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Low GMAT Score? Don’t Panic…Yet. [#permalink]

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New post 25 Mar 2016, 11:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Low GMAT Score? Don’t Panic…Yet.
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Look at your scores in the context of a bigger picture.

A low GMAT score or a low GPA is not necessarily an MBA deal breaker. No adcom is going to admit or dismiss a candidate based solely on one semester’s poor GPA or a low verbal GMAT score without also reflecting on other numbers as well as the rest of the non-quantitative parts of the applicant’s profile.

Average numbers vary according to school, as well as numbers within your demographic group. You should examine each of these aspects and weigh the strengths and weaknesses in your application before you can really start to worry. And if your stats are worth worrying about, then it’s time we get to work and address these concerns!

How Low Can You Go? It Depends

Certain numbers will be significant hurdles. Say, for instance, you have a GPA of 2.9 and your top choice MBA program’s GPA average is 3.5. In this case, your chances of acceptance have just taken a major hit. If, on the other hand, that same applicant applies to a b-school with a GPA average of 3.2, then he or she may have a chance of acceptance, provided, the rest of the application is solid, or better yet, above average.

Here’s another “it depends” situation: Overrepresented demographics – Indian engineers or investment bankers from overrepresented ethnicities – will have a harder time getting into a top MBA program than a corporate finance executive from an underrepresented background with the same stats. In such a case, a GMAT score in the lower part of the school’s 80% range and a GPA of 3.3 may be just too low for one person and just high enough for another.

Your Score + Yourself = A Balancing Act

You need to examine the details of your scores and reflect on them in the context of a bigger picture. Ask yourself these questions:

• Is one score low, but balanced out by other higher numbers? Can you provide other evidence of academic ability?

• Did your overall GPA improve as you matured through the college experience?

• Do you have flawlessly-written, compelling essays that prove your strong writing and communication skills despite a somewhat lower-than-average GMAT verbal score?

• Do you offer specific examples and anecdotes in your essays that highlight your quantitative skills, even though your GMAT quant scores weren’t as high as you’d like?

• Do your recommenders vouch for your abilities—especially ones that the numbers don’t reveal?

• Have you chosen schools that will view your scores as competitive?

• Have you taken additional college courses in an attempt to boost your quant or verbal capabilities?

• Have you written the optional essay to further boost your competitive edge?

You need to assess and interpret how you’ll be perceived with such scores and numbers, and then develop an application strategy to address those issues.

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Related Resources:

• Handling a Low GMAT Verbal Score

• Handling a Low GMAT Quant Score

• GMAT, GRE, SAT, and All Things Test Prep

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Low GMAT Score? Don’t Panic…Yet. appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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3 Tips for Handling a Low GMAT Quant Score [#permalink]

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New post 27 Mar 2016, 11:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 3 Tips for Handling a Low GMAT Quant Score
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A low quant score on the GMAT (at the lower end of the school’s 80% range) is never good news, but it doesn’t equal immediate rejection. As I’ve mentioned in the past, no single score is scrutinized independently, but rather your entire profile is examined as a unified package.

WWAS (What Would Adcom Say)?

Interpret your scores as an adcom member would and ask yourself these questions:

• Is the rest of your profile stellar?

• Do you have solid grades in quant-related courses?

• Is it possible that you’re just not great at standardized tests?

• Is your score perhaps not so low for people in your demographic group?

• Are you applying to schools where the average GMAT score is not far off from your lower-than-you-would’ve-wished score?

If you answered “yes” to any of the above, then you have a chance!

3 Steps to Despite-Low-Quant-GMAT Success

The following 3 tips will help you overcome the odds and present a strong case of acceptance to a top b-school, despite your lower-than-desired quant stats.

[b]1. Do more. Do better.[/b]

You MUST improve your quantitative abilities or demonstrate that you have them in some other way. In b-school and in the business world at large, knowing how to crunch numbers is essential. You’ll need to act quickly to show you are equipped for a spot in their next b-school class. Enroll in a calculus, statistics, and/or accounting class at your local community college ASAP. Make sure you have the prerequisite skills; you will need to earn an A! If you have time, also take additional quant-oriented courses, like finance or economics.

[b]2. Highlight your quant abilities[/b]

In your resume and essays, highlight quantitative aspects of your work to further demonstrate your quant proficiency. Use vivid details, examples, and anecdotes that will prove to the adcoms that your low quant score was a fluke, and that it’s clear to you and those who work with you that there are no quant problems here.

[b]3. Let your recommenders get the job done[/b]

Ask your recommenders to highlight your quantitative achievements as well. Having a respected third-party vouch for your skill will help you immensely.

Remember, your scores don’t exist in a vacuum. With the right moves, you can overcome this weakness and still present a super strong MBA application.

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Related Resources:

• Handling a Low GMAT Verbal Score

• MBA Admissions Tip: Dealing with a Low GPA

• Low GMAT Score? Don’t Panic…Yet.

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post 3 Tips for Handling a Low GMAT Quant Score appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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NYU Stern 2016 Executive MBA Essay Tips [#permalink]

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New post 27 Mar 2016, 11:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: NYU Stern 2016 Executive MBA Essay Tips
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Reflecting the character of the university at large, NYU Stern has always sought applicants who bring not just requisite accomplishment, but also intellectual energy and engagement with the world – people who have a point of view and are willing to express it. Stern’s EMBA essay questions are consistent with these values. While they cover the standard concerns, they also draw out your ability to self-reflect and to understand yourself in relation to others and to the world. The key to acing these essays is to present a point of view, a message, a distinctive perspective that will enrich the EMBA community at NYU Stern.

Essays:

1. Describe your short- and long-term career goals and how the NYU Stern Executive MBA program will help you accomplish them. (750 word limit, double-spaced)

One simple, straightforward, and effective way to structure this essay is to start with where you are in your career now. This opening sets the context and conveys a bit about your current situation, emphasizing what is impressive and/or distinctive about it. Then discuss how the EMBA education will enable you to achieve your immediate goals in your current role and later your intermediate and longer-term goals, which should logically flow out of this present role.

In describing your goals, clarify why you want to take that step or assume that role. Add more detail for your short-term and intermediate goals. In discussing how the program will benefit you, describe the skills and knowledge you need to acquire and how the program provides them. Also refer to the structure, curriculum, and/or special features of the program, noting how you will benefit from them. Finally, resist the temptation to detail your career progress — limit yourself to points relevant to your goals.

2. NYU Stern is committed to helping students develop a deeper set of professional skills and a broader perspective of the role of business in the world. (750 word limit, double-spaced)

a. What is a significant contemporary issue on which you, as a business leader, would like to have an impact?

b. Why is it important to you?

c. How could you leverage your skills and resources to address the issue?

The most important advice here: select an issue that you truly care about (and are knowledgeable about). You may research some fine points, but responses to this question that are entirely constructed of research on a topic don’t work.

A simple and effective structure for this essay is to follow the a-b-c structure. First talk about the issue in personal as well as objective terms, i.e., how you came to learn and/or care about it, perhaps what experience you’ve had with it if relevant. Take a stand; avoid being bland or abstract. Then describe how as a business leader you can address this issue in concrete terms. This last part will vary greatly from person to person – for some your work will directly address this issue; for others work will be divorced from it, and you will indirectly use your business leadership role as a bully pulpit, as a prominent and influential community leader/volunteer, etc.

Optional Additional Information Essay: Please provide any additional information of which you would like the Admissions Committee to be aware. This may include additional details on your academic/quantitative preparedness through educational or professional experience, further explanation of academic history, current or past gaps in employment, or any other information relevant to your application. (500 word limit, double-spaced)

This question’s wording indicates that you can use it not just to explain a problem (low GMAT, employment gap) but also to present new material that you think will enhance your application. However, if you are making the adcom read more than is required, there should be a darn good reason; not just a nice-to-know.

First, succinctly explain any points that need explaining. Then, if there is something you feel is important that you haven’t had a chance to discuss elsewhere, write about it, noting why it’s essential to a full understanding of your candidacy.

Optional Scholarship Essay: NYU Stern has a strong reputation for fostering entrepreneurial spirit. Imagine the NYU Stern Executive MBA Admissions Committee is a group of potential investors, representing a broad spectrum of stakeholders. Why should the Admissions Committee invest in you as a global business leader?  Be sure to articulate your competitive advantage, as well as the personal and professional qualities that make you the most compelling candidate for an NYU Stern Executive MBA program scholarship. (500 word limit, double-spaced)

This essay is essentially your portrait – your candidacy at a glance. Do not just list accomplishments that repeat your resume or the goals in essay 1. Also, don’t present every possible reason you think the adcom should invest in you. Focus on those few points that (a) are really distinctive and relevant to the MBA and/or (b) support your goals directly or indirectly and also (c) enhance rather than repeat the application. Developing an overarching message or theme for this essay before you write it will help you shape and select the content.

Deadlines:

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By Cindy Tokumitsu, co-author of The EMBA Edge, and author of the free special report, Ace the EMBA. Cindy has helped MBA applicants get accepted to top EMBA programs around the world. She is delighted to help you too!

Related Resources:

• School-Specific EMBA Application Essay Tips

• NYU Stern 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

U.S. News Top EMBA Programs 2016

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post NYU Stern 2016 Executive MBA Essay Tips appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Harvard Business School Appoints New Admissions Director [#permalink]

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New post 28 Mar 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Harvard Business School Appoints New Admissions Director
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On Thursday, Harvard Business School announced that starting this June, Chad Losee (MBA 2013) will serve as the program’s new Managing Director of MBA Admissions & Financial Aid. Losee will succeed Dee Leopold (MBA 1980), who has held this position since 2006 and who will remain Program Director for the 2+2 program.

The HBS Baker Scholar (an honor awarded to the top 5% of the class), graduated in 2008 from the Brigham Young University’s Honors Program, where he earned a BA in international relations summa cum laude.

After graduating from HBS, he worked for a year in the Dean’s Office as an HBS Fellow, during which time he helped launch HBX, a digital learning platform, worked on developing an HBX course on Disruptive Strategy, and co-led the exam and credential strategy for the Credential of Readiness (COR).

After serving as an Admissions Ambassador as an HBS student, Losee later acted as an observer with the HBS admissions board, where he’d evaluate prospective students during interviews.

Losee worked at Bain & Company’s Dallas office pre-HBS from 2008 to 2011, and then after receiving his MBA in 2014. In 2012, he spent some time in the BYU-Idaho president’s office as a summer associate, where he led campus-wide initiatives for students, faculty, and administrative leaders.

“I am a real believer in Harvard Business School’s mission to educate leaders who make a difference in the world,” says Losee. “I’ve seen firsthand how my classmates, the amazing body of HBS alumni, and the outstanding faculty and staff all strive to shape the world around them for the better. The experience of a two-year, full-time MBA at HBS continues to have a great impact on me personally and as a leader. My goal as Dee’s successor is to make sure that each diverse MBA class continues to have a transformative experience at HBS and go on to make a real difference in the world.”

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Related Resources:

• Harvard MBA, 2+2 and How to Get In

• Harvard Business School 2016 Essay Tips & Deadlines

• Two Years After My Harvard MBA

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Harvard Business School Appoints New Admissions Director appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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What?! You Have a Low GMAT/GPA Score… [#permalink]

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New post 28 Mar 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: What?! You Have a Low GMAT/GPA Score…
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…and still haven’t signed up for our upcoming webinar Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats?

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Well consider this post your personal reminder to reserve an hour of your time and attend THE webinar that will help you overcome your less-than-desirable GPA or GMAT score and apply successfully to your top choice MBA programs!

The Info:

Date: Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Time: 10am PT/1pm ET

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Registration link: Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats (Registration is free, but required.)

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post What?! You Have a Low GMAT/GPA Score… appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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MBA Applicants: Start Your Engines! [#permalink]

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New post 29 Mar 2016, 11:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: MBA Applicants: Start Your Engines!
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You can feel it in the air: the excitement of the just-published US News and other business-school rankings, the proud chatter of accepted candidates on MBA forums worldwide, the articles speculating on just how many more people will apply to business school this year and how acceptance rates seem to be getting lower and lower. Whether you’re a first-time MBA applicant, a reapplicant (or re-reapplicant), or even if you haven’t yet decided if you’ll be applying this year, it’s time to start doing some deep thinking about your candidacy.

The sooner you start your MBA engines, the more successful your ride will be. Head to the starting line and with the following tips get ready…get set…and go!

[b]1. Build your experience – now. [/b]

Yes, the GMAT is important. And yes, where you went to college is (somewhat less) important. But what truly distinguishes successful applicants from unsuccessful ones is this: their professional and extracurricular experience.

B-schools love to admit proactive candidates, and it’s never too late to volunteer for new experiences at work and in other roles. Is there a cool new initiative that requires as many hands as possible? Sign up for it. Are there opportunities to reach across functional lines, maybe to find new customers or reposition products and services? Go for it. It doesn’t even have to be within your current workplace. Especially for applicants without formal business experience, having something to say in this domain can go a long way to setting you apart. For example, maybe you have an IT/engineering background and have been involved in friends’ startups, advising them on tech strategy, operations, and other key components. Be creative – it’s a key skill for any aspiring MBA.

And this doesn’t just apply to experiences in the workplace. It’s never too late to add to your outside-of-work experience too. You may not have time to establish a new non-profit, but you can certainly contribute your time to existing service efforts (they don’t seem to have quotas on volunteers!).

[b]2. Clarify your goals. [/b]

If you’re applying to business school, then you need to have goals. Ideally you’ll be able to lay out what you’d like to do immediately post-MBA and in the longer-term, and why.

Don’t be lazy on this point – “I’d like to be a management consultant and eventually an entrepreneur” is simply not specific enough.

Why are you interested in consulting? Maybe you’re already a tech consultant or love problem-solving in multiple domains. What firms would you like to work with? McKinsey, BCG, and Bain are the usual suspects, but think more broadly too. Are you big on operations? Then Booz Allen or A.T. Kearney may be great fits. Do you come from a healthcare background? Then ZS Associates may be worth mentioning. You’ll want to mention firms that recruit at the school in question.

For the long-term goal, you may not have to be quite as specific, but you should still try to paint a clear picture. If it’s entrepreneurship, why? Ideally you have some entrepreneurial experience already or can demonstrate your passion for the field in some other way. What type of business would you like to establish? Why? What trends suggest this is a “hot” area? Ask yourself these questions and work on developing concise, detailed answers.

[b]3. Start thinking in stories. [/b]

Story is a highly powerful tool that’s too often overlooked in the business world and elsewhere. If the schools weren’t interested in your stories, then they would only look at your grades, GMAT, and resume.

But they want to know why you’re interested in an MBA and how you achieved what’s on your resume. They want to know what obstacles you faced at work and, sometimes, in your personal life. They want to know what lessons you learned.

Frankly, they want to know if you can tell a good (true) story; holding your audience’s attention is a critical skill, whether that audience is made up of classmates, professors, future colleagues, shareholders, boards, or Congress.

So think about what went into that great project management experience or consulting engagement or fundraising effort. What would be a good way to open the story? What were the obstacles you faced and how did you overcome them? What was the ending? Great stories aren’t just for novels or movies.

Do you need more help starting your MBA engine? Check out our 1-on-1 consulting & editing services to learn more about how we can help you get accepted.

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Related Resources:

Why MBA? (free guide)

• Why Extracurriculars Activities Make a Difference

• Writing About Overcoming Obstacles in Your Application Essays

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post MBA Applicants: Start Your Engines! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Haas, McCombs, and Case Interviews [#permalink]

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New post 30 Mar 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Haas, McCombs, and Case Interviews
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This week, join us for a discussion about Haas, McCombs, consulting, and case interviews.

Meet Erin Robinson, Destin Whitehurst, and Robin Ligon, the team behind Consulting Interview Coach. [0:45]

All three have extensive experience in consulting prior to starting their MBAs – Erin and Destin at Deloitte and Robin at McKenzie. And all three are currently first-year MBA students – Erin and Robin at Haas, and Destin at McCombs. Welcome!

What is Consulting Interview Coach? [1:30]

It’s an interview training service to prepare candidates for the case interview method. They also provide behavioral interview prep, resume and cover letter review. All three coaches have experience as recruiters and consultants.

How did they found this company? [2:43]

Destin and Erin started the company. They were thinking about ways to give back and help other candidates while also creating a venture during b-school. And they wanted something that would draw on their consulting skills. Robin joined the company this year – he had previously worked with candidates in Belgium.

What are firms looking for? [4:50]

The case interview screens for intellectual horsepower and problem solving skills – there’s not always a right answer to the question. The other big point of the interview is identifying candidates’ cultural fit with the firm. Some of that also comes across in a behavioral interview or in networking events. (And it’s one reason why networking events are important – so that candidates can get a read on the firm’s culture and understand whether it’s a good fit.)

Since “culture” can sound intangible, what are some ways to understand it? [6:45]

The firm’s work culture has to do with how consultants operate — whether they take a more academic approach, more time doing research, etc, or spend more time in the field with the client, for example. Another aspect is the tone of the work interaction: competitive? Cooperative? Team-oriented? Networking events can help you get a feel for firm’s corporate culture.

Their book: 20 Days to Ace the Case [10:00]

It’s a 20-day boot camp to prep for the case interview. (It also contains advice about consulting in general.) The book features industry insights, firm profiles, etc. It provides a structure for candidates. Their preparation strategy focuses on critical thinking, not memorization – the goal is to fit the framework to the case, not the case to the framework. They also provide profiles of successful candidates, networking tips, behavioral interview tips, etc.

Does the book give cultural insight on firms? [13:25]

It lets consultants speak about their experiences. But networking is really the best way to learn a firm’s culture.

Robin and Erin are first years at Haas. What’s going well and has met/exceeded expectations? [14:22]

Robin: The professors are really accessible, the classmates are great, and the location is ideal.

Erin: The way the classes are taught (discussion more than lecture) allows for exciting exchange of perspectives. And the class is diverse.

Anything they would change/improve? [17:30]

Erin: Because Berkeley’s a public university, it can be a little resource constrained.

Robin: There can be some extra challenges for international students.

Destin is a first-year student at McCombs. What’s going well and has met/exceeded expectations? [19:00]

There are great opportunities for experiential learning. Austin is a start-up hub, and there’s great support from professors and the community for entrepreneurs.

Anything he would change/improve? [20:40]

He wishes the school would try to brand itself as an entrepreneurial school.

Any surprises in b-school so far? [21:40]

Robin: The small size of the program at Haas makes it intimate and integrated. The profs are really approachable – it’s a great opportunity to have drinks/dinner with top scholars.

Destin: Working in consulting, the long hours didn’t allow me to spend time on personal interests. So having time to explore opportunities is exciting.

Erin: Adapting to change is never easy – moving to a new part of the country and adapting to a new place and lifestyle is a process.

Any unique challenges for international MBAs? [24:40]

Robin: UC Berkeley has a great international office, providing help with visas, etc. But coming to the US as an international student is a long administrative process. And finding an internship without a green card is a little challenging, since many companies prefer candidates who have permanent residency.

Pre-MBA, Erin spent 4 months at Bodhi Surf School in Costa Rica, surfing and doing yoga. [26:40]

She knew she wanted a break from consulting, pre-grad school, and this was the lifestyle change she’d been looking for. The experience taught her about personally taking risks. Destin went as well.

Common pop culture misconceptions about consulting? [30:30]

1. The glamorous lifestyle. Most consultants aren’t living it up in luxury hotels on the beach.

2. The theme of tricking clients into paying more. In fact, the process is about solving problems together with the client.

What mistakes do candidates make during recruiting? [32:20]

Robin: Not being humble enough or friendly enough. Remember that the recruiters are looking for people they want to work with, not just the smartest people.

Erin: Not laying groundwork. The networking you do before the interview is important – building advocates in the firm.

Destin: Many candidates are afraid to practice live interviews. Doing mock interviews is vital – it helps you be more relaxed and natural.

Advice for MBA applicants [36:45]

Erin: Self-reflection. You need to know exactly what you want to get out of the MBA process.

Destin: Give the application process everything you have. Prepare for the GMAT/GRE and get the best score you can; research schools. Put yourself in the best position for success.

Future plans post-MBA [39:35]

Robin: Plans to return to McKinsey

Destin: Hopes to pursue entrepreneurship but may return to consulting

Erin: Plans to return to consulting but in a new area: social impact. Also concerned with women’s leadership and wants to continue working on that.

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Relevant Links:

• Consulting Interview Services

The Case Interview: 20 Days to Ace the Case

What’s it Really Like for Women in Consulting?

Is ‘House of Lies’ an accurate portrayal of management consulting?

• Business School Interviews – Resource Page

MBA Interview Prep – Free Guide

Consulting at Top MBA Programs

Consultants, Here’s a Guide Written Specifically for You!

Related Shows:

• The Lauder Institute Changes to Reflect the World

• The Schwarzman Scholars Program: Leaders of the Future Unite

• An HBS Student Helping HBS Applicants

• What’s Important In MBA Admissions? With Rotman’s Niki da Silva• Linda Abraham’s Admissions Assortmenthttp://blog.accepted.com/2015/09/24/whats-really-important-in-mba-admissions-interview-with-rotmans-niki-da-silva/• How to Become a Management Consultant

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, MBA Admissions

The post Haas, McCombs, and Case Interviews [Episode 147] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
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Accepted Applicants: Got 2 Minutes? Help Us Out & Help Fellow Applican [#permalink]

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New post 30 Mar 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Accepted Applicants: Got 2 Minutes? Help Us Out & Help Fellow Applicants
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The AIGAC survey will be closing on Saturday, April 30th, which means you’re running out of time to participate in this important research endeavor AND you may lose your chance at winning $500!

Share your application experience with us now by filling out this survey – it’ll take you just a few minutes and will help business schools, consultants, and applicants alike.

The survey is for admitted students who will be starting business school in August/September 2016.

Do your part. Take the survey now.

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Accepted Applicants: Got 2 Minutes? Help Us Out & Help Fellow Applicants appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
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Updated EMBA Guide Available! [#permalink]

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New post 31 Mar 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Updated EMBA Guide Available!
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Are you looking for the most up-to-date advice on optimizing your EMBA application? You’ve come to the right place!

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We’ve just updated and expanded our bestselling EMBA admissions guide, Ace the EMBA: Expert Advice for the Rising Executive, bringing you new, up-to-date tips on how to create an outstanding EMBA application, with a detailed focus on the following topics:

• Assessing your qualifications

• Taking the GMAT

• Securing company sponsorship

• Choosing the best program for you

• Planning for future employment

• Differentiating yourself from the crowd of other highly qualified applicants

Grab your free copy of Ace the EMBA: Expert Advice for the Rising Executive now to increase your chances of getting accepted.

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Updated EMBA Guide Available! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
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3 Tips for Handling a Low GMAT Verbal Score [#permalink]

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New post 31 Mar 2016, 11:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 3 Tips for Handling a Low GMAT Verbal Score
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Highlight your solid communication skills.

Recently I talked about overcoming the challenge of a low GMAT quant score. Today we’ll discuss how to handle a less-than-perfect verbal GMAT score (in the bottom of the 80% range or lower for your target programs).

With such a strong emphasis on teamwork and communication in b-school (and for the rest of your life as a successful businessperson), it’s no wonder that stellar written and spoken verbal skills are essential for MBA students.

Here are 3 things you can do if you’re worried that your low verbal score may interfere with your chances of acceptance:

[b]1. Demonstrate the power of the written word[/b]

You must construct expressive, flawlessly written essays. Maybe you couldn’t prove your verbal abilities with your test performance, but now’s your final opportunity to put your best verbal foot forward. Be sure to include examples and anecdotes that highlight your solid communication skills, so that you don’t just have well-written essays, but that the content speaks to your verbal strengths as well.

[b]2. Boost your verbal skills resume[/b]

You can enroll in additional writing and/or communications courses at a local college (and earn A’s). This option is particularly important if you’ve received low grades in your college English courses in addition to scoring poorly on the GMAT. Public speaking clubs, debate teams, and other activities, roles, or events for which you’ve stepped up and proven your strong communication skills are all noteworthy items worth focusing on.

[b]3. Reason with your recommenders[/b]

You can ask your recommenders to comment positively on your written and verbal communication skills.

Don’t run for the hills just yet! A low verbal GMAT score won’t banish you from b-school if you take strategic steps to build a rock-solid application, despite those pesky low numbers.

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Related Resources:

• 3 Tips for Handling a Low GMAT Quant Score

• Low GMAT Score? Don’t Panic…Yet.

• MBA Admissions Tip: Dealing with a Low GPA

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post 3 Tips for Handling a Low GMAT Verbal Score appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
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Mapping out Your MBA Prep — Post-Grad + 3 [#permalink]

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New post 01 Apr 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Mapping out Your MBA Prep — Post-Grad + 3
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Show that you are a citizen of the world!

“Wish I had done that a few years ago ….” We hear that frequently from MBA applicants as they’re filling out their MBA applications. We don’t want you to have to say that. This is the fourth of a five-part blog series with advice on how you can prepare, years in advance, to be competitive for a top MBA program. From college to those first years of work, I’ll discuss steps you can take along the way that will appeal to adcoms.We don’t want you to have to say that.

Post-Grad +3

Seek to have impact in a culture that’s not your own

MBA programs pride themselves on the diversity of their classes. Adcoms want to know that you will both contribute something unique to their program based on your background, and that you can handle differences with diplomacy. Candidates who’ve not only traveled to foreign countries, but who have had a powerful, longer-term episode volunteering or working in a different culture will standout at decision time. This type of experience signals that you are a citizen of the world, with the fortitude and savvy to navigate the challenges in attitudes and communication in a diverse group.

International projects at work

If you didn’t have a chance or the funds to travel abroad during college, now’s the time to seek out international opportunities at work. This is especially important for foreign applicants to U.S. and European MBA programs. Seek assignments in North America or Europe. Your ability to convince the adcom of your reasons behind applying to a top global program will be more persuasive if you can speak with the authority of experience.

Now that you’ve had a couple years at work under your belt, petition your boss for an international project when the opportunity arises. But in doing so, make yourself a hero. Write up a no-frills budget. Figure out why remote communication would be insufficient, and sending you would be more cost and time effective for the business. Prepare in advance to make a positive impact with international clients or colleagues by speaking to seasoned sources about cultural differences and communication practices. Focus on completing excellent work while you are there, but also set aside some down time for an authentic, local experience. If you’re travelling near a potential MBA program, contact the admissions office to arrange a visit. Make the most of your time!

Serving abroad

On the other hand, if you’re one of those MBA who candidates can rattle off a list of 20 countries where you’ve either worked or visited already, take time this year to make an impact on your travels. Instead of hitting the ski slopes or the beach, consider attending an immersive language school and as part of your down time, volunteer at a start-up incubator where you can mentor local entrepreneurs. I guarantee it will give you a sense of deep satisfaction, and though this may sound cynical, it will make your profile more appealing to an adcom. Watch out, you may enjoy it so much you’ll start skipping the beach vacations and head back the following year–which again–shows commitment and will be attractive to an adcom.

The Bottom Line: Find a way to get international experience that shows you are a citizen of the world.

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Michelle Stockman is a professional journalist, former Columbia Business School admissions insider, and experienced MBA admissions consultant.

 

Related Resources:

• Why MBA? [free guide]

• How To Become A Corporate Executive

• 7 Signs an Experience Belongs in Your Application Essay [short video]

Tags: MBA Admissions

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3 Tips for Discussing Failure in Your MBA Application Essays [#permalink]

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New post 03 Apr 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 3 Tips for Discussing Failure in Your MBA Application Essays
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Nobody’s perfect, but you’ll need a “perfect” answer to this question!

“Business schools only want to accept candidates who are perfect, so I am going to make sure I show myself in the best possible light. Crickey. One of the essay questions is to tell them about a failure. What do I do now?”

While this is a conversation you might conceivably have with yourself, fear not. An honest and introspective essay discussing a failure or weakness can actually be one of the strongest advocates for your admission, but note the key word: honest. Admitting to a failure or weakness is difficult, to be sure, but also one of the ways to show you have integrity, are self-aware, and are able to change.

To get started on your essay:

1. Recognize that nobody is perfect. As a former admissions committee member, I know that members of the adcom are human, too. You can guarantee they’ve all had to acknowledge a failure or weakness at some point in their lives. The reason this question is being asked by a particular school is because the admissions committee is looking for applicants who have the self-awareness to acknowledge shortcomings and adapt.

2. Start jotting down the examples you can think of, since the likelihood is that you have faced more than one failure in your life. Same goes for weaknesses, if that is the question.

3. Take each of the examples and think about which experiences helped you grow the most. Which ones have made you a better person, a stronger person, one who is more prepared to face adversity in the future? How are you different now as a result of confronting the negative situation? Do you have concrete examples to show how the changes you made as a result of the failure or weakness have led to success? Oftentimes a weakness is a flip side of a strength, so perhaps a weakness served you well at some point? Perhaps the fact you are “too detail-oriented” resulted in discovering a critical error? Or perhaps identifying your weakness – from a perspective of maturity and introspection – has allowed you to take steps to ameliorate it.

Recently I worked with a client who suffered a failure that could have been catastrophic for the business relationship between his company and its client. The analytics department had interpreted data incorrectly, such that their strategy recommendation to the client was the exact opposite of what it should have been. The error wasn’t discovered until after the new strategy had been implemented. Rather than watch from afar as the strategy failed, my client told the truth, fully prepared for awful consequences. Instead, the relationship between the two companies flourished, due to a newfound appreciation for honesty and integrity in the relationship.

Be thoughtful in your response to a question on weakness or failure, and try to create the link with honesty and integrity as you lay out the answer. Successful leaders must have honesty and integrity as part of their DNA, and be able to see and admit to failures and weaknesses. As I said earlier, nobody’s perfect, but a “perfect” answer to this question just might get you admitted!

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Jen Weld worked as an admissions consultant and Former Asst. Dir. of Admissions at Cornell’s EMBA program (4 years) prior to joining Accepted.com. She has an additional 10 years of experience in higher ed and corporate marketing.

Related Resources:

• 5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your MBA Application Essays, free guide

• Can You Get Accepted After Doing Something Stupid?

• 5 Tips for Your MBA Resume

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Should You Apply to Grad School? [#permalink]

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New post 04 Apr 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Should You Apply to Grad School?
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Know what you are getting into before you dive in!

To apply or not apply. That is the question many of you are asking yourselves as admissions deadlines approach. Is it time to go for the MBA? The JD? MD? PhD?

Here’s the answer: it depends. It depends on you, your circumstances, and your goals. You’re considering investing the next 1-8 years studying – this is a big decision and not one with a general “yes” or “no” answer. As you evaluate your unique situation, make sure you consider the following:

If you’re considering a PhD…

The best reason (for most people) to pursue a PhD is to secure a career in academia. For professorships at big-name research institutes, it’s the only way in. Sure, people enter other industries after becoming this “other kind” of doctor, but they don’t necessarily need the degree to get there, and generally their time would be better spent gaining real-world experience.

A PhD is the right degree for you if…

• You live and breathe research – using data of all kinds to build on existing theories, generate new ones, and explain phenomena.

• You love debating theory and methodology with others.

• You have discipline and patience. As you can imagine, earning a PhD also takes tremendous discipline – for that matter, so does being a professor. It’s not for those who require a lot of external structure and guidance.

If you’re considering going to business school…

Getting an MBA takes the least time of any advanced degree (1-2 years) and generates good job opportunities, so if you have well thought-out career goals and know that the degree will help you achieve those goals, then this could be a good option for you. It is a substantial investment in terms of tuition costs (as well as the potential time away from your career), so engage in some serious self-reflection about your goals and interests.

An MBA is the right degree for you if…

• You’re interested in propelling your current business career forward, or potentially changing fields or job functions.

• You’re an entrepreneur or thinking about starting your own business.

• You enjoy structure and data-based problem-solving and team projects.

If you’re considering going to med school…

It takes a long, long time to become a doctor, but once you’re there, you’ll likely have a stable income and a stable job.

An MD is the right degree for you if…

• You truly want to help people while making a reasonable living.

• You enjoy solving the problems that doctors solve. That sounds self-evident, but you may forget, especially after all the TV shows that highlight the profession’s highest and lowest moments, that in the end it’s often you in a room with patients and/or other doctors, trying figure out how to diagnose and treat a given set of symptoms. Are you good at that kind of pattern-matching-based problem-solving?

• You’re okay with the idea of dissecting a cadaver (you have to, in med school).

• You don’t mind dealing with people often at their worst (other than pathology, radiology, and maybe some other specialties, you’ll have to).

If you’re considering going to law school…

There is a very large number of trained lawyers do not work as attorneys – many end up in the business world and elsewhere. This is due to one of two reasons (generally): one, that getting a job as an attorney may be difficult, given supply and demand (it’s still a challenging job market for lawyers right now); two, that many people rush into law school without really knowing if they want to be lawyers. So think hard about it, and be sure you want to go to law school. Maybe it makes sense to work in the field before committing to grad school. Research what attorneys do, day to day. Again, TV has glamorized litigation (i.e., trial work), but many lawyers rarely set foot in the courtroom.

A JD is the right degree for you if….

• You want to be a lawyer.

• You thrive in a rigorous, intellectually challenging environment.

• You have strong writing and critical thinking skills.

Bottom Line

Think hard about your grad school decision. Don’t get a degree because you feel you “should” or you don’t have a lot of other options. Those reasons are just not strong enough or smart enough to justify the time and costs that go into graduate education.

If and when you decide a graduate degree is the way to go, we can help! Check out our catalog of services for more information.

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Related Resources:

• Get Your Game On: Prepping For Your Grad School Application, free guide

• The 4 Must-Haves Of A Grad School Application

• Graduate School Admissions Consulting and Editing Services

Tags: Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Get Accepted to B-School with Low Stats [Live Webinar on Wed] [#permalink]

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New post 04 Apr 2016, 11:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Get Accepted to B-School with Low Stats [Live Webinar on Wed]
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There is not much time left to register for our upcoming webinar! Make sure to be there for what promises to be an enlightening, practical, and helpful presentation on how to get into top business schools despite low GMAT/GPA scores.

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Register ASAP for Get Accepted to Top B-Schools with Low Stats to reserve your spot. We’ll see you at 10:00 AM PST/1:00 PM EST Wednesday morning (April 6th).

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Tags: MBA Admissions

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Mapping out Your MBA Prep — Post-grad + 4 [#permalink]

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New post 05 Apr 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Mapping out Your MBA Prep — Post-grad + 4
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Polished presentations and other public speaking should be part of your wheelhouse.

“Wish I had done that a few years ago ….” We hear that frequently from MBA applicants as they’re filling out their MBA applications. We don’t want you to have to say that. This is the fifth of a five-part blog series with advice on how you can prepare, years in advance, to be competitive for a top MBA program. From college to those first years of work, I’ll discuss steps you can take along the way that will appeal to adcoms. We don’t want you to have to say that.

Post-Grad +4

Leadership at work

By now, you should have shown clear advancement at work in terms of your responsibilities, leadership and impact. The complexity and visibility of your duties will have increased because you have demonstrated over the past four years that you are an excellent analyst, problem solver, and director of projects and people. You should nominally have a role that entails the management of others, or you can clearly demonstrate this role through descriptions of projects you’ve led. Polished presentations and other public speaking opportunities, though at times nerve wracking, are part of your wheelhouse. Ideally, you or a manager can cite an example of how you went against conventional wisdom to develop and deliver an innovative idea that has left a lasting impact on the business.

Clarifying Your Goals

Take this year to think deeply about and research what want to accomplish in the future. Do you now want to take the skills you have and transition into a new industry? Do you want to stay in the same industry and position yourself to be a thought leader and executive? Do you want to strike out on your own and become an entrepreneur? Speak with mentors or people who have the career you want about the skills you need to make this transition, and how an MBA will benefit you.

School Research

With so many MBA programs to sort through, the process can be daunting. But the more familiar you are with a school, the better chance you have to convince the adcom you’re a good match. Start out by speaking with people in your network who are alums. Find out how the program helped them. Map out the curriculum you would take that would give you the knowledge and skills you need to reach your career goals. Participate in MBA fairs and attend receptions and programs sponsored by the schools you are interested in. If possible, arrange a visit. Go to classes, speak with current students, meet the adcom. Send follow up notes thanking them for their time. Getting into business school is as much about relationships as it is about preparing a strong application. You will stand out in the applicant pool if you have shown sincere interest.

Checking back on the GMAT …

If you didn’t have time to take the GMAT immediately after graduation, now is a good time to take the test. Your GMAT score will be an indicator of your competitiveness at top schools. Set aside three months to prep for the test, as well as three months post-test for a second chance if you didn’t do well. Most schools take the highest score, so don’t be discouraged if you need to retake.

… and on your GPA

Here are a couple of resources that help you define and mitigate: a low GPA after you’ve graduated:

• MBA Admissions: Low GMAT or GPA

• MBA Admissions A-Z: U is for Undergrad Grades, free guide

• 5 A’s for Your Low GPA, podcast

The Bottom Line: You’re ready to apply

If you’ve followed this advice, you’re ready to apply to business school. All these experiences will give you the material you need to present an impressive application to competitive MBA programs — and get accepted!

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Michelle Stockman is a professional journalist, former Columbia Business School admissions insider, and experienced MBA admissions consultant.

Related Resources:

• Why MBA?, free guide

• MBA Applicants: Start Your Engines!

• How To Become A Corporate Executive

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Introducing MIT Sloan’s New Master of Business Analytics Degree [#permalink]

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New post 06 Apr 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Introducing MIT Sloan’s New Master of Business Analytics Degree
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Starting this fall, MIT Sloan, together with the MIT Operations Research Center, will be launching its brand new Master of Business Analytics (M.B.An) program. This is a full-time, one-year degree program designed to prepare students for careers in the data science industry. According to an MIT Sloan press release, the program was created as a response to the demand for a rigorous opportunity to apply “the tools of modern data science to solve problems in business and society.”

According to MIT Sloan Dean David Schmittlein, finding skilled practitioners who know how to mine and analyze vast amounts of digital data is a challenge. “In recognition of this need for innovation and excellence in analytics,” he says, “our mission is to build a world-class master’s program in data science that leverages the intellectual resources of MIT, is based on cutting-edge research, and, as a result, attracts the very best applicants.”

With this new program, MIT now offers analytics degrees at the undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral levels.

What is the capstone?

The M.B.An program is divided into three semesters: fall, spring, and a 10-week summer capstone during which students will work in teams onsite at various companies in the US and abroad on real data science problems.

“The capstone reflects the school’s commitment to action learning,” says MIT Sloan Professor John Hauser. “It gives students an opportunity to get out in the field—with a lot of faculty mentoring and support – and apply the very deep technical knowledge they’ve learned in the classroom to solve a real world challenge. We want them to dive into data: to handle it, to organize it, and to interpret what it means.”

Who is the program for?

This program may be for you if you:

• Have a strong mathematical, computer science, and statistical background

• Are a recent college graduate looking to pursue a career in the data science industry or a career changer, particularly one with a background in engineering, mathematics, physics, computer programming, or other high-tech fields

How do you apply?

Candidates must submit a transcript, resume, personal statement and optional essay, 3 letters of recommendation, and recent GMAT or GRE scores. Tuition for the yearlong program is $75,000. Apply to the Master of Business Analytics program here.

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Related Resources:

• Insights into MIT Sloan MBA Admissions with Dawna Levenson [Episode 132]

• MIT Sloan Zone Page

• 4 Ways to Show How You’ll Contribute in the Future

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Introducing MIT Sloan’s New Master of Business Analytics Degree appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
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Applying to Business School Next Year? [#permalink]

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New post 07 Apr 2016, 11:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Applying to Business School Next Year?
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Check out the recording of our recent webinar, Get Accepted in 2017: 7 Steps to a Strong MBA Application.

In the webinar, Linda Abraham paves the way to acceptance to a top b-school by exploring the things you can do NOW to increase your chances of acceptance later on. When those applications are released, you’ll be ready to tackle them head-on and complete them efficiently and successfully.

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You’re just 7 steps away from creating your super-strong application (and getting accepted!). Get started now!

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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310-815-9553

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Georgetown McDonough to Offer Peace Corps Scholarship [#permalink]

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New post 08 Apr 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Georgetown McDonough to Offer Peace Corps Scholarship
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Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business has been selected as the 18th business school to join the Paul D. Coverdell Fellowship Program. Established in 1985, this fellowship offers returned Peace Corps volunteers admitted to full-time MBA programs a minimum of $10,000 in tuition scholarship funding per year, as well as the ability to apply for graduate assistantships.

As part of the program, fellows will complete internships in underserved American communities, allowing them to bring home and expand upon the skills they learned as Peace Corps volunteers.

Georgetown McDonough will also waive the application fee for all returned Peace Corps volunteers. In the school’s optional essay, eligible volunteers should note that they would like to be considered for the Paul D. Coverdell Fellowship. 

“Georgetown University has a longstanding commitment to being men and women for others, as well as understanding the intricacies of different cultures around the world,” said David A. Thomas, dean of Georgetown McDonough. “By joining the Coverdell Fellows Program, we can reward incoming MBAs who already have the global mindset and value for serving society that we teach in our programs.”

Learn more about the Peace Corps Coverdell Fellows Program at Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business here.

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Related Resources:

• Leadership in Admissions

• Mapping out Your MBA Prep — Post-Grad + 3

• Volunteering and Extracurriculars in Your MBA Application

Tags: MBA Admissions

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310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Narrowing Down Your B-School Options – Part-1 [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Narrowing Down Your B-School Options – Part-1
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Shoot for the stars, but don’t overshoot.

This is the first post in our MBA Profile Series, in which we’ll explore the different criteria that factor into your decision of WHERE to apply to b-school.

Where Should You Apply?

You’ve decided that you are going to apply to b-school. Now you need to ask yourself the next critical question: WHERE? Where should you spend your next few years? Which country? Which city? And last but not least, which program?

The following questions will guide you through the process of finding the best MBA program for you based on your unique qualifications and goals:

1. What is your post-MBA goal?

a. What job function do you see yourself doing?

b. Which industry do you want to work in?

c. Where (which country/city/environment) do you want to live?

Analyzing your goals is a crucial first step. If you don’t know what you want to do, it is difficult to identify the right training you need. So think carefully and honestly about your goals.

2. Which schools support your goals?

a. Are the companies you would like to work for recruiting for the functions/industries you would like to pursue at your target school?

b. Do your target schools offer clubs and extracurricular activities in your desired field (and if not, is it possible for you to start your own club)?

c. Does the school’s curriculum offer a major, concentration, or adequate coverage for your particular interests and goals?

d. Are there professors who have done or who are currently doing research in your area of interest or in a field where you want to acquire expertise?

If a program won’t help you meet your career goals, then what would be the point of attending? If you’re interested in non-profit management, choose a school that will let you explore that focus. If international business is important to you, pick a program that will allow you to travel and interact with different aspects of the business world. Don’t choose a school if it won’t help you further your goals.

3. What are your qualifications?

a. Are you academically competitive? (Take a look at your GMAT/GRE score, transcript, additional courses, etc.)

b. Do you have impressive work experience, qualitatively and quantitatively?

c. Do your community service activities show additional skills and character traits (like initiative, leadership, responsibility, and teamwork)?

A school may full support your educational and career objectives, but if your stats are way below average, you don’t have enough work experience, and you have nothing to show leadership-wise, then you simply won’t get in. You must apply to programs that support your goals AND for which you are competitive. Yes, it’s good to shoot for the stars, but don’t overshoot.

4. What are the top 4-8 schools that you envision yourself attending?

The schools that both support your goals and at which you are competitive are the ones you should apply to. If there are lots of schools in that category, you’re in luck! Apply to the ones that simply appeal to you most. If no school meets those two criteria, then you either need to improve your qualifications or adjust your goal.

Want to see this process in action? Stay tuned…the next post in this series will introduce you to “Joe” who will walk you through the steps he takes to evaluate his qualifications and goals and choose the best b-school for him.

Ask questions. Get answers. And then map out the route to the best MBA program for you. For more details, grab your copy of Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One.



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Related Resources:

• U.S. News Ranks Best Business Schools in 2016

• 3 Ways to Determine Which B-Schools are a Good Fit for You

• Linda Abraham’s Admissions Assortment

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Narrowing Down Your B-School Options – Part-1 appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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What Your Work Experience Reveals About You in Your MBA Application [#permalink]

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New post 11 Apr 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: What Your Work Experience Reveals About You in Your MBA Application
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Demonstrating your career progression will help the adcoms get to know you better.

Work experience is important because of what it reveals about you in terms of your character, maturity, and abilities. Even if your GPA and GMAT/GRE scores are spectacular, your work experience still needs to impress the admissions readers.

Post-college employment reveals that you have “grown-up” experience in taking direction, meeting deadlines and working in teams. These are all highly relevant in a program where group projects are the norm. Developing a baseline track record in your field also gives you industry knowledge and the ability to contribute your insights to class discussions. Finally, recruiters prefer MBAs with work experience.

How Much is Enough? Too Much?

Most applicants for two-year, full-time MBA programs have from two to eight years of work experience. (If you have been working longer than that, you probably should consider an EMBA or other program geared for the more seasoned professional.)

Unless a program actively courts younger applicants, such as Chicago Booth or CMU Tepper, two years of work experience is usually the effective minimum you will need to prove that you can contribute to and benefit from the program.

Can You Show Impact?

It isn’t only the quantity of work experience that is significant – it’s the ability to show how much you have contributed and what impact you have had. If you have the focus, determination, stick-to-it-iveness, collegiality, initiative, and maturity that MBA programs prize, chances are you will have found an opportunity to have an impact on the job by applying those skills and traits. And this is true no matter what sort of role you performed, or whether you worked in a large company or fledgling start-up.

For example, if you worked for a large company, such as Infosys, Google, Goldman Sachs, or Bloomberg Financial, the adcoms will understand that you were a small fish in a large pond. They will appreciate that you had to work harder to stand out, but they will also look for signs that you did.

Advancement in large companies is often highly structured, bureaucratic, and possibly slow, with less room to dazzle supervisors with distinctive skills and abilities. The schools are familiar with the typical path, and if your talents were recognized in such a large organization and you were given a project normally given to someone above your pay grade, or fast-tracked for a promotion, this will add stature to your application. Additionally, the fact that a large company with a valued brand name hired you in the first place is another indication that you probably have at least some of what your MBA program is looking for.

On the other hand, if you joined a start-up or launched an entrepreneurial venture, you will have the opportunity to show how you survived, and perhaps even thrived in those risky, exciting, uncharted waters. In a small company you would have had more occasions to display your adaptability and versatility. You may also have handled more responsibility with less supervision.

Most applicants who joined start-ups or launched entrepreneurial ventures have learned invaluable lessons on a faster track than if they had worked in established firms and wouldn’t trade those experiences for anything, even if their entrepreneurial ventures were short lived. Not only did they have to toggle among many disparate kinds of tasks, ranging from sales to public relations to product design, but they also learned – sometimes the hard way – fundamental rules of business planning and formation. If you write about being an entrepreneur, however, you will have to demonstrate that this was not a euphemism for “unemployed.” Your business may or may not have succeeded, but showing how you planned and executed it will speak volumes about you. It will show how you strategized, how you determined the need in the market for your product or service, and the logical sequence you applied in launching and managing your enterprise.

Bottom Line

The kind of work experience you have, as well as your career progression, will help the adcoms get to know you better. Furthermore, even two years of full-time, professional employment can lend credibility and substance to your stated career goals. They will not be based on a youthful, fuzzy, naive dream, but on some real-world business experience that has tested and refined those goals, clarified where you are heading, and how you will get there. Finally, work experience puts you at a competitive advantage to snag the best jobs after earning your MBA.

This is an excerpt from MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools, by Linda Abraham and Judy Gruen, Like what you see? Get the complete book here for more fabulous advice on assessing your qualifications, choosing b-schools, perfecting your essays, and more!

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Related Resources:

• Leadership in Admissions

• How to Prove Character Traits in Essays

• Does Extracurricular Equal Extra Credit?

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post What Your Work Experience Reveals About You in Your MBA Application appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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What Your Work Experience Reveals About You in Your MBA Application   [#permalink] 11 Apr 2016, 11:01

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