.accepted.com/london-business-school-executive-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/]London Business School Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020][/url] appeared first on [url=https://blog.accepted.com]Accepted Admissions Blog[/url].
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

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Yale School of Management EMBA Class of 2021 Profile  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Dec 2019, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Yale School of Management EMBA Class of 2021 Profile
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Here is a look at Yale School of Management’s MBA for Executives Class of 2021, taken from the Yale School of Management website.

  • Students enrolled: 74
  • Average age: 37
  • Average years of experience: 13
  • Women: 36%
  • Born outside the US: 22%
  • With advanced degree: 41%
  • Countries represented by citizenship: 11
  • Non-US citizenship: 3%

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Undergraduate majors

MajorPercent

Social Science/Humanities32.4%

Mathematics/Physical Sciences24.3%

Business19%

Economics16.2%

Engineering/Informational Systems & Computer Science8.1%

Professional background

Employer SectorPercent

For-profit69%

Nonprofit26%

Government/Public5%

Area of focus

AreaPercent

Healthcare37%

Asset Management32%

Sustainability31%

Applying to the Yale EMBA program?
Round 2 deadlines are only a month away! Work with one of our admissions consultants to ensure that your application will get you ACCEPTED – whether you’re applying to Yale or any other top MBA program!

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

Ace the EMBA: Expert Advice for the Rising Executive, a free guide

Yale SOM’s EMBA Program, a podcast episode

Yale School of Management Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [2019 – 2020]

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Yale School of Management EMBA Class of 2021 Profile appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

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MBA Application Timeline: How to Get Accepted in 2020  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jan 2020, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: MBA Application Timeline: How to Get Accepted in 2020
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It’s time for my annual harangue/plea/rant.

If you are planning to apply Round 1 in the fall, but have not yet thought about why you want an MBA, taken the GMAT/GRE, researched schools, or evaluated your qualifications, please please please keep reading. And then get started!

I would like to help you avoid the harried hassle and diminished application quality that accompany rushed applications. Just to be clear: Rushed applications are started just a few weeks before the deadlines by applicants who cogitate, procrastinate, or just start thinking about applying late in the cycle. Instead follow the example of those many applicants who start their applications months before applying and who work steadily to complete them by their deadlines.

Those people are getting started now.

My 25+ years in this business tell me that those who start the application process 9-12 months before they apply:

  • Get into more and “better” schools.
  • Are more likely to get scholarships.
  • Are more prepared for b-school when they arrive on campus.
They simply do better in the MBA application process than those who wait until the eleventh hour (or even the tenth).

Those better prepared applicants – they are your real competition. And the best way to compete is to start the race now.

Not tomorrow. Not next week or month or quarter. Now.

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Start your GMAT or GRE prep
Once you determine that you have a goal that requires an MBA, start preparing for the GMAT or GRE. Don’t wait for the summer or “later.” Your test score is a critical element in your application. Choosing schools without knowing that number leads to all kinds of aggravation, stress, and unpleasant surprises.

Every year I get calls, emails, and comments from applicants who bombed the GRE or the GMAT and don’t have time to retake it. They are torn between applying to the programs they really want to attend but where their test score (and perhaps other elements) are less than competitive, and applying to programs where they are competitive but where they aren’t dying to go.

It’s a dilemma you can avoid by allowing yourself the time to retake the GRE/GMAT, if necessary.

Lower than expected test scores can throw a major monkey wrench in your plans when you take the test within two months of your target deadlines. However, if you bomb it in the spring, you will still have months to prepare again and retake the exam before the deadlines – even the first round deadlines.

Where to apply: Dartboard vs. intent
And then there are the applicants who don’t understand the importance of fit in the application process. They just know they want an MBA from a Top X-ranked school. They may or may not have a specific goal or reason to pursue an MBA, and they really could just as easily be throwing darts at a list of schools to determine where to invest their time and money.

Or maybe they just started too late to do the research and reflection that they could’ve and should’ve done had they started earlier. Like now.

In any case, this superficial approach could lead to rejection, a very expensive mistake, or a less-than-optimal MBA experience.

Apply purposefully to specific programs that support your goals and at which you are competitive. Don’t apply to rankings. You won’t attend rankings. You’ll attend a graduate business school.

Writing is rewriting & requires time
Some of you know why you want an MBA, have good reasons for selecting the school you will apply to, and will get the GMAT or GRE score that you want the first time you take the exam; so you may be feeling a little smug. Okay, so you got the first part of the application process done. Fantastic!

However, if you slack off and wait for the last minute to complete your applications, you will end up hurrying the writing process for your essays, short answer questions, and resume, or the practice/filming process for video options on your application. Either way, you will end up rushing.

Bad idea. And bad ideas lead to bad results.

Writing – whether long essays, short essays, scripts, activity descriptions, or resumes – benefits from time. Temporal distance between revisions improves critical analysis and editing. In contrast, scrambling to slap something together leads to sloppy thinking and writing.

Getting the GMAT or GRE out of the way, thinking profoundly about fit, and starting your essays early are all important steps, but you can’t just assume that ticking items off your checklist will get you into b-school. You need something more comprehensive than that…

A holistic, purposeful approach to the MBA application process
New Year’s Resolution: Proceed purposefully, methodically, and thoughtfully so that you submit a superior MBA application to the most appropriate schools at the most desirable deadline for you.

We’ve all made resolutions this year and in years past, but do yourself a favor and make the resolution above the 2020 resolution that you stick to.

I’m going to help you keep this one by laying out the process holistically from January through September so that you can present a superior application. It’s not just the test score or the GPA or the years of work experience or solid extracurriculars. It’s all of the above.

I’ve mapped out the process for you here.

MBA application timeline
[Click here to view full size]

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If you are aiming for the Round 1 deadlines, you can download the PDF, print it, and tape it on your mirror, wall, fridge, or wherever you’ll regularly see it. Alternatively we have created a public Google doc that you can copy and paste and modify to suit your needs. Then using the timeline as a guide, add the above tasks to your calendar. And do them.

If you follow this MBA timeline, your MBA dreams will not be a mad, breathless sprint to the finish line, but a long, steady jog that allows you to successfully complete the MBA application marathon.

Apply with an admissions expert on your team
And what better way to reach this goal than to train with a personal coach? At Accepted, you’ll get matched with an expert admissions advisor who will guide you through the MBA admissions process – step by step, checking off each to-do along the way. Learn more when you explore our MBA Application Consulting & Editing Services. Come on – let’s nail this thing!  

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted. Linda earned her bachelors and MBA at UCLA, and has been advising applicants since 1994 when she founded Accepted. Linda is the co-founder and first president of AIGAC. She has written or co-authored 13 e-books on the admissions process, and has been quoted by The Wall Street Journal, U.S. News, Poets & Quants, Bloomberg Businessweek, CBS News, and others. Linda is the host of Admissions Straight Talk, a podcast for graduate school applicants. Want an admissions expert help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

• MBA Action Plan: 6 Steps for the 6 Months Before You Apply, a free guide to applying to business school at your best

• Business School Selectivity Index [Can I Get Into My Dream School?]

• Why MBA?, a free guide to writing about your MBA goals

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post MBA Application Timeline: How to Get Accepted in 2020 appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Listen to Admissions Straight Talk for interviews with admissions directors, MBAs, test prep pros, and financial aid sources.
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MBA Round 3: Should I Apply Now or Wait for Next Year?  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jan 2020, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: MBA Round 3: Should I Apply Now or Wait for Next Year?
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MBA round 3: Should I give it a shot, or wait for next year?
The answer, as is often the case in MBA admissions, is…it depends.

You didn’t think we’d give you a clear cut yes or no answer, did you?

FACT: The chances of gaining acceptance decrease as the rounds progress. This means that MBA round 3 acceptance rates are generally lower than in R1 and R2. Similarly, grants and scholarships are harder to come by later in the admissions game.

Now, this doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t apply. Your chances of acceptance are obviously zero if you don’t apply. They are greater than zero (even if not much greater) if you do.

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4 reasons why you should apply round 3:
  • You have a class of 2022 or bust attitude.
    If you really have your heart set on joining the b-school class of 2022, then you should definitely apply R3 (or even R4 if your target program offers that option).

  • You’re an admissions dream come true.
    If you are a truly exceptional candidate – stats-wise, diversity-wise, experience-wise, etc. – then you should apply R3/R4. Not everyone is rejected (or there wouldn’t be such a thing as late rounds), and if anyone is going to get in, it’s going to be those applicants with extremely impressive profiles.

  • You have nothing to lose.
    If you don’t mind spending the extra money, time, and energy to apply now, get rejected, and then apply again during R1 of the next application season, then you really don’t have much to lose going for it this year. In fact, if you’re lucky enough to get feedback (that is, if you’re unlucky enough to get dinged), then that feedback will prove extremely valuable when you reapply next year.

  • You were rejected R1 and have a new plan.
    You understand that you simply aimed too high and are now ready to apply to less competitive programs.

6 reasons why you should wait until next year:
  • Your essay’s still not quite right.
    Maybe you don’t have the time to create flawless essays before the R3 buzzer. In that case, it’s much better to wait until you can submit something closer to perfect than to rush and send in a sloppy essay early.

  • You plan on retaking the GMAT.
    If you’re not happy with your current GMAT results, then you should wait until you can apply with that (hopefully) higher score.

  • Your recs won’t be ready.
    If you won’t be able to secure the best recommendations by the R3/R4 deadline, it’s better to wait for the ideal recommenders than to go with less-impressive ones early.

  • Your work experience is weak.
    Applying next year will give you more time to bulk up your work experience and personal profiles.

  • You’re uncertain about your goals.
    If you’re fuzzy as to why you want an MBA or your reasons for choosing particular schools, get clarity, and then apply – preferably round 1.

  • You have international issues.
    If you are an international applicant and may have trouble getting the necessary visa and financing, it might be worth taking extra time.

For a more in-depth analysis of the round 3 vs. next year application debate, join our live, free webinar where Linda will address the differences between round 3 and earlier rounds, the pros and cons of applying R3, and help you answer the million-dollar-question of when you should apply to business school. Click here to save your spot!

Need help deciding when to apply?
Deciding when to apply is not always easy. Work with an expert admissions consultant to create a strategy for when and how to apply that will maximize your chances of getting accepted! 

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

Related Resources:

School-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips

Is 10 Days Per Business School Application Enough?

Your 5-Item Checklist for Submitting Your Applications

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post MBA Round 3: Should I Apply Now or Wait for Next Year? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Listen to Admissions Straight Talk for interviews with admissions directors, MBAs, test prep pros, and financial aid sources.
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Is an MBA Worth It, or Is the Sky Falling Down on the MBA Degree?  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jan 2020, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Is an MBA Worth It, or Is the Sky Falling Down on the MBA Degree?
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Accepted founder Linda Abraham discusses when pursuing an MBA justifies its cost [Show Summary]
Linda Abraham, Accepted’s founder and president explores the latest headlines about the value of an MBA. This is a must-listen for anyone trying to decide whether or not to get an MBA degree.

Why we’ve been asking the wrong question about the value of the MBA [Show Notes]
Headlines scream “Is an MBA Worth It?” and frequently conclude, as did an editorial in the WSJ in the fall, that an MBA usually isn’t worth it in an era of low unemployment, high tuition, and declining enrollment for U.S. business schools’ flagship, two-year, full-time MBA programs. Other articles conclude differently and trumpet that the MBA is almost always worth it because of the value of the MBA education and network. In my opinion, they’re both asking the wrong question.

The right question is:

“When is an MBA worth it?”
This is not a categorical question, or one that an op-ed can answer across the board for everyone or even “most.” It’s something that individuals must assess and analyze individually. If you’re a prospective MBA applicant trying to decide if you should apply or attend if accepted, ignore the headlines (for the most part). Approach the question, with this maxim in mind.

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The MBA is worth the investment in time and money when anticipated benefits – both financial and non-financial – exceed anticipated costs.
That sounds straightforward, but let’s unwrap it. To analyze the situation, record in a spreadsheet your anticipated costs:

  • Out-of-pocket tuition, fees, travel expenses
  • Opportunity cost – lost salary for the time spent in school less the amount you anticipate making during your summer internship.
Don’t include living costs that you would have regardless of whether you work or attend school. You do need to budget for them, but they are not part of the cost of the MBA.

My next point is really important: When considering costs, realize that the stated tuition and costs may be more than you will actually pay. Many schools, especially elite, private MBA programs, offer significant amounts of scholarship money. In 2018, the Wall Street Journalreported that while stated tuition has increased steadily, schools have also increased both the total dollars offered and the percentage of students receiving scholarships and financial aid. In fact, the article states that “61% of this year’s students are receiving scholarships based on merit, financial need, or a combination of the two.” The same article reveals that the average fellowship award cut the cost of Harvard tuition in half, and that total monies available for scholarships at the school have more than doubled since 2009. Dartmouth Tuck reported similar stats.

Our clients who joined the MBA class of 2021 received 40% more in scholarships than those who joined the class of 2020. So far in this application cycle, we have several clients who have received full rides in round one, and two who have received two full ride offers each.

What’s driving this generosity? Business schools are competing for top applicants in a shrinking applicant pool. HBS announced its second annual decline in application volume – down 6.7% in 2018-19 and 10.8% total since 2017. Dartmouth Tuck applications plunged 22.5% and Yale SOM dropped 15.6% year over year.

With employment and job growth so strong, it’s understandable that some potential applicants ask themselves, “Why should I leave my job and go to the trouble and expense of getting an MBA?” The answer: The benefits of the MBA may be worth it.

Let’s look at average total comp for 2019 grads at some of the top U.S. business schools, which are usually among the most expensive: Forbes surveyed 17,500 b-school alumni for its 2019 rankings. Forbes’ conclusion: “a degree at a leading business school is still incredibly valuable and pays for itself in roughly four years. Graduates from the Class of 2014 at the top 25 U.S. programs increased their earnings from $73,000 on average before school to $193,000 last year. Earnings have increased 10% annually since graduation.” Their survey shows that a top MBA can cost a jaw-dropping $350,000 in foregone income and out-of-pocket expenses – if you pay full freight – but pays for itself in roughly four years. Any increased salary after that is gravy and return on investment.

In addition to the financial reward, MBA grads usually are seeking and enjoying more satisfying work. GMAC data shows overwhelmingly satisfied alumni. Financial and non-financial benefits propel people to invest in the MBA. The education, network, and credential that you acquire by earning an MBA all enable the financial rewards and personal satisfaction that last a lifetime. With achievement of those two goals as your North Star and your spreadsheet of costs keeping you grounded, you can determine at what point the benefits outweigh the costs. At that point, the MBA is worth it for you.

Notice I have spoken very little about rankings, immigration policy, rising tuition, or any of the factors that create headlines. However, one headline, declining application volume, does benefit you, the applicant. With fewer applicants vying for spots at top-tier programs, your chances for acceptance and financial aid improve. The reduced application volume and increased financial aid can make all the difference in your decision to attend business school or not.

Another common question: Is an MBA worth it if you can’t attend Harvard, Stanford, or Wharton?
The star status of Harvard, Stanford, and Wharton, or H/S/W to their friends, blinds many would-be MBAs to the strengths of other programs. They assume it won’t be worth their while to attend “lesser” programs. This is frequently false. H/S/W do boast outstanding programs, brand value, name recognition, networks, placement centers, and salaries upon graduation. However, the table below shows that they aren’t the only programs whose graduates sport stratospheric salaries.

Median total compensation for 2019 MBA grads*

School NameMedian Total Compensation

Average$170,977

University of Pennsylvania (Wharton)**$175,000

Stanford University$187,760

Harvard University$172,090

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Sloan)$173,670

Chicago Booth$168,060

Columbia University$177,970

Northwestern University (Kellogg)$165,080

University of California–Berkeley (Haas)$162,147

Yale University$157,990

Dartmouth College (Tuck)$170,000

*Data is from several articles on Poets & Quants.

**Total compensation for Wharton graduates is P&Q’s estimate.

Let’s put it this way. If you are in the elite group already advancing quickly in your careers, making post-MBA salaries, listing Ivy League degrees on your resume, and enjoying the luxury of achieving your goals without the MBA, you may be in the “H/S/W or bust” camp.

If, however, you are a more typical above-average achiever who doesn’t enjoy an elite’s advantages and seeks the increased salary and career satisfaction that your North Star will provide, you still enjoy excellent options among the so-called M7 (H/S/W, MIT, Kellogg, Chicago Booth, and Columbia), as well as the Top 10 – which, due to multiple rankings, includes about 15 schools – and depending on your circumstances, outside those 15 programs, too.

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A good question: How do I decide where to apply?
Assess your qualifications for each program, as well as each program’s ability to help you follow your North Star, the realization of your short- and long-term, post-MBA goals. For each school that you consider, evaluate the following:

  • Employment reports. Does this school place a significant percentage of grads in the industry and job function that you find most attractive at a salary that makes your MBA worthwhile? For example, 19% of Vanderbilt’s 2019 MBAs went into healthcare, making that school a smart target for applicants interested in this space. 37% of Yale SOM’s 2019 class went into consulting.
  • Curriculum and educational approach. Will you perform better in a highly structured program, or a flexible one? (Darden has a one-year core curriculum that all students take. In contrast, Chicago Booth has only one required course and a flexible core.) Do you want a program that is case-based? (Darden and HBS) Highly experiential? (Ross, Haas, and MIT Sloan) Or a mixture of case, lecture, and experiential? (Kellogg and Yale SOM)? Do you want to concentrate or perhaps earn a certificate in a specific area relevant to your goals? For example, do you seek a globally focused program (INSEAD, anyone?), or one that offers advanced courses in a specific area? Duke Fuqua excels in Energy Finance courses; Georgetown McDonough is strong in the intersection of business and government; and UCLA Anderson, USC Marshall, and NYU Stern are all known for their Entertainment and Media offerings.
  • Extracurricular opportunities. Important learning takes place outside the classroom. Look for special programs, competitions, events, treks, and other opportunities where you would like to contribute and learn.
  • Personal factors. Do you have a significant other or children? Do you thrive in big cities, or in smaller communities? Can you handle snow? Or oppressive heat? If you visited different campuses, where did you feel at home? Where could you really envision yourself being for two important years of your life?
After you study what each school can offer you, turn the question around: What do you bring to the table? Even in a slightly less competitive environment, admissions committees will be carefully looking at your qualifications. They need assurance that you have the academic chops and credentials that show you can thrive, or at least survive, in their programs. Does your professional experience (and perhaps volunteer work) demonstrate that you will be both a leader and a team player, eager to contribute? Can you show in your application that you share your target programs’ values and mission? Cultural fit and common values are important to b-school gatekeepers, who tend to be proud of their communities. Finally, what makes you distinctive personally? Where is the “wow” factor in your personal story?

Another good question: What if I’m not competitive at the schools I’d love to attend?
You have three options:

  • Improve your qualifications. Take classes in your areas of weakness, especially if business-related, and earn A’s. Prepare again, retake, and raise your GMAT/GRE. Look for opportunities to expand your responsibilities and impact at work. Assume leadership roles off the job. Obtain international exposure.
  • Look at other programs with an open mind. Find programs that can help you realize your aspirations and where you are more likely to get accepted. Your dream program may be a stretch, but give it a try! No need to reject yourself, but also apply to programs where you are competitive and that support your goals.
  • A combination of 1 and 2.

The MBA is worth it to some and not to others
While the blaring headlines may be attention-getting, you should base your decision whether and where to apply for an MBA on a solid foundation of self-reflection, research, and analysis. Done properly, this process should be deeply purposeful and even gratifying. For today’s MBA applicants, declining application volume means you are a buyer in a buyer’s market. Even elite programs are wooing applicants with bigger fistfuls of scholarship dollars, helping you achieve a richer ROI.

The MBA may be in an era of retrenchment, but it is hardly toast. In fact, if you go after your MBA thoughtfully and purposefully, you could someday eat the lunch of those who focused on the sky-is-falling-down headlines and unwisely chose not to apply to a program that could enrich the rest of their professional lives and is enriching yours.

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Related Links:

Is an MBA Still Worth It?
Paying for Your MBA
Accepted’s MBA Admissions Consulting Services

Related Shows:

A Conversation About Today’s MBA Marketplace
Entrepreneurship at HBS: How Stride will Help You Fund Your Future
How to Leverage an HBS Education: The Story of LeverEdge

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The post Is an MBA Worth It, or Is the Sky Falling Down on the MBA Degree? [Episode 346] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Listen to Admissions Straight Talk for interviews with admissions directors, MBAs, test prep pros, and financial aid sources.
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7 Ways to Make the Most of B-School Visits, Fairs & Receptions  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jan 2020, 09:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 7 Ways to Make the Most of B-School Visits, Fairs & Receptions
[img]https://blog.accepted.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/5-Ways-to-Make-to-Most-of-B-school-Fairs-and-Visits.jpg[/img]
[img]https://blog.accepted.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/5-Ways-to-Make-to-Most-of-B-school-Fairs-and-Visits.jpg[/img]

Applying to MBA programs in the fall? Then you’re probably planning to meet with MBA admissions committee members at various types of events – school visits, MBA fairs, school receptions, etc. – as part of that process.

Adcom members are preparing for you as well. In their interactions with prospective applicants, they look to get an early read of your “social intelligence.”

Here are some tips to make a positive first impression while also getting the most out of the visits for your own informational and decision-making needs.

7 tips for getting the most out of MBA visits and fairs
[list]
[*]
[url=https://reports.accepted.com/resume_guide]Polish up your resume[/url] to bring with you.
You can always refine or modify it later if need be. Sometimes you may have a chance to show it to an adcom member or a current student willing to give feedback on your competitiveness for the program.

[/*]
[*]
Have your overall “goals story” on the tip of your tongue.
Most visiting applicants will have a simple sentence prepared (like “My goal is to become an IT manager in finance and eventually CIO”), but ideally, you’d have something more substantial to share. [url=https://reports.accepted.com/mba/why-mba]The goals story[/url] includes another sentence that shows why you have these goals (your motivation) and your vision for what you want to achieve (often these two elements are interrelated).

This story will enable you to engage more meaningfully with adcoms or students – people will care about your goals when they know why you want to do it!

[/*]
[*]
Research, research, research.
[url=https://blog.accepted.com/focus-fit-episode-162/]Research the programs[/url] that you’re interested in hearing more from at the event. Be sure not just to browse through the material, but to research the programs relative to what they can offer you based on your specific post-MBA career goals. When you’re at the event asking questions, you’ll look foolish asking basic questions whose answers appear on the program’s homepage.

[/*]
[*]
Have a couple of thoughtful questions ready about the program.
For each school you visit, prepare questions related to your learning and career needs. It never hurts to show ‘em the love. Moreover, your ability and willingness to identify your specific developmental needs reflects maturity.

[/*]
[*]
Dress and act professionally.
Don’t be too casual in dress or in attitude, or school representatives may assume that you’re not serious about your future business education and future career. These schools are looking for sincere, thoughtful candidates. Also, keep in mind that people generally act differently depending on what they’re wearing – dress casually and you’ll act casually; dress professionally and most likely it’ll professionalize your attitude and demeanor.

[/*]
[*]
Request contact info to facilitate follow-ups when meeting students from your target schools.
There are all kinds of opportunities to [url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/what-is-business-school-like]learn more about the program from students[/url] (for example, one student may connect you to a classmate who leads a club of interest to you) – gaining unique and fresh insights that can greatly enhance your essays.

[/*]
[*]
Learn how to create an elevator pitch and prepare one.
Having an effective “elevator pitch” will enable you to attend school visits without anxiety, show that you are socially adept, and free you to focus on listening and responding rather than thinking about what to say in those initial moments. Aim to present a thoughtful, meaningful nugget of information to make a positive first impression and facilitate conversation. You can use your nugget with adcom members, MBA students, and fellow applicants. With the latter two groups, you can also follow up with “What is your industry background?” or “What are your post-MBA goals?”

Your elevator pitch should be one to two sentences only. Its content should usually focus on the present and future. The key is to convey core information in a way that is engaging.  

Here are two examples:

[/*]
[/list]
[list]
[*]
[list]
[*]Hi, I’m Mary Liu, a consultant in McKinsey’s supply chain practice. I hope to develop and lead the next generation of supply chain innovations in emerging markets.[/*]
[*]Hello, Manish Das here. I’ve been troubleshooting Bank Paribas’ risk management applications in Eastern Europe during the global financial crisis. Post-MBA I want to focus on developing new risk management strategies to avert such crises.[/*]
[/list]
[/*]
[/list]
If there is something important in your past to add for a clearer picture, mention it. E.g., a listener would probably assume Manish Das grew up in India. What if Manish grew up in Kenya, an interesting tidbit: “Hello, Manish Das. I grew up in Kenya. I’ve been troubleshooting…”

Finally: practice! Your pitch should be natural for you to say, and practicing will help you adjust it to make it so.

Don’t underestimate the power of a good impression
The preparation sketched above will yield rich rewards: good impressions on adcoms, fruitful contacts with students, and deeper knowledge of the programs to fuel your decision making and propel your essay writing.

[b]You need to choose and apply to the MBA programs that will best support your individual goals and preferences. Not only will choosing the right programs increase your chances of acceptance, but it will ensure that you make the most of your time spent pursuing your degree. Our expert consultants can help you strategize, choose, and then apply to the best programs for you. [url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/services/consulting?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=make_the_most_of_mba_fairs&utm_source=blog]Check out our MBA Consulting Services[/url] for more information.[/b]

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[img]https://blog.accepted.com/cindy-tokumitsu-accepted-consultant/[/img]
Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. [url=https://www.accepted.com/service-request-cindy?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=blog_bio_cindy&utm_source=blog][b]Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch![/b][/url]
 

[b]Related Resources:[/b]

• [url=https://reports.accepted.com/resume_guide]The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes[/url], a free guide

• [url=https://blog.accepted.com/top-6-tips-for-visiting-business-schools/]Top 6 Tips for Visiting Business Schools[/url]

• [url=https://blog.accepted.com/connections-count-in-admissions-and-you-can-create-them/]Connections Count. And You Can Create Them.[/url]

Tags: [url=https://blog.accepted.com/category/mba-admissions/]MBA Admissions[/url]

The post [url=https://blog.accepted.com/mba-program-visits-fairs-receptions-success/]7 Ways to Make the Most of B-School Visits, Fairs & Receptions[/url] appeared first on [url=https://blog.accepted.com]Accepted Admissions Blog[/url].
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Wharton Executive MBA 2021 Class Profile  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jan 2020, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Wharton Executive MBA 2021 Class Profile
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Here’s a look at Wharton’s EMBA Class of 2021 (profile info from their website):

Wharton EMBA class of 2021 facts and figures
Total class size: 236

Women: 32%

Underrepresented minority students: 10%

Countries represented: 26

Average age: 36

  • Under 30: 9%
  • Over 40: 15%
Average years of work experience: 12

Median GMAT score: 700

Middle 80% GMAT range: 640-740

Students holding advanced degrees: 53%

Median salary and bonus: $195,000

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Sponsored by employer (>50% financial support): 33%

Industries represented:

  • Advertising/PR
  • Aerospace & Defense
  • Agribusiness
  • Automotive & Transportation
  • Biotech/Pharmaceutical
  • Chemicals
  • Computer Hardware/Electronics
  • Consulting
  • Consumer Goods & Retail
  • Diversified Financial Services
  • Education
  • Energy/Utilities
  • Food & Beverage
  • Government/Military
  • Healthcare
  • Insurance
  • Internet Services
  • Investment Banking/Brokerage
  • Investment Management
  • Manufacturing
  • Media/Entertainment/Sports
  • Not-for-Profit/Social Entrepreneurship/Impact Investing
  • Private Equity/Venture Capital
  • Professional Services
  • Real Estate
  • Technology Services/Computer Software
  • Telecommunications
Check out our podcast interview with Wharton’s EMBA Admissions Directors
Wharton’s Executive MBA, Where East and West Meet and Mix [Episode 283]

Are you applying to Wharton’s Executive MBA Program or another hard-to-get-into top-tier EMBA program? Do you need help getting your application in tip-top admissions-worthy shape? Check out our MBA/EMBA Admissions Consulting & Editing Services and work one-on-one with an expert consultant who will help make sure that your Wharton EMBA application lands on the top of the adcom’s ACCEPTED pile!

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
 

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Tags: MBA Admissions

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Which MBA Program is Right for Me? The Ultimate Guide to Choosing an M  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jan 2020, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Which MBA Program is Right for Me? The Ultimate Guide to Choosing an MBA Program
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[url=https://reports.accepted.com/mba/where-you-should-apply][img]https://blog.accepted.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/Which_mba_program_is_right_for_me.jpg[/img][/url]

In 18+ years of MBA admissions consulting, I have found that otherwise highly capable and focused people often basically wing it when it comes to creating their target list of business schools. I’ve heard things like: [url=https://blog.accepted.com/busting-2-mba-myths]“I’m just applying to all the top ten.”[/url] Top ten according to what source? And this: “I realize now [after R2 deadlines have passed] I was overreaching. Are there any good schools I can still apply to?” Probably. And even this: “I’m applying to H/S/W, with Duke as my safety.” Duke as your safety?

By starting to develop your list of prospective schools now, you can avoid these and similar problems.

Why it’s so important to choose the right MBA programs

By approaching school selection thoughtfully and systematically, you will save time, money, and effort in the long run (even if you expend more of all three initially). You will conserve precious energy for [url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/services/essay-editing?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=intro_best_mba_programs&utm_source=article]the nitty-gritty work of the applications[/url]. You will also be able to devote time to planning school visits and recommendations, two things that often get neglected in the heat of the application season.

In this post you’ll learn about:

[list]
[*][url=https://blog.accepted.com#assessing][b]Assessing your MBA admissions profile[/b][/url]

[/*]
[*][b][url=https://blog.accepted.com#determining]Determining your needs and wants in an MBA program[/url]

[/b][/*]
[*][b][url=https://blog.accepted.com#reaches]Reaches, on-pars, and safeties[/url]

[/b][/*]
[*][b][url=https://blog.accepted.com#initial_list]Putting together your initial list of b-schools to apply to[/url]

[/b][/*]
[*][b][url=https://blog.accepted.com#examples]Two examples of how to choose which MBA programs to apply to[/url]

[/b][/*]
[*][url=https://blog.accepted.com#adapting][b]Adapting your list of b-schools to apply to as the season progresses[/b][/url][/*]
[/list]
Let’s jump right in and develop a strategy that will get you accepted to your top choice b-schools!

4 steps to jumpstarting the b-school selection process
Here are four things you can and should do right now to get started on the school selection process for next season:

1. [b]Take notes.[/b]

Write down those random thoughts that have been floating around in your head, for example, “top 10,” “friendly to older applicants,” “strong quant focus,” “need to be within an hour by plane from my ailing mother,” etc.

2. [b]Surf social.[/b]

Read blogs and scroll through newsfeeds on Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube of MBA students not just at schools you’re already interested in but from a wider array of schools – both the substance and the tone of those blog posts will give you a subjective feel for different programs and your own responses to them.

3. [b]Talk to MBA students, current and alumni.[/b]

If possible, talk to MBA students and ask them about their school selection process, about what went well and what proved difficult or problematic. Also ask what they would do differently.

4. [b]Visit schools.[/b]

[url=https://blog.accepted.com/top-6-tips-for-visiting-business-schools/]Visit schools you know you are interested in[/url] (you can always revisit later), schools you might be interested in, and even schools on the margins. The best time to visit is when schools are still in session and when you’re not pressed by the application process yet, but when it’s still close enough to application time for your insights from the visits to be relevant if you discuss them in essays. Take advantage of travel you may do for business or pleasure to schedule a visit, rather than trying to cram everything in the fall – when you’ll be even busier than usual with applications plus work. Moreover, visiting early on (like in the spring) gives you time to digest and reflect on your campus experiences.

We’ll delve deeper into each of these topics in the upcoming sections of this post, so keep on reading!

[url=https://cta-redirect.hubspot.com/cta/redirect/58291/9bb31be0-3cf6-45f0-be3d-3791cc1bd9bd][img]https://no-cache.hubspot.com/cta/default/58291/9bb31be0-3cf6-45f0-be3d-3791cc1bd9bd.png[/img][/url]

Assessing your MBA admissions profile

Thinking about what you want and need in an MBA program is the fun part. Before you do that, though, you’ll need to tackle the less fun part: [url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/services/consulting?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=which_mba_program_right_for_me&utm_source=blog]assessing your profile[/url]. Knowing a program has everything you’ve ever dreamed of is nice, but if it does not welcome applicants like you, it’s just a fantasy, not something to expend effort and money applying to. Conversely, learning that a seemingly so-so program would likely value your candidacy might prompt you to take a closer and warmer look.

5 factors to consider when evaluating your profile

Break down your assessment into several basic areas, as follows.

1. [b]Work experience[/b]

There are many dimensions to [url=https://blog.accepted.com/how-an-admissions-committee-views-mba-work-experience/]the work experience element[/url]: your industry and company, your role overall, how you compare to accomplished peers, how fast you’ve advanced and/or how impressive your impact has been, and your leadership (formal and/or informal).

What are your strengths in this area, and what are the weaknesses or challenges? A challenge might be, for example, that you’ve increased responsibility significantly but because you work for a “flat” company you don’t have promotions. Another challenge: You work in the tech side, so you have to illustrate your business knowledge and exposure. One more: You’re a successful consultant or financial analyst, but how do you differentiate yourself in this group?

Strengths would be distinctive roles or industries, visibly rapid advancement, clear leadership. [b][For more information, check out [url=https://blog.accepted.com/how-an-admissions-committee-views-mba-work-experience/]How an Admissions Committee Views MBA Work Experience[/url]][/b]

2. [b]Academics[/b]

This part includes your undergrad GPA and transcript, grad GPA and transcript (if any), and GMAT or GRE score(s).

What are the strengths and [url=https://reports.accepted.com/mba/get_accepted_with_low_stats]weaknesses in each area[/url], and how do they add up overall?

For example, a weak undergrad GPA and solid GMAT will not be great if your GPA trended down and the quant section of the GMAT was under 80%. However, if the GPA trended up and your GMAT quant was 90%, you’re in much better shape. A strong grad GPA won’t completely neutralize a low undergrad GPA but it can go a long way to doing so. (NOTE: If your GPA is low and you have time to take a class or two and earn A’s, this can help mitigate your lower GPA – I recommend doing this even if you have a high GMAT.)

3. [b]Post-MBA goals[/b]

Ask yourself these questions when evaluating this aspect of your profile:

[list]
[*]
[list]
[*]What industry and function are you currently in? What industry and function do you envision yourself in after you receive your MBA? [/*]
[*]What specific position(s) are you considering immediately post-MBA? Is it a major career change? A slight career shift? [/*]
[*]What is the link between your current work and [url=https://reports.accepted.com/mba/why-mba]your goals[/url]? [/*]
[*]If it’s a career change, how will you build the bridge between here and there?[/*]
[/list]
[/*]
[/list]

4. [b]Extracurriculars[/b]

At the least, extracurricular activities will round out your profile. At most, they will set you apart and give your application extra sparkle. They will be more important to some programs than to others. And the weight they have in any individual application will vary depending on the other factors, as adcoms review the applications holistically.

5. [b]Other miscellaneous factors[/b]

Honor code infraction, DUI, DWI, academic probation – [url=https://blog.accepted.com/can-you-get-accepted-after-doing-something-stupid/]all clear negatives[/url], but again, how negative they truly are will vary. Perhaps the worst is the honor code infraction. On the positive side: obstacles overcome, extraordinary level of achievement in almost any area, and military experience.

With a clear understanding of your profile and your competitiveness, you can determine which schools are likely safeties, on-pars, and reaches.

[b]Have your profile evaluated by an experienced MBA admissions consultant who will help you determine the best schools to apply to and craft a strategy that will get you accepted. [/b][url=https://www.accepted.com/how-can-we-help?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=which_mba_program_is_right_for_me&utm_source=blog_inline][b]Click here to get started! >>[/b][/url]

Determining your needs and wants in an MBA program

You’ve assessed your academic and professional profile. You now know who you are; but do you know what you want? Now it’s time to focus on the future: what you want and need in your MBA program.

If you are [url=https://blog.accepted.com/top-6-tips-for-visiting-business-schools/]visiting schools[/url] now, the visits can help you sort through these points and see them in a new light. For example, you might have thought you could never spend two years outside a city, but stopping by Tuck on a ski trip opened your eyes to the abundant diversity and culture the campus and town offer, and you give the excellent program a closer look.

How important are these 7 factors to you?

Whether or not you get a chance to visit schools before compiling your school list, consider the following factors and decide what’s important to you in each category:

1. [b]Academics[/b]

This category includes the curriculum structure and approach (for example, preset concentrations versus flexible), strength in particular disciplines, professors in your areas of interest, degree of analytic rigor, opportunity to take courses outside the b-school, and study abroad options.

2. [b]Recruiting and career services[/b]

Recruiting for both internships and post-MBA positions should be relatively strong for your goals. But students’ actual need for this service varies depending on their existing contacts and resources. Similarly, some people have more need than others of career services’ support.

3. [b]Extracurricular opportunities[/b]

Most people will want to see that the school hosts clubs and activities in their areas of professional interest. Other than that, do you want certain volunteer activities, arts or cultural activities, religious resources, or political opportunities? Are you looking for people who share your interests? If you don’t find something you need, would it be easy to initiate a club or activity?

4. [b]Brand[/b]

This factor is critical to some, insignificant to others, and somewhere in between for most. There is brand in your own perspective, and brand in the eyes of your prospective employers. Probably the latter is more important and less open to compromise. Do not mistake “brand” for “ranking.” If you need a highly competitive program such as [url=https://blog.accepted.com/columbia-business-school-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/]Columbia[/url] or [url=https://blog.accepted.com/wharton-mba-essay-tips-deadlines/]Wharton[/url], that’s fine. But the issue isn’t “top 5”; it’s the value of the specific school brands for your context.

5. [b]Environment and ambiance[/b]

Do you prefer a warm and fuzzy or a hard driving learning environment? Everyone wants diversity, it seems, but what kind: geographic, professional, functional, ethnic, religious? Do you prefer a small, close-knit campus or a large, teeming one? Does it matter to you if the student body has a more conservative or liberal orientation?

6. [b]Geography[/b]

Where would you like to be? Start broad, like continent. Many non-US applicants think globally, considering programs in Asia, Europe, or the US. Many Americans however remain fairly US-centric almost reflexively. If you are an American traveling abroad, try to visit some of the overseas MBA programs. You will be pleasantly surprised.

7. [b]Other personal factors[/b]

Do you need quick access to an international airport? Special medical resources? Resources for a spouse or partner? Or maybe you’re really into bobsledding and want a track nearby….

Once you’ve established what you’re looking for, you’ll have an even easier time narrowing down your choices and selecting the programs that are just right for you. But first, you’ll need to weigh those items that you’ve deemed important or unimportant.

Let’s break it down

Break down your likes and dislikes into four categories:

[list]
[*]What are the things that you absolutely cannot live without?[/*]
[*]What is important to you, but you’d be willing to settle without?[/*]
[*]What would be nice to have but not entirely necessary?[/*]
[*]What do you really not need at all? [/*]
[/list]

Let’s delve deeper into each of these.

What are the things that you absolutely cannot live without?

These are your Essentials. This category applies to things that you must have no matter what – without them, you can’t attend a program. If you are making a career change into marketing, you need a program with strong marketing curriculum and recruiting. Period.

What is important to you, but you’d be willing to settle without?

This category applies to the things that are highly important to you, but are not “must-haves” like those above. Things that you would consider compromising on if you really, really had to, but really, really don’t want to. For some people that might mean a geographic location, for others a warm and open community, for others the chance to take courses in the university’s law or public policy program.

What would be nice to have but not entirely necessary?

These are things that would make a program more attractive to you but wouldn’t necessarily be a deciding factor.

What do you really not need at all?

This category means simply not a factor. Some people would just as readily have curriculum flexibility or structure or would just as readily live in Palo Alto or Fontainebleau, strange as that may seem.

The importance of defining your priorities

The main purpose of this exercise is to think about and define your priorities. Some people may be comfortable keeping these rankings in their head as they go through the next steps; others will make a spreadsheet with them.

[b]Work with an experienced MBA admissions consultant to craft a strategy that will get you accepted to your dream school. [/b][url=https://www.accepted.com/how-can-we-help?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=which_mba_program_is_right_for_me&utm_source=blog_inline][b]Click here to get started! >>[/b][/url]

Reaches, on-pars, and safeties

Now it’s time to [url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/services/consulting?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=which_mba_program_right_for_me&utm_source=article]determine what types and levels of MBA programs you’re competitive and qualified for[/url], and what if any are out of reasonable reach.

I use the following categories:

1. [b]Reasonable reach:[/b] Acceptance is not likely, but with a great application, is within reach.

2. [b]On-par:[/b] With a great application you’ll have a solid chance of acceptance.

3. [b]Safety:[/b] You will likely be admitted if you present your case credibly.

There’s also a fourth category: out-of-reaches. Conceding the wisdom and validity of “never say never” and “nothing’s impossible,” there are still much, much better ways to spend your energy and time than applying to such schools.

3 main factors to consider when determining your reaches, on-pars, and safeties

Keep in mind that these factors all work together holistically.

1. [b]GPA and GMAT[/b]

Let’s start with the basics. How do your stats stack up versus the mid 75-80% of students in a given program? To be fundamentally qualified you’ll want to be in the higher two-thirds of that range at least. If you’re above or in the upper one-third of this range, you’re competitive in this area. If you’re in the middle third you’re qualified, and if you’re in the lower third or below, you’re reaching.

2. [b]Work experience[/b]

This is the next factor to consider, specifically, [url=https://reports.accepted.com/mba/importance_of_work_experience_when_applying_for_your_mba]the quality of your experience[/url]. The more competitive the MBA program, the more important it is to have strong and demonstrable advancement, impact, and leadership relative to your accomplished peers, regardless of your function, industry, or organization. Quality of work experience is a key factor in determining the level of program you would be competitive in; top-tier programs turn down many applicants with near perfect stats who lack the requisite professional accomplishment.

3. [b]Diversity[/b]

Being in an overrepresented or underrepresented industry, demographic group, or global region/country will affect your competitiveness. Perhaps the largest [url=https://blog.accepted.com/what-to-do-if-you-belong-to-an-overrepresented-applicant-group/]overrepresented group[/url] is Indians in technical fields, a group that also has relatively high average stats. Schools that might be reasonable reaches for others will be almost out of reach for many in this group. On the other hand, no matter how underrepresented you are, if the adcom doubts you can handle the program, you won’t be admitted. As you can see, this factor influences what programs would be reasonable reaches, on-pars, and safeties.

Other factors to consider

A myriad of other factors will also affect your qualification and competitiveness. Having fewer than three or more than eight years of work experience or already holding an MBA from another program usually makes you less competitive.

If you have an unconventional background, such as teaching or airline pilot, you face extra burdens in making your case. However, if you successfully make the case for your qualifications and need for an MBA, your nontraditional background may become a plus in this competitive process.

As you research and visit MBA programs, determine how qualified and competitive you are for them.

How to research and choose the best MBA program for you

You may be researching schools already. Going through the steps we’ve already mentioned will help you do so efficiently. It will also help you remain objective.

That means that you should eliminate from consideration:

[list]
[*]Programs that lack elements you consider essential[/*]
[*]Programs where you are not qualified[/*]
[/list]

Some applicants will immediately run into a dilemma here: What if you need a globally recognized brand, yet you don’t qualify for schools that carry the desired panache? In some cases, you might find it worthwhile to apply to such schools’ part-time or EMBA programs. Or you may target programs recognized globally in your niche, but not for overall brand. Or you may decide it’s not worth it to pursue an MBA. Luckily, most people can find programs that offer their must-haves.

Let’s define our terms

“Qualified” means you meet the basic standards of a given program. You can be fully qualified but not competitive – this is exactly the problem that many excellent Indian IT applicants face. “Competitive” is more nuanced; it encompasses the preferences and character of the program, the commonality or distinctiveness of your background, and even sometimes political and/or economic trends and events. When you happily conclude that you are qualified for Columbia, don’t forget to ask yourself whether you are also competitive there.

Quantitative factors

When you identify schools that meet your needs and important wants, determine whether they are reasonable reach, on-par, or safety schools. First examine the GMAT and GPA ranges, and analyze student profiles. How do you compare? [url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/selectivity-index]The numbers are easier to compare[/url]; it might take some digging and some thoughtful self-critique to determine how you stack up in terms of quality of work experience and leadership. This aspect is at least as important, if not more important, than the numbers for competitive programs, so buckle down and do the qualitative evaluation of your work experience and compare it to the level of achievement of students in your desired schools. Otherwise you won’t know where you really stand.

[b][url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/selectivity-index]<< Check out the MBA Selectivity Index to see if you are competitive at your dream schools! >>[/url][/b]

Qualitative factors

Then look at other qualitative factors that would make you a great fit or a challenging fit for the school. One main point is status in an underrepresented or overrepresented group. Then there are the individual qualitative factors. For example, you’re a finance professional and one program you’re considering has a great finance curriculum but is not reputed for it. Your finance status would be a plus for such a school, whereas you might not stand out from the army of finance applicants at a known finance school.

Finally, combine all these factors – your scores, qualitative analysis of your work experience, and any other issues pro or con – to refine your determination of reasonable reach, on par, or safety for each school of interest.

It’s not ALL objective…

It’s true that you should be objective. Still, don’t ignore the subjective factor in your research. If you find yourself falling for a school that doesn’t seem like a great fit – you wanted intimate campus and yet when you visited NYU while on a business trip to the Big Apple, you found its downtown vibe utterly scintillating – well, great! It’s possible you’re momentarily infatuated, and it’s also possible that there’s a side of you that this environment has opened up and brought to light.

Allow yourself to be enchanted and surprised in the process.

So, how many MBA programs should I apply to?

At this point in your school research, you know what you’re looking for in an MBA program, but what’s the magic number? How many is too many and how many is not enough?

Deciding how many schools to apply to is another often shortchanged step in the pre-application process. It’s something that people seem to think just happens. And it will just happen, but not necessarily in an advantageous way, unless you take control of the process. Your specific situation and needs should drive your choice of how many schools to apply to – in each category: [url=https://blog.accepted.com/reaches-on-pars-and-safeties/]reasonable reach, on-par, and safety[/url]. Having a clear idea before you start your applications of how many schools you’ll be targeting will help you plan and allocate your resources. (By “number” I mean roughly; a short range such as “five or six” is fine.

How many business schools to apply to: Let’s talk numbers

A “typical” applicant would apply to about five or six programs: 2-3 reasonable reaches, 2-3 on-pars, and 1-2 safeties. The rationale for this scenario is that it yields a decent possibility of acceptance at a reach, likelihood of acceptance at an on-par program, and certainty through the safety.

This typical case doesn’t apply to a lot of people though. Here are some common exceptions:

[list]
[*]You’re on the older side, so getting in this year is essential – next year you will be solidly in EMBA territory. Consider applying to more programs – as many as you can manage.[/*]
[*]You’re fairly young, have a spectacular career and stats, and don’t think it makes sense to take off two years now if it’s not HBS or Stanford. You should apply to those two only, because you can reapply next year if need be without worrying about age.[/*]
[*]The brands you require are all reaches, some reasonable and some almost out of reach. It wouldn’t be worth it to you to attend other programs. Apply to as many as you can that fit your criteria and offer some realistic hope of acceptance to increase the possibility of a hit.[/*]
[*]You are applying with a handicap – a DUI or honor code infraction, were fired for cause, etc. If you [url=https://blog.accepted.com/your-past-doesnt-define-you-episode-209/]write a frank and compelling essay about growing from the situation[/url] (and if it didn’t happen yesterday), you should have a shot. But because it’s such an unpredictable factor and adcoms often react defensively, apply to more schools than you otherwise would need to.[/*]
[*]You’re unsettled about geographic region and want to keep options open. Apply to more programs to keep options open.[/*]
[*]You’re pressed for time. Maybe you can’t devote more than two hours a week, or maybe you must have all your apps done by a given deadline. Select a number that will allow you to deliver the strongest quality applications, even if it’s fewer than you would normally do under other circumstances.[/*]
[/list]

Last but not least, this number isn’t written in stone. The application process is dynamic, and you are not closing off opportunities by deciding on a number to target now.

Putting together your initial list of b-schools to apply to: Which MBA programs are right for me?

As you have gone through the previous steps in this process, a group of feasible and appealing programs most likely has evolved almost organically. It’s time to firm it up in preparation for the hands-on application process.

Break it down into categories

Establish your desired balance among our three categories: [url=https://blog.accepted.com/reaches-on-pars-and-safeties/]reach, on-par, and safety[/url], remembering that these categories have variations within them. Whether you are applying to ten programs or two, you should be clear about where each falls on this continuum vis-à-vis your profile. Out of the total number of programs you’ll apply to, how many do you want in each category, and why? Answer this question based on your previous evaluations, and make your list accordingly. This allocation should be deliberate and informed, not accidental.

Mix and match with your wants and needs

Now take the list of schools that meet your needs and, ideally, fulfill your important wants, and that also are viable targets (meaning, they are not out of reach), and sort these schools by reach, on-par, and safety.

If your research yielded more programs than you want to apply to, you’ll need to further whittle down the list. Which programs in a given category meet the most of your wants and/or best meet your needs? You can also factor in [url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/selectivity-index]where you have the better chance of admission[/url], since the programs within a category will vary in competitiveness.

Balance your scales

What if this process results in an imbalance? You wanted two reaches, three on-pars, and one safety. You ended up with no safeties, one on-par, and an overabundance of reaches. It’s not uncommon. Remember, competitiveness will vary within category. So some reaches might be close enough to on-par to almost fit in that category or straddle the two. If not, you have some hard choices to make:

[list]
[*]You can proceed with this less than ideal balance, fully aware of the situation and doing your best.[/*]
[*]You can research more programs: Look again at some you previously rejected and/or broaden your scope; maybe consider other geographic regions or part-time programs.[/*]
[/list]

Especially if you are applying to numerous programs, consider balance within categories as well, and try to widen your scope of programs. Say you’re a consultant. The majority of consultants will gravitate to the known consulting programs (e.g., Kellogg); but you’ll stand out more in programs renowned for other areas (e.g., [url=https://reports.accepted.com/mba/chicago_booth_mba]Chicago Booth[/url]). This balance within categories is especially helpful because the vicissitudes of the upcoming admissions season are still unknown. If a flood of consultants apply, your breadth of programs will be all the more important.

Now you should have your list of MBA programs. Or, I should say, your preliminary list. Since you continue to learn as you go through the application process, it’s quite possible that you will modify this list. This list should be firm but not rigid; you shouldn’t veer from it on a whim (otherwise, what would have been the point of all of this work?), but you should be open to change for a solid reason that engages your initial assumptions or preferences.

Two examples of how to choose which MBA programs to apply to

Let’s get practical. How can all of this information be practically applied? Here are two examples that illustrate how this school selection process works.

Example 1: Ted

Who is Ted?

[list]
[*]25-year-old American male of Korean ethnic background[/*]
[*]Industry: finance[/*]
[*]Work experience: two years as an investment banking analyst followed by one year in private equity[/*]
[*]Stats: combined GMAT score of 710 and a GPA (from a strong but not elite college) of 3.45[/*]
[*]Post-MBA goal: to return to his present employment at a higher level[/*]
[/list]

More about Ted

His career track record of impact and accomplishment is solid but not exceptional; similarly, he demonstrates clear but not outstanding leadership. His [url=https://blog.accepted.com/your-extracurricular-activities-in-your-mba-admissions-profile/]extracurricular activities[/url] are consistent but do not elicit a “wow.” MBA brand is important to him, but he accepts that he may not be competitive at Wharton or Columbia. Given his age, he would rather reapply (at least he knows where he can improve if need be – leadership, impact, and GMAT) than attend a program that does not excite him or that represents a steep compromise, and since no safety schools excite him, he selects only reaches and on-pars. Still, he’d love to get in this year, so he decides to apply to eight programs over Rounds 1 and Round 2 to widen his chances.

Which MBA programs does Ted apply to?

During his research he was surprised to find a few on-pars that interested him, and he put all three on his list:

[list]
[*]Georgetown McDonough (when he visited, he was unexpectedly thrilled by the extensive campus resources and the high caliber of students)[/*]
[*]USC Marshall (a lot more intense than he’d believed, and he was invigorated by the Asia focus)[/*]
[*]Cornell Johnson (where his private equity experience will be a slight differentiating factor, and Cornell actually straddles reach-level). [/*]
[/list]

The five reaches vary in competitiveness:

[list]
[*][url=https://reports.accepted.com/columbia_bschool_webinar]Columbia[/url][/*]
[*]Wharton[/*]
[*]Chicago Booth[/*]
[*]NYU Stern[/*]
[*]London Business School[/*]
[/list]

Example 2: Joyce

Who is Joyce?

[list]
[*]30-year-old female[/*]
[*]Work experience: a junior manager in manufacturing operations, with a record of solid advancement and leadership[/*]
[*]Stats: a GMAT score of 680; an undergrad GPA of 3.3 from a second-tier state school; and a graduate (supply chain and IT) GPA of 3.65 from the same school [/*]
[*]Extracurricular activities: significant leadership in her church[/*]
[*]Post-MBA goal: to acquire a mid-level management position in global operations at a top-tier manufacturer that will lead to senior management within several years[/*]
[/list]

More about Joyce

Joyce needs to get in this year because of her age, since she knows that chances of acceptance become increasingly difficult for each year after the age of 30. Her work experience is a strength, in part because women in operations are relatively few, but also because core manufacturing related experience isn’t highly represented in many programs. She doesn’t have the time, the resources, or in fact, the desire to apply to more than six schools, and she feels she should be able to gain acceptance to an exciting program if she approaches her list thoughtfully.

Which MBA programs does Joyce apply to?

Joyce targets two reaches:

[list]
[*]Michigan Ross[/*]
[*]MIT Sloan [/*]
[/list]

Two on-pars:

[list]
[*]Indiana Kelley [/*]
[*]CMU Tepper[/*]
[/list]

And two safeties:

[list]
[*]York Schulich (in Toronto)[/*]
[*]Purdue Krannert[/*]
[/list]

For both of the above hypothetical applicants, objective assessment of their profiles, thoughtful examination of their needs and wants, extensive school research, and consideration of the number of schools to apply to yield promising lists of targeted MBA programs.

Adapting your list of b-schools to apply to as the season progresses

As you know, your initial school list isn’t set in stone. It is a firm starting point that allows you to plan and to proceed efficiently and systematically through the often unwieldy application process.

As you progress through your applications, continuously assess and respond to any new developments that might warrant revising your list.

Examples of situations that may impact your school list:

[list]
[*][b]You receive evidence that your initial assessment of reaches, on-pars, and safeties was off.[/b][/*]
[/list]

If you applied to reaches and on-pars with competitive interviewing and you don’t receive interview invites even from schools you considered on-pars, it’s a sign that you may have miscalculated your competitiveness. On the other hand, [url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/services/interview-assistance]if you receive an interview invite[/url] from a high reach that you really didn’t expect, a reassessment might reveal the advisability of adding another reach or two in the second or third round. In either of these cases, revisit your list. Changing it may involve replacing some programs, or simply adding some.

[list]
[*][b]Your plans or needs change.[/b][/*]
[/list]

As the application season progresses, life goes on. Personal needs change: geography, partner and family issues, personal interests. Professional needs and goals change – perhaps you lost your job; perhaps a new healthcare project intrigued you and you now want to consult in this area. Revisit your list, see what works and what doesn’t, and adapt it accordingly.

[list]
[*][b]You encounter a program that appeals to you that you didn’t initially consider (like in the NYU Stern example earlier in this post).[/b][/*]
[/list]

Look at your list: Would this program replace another one on your list? Or would you want to add it? Either option is fine, depending on your needs and resources.

We’re here to help

By following the steps in this post, you will create a list of MBA programs that meet your needs and will yield admission to desirable programs. This systematic approach will also help you keep sane during the application process.

[b]You can significantly increase your chances of getting accepted by applying to the programs that are the best fit for your unique qualifications, goals, and preferences. Our [/b][url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/services/consulting?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=which_mba_program_is_right_for_me&utm_source=blog][b]MBA Admissions Consulting Services[/b][/url][b] will provide you with the one-on-one guidance you need to submit the best MBA applications to the best MBA programs for YOU! Are you ready to GET ACCEPTED?[/b]

[url=http://cta-redirect.hubspot.com/cta/redirect/58291/7de5e366-4f37-4aa9-8313-45a286c4665c][img]https://no-cache.hubspot.com/cta/default/58291/7de5e366-4f37-4aa9-8313-45a286c4665c.png[/img][/url]

[img]https://blog.accepted.com/cindy-tokumitsu-accepted-consultant/[/img]
Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 20 years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. [url=https://www.accepted.com/service-request-cindy?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=blog_bio_cindy&utm_source=blog][b]Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch![/b][/url]

 

[b]Related Resources:[/b]

[list]
[*][url=https://reports.accepted.com/9-secrets-to-stand-out]9 Secrets to Standing Out[/url], an MBA Admissions Guide[/*]
[*][url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/what-is-business-school-like]Interviews With Current MBA Students[/url][/*]
[*][url=https://blog.accepted.com/harvard-stanford-wharton-whats-the-difference/]Harvard, Stanford, Wharton: What’s the Difference?[/url], a short video[/*]
[/list]

Tags: [url=https://blog.accepted.com/category/mba-admissions/]MBA Admissions[/url]

The post [url=https://blog.accepted.com/which-mba-program-is-right-for-me-the-ultimate-guide-to-choosing-an-mba-program/]Which MBA Program is Right for Me? The Ultimate Guide to Choosing an MBA Program[/url] appeared first on [url=https://blog.accepted.com]Accepted Admissions Blog[/url].
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

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From the Mouths of MBA Adcom Members: How to Get Accepted  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jan 2020, 12:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: From the Mouths of MBA Adcom Members: How to Get Accepted
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https://blog.accepted.com/listen-mba/Looking for the best possible admissions advice?

How about admissions advice from the admission committee members themselves?

Linda Abraham, founder of Accepted and host of the Admissions Straight Talk Podcast has a collection of highly enlightening interviews with directors of admissions and adcom members of top business schools!

Listen in as Linda asks her adcom guests pointed and to-the-point questions about the school, the admissions process, how to get in, and…how to get rejected.

Listen, enjoy, and apply successfully!

 

Wharton
Blair Mannix, Director of Admissions

NYU Stern
Rabia Ahmed, Executive Director of Strategic Marketing & Admissions

Yale SOM
Bruce DelMonico, Assistant Dean and Director of Admissions

Wharton-Lauder
Kara Keenan Sweeney, Director of Admissions, Marketing, & Financial Aid

Duke Fuqua
Shari Hubert, Associate Dean of Admissions

Kellogg
Kate Smith, Assistant Dean of Admissions

HEC Paris
Dr. Andrea Masini, Associate Dean

Michigan Ross Online MBA
Dr. Wally Hopp, Associate Dean for Part-Time MBA, & Anne Schoen, Associate Admissions Director, Part-Time MBA Programs

Toronto Rotman
Imran Kanga, Director of Recruitment & Admissions

INSEAD
Virginie Fougea, Director of MBA Admissions

Georgetown McDonough
Shelly Heinrich, Interim Associate Dean for MBA Admissions

Michigan Ross
Soojin Kwon, Managing Director of the Fulltime MBA Program & Diana Economy, Director of Fulltime Admissions

USC Marshall
Kellee Scott, Senior Associate Director

Dartmouth Tuck
Luke Pena, Executive Director of Admissions & Financial Aid

MIT Sloan
Dawna Levenson, Director of Admissions

Vanderbilt
Christie St. John, Director of Admissions

Cornell Johnson
Judi Byers, Executive Director of Admissions & Financial Aid

UCLA Anderson
Alex Lawrence, Assistant Dean of MBA Admissions & Fin Aid

UC Berkeley Haas
Peter Johnson, Assistant Dean

For a varied menu of thought-provoking and informative conversations with business leaders, entrepreneurs, MBA students, and more, check out the Admissions Straight Talk Podcast:

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post From the Mouths of MBA Adcom Members: How to Get Accepted appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

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Ask the Experts: How to Get Accepted to a Top EMBA Program  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jan 2020, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Ask the Experts: How to Get Accepted to a Top EMBA Program
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Interview with Accepted MBA/EMBA admissions consultants, Cindy Tokumitsu and Jen Weld [Show summary]

Should you apply to an Executive MBA program or a regular MBA program? And if you decide on the Executive MBA, what do you need to do to get in?  And which EMBA should you apply to? These are the questions that we are going to address with today’s guests, Accepted’s EMBA experts, Cindy Tokumitsu and Jen Weld.

Admissions consultants share tips for crafting an acceptance-worthy EMBA application [Show notes]

Our guests today, Cindy Tokumitsu and Jennifer Weld, are both Accepted consultants. Cindy joined Accepted in 1998. Since then she has carved out a niche for herself working with EMBA and older MBA applicants. She is the author of Ace the EMBA and Top Executive MBA Program Essay Questions: How to Answer Them Right. Jen Weld served for four years on the Cornell Executive MBA admissions committee and later joined Accepted in 2010. She has authored numerous blog posts on MBA and EMBA admissions including the new free guide, Perfect Answers to MBA Interview Questions.

Let’s say I’m in my early to mid 30’s and I’m in middle management and have c-suite ambitions. I have a fairly strong technical background. Should I apply for an MBA or an EMBA and why? [2:51]

Cindy: Linda, you mentioned early-30s and mid-30s, and for MBA programs I think there is a big difference between them. Early 30s is still the upper range of full-time MBAs, whereas mid-30s is really getting out of the full-time range, but also may be even early for an EMBA program. You need to look at what programs are looking at to see whether you qualify. EMBA programs sometimes want a certain level of experience and specifically managerial experience so it is important to consider that.

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Jen: It also can depend on whether or not you are interested in changing industries or job functions to get to a C-suite eventually. A full-time MBA can advantage you if you are a career switcher, but if you are continuing on with your organization or job function an EMBA might make more sense.

[youtube2]figure>

[/youtube2]

What makes for a great EMBA application? [8:33]

Jen: Great essays! On an admission committee, you look at hundreds of applications in a season, and over the course of your career you will look at thousands if not tens of thousands.  You get good at being able to tell quickly if you are going to want to learn more about this person or if this is another “yawn-your-way-through” kind of application. I tell my clients to think about what about your essay will make an adcom member leap out of their chair and want to meet you. No doubt any number of business examples could answer an essay question, but some stand out more from an impact and audience perspective. Think of someone who doesn’t have your technical skillset – how can you bring your achievement to life in a way that helps the adcom not only understand it but also want to learn more about it.

Cindy: I agree 1000%. That sense of engagement with the essay. Engagement is a word I use a lot. The essays are precious real estate, so make sure your personality comes through and ideas and thoughts come through. It is not a place to summarize your career or show you are qualified, that is a waste. Be strategic but let your voice and instinct come through as well.

How does an EMBA student’s part-time status (or full-time job) affect the application process? [11:51]

Cindy: It is important to remember that what you are doing day-to-day in your job is what you will bringing to your classroom, team, and study group, so show that in your application, usually through the essays. Give a glimpse of some of the challenges you have, essentially provide a lens into your day to day role. Also make sure that due to the fact the program is part-time you are prepared to demonstrate or express that you are able to handle that additional work and responsibility.

Jen: I agree. There are some programs that expressly ask about the commitment in the application process. I always asked in my interview, “What gives you heartburn about joining the program?” If someone said, “Nothing,” that really gave me pause – they really had no idea what they were in for. This is an extra 20 hours a week on top of a busy work and personal life. It can be mind boggling.

On the other side though, there are some rewards. There are several Cornell students I have kept in touch with over the years and universally they say after they graduate, “I have so much free time on my hands now I don’t know what to do with myself, I’m going to have to take up three new hobbies!” So, by the end of the program your time management skills are going to be top notch, and you will reap that intangible benefit when you graduate.

How do you recommend applicants address adding the program in to their already busy lives? [15:43]

Jen: If it’s not asked specifically in an application you don’t have to weave it in but be prepared to answer it in an interview. Have you talked to your manager about offloading work, or your family about commitments that will have to go by the wayside, or are you pulling back from volunteer work to address the oncoming challenge? Think about it upfront.

Cindy: I always include it in the interview prep and counsel people to be specific. Give a few examples of what you will change, concrete things you will change in your life to be able to fully participate in the program.

<< Click here to schedule a mock interview and feedback session with an EMBA admissions expert. >>

MBA applicants sometimes struggle to fit in all that they want to tell admissions committees. EMBA applicants have so many more years of experience that the challenge can be even greater. How do you advise EMBA applicants to distill their experience into succinct stories and sound bites? [17:30]

Cindy: Don’t try to fit it all in, think about the 2-3 things you have to communicate, that will make your application be strong and focused. What is your message. Be disciplined, focus on those, and go into a little depth in those areas.

Jen: I always started with the resume when I went through applications, which is common for many adcom members, so I help my clients to have the most impactful and useful resume possible. If someone has a very technical background, I’ll encourage them to strip out the technical components that someone without a tech background wouldn’t understand, and make sure the resume is accomplishment-based. In that sense the reader will already have an idea of how impressive you are, and the rest of the application can build the 360 view rather than relying on the essays to do that for you.

What do you find is the biggest challenge your EMBA clients face and how do you help them overcome it? [19:41]

Jen: Can I really do this? There never seems to be the right time. It’s kind of the same situation with starting a family – there will never be the “perfect” time. EMBA application cycles are often very flexible and accept applications late in the process, maybe even as late as 1-2 months before, as applicants are still trying to put their ducks in a row in terms of the whole process. I am not encouraging this, but admissions offices are pretty flexible and do offer a deferral for a certain period of time, so if circumstances change, that could be an option.

Cindy: What I find is that applicants are so involved in their day to day work, and their application relates to that. It can be hard to step out to see things holistically and strategically. I encourage my clients to try and get a little distance, take a strategic look, and develop a message and focus so they are not just talking about “stuff.” I really like that EMBA adcoms are so helpful, which is so different from full-time programs – there are so many opportunities to engage, they are so willing to take a call, answer a question, and sometimes even offer an extension.

Any tips for the EMBA interview? [23:26]

Cindy: Practice! EMBA applicants are very sophisticated and have great communications skills, but for many it has been a long time since being in that particular seat. Sometimes the most polished people struggle the most through a mock interview. My advice for essays applies to the interview as well – be specific, have anecdotes ready.

Jen: There aren’t going to be any gotcha questions. They are often conducted on much more of a peer to peer basis and are more based on fit than anything else. It’s verifying that what you see in the application is what you see in person, so bring your application to life.

Any last words of advice for EMBA applicants? [25:46]

Jen: If at all possible, visit the programs There is no substitute for sitting in on classes, meeting students, and seeing if it is a good fit. If you can’t make it to campus, at least talk to alums or current students because you need a flavor of the program. It is so much time and so much money and you don’t want to make a mistake.

Cindy: I totally agree. Most EMBA applications have a goals essay and are sometimes longer than the full-time MBA application. Try to include both the practical information, but also some vision for what you want to achieve that inspires or motivates you.

What would you have liked me to ask you? [28:00]

Cindy: I think you covered the key points. People have a lot of questions about whether or not they have enough extracurriculars, but at this point go with your strengths.

Jen: There is a lot of pressure that rankings really matter. I go back to the earlier challenge to visit the program. Any of the top 25 programs will provide an excellent education. There are so many different formats – three Saturdays a month, every other Fri/Sat, one week a month, and proper fit is more important than that ranking “thing.” Ultimately, are they people you will enjoy being with for two years and being your network, and will they help you achieve your goals? That is what is important.

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The post How to Get Accepted to a Top EMBA Program: The Experts Speak [Episode 348] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
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310-815-9553

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Ask the Experts: How to Get Accepted to a Top EMBA Program   [#permalink] 21 Jan 2020, 09:01

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