It is currently 19 Sep 2017, 21:08

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Accepted MBA Updates

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
Expert Post
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5734

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Location: Los Angeles CA
London Business School 2016 Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Feb 2016, 13:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: London Business School 2016 Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
Image
Image
In the LBS EMBA website landing page, a short introduction to the program includes the words “transform,” “transition,” and “catalyst.”  Also, “accelerate” and “propel.”  This is a clear message from the adcom: the program goes beyond conveying necessary skills for senior managers; it is for people who have a dynamic sense of their future and a willingness to change and grow, as well as to study and learn. Your essays should mirror and convey this dynamic sense, this energy, this vigor.

Question 1: How has the scope of your management experience affected your career objectives? (500 word max)

This is a goals question, albeit rather indirect.  And the question itself reflects the dynamic perspective: rather than “what” your career goals are, it asks you to present them as a part of an ongoing process.

It’s an essay for which the most work might come before you write it – in the preliminary thinking process.  Make it an exercise: FIRST, define your career objectives (short and longer term).  SECOND, identify what factors influenced the development of those objectives.  THIRD, of those factors, single out those related (directly and/or indirectly) to your management experience.  Now, you’ve got the raw material for your essay.

In the actual essay, you could start with career objectives and work back to portray the related management experience – or vice versa.  Either way, be specific in all aspects – make your goals concrete, and use anecdote and detail in describing the influential management experience.

Question 2: What was your response to a piece of feedback that you have received regarding an area of weakness?  (500 words max)

The adcom wants to see how frankly you portray the feedback and your own shortcoming, and how insightfully you contextualize your experience. Secondarily, it’s about change –did you grow and change as a result of the feedback?

This essay will be most compelling and engaging if written as a story. Start right in with the story’s setting – where, who, when (ideally make it a fairly recent experience, and one that holds some meaningful stakes). Then progress through the story, highlighting not just what you and the other party said and did, but also your thinking as the story progresses.  Finally, give a short example of how you have applied this feedback (or your learning from this feedback experience) subsequently – in other words, how you grew.

Question 3: Please choose ONE essay from the following two options: (500 words max)

If you could choose any three people who have ever lived to join you for dinner, who would you invite and why?

OR

If you were on the cover of any publication in 10 years, what would the headline and the content of the article be?

If the first two questions are rooted in real-world, concrete experience, this question urges you to “play” a little and use your imagination, wit, creativity, and possibly broader passions in answering.

Which should you answer? Both are equally good; it depends on which serves your needs and interest best.

There are various viable and effective approaches to this essay. One is “gut instinct” and personal appeal.  I.e., if one of these questions strikes a chord with you, engages you, and you have an idea that you like, probably it will be an effective essay. Go with it!  BUT, do apply some objective, focused analysis as well. Ensure that your content truly illuminates you in some new and fresh way relevant to the application, and do use detail and example to make your essay credible and vivid.

Another approach is strategic.  If your imagination isn’t tickled by these questions, instead analyze and plan. What relevant and interesting aspects of your profile aren’t yet portrayed (or portrayed adequately) in the application? Identify one or two such points, and work back from that to find suitable topics for one of the two questions.  BUT: don’t be too heavy handed with the essay, which wouldn’t align with the question’s tone.

Random pitfalls:

• If you choose the first question, please don’t use very obvious or overly angelic people (I’ve seen this essay answered with Gandhi and Mother Teresa more often than I can believe over 15 years.)  Rather, discuss people who show your creative thinking and/or are personally meaning to you.

• If you choose the second question, don’t turn the essay into a second goals essay.  Ensure that it extends the portrayal of you in some way.

Image

If you would like professional guidance with your London Business School EMBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Package, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edits for the LBS EMBA application. 

Image

Image
By Cindy Tokumitsu, co-author of The EMBA Edge, and author of the free special report, Ace the EMBA. Cindy has helped MBA applicants get accepted to top EMBA programs around the world. She is delighted to help you too!

 

Related Resources:

Excellent Executive MBA Admissions Advice podcast

• School-Specific EMBA Application Essay Tips

• London Business School Zone Page

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post London Business School 2016 Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Expert Post
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5734

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Location: Los Angeles CA
How to Get Accepted in 2017: FREE WEBINAR! [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Feb 2016, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How to Get Accepted in 2017: FREE WEBINAR!
Image
That’s right – we’re already talking about 2017 MBA applications! You may feel like you’ve got loads of time, but believe me…you’ve got loads to do!

Image

We’d like to help you start out on the right foot by inviting you to our upcoming live webinar, Get Accepted in 2017: 7 Steps to a Strong MBA Application, in which Linda Abraham, Accepted CEO & Founder and MBA admissions guru, will outline the steps you can take NOW to increase your chances of a successful application next year.

Applicants, take heed: It’s NOT TOO EARLY to get started! Remember, the early bird gets the worm – those who are prepared to hit the ground running once those apps are released are the ones who will stand a better shot at getting accepted.

Image

WEBINAR DETAILS:

Date: Wednesday, March 2nd

Time: 10am PT/1pm ET

Registration link: (Spaces tend to fill up quickly, so grab your spot now!)

Image

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post How to Get Accepted in 2017: FREE WEBINAR! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Expert Post
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5734

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Location: Los Angeles CA
Saving Money on Your Student Loan Debt: The CommonBond Story [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Feb 2016, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Saving Money on Your Student Loan Debt: The CommonBond Story
Image
Image
Today’s show: a conversation for anyone with student loans. We’re talking with CommonBond’s Phil DeGisi about options to save money by refinance outstanding student loans and financing your education, as well as CommonBond’s MBA Accelerator and Social Impact Award and his own MBA experience.

Meet Phil DeGisi [1:40]

Undergrad at Vassar, Tuck MBA. After earning his MBA, he focused his career on merchandising and then digital marketing. In 2014 he became VP of Marketing at CommonBond and just 3 months ago, he became CB’s Chief Marketing Officer.

CommonBond Overview [2:25]

CommonBond considers itself a values-driven and customer-service centric lender. They can refinance your undergraduate or graduate loan at a lower interest rate, potentially saving you significant money over the life of the loan. And they offer new loans for MBA students at low rates.

Parent PLUS loans, too [4:50]

Most Parent PLUS loans have a higher interest rate- 7-8%- so refinancing for a lower rate can save a lot of money. It’s also possible to transfer the loan from the parent to the child, which can help the student build their credit history.

The 3 S’s: Savings, Simplicity, Social Good [6:05]

Saving: students can save over $14k on average (over the life of the loan) by refinancing. Simplicity: it’s easy to get decisions and information. Social promise: for every loan they fund, they also pledge to fund the education of a child in the developing world. They partner with Pencils of Promise.

A fourth element is customer service: the marriage of tech and customer service. The decision to refinance $100K in debt is a big decision, so it’s important to be able to talk to someone—they offer live chat, email, phone.

How does it work? [8:39]

Go to the site and get a rate quote (to do that, only basic info is required). This is an estimate with no credit impact. If you are interested in moving to the next step after that, you can supply more detailed information electronically (pay stubs, etc).

Applying for an in-school loan for MBA [10:05]

Also a straightforward, easy application process. MBA loans have a 5.78% APR for a 10-year loan.

MBA Accelerator Program [10:45]

CommonBond has developed an internship program for MBAs, where interns design and build a product that solves a problem in personal finance. A previous intern (who originally learned about CommonBond by borrowing from them) is now a full-time employee.

Social Impact Contest [14:00]

They consider themselves a “values driven company” and are looking to reward and mentor entrepreneurs who are using business to drive social change. The award is $10K, and the application is open through the end of February. The initial entry is a 2-minute video: how your business is a force for positive change.

Where CommonBond is going next [16:55]

Striving to keep making finance more human. And they see a potential for CommonBond to be a platform for financial services beyond student loans.

DeGisi’s own MBA experience at Tuck [21:30]

He’s definitely glad he went! The Tuck network has helped him in his career.

What does he miss? [23:40]

It can be easy to take some b-school opportunities for granted—such as access to great speakers. And some classes you don’t necessarily appreciate fully at the time are really important in hindsight.

He paid back his $150K in student loans in about 6 years, saving substantial money in interest. His repayment tips? [25:45]

Know your budget: know the living expenses in the city you’re living in, know what your loan payments are. When he could afford to pay over the minimum payment (such as when he had a bonus), he did. If you want to pay off the loan faster than the standard period, you’ll need to pay more than the minimum payment.

Many lenders offer a rate reduction if you set up direct deposit/autopay. (He cautions that you should make sure there aren’t any strings attached – that they’re not requiring you to set up a checking account with them, etc.)

Last tips for borrowers [29:40]

You’re not alone! Know the tools and options to help decrease your loan burden.

Image

Related Links:

• CommonBond• CommonBond Social Impact Award Opens for Applications: Win $10,000 For Your Business!• CommonBond Launching a “Startup Within a Startup”• How to Pay Off a Huge Debt in Five Years,  Phil’s interview with the BBC.

• Reflections of a Wharton MBA Student and CommonBond Intern• How to Pay for Your MBA, an on-demand webinar presented by CommonBond.

Related shows:

• CommonBond’s Story: A Revolution in Student Loans• Making International Student Loans a Prime Investment

• SoFi: Alumni Funded Student Loans• Financial Aid & Health Insurance for International Students

• Promoting Financial Health for Doctors• Tuck Talk: IV with The Dean of Admissions• The Tuck School of Business and the Global Insight Requirement

Subscribe:

Image
            Image

Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Saving Money on Your Student Loan Debt: The CommonBond Story [Episode 142] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Expert Post
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5734

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Location: Los Angeles CA
MBA Application Planning: The Program Research Phase [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Feb 2016, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: MBA Application Planning: The Program Research Phase
Image
Image
There is a sea of information out there: Make sure you’re not swimming in circles.

You’ve defined your goals and assessed your qualifications. Now it’s time to move on to the program research stage of the MBA admissions process. There is a sea of information out there: rankings, books, MBA program websites, MBA fairs, Poets & Quants, newspaper and magazine articles on MBA programs, student and adcom blogs, school open houses, etc.

Let’s dive right in!

Here is some advice to help you add structure to the process so you’re not swimming in circles after you dive.

Use the Rankings…Sort of

If you’ve read our blog posts, vlogs, etc., you know we caution against relying exclusively and uncritically on rankings to decide where to go (so that means no “I’m just gonna apply to the top-5”). Well, here we’re going to suggest the opposite: use the rankings…at the beginning of this research phase. They’re helpful at the start.

Below you’ll find 6 key steps for doing MBA program research in a way that a. yields meaningful info for decision-making and list-making, and simultaneously b. is efficient and focused – conserving and respecting your precious time.

Step 1  Look at Rankings

With your competitive profile in mind, look at several broad MBA rankings. Determine what levels/ranges of programs for which you’re competitive generally (taking into account reasonable reaches, on-pars, and maybe safeties). Note the plural – rankings – as each has its idiosyncrasies (US News, Financial Times, Bloomberg Businessweek, etc.).  Sometimes a program will be below or above your target competitive range, but it still might make sense to apply for some reason (it’s in the following steps that you’ll gain the additional info needed to make this decision).

Step 2  Talk to People

At this point it’s good to start talking to people with MBA experience – colleagues, friends, mentors, etc. – and add a qualitative dimension to the above step. Ask about their impressions and experiences, and assess how their views align (or not) with what you gleaned from the rankings vis-à-vis competitive fit.

Step 3  Search Industry/Function-Specific Rankings

Research industry- and/or function-specific rankings in your area(s) of interest. Identify programs from these rankings that overlap with those from Step 1 (and factoring in any learning from Step 2).

There may be programs in your competitive range that do meet your academic needs but don’t show up on specialization rankings (e.g., Kellogg isn’t known as a finance school but offers much in this area and might be great for someone in PE who will be doing a lot of managing; Columbia doesn’t often appear on entrepreneurship rankings but is quite strong in it). So indulge in some unstructured exploring, to “see what you might see.”

Step 4 – Start Digging Deeper

Go to the source – the websites of programs that interest you. Look for specifics that you care about (structure of curriculum, flexibility, strong concentrations, students from a given industry or geographic region, etc.). Listen to your gut as well as objective response; does it feel like a good fit?

Step 5  Go to MBA Fairs and Visit Schools

What better way to understand your fit with a school than to see the students, professors, and administrators in action? You will get the most out of MBA fairs, school information sessions, and school visits at this point in your research, after you already have a good idea of what each program offers and how you’d fit in competitively.

Step 6  Putting the Puzzle Pieces Together

You’re narrowing and refining a list. Now you can spend time meaningfully (i.e., with informed focus) on adcom and student blog posts, searching the web for articles and information, and attending school information sessions, and of course continuing to talk to people with MBA program experience and insight. You should now have a finalized or near-finalized list of 2-4 programs to apply to. You can continue refining the list and deciding on other programs to add later.

NOTE: This is a guideline, not a rigid process. Always stay open to discovery – maybe you’ll come across a school in a blog or a respected colleague suggests a program you hadn’t considered. Maybe you thought you wanted to stay in the U.S. but got seduced by INSEAD… Who doesn’t love a pleasant surprise?

Image

Image
By Cindy Tokumitsu, author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.

Related Resources:

• MBA Rankings: What You Need to Know [free guide]

• MBA Admissions: Research the B-Schools [short video]

• 3 Ways to Determine Which B-Schools are a Good Fit for You

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post MBA Application Planning: The Program Research Phase appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Expert Post
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5734

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Location: Los Angeles CA
Tips for Executive MBA Reapplicants [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Feb 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Tips for Executive MBA Reapplicants
Image
Image
Put together a superstar application that demonstrates why you’re passionate about THIS program.

If you have been rejected from an Executive MBA program, it often comes down to one of three reasons (or combination thereof):

1. Your academic record was not strong enough to convince the admissions committee you could handle the rigor of an EMBA program,

2. Your work experience was not sufficient/relevant enough yet to be considered a solid addition to the program, or,

3. You did not show adequate interest in the program to warrant an offer of admission.

All of these reasons can be mitigated, with time or effort on your part. At the end of the day, there is no guarantee of admission, but by taking a hard look and assessing your situation, you can make yourself a much stronger candidate by addressing the pertinent issues.

Academic Record

A low GPA in and of itself is not a reason to ding an applicant. What tends to concern schools is when a transcript shows consistently low grades in subjects that are important to have competence in to do well in an MBA program – quantitative subjects in particular. If you do have quantitative weakness, enroll in an Algebra or Statistics course (or both) at a local college – a “real” class as opposed to online would be preferred. Get strong grades, and submit that transcript with your new application. In the optional essay, express how you recognize the admissions committee might have been concerned about your quantitative abilities, but the new grades should allay any concerns. Also lay out any additional plans you may have prior to joining the program to bolster your skills – MBA Math, for example.

Work Experience

In this situation, time and more leadership experience are probably the two best ways to enhance your application. The average years of work experience in an EMBA program is typically 10-15. Some schools specifically state the minimum years of experience necessary to apply. While I was at Cornell, we never seriously considered anyone with less than five years of experience, and when we did admit someone on that lower end of the scale, there was a clear indication the individual was a superstar at his or her organization. So, if you are in the lower range of experience, seek out more high-profile leadership opportunities, and work on putting together that “superstar” profile.

Program Interest

Admissions committees realize most applicants consider multiple options, as they should, and most have a clear first choice school. What tends to bother admissions folks is when it’s obvious an applicant is only applying to a school because it’s a brand name and would be an “ok” fallback.

How can they tell an applicant’s lack of interest? It’s pretty easy – never came to an information session, never visited the campus, never reached out to anyone on the admissions committee, and/or put reasons like “location” and “reputation” in their essay as to why he/she would like to come to the school. With EMBA classes quite small compared to fulltime programs, it is a distinct possibility an applicant with stellar qualifications could be dinged – why offer a spot to someone who clearly has no real interest in attending? If you feel this might be why you were rejected, this reason can be mitigated or eliminated as well. Reach out to admissions committee members and ask questions that show you’ve both done your homework and are thinking seriously about their school. Start sending signals indicating your sincere interest.

Not sure where your application might be lacking? The good news about most Executive MBA programs is that with smaller applicant pools, admissions officers typically have more time to devote to individual applicants. Therefore, make a call and see if you can receive feedback on your application.

Furthermore we here at Accepted are always available to provide a critical analysis of your EMBA application and help you develop a game plan for the future.

Image

ImageJen Weld worked as an admissions consultant and Former Asst. Dir. of Admissions at Cornell’s EMBA program (4 years) prior to joining Accepted. She has an additional 10 years of experience in higher ed and corporate marketing.

Related Resources:

• 5 A’s for Your Low GPA

• Excellent Executive MBA Admissions Advice

• The GMAT and EMBA Programs

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Tips for Executive MBA Reapplicants appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Expert Post
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5734

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Location: Los Angeles CA
4 Qualities Top MBA Programs Seek [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Feb 2016, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 4 Qualities Top MBA Programs Seek
Image
Image
Business schools aren’t looking for intelligent robots!

There are four main qualities that top b-schools look for when reviewing MBA applications. If you’re aiming for the top 10, then you’ll want to make sure not only that you possess these qualities, but that you’ve highlighted them in your application.

1. [b]Problem Solving Skills. [/b]This is probably the most important quality, at least initially. Schools want the types of students that exclusive consulting firms like McKinsey would take interest in, and that type of student is an expert problem solver. Everyone working in firms like McKinsey needs to be adept at solving a range of “problems” – top schools recognize this and seek out students who would eventually be an excellent fit at these top firms.

[b][b]2. Drive/Ambition.  [/b][/b]Applicants must show evidence of longstanding drive for success in their applications, resumes, and interviews. Did you push yourself to succeed inside and outside the classroom in college? Do you have an ambitious vision for your career path? B-schools want students who will succeed in the business world once they graduate – if you prove that you have drive/ambition, then you’ll stand out as someone who they want in their classrooms, and beyond.

3. [b]Interpersonal Impact. [/b]“Brains on a stick” just won’t cut it at business school and then later on in the business world. You also need to be dynamic and likable. You need to be able to work well on a team and gain the respect of your teammates, not to mention later on, your employers and employees. You can show the adcoms your interpersonal impact by highlighting your involvement in teams at work as well as in clubs, sports, or other socially driven activities. Additionally, choose recommenders who know you well and who will attest to this attribute.

4. [b]Leadership/Management Capabilities [/b]Demonstrating general interpersonal impact isn’t enough: top candidates need to show strong evidence of leadership experience and potential. Did you take on leadership positions in clubs, sports teams, and service organizations? You need to express that you are the type of person who will earn the respect of those around you so that they’ll be eager to follow your lead. In your application, resume, and interview, come up with concrete examples that show how you wielded authority with skill and integrity.

Do you need help highlighting these essential qualities in your MBA application? We’re here to help! Contact us so we can provide the one-on-one counseling you need to put together the highest-impact b-school application.

Image

Image

Related Resources:

5 Ways to Make B-Schools love you – on-demand webinar

• Leadership in Admissions – free guide

How to Prove Character Traits in Essays

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post 4 Qualities Top MBA Programs Seek appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Expert Post
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5734

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Location: Los Angeles CA
Putting Learning Above All: A Talk with Rohan from Kellogg [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Feb 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Putting Learning Above All: A Talk with Rohan from Kellogg
Image
Image
This interview is the latest in an Accepted blog series featuring interviews with MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Rohan Rajiv, a student at Northwestern Kellogg.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad?

Rohan: I am originally from Chennai in India. I was fortunate to do my undergrad at the National University of Singapore (NUS) in Electrical Engineering on a scholarship. However, I spent most of my time working on a start-up that connected students with work they love that didn’t eventually work out. So, I feel I learnt more about entrepreneurship (primarily that it is very hard to do right) from my undergrad years than about Electrical Engineering.

Accepted: Can you share 3 fun facts about yourself?

Rohan:

1. I have a daily learning blog where I’ve posted a learning every day since May 12, 2008 (3700+ posts and counting).

2. I sleep a lot and fidget a lot. My wife continues to be amazed at both abilities.

3. I was a paid TV actor for a couple of years between ages 9-11 when I acted in a local language version that combined Barney and Teletubbies for adolescent kids. We don’t have any video recordings – thank god.

Accepted: What year are you at Kellogg? Why did you choose this program? How would you say you are a good fit with the program?

Rohan: I am a 2nd year. I chose to apply to a collection of schools that I would have loved to go to. Kellogg was one of those that accepted me and I’m grateful to the admissions team for giving me a shot.

Kellogg’s culture is built around a collaborative student body that is characterized by folks who are “low ego, high impact.” I’d like to believe I fit well in the culture and I think that definitely helped me get in. But, you’d have to check with my classmates and the Office of Admissions to make sure. Image

Accepted: Is there anything you’d change about the program? If so, what?

Rohan: Not much I can think of. That is not to say that it is perfect. But what I’ve loved about my experience is that I’ve been given the freedom to lead teams to work toward changing what I/we thought was sub-optimal. And that’s been one of the favorite parts of my experience. It is truly what you make of it.

Accepted: What’s your favorite class so far?

Rohan: This is a 4-way tie (sorry!) between –

1. Core Operations with Prof. Gad Allon

2. Customer Analytics with Prof. Florian Zettelmeyer

3. Supply Chain with Prof. Sunil Chopra

4. Federal Policy for Business Leaders with Prof. David Besanko

Accepted: Looking back at the b-school admissions process, what would you say was your greatest challenge? How did you overcome that challenge and how would you advise others who may be facing similar hurdles?

Rohan: I had 2 primary challenges – I didn’t have a big brand on my resume and I didn’t have a good undergrad GPA (start-up, etc.). Being aware of these challenges was probably a big first step. Once you are aware, you can make sure you address them.

I don’t consider myself as someone who excelled in the application process. So I’ve generally had less to say about this. However, 3 things I think I did well were –

1. Got lots of help and support from a lot of people without whom I wouldn’t be here. The application process is a team effort.

2. Worked with recommenders who knew me very well and could speak to specifics really well.

3. Did my best to make sure my application was true to who I am.

Accepted: Do you have a job lined up for next year? What role did Kellogg play in helping you secure that position?

Rohan: I interned at the Business Operations (“Biz Ops”) team at LinkedIn over the summer and I am lucky to be going back.

Kellogg helped every step of the way – 2nd years were invaluable in helping me prepare for interviews and the year spent at school went a long way in helping me perform at the job.

(Side note for prospective students: While every school paints the picture of business school being that magical place where your dream job awaits, the recruiting journey is generally a tough one. More here – along with links to 5 other posts about how to prepare for and think about the experience.)

Accepted: Can you tell us about the 200 words project? 

Rohan: Every Sunday, I share an idea via email within 200 words to people I’ve met over the years – friends, family, ex-colleagues, etc. I post it a week later on my blog.

This idea is typically a synthesized learning either from a book I’ve read or from a blog post or article I’ve read online. I’ve been doing this in different forms for 7 or so years now. Creating and sharing content every week requires me to read, absorb and synthesize ideas. And, of course, it helps me stay in touch with folks I’ve met over the years.

(Side note: If you are ever looking for book recommendations, please feel free to check out www.RohanRajiv.com. Most books have links to a short summary as well.)

Accepted: Can you tell us more about your blog? How has it evolved over these years? What have you gained from the blogging experience? 

Rohan: One of my side projects during my undergrad years was a student talk show. It was mocked by a group of classmates and I took the criticism to heart. I had always thought of myself as a fairly confident person. But my reaction to the criticism made me realize that I was way too insecure for my own good. I thought the way out might be to share my failures on a blog so I learn to treat them as learnings. But, my first challenge turned out to be to simply develop the discipline to do something every day. Most days, I’d get in a line. Soon, I began posting quotes every weekday as a way to make sure I didn’t miss days. Two and a half years into the experience, I finally developed the discipline to post “long form” every day and have done so for the 5+ years since.

The blog has changed me more than I have changed it. It has fundamentally changed how I view the world – any failure is no longer a failure – it is a blog-worthy experience I can now learn from. This learning mindset has changed how I approach life, and, while it has given me a more evolved understanding of the principles that govern a good life, it has taught me that happiness in life isn’t about attempting to big things. It is about repeatedly doing small things with extraordinary love.

And, I’ve also been fortunate to hear from and meet many wonderful readers from around the world over these years. These sort of serendipitous connections have a magical feel about them.

You can follow Rohan’s story by checking out his blog at www.ALearningaDay.com. Thank you Rohan for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages. For specific advice on how to create the best Kellogg application.

Image

Image

Related Resources:

MBA Admissions for Indian Applicants

• Kellogg 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• MBA Admissions: Low GMAT or GPA

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Putting Learning Above All: A Talk with Rohan from Kellogg appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Expert Post
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5734

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Location: Los Angeles CA
2017 MBA Applicant: Where will You Be on March 2? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Feb 2016, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 2017 MBA Applicant: Where will You Be on March 2?
Image
Image

Applying last minute is never a good idea. In fact, doing anything last minute rarely pays off, but especially when it comes to something like securing your future, we recommend that you give yourself plenty of time to get the job done right.

Step 1: Attend our upcoming webinar,Get Accepted in 2017: 7 Steps to a Strong MBA Application on Wednesday, March 2nd at 10am PT/1pm ET.

During the webinar, Linda will lay out the next 7 steps of a 2017 acceptance. Do the legwork now, and make your lives a heck of a lot simpler later on when those applications are released.

Image

Reserve your spot for Get Accepted in 2017: 7 Steps to a Strong MBA Application now!

Image

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post 2017 MBA Applicant: Where will You Be on March 2? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Expert Post
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5734

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Location: Los Angeles CA
Grad School Admissions: When Should You Apply? [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Feb 2016, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Grad School Admissions: When Should You Apply?
Image
Image
Goals set? Start now!

When is the best time to apply to graduate school?

Now: Here’s Why…

Here are a few factors that indicate that NOW is the time for you to apply.

1. You have a specific goal that requires a graduate degree, be it an MBA, MD, JD, or any other combo of letters.

2. You feel you are stagnating in your current position.

3. You are excited about the prospect of 2 (or 4 or 10) more years of study towards your professional goal.

4. You have the level of experience desired by the graduate programs you are targeting.

5. You have the qualifications.

6. You have the means (or know-how to acquire the means) to pay for your education.

Goals: Don’t Go Any Further Without Them

#1 above is an absolute requirement for graduate admissions. It doesn’t matter whether we are talking about MBA admissions, med school admissions, grad school, or law school admissions, you need to have a clear vision of what you want to do at the other end of the graduate study tunnel. For MBAs that goal has to be fairly specific. For future doctors, lawyers and other professionals, the goal can be a little more general, but still must require the education you are seeking.

Reasons 2-6 are not sufficient reasons on their own to pursue a graduate education, but in combination with #1 they are good indicators that now is a propitious time to apply.

These Reasons Just Won’t Cut It

What are the wrong reasons to pursue a graduate degree?

1. You hate your job.

2. You don’t want to get a job.

3. Your parents offered to pay for it.

4. Everyone else is doing it.

5. You always assumed you were going to go for a graduate degree and have no other plan.

6. You worry that if you don’t go now, you’ll never go.

Relate to one or more of these? You will be applying for the wrong reasons and should postpone your application.

Image

Image

Related Resources:

• The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes

• 6 Tips for Getting Started on Your Application Essays

• Epidemic Among Applicants!

Tags: Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Grad School Admissions: When Should You Apply? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Expert Post
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5734

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Location: Los Angeles CA
Increase in On-Campus Recruiting for B-Schools [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Feb 2016, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Increase in On-Campus Recruiting for B-Schools
Image
Good news for MBA students and applicants – the MBA Career Services & Employer Alliance (a global association of business school career management offices and companies who hire MBA and Masters in Business students) reported last week an increase in on-campus recruiting for full-time positions.

Results includes research on full-time MBAs, part-time MBAs (but not EMBAs), Masters in Finance, Masters in Technology, and other specialized Masters programs.

Image

A few highlights:

• On-campus recruiting for full-time positions for full-time students is up slightly since last year – 65% reported an increase this year (2015), compared to 64% the previous year (2014).

• 61% of full-time MBA programs reported an increase in full-time postings, down from 79% in 2014.

• 46% saw an increase in on-campus recruiting for part-time students for full-time positions.

• 64% reported an increase in full-time postings for part-time students.

• 55% reported an increase in on-campus recruiting and full-time job postings for specialized Masters programs.

• The strongest increases in on-campus recruiting were seen in the technology and consulting industries. The largest decrease in recruiting was in the energy industry.

• Full-time job postings for international MBA students decreased or remained the same this year compared to last – 44% announced no changes, 38% announced decreases, and only 19% said there was an increase in this area. On campus recruiting for international students was up slightly.

“We are delighted to see this continued upward trend in job opportunities for graduate business students,” says Damian Zikakis, MBA Career Services & Employer Alliance President, and Director, Career Services, Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan. “The positive trend we’ve observed extends from traditional full-time MBA programs through part-time MBA and specialized Masters degrees offered by our member schools worldwide.”

Image

Image

Related Resources:

• The Hottest Skills that will Land You the Hottest Jobs

• Payscale: How Much Can You Earn, and How To Earn It

• Highlights from the Bloomberg Job Skills Report 2016

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Increase in On-Campus Recruiting for B-Schools appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Expert Post
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5734

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Location: Los Angeles CA
Top 6 Tips for Visiting Business Schools [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Feb 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Top 6 Tips for Visiting Business Schools
Image
Image
School visit tip #1: Do it!

Now is a great time for business school applicants to visit their top choice programs – classes are in session, students and professors aren’t yet stressed by exams, recruiting may be in action, and the weather is warming up (well, in some places).

Rule for Life: Do What Makes Sense

Our #1 tip for visiting schools is that you should definitely visit your target b-schools if it makes logistical and financial sense. Programs understand that geography and financial resources can prevent a visit, but if it is possible to visit the schools on your list, then you certainly should – not because of imaginary “brownie points” that the school may or may not award you, but because you will be a better informed applicant after you visit than before. You will know more about the school and its culture. You will know more about why it appeals to you, what about its style matches yours, and how it supports your goals.

You will also, most likely, prepare a better application for admission after you’ve learned more about the school.

Your Checklist for a Valuable School Visit

Once you’ve made the decision to visit, we recommend that you follow this advice:

1. Visit when class is in session.

You want to get a feel for what life on campus is like, and you won’t get much of an idea of student life if everyone’s on break. Likewise, if classes are done for the term and everyone is cramming for exams and taking tests, you won’t get the full day-to-day campus experience (though you will get to see what b-school students are like under pressure!).

Another good reason to go while class is in session is so that you can sit in on classes – definitely take advantage of this if your target program offers this option.

(Note: Like we said above, this is why now is a great time to visit.)

2. Take the tour and attend the info sessions.

Again, your goal is to learn as much as possible about the program. Don’t brush off the official tours because you’d rather explore on your own; instead, take the tour, sit through the info sessions, and explore on your own.

3. Talk to everyone!

B-school students and adcom are generally more than happy to talk with prospective students, so don’t miss out on the valuable opportunity to chat anyone and everyone about their b-school experience.

4. Prepare your questions in advance.

You’ll have the most productive conversations if you go in with some direction. Obviously questions will differ depending on what’s important to you and where you’re visiting, but here are some basic questions:

• What is a typical day like for a first or second year student?

• How do professors view their teaching – as an integrated approach to business, as part of the interconnection of business functions (and if interconnected, how do they collaborate with other professors), or simply as a job? How do they balance teaching and research?

• How are interview slots assigned? Is there a bidding process? What is it?

5. Review the school’s website before you go.

Asking questions is good; asking questions that are answered on the homepage of your target school’s website…not so good. Do your research ahead of time that you can ask specific, unique questions that show that you’ve done your homework as well as done some good quality thinking.

6. If you can’t visit a school, visit info sessions closer to home.

While this won’t facilitate experiencing life on campus, you will still get to make an appearance before the adcom and speak with students/alumni/faculty – whoever is leading the event. You can also do some quality research by emailing current students and reading student blogs.

Bottom Line

Visiting a school is highly recommended, and if you go, you should take advantage of all of the school’s people and resources so you can learn as much as possible about whether you’re the right fit for the program. If, however, you’re unable to visit, then you should still do all you can to learn firsthand about your target schools so you can see how you’d fit in and optimize your applications to reflect that!

Image

Image

Related Resources:

• MBA Admissions A-Z: 26 Great Tips (free guide)

• Choosing And Visiting Business Schools

• What to Do at an MBA Fair (podcast episode)

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Top 6 Tips for Visiting Business Schools appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Expert Post
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5734

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Location: Los Angeles CA
Important MBA 2017 Webinar on Wednesday! [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Feb 2016, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Important MBA 2017 Webinar on Wednesday!
Image
Image

We’d like to remind you about Wednesday’s webinar, Get Accepted in 2017: 7 Steps to a Strong MBA Application, which will take place at 10am PT/1pm ET (that’s March 2nd). It is essential that you attend if you are planning on applying to a competitive b-school next year.

Applicants who get an early start can move through the application process more quickly, more efficiently, and with better results than those who leave their MBA applications to the last minute.

Image

See you on Wednesday!

Image

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Important MBA 2017 Webinar on Wednesday! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Expert Post
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5734

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Location: Los Angeles CA
Cornell Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Mar 2016, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Cornell Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
Image
Image
The Cornell Executive MBA Program has three required essay questions and one optional question in its application.

One of the most important things to keep in mind is brevity. While no one is going to be counting individual words, the short word count guideline is a clear indicator that you should work on clarity of thought with all of your answers. Cornell interviews every applicant to its program, so if you are concerned that the essay format doesn’t give you space for your answers, rest assured you will have the opportunity to discuss them further in the interview.

Question 1: In a concise statement, tell us why you are seeking an MBA. Specifically, what are your short and long-term career goals? And how will an MBA earned through an Executive MBA program at Cornell University help you achieve your goals? (400 words max)

You first want to identify why you feel you need an MBA, linking your past/current career experience with your short and long term goals and what about an MBA degree will allow you to achieve them. Then you need to relay “Why Cornell?” and “Why EMBA?” For the former, be convincing about the reasons Cornell is the best choice for you, and show you have done your homework – “location” and “reputation” won’t cut it. The admissions committee wants to know what you anticipate the program will be like, what you will get out of it, how the program fits with your career vision, and what the entire experience means to you as a person. For the latter, by making the choice to apply to an Executive MBA program, you are of course signaling you will keep your job while going to school. Indicate why that format is the best fit.

Question 2: Briefly describe your leadership style. Include two examples of situations that helped you develop your style.  One example should be a positive situation that helped to shape or reaffirm it.  The other example should be of a situation with an unsuccessful outcome that led you to change or redefine that style. (400 words max)

This essay wants you to showcase that you are a thoughtful leader who can build upon strengths and also learn from mistakes. The examples you use don’t need to be high impact (though they certainly can be if they are relevant), but rather ones where there were clear takeaways from the experiences that you implemented moving forward. This essay encourages you to show humility, arguably an important characteristic for a successful leader, so don’t shy away from the opportunity to show that with the unsuccessful situation.

Question 3: Cornell Executive MBA students are expected to be supportive and effective members of a learning team.  Describe your philosophy regarding teamwork. Specifically, how do you define success in a team? (250 words max)

The Cornell EMBA program values team players. Throughout the program students are placed in rotating teams, with the goal of supporting each other with the coursework as well as developing and completing group projects. They want individuals who are willing, ready and able to collaborate with the rest of their cohort. Discuss how your philosophy and definition of team success fit with that model.

Optional Essay: What else would you like us to know? Please use this statement to address potential concerns such as gaps in employment or prior academic difficulties. You can also use this statement to highlight any achievements or significant life events that are not included elsewhere in the application. (250 words max)

If there are flaws in your application, they will be noticed. It’s much easier to address them upfront than in an interview situation. Be as honest as you can possibly be. Keep in mind the admissions committee members are human, too, and they have flaws as well! If you opt to share additional accomplishments, make sure they truly do add to your application and the type of student you will be, so that the additional information comes across as pertinent information rather than just bragging.

Deadlines:

The Class of 2018 application is open and applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

• For the Executive MBA Americas, priority will be given to applications received before May 6, 2016.

• For the Executive MBA Metro New York, priority will be given to applications received before June 10, 2016.

Applications will be accepted after these dates only if space is available.

We encourage all applicants to apply early to ensure a seat in the class and to allow ample time to prepare for the start of the program.

Image

Image
Jen Weld worked as an admissions consultant and Former Asst. Dir. of Admissions at Cornell’s EMBA program (4 years) prior to joining Accepted. She has an additional 10 years of experience in higher ed and corporate marketing.

 

Related Resources:

• Excellent Executive MBA Admissions Advice

• School-Specific EMBA Application Essay Tips

• Tips for Executive MBA Reapplicants

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Cornell Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Expert Post
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5734

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Location: Los Angeles CA
5 Tips to Assess Your MBA Profile [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Mar 2016, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 5 Tips to Assess Your MBA Profile
Image
Image
Checked off the boxes? Now reach for your goal!

An MBA application is like a mosaic. Each element contributes to create a full picture of who you are. Some pieces will be brighter or more colorful than others. For those less sparkly components (aka your weaknesses), you can either polish them to hide their dullness and to highlight the brilliance that surrounds them, or you can re-evaluate your school choices to be more competitive.

Here are five tips for assessing your profile – examining and weighing your strengths and weaknesses – so you can narrow down your list and apply to the best schools for you.

1. GMAT/GPA

If your score is more than 30 points below the average listed at your target school, then you can either adjust your list of target schools and aim for MBA programs that have lower GMAT averages, or you can keep your list and retake the GMAT.

That being said, it’s only one factor in your application. If you scored low on the GMAT, you may be an outlier in another area, which could mitigate your score.

Your undergraduate GPA is another factor the adcom considers. Those with a 3.6 and above are generally fine at top schools. If you had a wobbly semester or two, use the optional essay to provide context and discuss what you’ve done to address those weak areas. Perhaps you retook a few classes, or later enrolled in a continuing ed course to brush up your skill set.

2. Work experience

Top business schools are generally looking for folks with between 3-7 years of work experience.

Certain professions are highly represented. For example, at Harvard, the top professions pre-MBA are consulting, financial services, VC/PE and “High Tech/Communications.”  At Wharton, it’s consulting and military/government/non-profit. At Stanford it’s consulting, VC/PE and military/government/non-profit.

If you’re not a consultant, in finance, or a government wonk – that doesn’t mean you’re not competitive! MBA programs are also looking for diversity to bring differing viewpoints to class discussions. What you need to communicate is how your achievements are extraordinary and how your background will add to the school’s diversity. That’s what will make you stand out.

3. International considerations

International applicants need to show work experience + international exposure. Or work experience + extraordinary accomplishments. (For that matter, non-international applicants would also do well to show their international exposure!)

Take a look at the profiles of students who head up international clubs at top US and UK b-schools. More likely than not they have one of two boxes checked.

1. They have significant international experience working outside of their home country, often with a multinational company or recognized global organization.

2. They’ve done something truly extraordinary in the context of their profession.

If you have never traveled or worked outside your home country, then your accomplishments should stand out anywhere around the globe. And not just with high test scores, but by introducing significant innovation at work, developing a skill, creating a business, or founding a socially-oriented activity that’s unique and interesting.

Are you networking for international assignments at work? If not, start doing so now.

Would you consider what you’ve done, extraordinary? If not, stop dreaming and start doing it now.

4. Goals

Your goals need to make sense based on your past experience. They should draw a clear connection from your past to your future.

Thinking about switching careers? That’s fine – just show the admissions committee that you’ve already gained some exposure to the industry, and why your past experience will be an asset as you move forward.

Bear in mind that the adcom will likely assess your employ-ability. Will your background + an MBA make sense to recruiters? Are you an international student? You may have a harder time getting hired by a firm outside of countries where you are already permitted to work. It’s best to show in your application that you’re flexible – you’re willing to return to your home country, get some more experience, then branch out based on your own networking.

5. Fit and familiarity

Have you taken a summer session course on campus? Are you an alum of the undergraduate program? Have you worked in the city where the school is located? If so, then you can then make a better case for being familiar with a program’s curriculum and community.

Your post-MBA plans also play a role when assessing “fit.” Do you have experience in a school’s specialization? Do you have family in the area, or previous business connections that would lead you to happily settle in the school’s locale after graduation? Are you a big city kind of person, or do you enjoy the strong connections forged in smaller communities?

Be HONEST with yourself. If a school ticks your boxes on paper but you can’t get a feel for how it would be to study there, then you should definitely plan a campus visit if you can afford it. (Visiting is a great opportunity!) Rankings and name recognition are a place to start, but ultimately, an MBA is a HUGE investment. Don’t make it the worst two-year vacation you went into debt for and will spend a lifetime paying back. Make it a transformative experience. Find an environment where you will thrive.

Do you need help assessing your profile and determining which b-schools are best for you? We can help. Head to our MBA consulting info page now.

Image

Image
Michelle Stockman is a professional journalist, former Columbia Business School admissions insider, and experienced MBA admissions consultant.

 

Related Resources:

• Why MBA? (free guide)

Tips for Researching MBA Programs

5 A’s for Your Low GPA (podcast)

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post 5 Tips to Assess Your MBA Profile appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Expert Post
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5734

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Location: Los Angeles CA
Best Practices for Financing Your MBA [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Mar 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Best Practices for Financing Your MBA
Image
Image

We want you to have the smoothest possible MBA financial journey – before, during, and after your studies. Check out a recording of our recent webinar, presented by Prodigy Finance’s student finance guru, Zack Hirschfeld, for expert tips on how to budget during your MBA, plan for unexpected costs, and how to handle your grace period and loan repayments.

Image

View Paying for Your MBA: Before, During & After and become financially wiser today!

Image

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Best Practices for Financing Your MBA appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Expert Post
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5734

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Location: Los Angeles CA
7 Ways to Distinguish Between Similar MBA Programs [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Mar 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 7 Ways to Distinguish Between Similar MBA Programs
Image
Image
Go to the school that will open the right doors for YOU.

School marketing materials/presentations/websites frequently sound very much the same. So how can applicants wisely research their options and discern the points of difference?

When doing school research, pay special attention to the following differentiating features:

1. The Employment Profile. See where graduates find jobs. Which schools send the most grads to the companies, industries, and locations you are most interested in?

2. The Class Profile. Do you want a large class or a small, close-knit class? Do you want an urban or rural setting? Do you really want to be in a class that draws over 70% of its students from engineering, business, and technical fields? Or would you prefer to be in a class where 46% come from the social sciences and humanities? Both MIT and Stanford provide outstanding MBA educations, but their class make-up is very different. You may prefer one or the other.

3. Curriculum. Would you chafe at Harvard’s rigid first year where everyone takes the same classes? Or would you be lost with all the options at Chicago, which prides itself on its flexibility? Is the ability to pass out of prerequisites important to you? Do you want a lot of teacher cooperation and integration of business functions such as is provided by Tuck or Yale.

4. Methodology. Do you prefer a mix of methodologies? Check out Wharton. Do you seek an emphasis on projects and hands-on learning as at Ross? Do you want strict case method? Take a closer look at HBS and Darden.

5. Clubs & Extracurriculars. There are many schools out there that have imitated MIT Sloan’s business plan competition, but not all programs have a social enterprise competition (HBS does). If you are interested in social enterprise, that competition may be particularly appealing. What are some of the unusual clubs at the different schools that you might be interested in. For example, almost every school will have a Marketing Club, but only some, like Columbia, will have a Luxury Goods Marketing Club. Again, if this is your interest, the existence and health of that club may be an important attraction for you.

6. Professor Research. If there is a prof or two researching the niche appealing to you, they may be the magnet pulling you to that program. Are there independent study opportunities? Do they teach MBA students? What classes?

7. Fit. Then there is that almost indefinable quality called “fit.” Visit the schools you are considering to determine fit. If visiting isn’t feasible, talk to current students, read MBA student blogs and interviews, and follow the student body newspapers.

Understanding the differences among business schools isn’t easy, but it is worthwhile. Grasping these points of difference will enable you to make more intelligent application and acceptance decisions.

Image

Image

Related Resources:

• U.S. News 2016 Best Graduate Business Schools

• 3 Ways to Determine Which B-Schools are a Good Fit for You

• How Many B-Schools Should You Apply To?

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post 7 Ways to Distinguish Between Similar MBA Programs appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Expert Post
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5734

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Location: Los Angeles CA
5 Key Qualifying Factors the EMBA Adcoms Look For [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Mar 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 5 Key Qualifying Factors the EMBA Adcoms Look For
Image
Image

This is the fifth post in our Ace the EMBA series on how to apply successfully to a top executive MBA program. Get need-to-know EMBA basics down with these important tips.

After you decide which programs you’ll apply to, you’re ready to start the hands-on application work. As you update your resume, plan your essays and choose recommenders, keep in mind several “qualifying” factors that EMBA admissions committees want to see in applicants they consider for acceptance. These factors will put you in the running for consideration; they’ll make you a viable candidate.

Throughout the application, but primarily through the essay(s), address these key questions:

1. Are your goals credible, and do they contain the right blend of feasibility and ambition?

Appropriate goals will place you within senior management, since presumably you are already at mid-management level or higher (or a comparable position) if you work for a company. If you are a business owner, your goals should clarify not only your plans for the business, but also the specific role(s) you intend to undertake – i.e., your own professional growth path. In addition, the adcoms want to be assured that the graduates will be a credit to the program!

All EMBA applications require a goals essay or a similar Statement of Purpose/Intent. Be prepared to discuss your immediate/short-term, intermediate, and long-term goals. Not all goals essays ask for this breakdown, but many do – and even if a question doesn’t ask for it, it will hardly hurt to present such a progression, for context.

2. Do you have the knowledge and skills to succeed in the EMBA academic program?

Even if your goals are credible and appropriate, you will need a fundamental familiarity with business operations plus quantitative skills to handle the coursework. Undergrad and/or grad transcripts will cover the quant aspect.

But EMBA applicants who come from non-business sectors – education, government, clinical medicine, and nonprofit are not uncommon – you have a higher burden to (a) show that you need business training, specifically, to address your goals and (b) that you understand the core purpose and content of graduate level business education.  You can ask your recommenders to address this point and you can work it into your essays.

For those lacking quant coursework, you can take a reputable online or community college course and/or take the GMAT and score 80% or above in the quant portion.

3. Will you contribute to the program (professionally and/or personally, during and after)?

This is a three-pronged point: (A) Does the quality of your experience make it a potentially rich and valuable resource to draw from?  (B) Do you have something to say – do you draw insight and meaning from that experience? (C) Do you share – are you a team player/collaborator?

EMBA programs are learning communities, and thus require willing contribution from all parties. While your recommendations can and should shed light on this point, your essays will be the primary vehicle to communicate your prospective contributions both as a student and as an alumnus/a.

4. Do you have the right level and amount of experience to fit the program (both its student body and its coursework)?

As we indicated in earlier posts, EMBA programs and their various sub-programs/options are looking for specific amounts and levels of experience. And these two items – amount and level – are inter-related.

In the “classic” EMBA candidate, the “level” will be achieved in a certain amount of years, during which the candidate progresses at a quick if not necessarily breakneck pace. You may have achieved the desired level with fewer years of experience, or you may have taken longer to achieve the desired level. Of these two deviations, the former is preferable to adcoms generally, because it indicates a high achiever. However, someone in the latter situation may well have good reasons for the slower pace – family matters, previous career transition, industry volatility, etc. Again, the burden is on the applicant to clarify such situations, and not to give the impression that you’re less than high achiever. Often, entrepreneurs seek the EMBA education when their business is poised for a growth spurt that will involve greater organizational and financial complexity than they’re prepared to handle with ingenuity alone.

5. Do you understand the demands of studying while working, and do you have a workable plan for fitting the EMBA studies into your life?

Some EMBA applications have an essay question specifically on this point. The last thing the adcoms want is for someone to leave the program before completion, or to get by academically without being a full participant in the learning community. And it’s very easy to underestimate the demands of studying and contributing while maintaining one’s professional and personal responsibilities. Whether in an essay or during the interview, demonstrate your time management skills and show that you have juggled multiple responsibilities effectively.

With these qualifying factors covered, the next post will how to go from “qualified” to “accepted” by differentiating and distinguishing yourself as an applicant.

Image

Image
By Cindy Tokumitsu, co-author of The EMBA Edge, and author of the free special report, Ace the EMBA. Cindy has helped MBA applicants get accepted to top EMBA programs around the world. She is delighted to help you too!

Related Resources:

• School-Specific EMBA Application Essay Tips

• Excellent Executive MBA Admissions Advice (podcast episode)

• Executive MBA Pros & Cons

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post 5 Key Qualifying Factors the EMBA Adcoms Look For appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Expert Post
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5734

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Location: Los Angeles CA
IMD 2016 Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Mar 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: IMD 2016 Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
Image
Image
IMD MBA Campus

The IMD EMBA essay questions will generate a comprehensive view of you as a businessperson and a professional – in very succinct form. Although the essays are not long, be prepared to put good thought into deciding what to write. Also spend time deciding what to emphasize about a given experience or point, because you will not be able to include all aspects given the brevity.   Keep in mind the program’s targeting of seasoned managers on the brink of senior management.

Rather than in a traditional set of essay questions, the IMD application asks you a couple of critical questions within the application.

5. Description of career history

Please provide a brief description of your career history and accomplishments to date, including current duties and reporting responsibilities.  (The response must be limited to 11 lines.)

This line limit gives you about 130-150 words – not much.  You can either weave in your accomplishments (selectively discussing the key ones) into your career history, or you can do a short paragraph with your career history followed by a short paragraph about your key accomplishments. Regarding the accomplishments, include at least one recent one. In this short essay, be specific and quantify where possible/relevant.

9. Briefly state your career objectives.  (The response must be limited to 10 lines.)

This prompt gives you just a few sentences. Be specific: roles/positions, industry, possibly geography. Give an example of companies that interest you. State not just what you want to do, but also what you’d like to accomplish, what impact you’d like to have in the long term (your “vision”).

10-13. Essays

Questions 10-13 should be answered on separate sheets of paper. Please re-type the questions with your answers and include your name on each page. Please take this opportunity to present yourself to the Admissions Committee in a concise, informative and open manner. Each essay should be a maximum of 15 lines which is about 200 words per essay.

10. Please describe three situations, business or otherwise, in which you were involved and which were of importance to you. Explain why you view them as such.

Selecting three interesting, different, and in some way pivotal situations is the key to using this essay to maximum effect. It gives the adcom YOUR lens onto your life and career –and it gives you a chance to present a multifaceted self-portrait. Ideally at least one of the three situations will be non-work related. A general rule of thumb in terms of time frame is, the longer ago something happened, the “bigger” its meaning and impact should be to make it a viable essay topic. For example, you should generally steer clear of discussing something as far back as high school – unless, for example, you escaped with your family from a region at war. Most likely you’ll discuss things within the last five years. For the work-related items, try to have one fairly recent, and also discuss experiences that are different. I suggest three paragraphs, each devoted to one situation. In each, describe the situation, and then discuss why it was important to you – and if it was so for multiple reasons, focus on one or two. Be thoughtful and insightful, don’t just state the obvious.

11. Please comment on a situation where you failed to reach an objective and what you learned from it.

Here you have a chance to go more in depth on a particular experience. Ideally use an experience from work, not too far in the past.  First narrate the situation, giving specifics such as where, who, when, etc. Don’t shrink from the part where you failed to reach the objective – this is the pivot point of the story. Explain what happened and be frank about where you fell short. Describe your learning from it – and then add a quick sentence noting how you have since applied that learning.

12. In what ways do you believe you can contribute to the IMD Executive MBA program?

Identify 2-3 key ways you stand out among IMD Executive MBA applicants and elaborate on how they will enable you to contribute. There is no formula here; it will differ for each applicant. Some examples of factors to consider are a unique industry perspective or niche, an unusual or powerful experience at work, in-depth experience in under-represented developing region, work that deals with critical or evolving social issues, significant and high-impact volunteer work.  These are just examples. For the top 2-3 factors you mention, describe each briefly and now how/why it will enable you to contribute. After this substantive discussion, if you wish and if you have room, you can add a couple more points in a concluding sentence or two – but there is no need to do so.

13. (Optional) Is there any additional information that is critical for the Executive MBA Admissions Committee to know that has not been covered elsewhere in this application?

The use of the phrase “is critical” indicates that you should not use this essay simply to further market yourself; write it only if there is an essential item not mentioned that the adcom must know in order to have a full understanding of your candidacy.  Obviously you’d need to discuss things such as an unimpressive undergrad record, gap in resume, etc.  But given the opportunity to discuss a range of issues that the regular essays present, you should not add another “interesting” experience here.

Application Deadline:

“Applications are reviewed, and acceptance decisions made, as the application are received. This means that the class can fill up some months in advance of the date it actually starts. We strongly recommend that you apply early.”

If you would like professional guidance with your IMD EMBA application, please consider Accepted’s essay editing and admissions consulting or our Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the IMD EMBA application.

Image

Image
By Cindy Tokumitsu, co-author of The EMBA Edge, and author of the free guide, Ace the EMBA. Cindy has helped MBA applicants get accepted to top EMBA programs around the world. She is delighted to help you too!

Related Resources:

Why MBA? free guide

• Excellent Executive MBA Admissions Advice podcast

• School-Specific EMBA Application Essay Tips

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post IMD 2016 Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Expert Post
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5734

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Location: Los Angeles CA
MBA 2017 – Ready, Set, Go! [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Mar 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: MBA 2017 – Ready, Set, Go!
Image
Image
Deadlines are sooner than you think. Are you prepared?

It’s not even spring yet. So why am I nagging you to get moving on your MBA application prep?

Not just because those Round 1 deadlines creep up with wicked stealth and speed. But also because there is so much you can still do between now and then to improve your candidacy (sometimes a lot, sometimes on the margins, but margins matter). Also, preparing now will enable you to apply to more programs earlier, and therefore to adjust strategy in Round 2 if necessary.

So, what should you be doing NOW?

First, two obvious things.

1. GMAT. I’ve seen too many people leave the GMAT till late summer or early fall, get a lower score than they expect, and have to recalculate their plans. If you don’t have a GMAT score yet, NOW is the time to prepare and take the GMAT, ideally by end of spring. Then, if your score isn’t realistic for your schools of choice, you have time to retake the test, reconsider your target schools, or both. And you will have it behind you when you focus on the applications.

2. School Research: It’s best to visit schools when classes are in session. So NOW is the ideal time to research schools for a preliminary list. I developed an easy-to-use resource, Best MBA Programs, A Guide to Selecting the Right One, to walk you through this process. This effort will also get you thinking about your profile strategically.

Then there are the less obvious things.

3. Academic Record: Is your academic record a potential weakness? There is time (not much), NOW, to take a relevant course or two, complete it, and have an A or two to report to the adcom as evidence of your ability to excel academically.

4. Recommendations: Not sure whom to ask for recommendations? Sort it out NOW, while there’s time to weigh the pros and cons of various options, to possibly broach the issue (directly or indirectly) with people, and adapt as needed. You do know whom you’ll ask? NOW is time to enhance your positive visibility to them, so they can’t help but write a scintillating letter.

5. Leadership: You can improve – deepen, broaden, refine – your leadership NOW and every day before your application. Whether or not you have a formal leadership role, you can always find ways to exercise informal leadership. And you can’t have too much leadership in an MBA application. If there isn’t space to write about it in essays, portray it in your resume.

6. Goals. Naturally, since you’re planning to apply for an MBA, you know what your goals are. But what are you going to say about them of interest? About your planned industry, company, function? Read. Books, journals, company reports, not just the WSJ. And do informational interviews (use your undergrad alumni network). An interview needn’t be longer than 10 minutes with two good questions to be illuminating! Interesting, informed perspective on your goals will make your essay jump out from the sea of merely competent essays. But do this research NOW, to digest and integrate it well.

7. Resume. NOW is also the perfect time to prepare or adapt your resume for business school. You can get it at least 95% done, and adjust as needed for any new developments later. This way, if you have a chance to visit or school or meet with an adcom member earlier than you planned, you’re ready.

Six months and counting to round 1 deadlines…

Image

Image
By Cindy Tokumitsu, author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

Related Resources:

MBA Action Plan: 6 Steps for the 6 Months Before You Apply

Top 6 Tips for Visiting Business Schools

5 Tips to Assess Your MBA Profile

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post MBA 2017 – Ready, Set, Go! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Expert Post
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5734

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

Location: Los Angeles CA
3 Key Ways to Stand Out Through Your EMBA Essays [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Mar 2016, 12:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 3 Key Ways to Stand Out Through Your EMBA Essays
Image
Image
Essentially, you’re giving the adcom the reason to select you

After demonstrating that you’re a well qualified applicant comes the biggest challenge: differentiating yourself. You must show your uniqueness and value as an individual and as an applicant in a way that is relevant to the EMBA program. Essentially, you’re giving the adcom the reason to select you out of other highly qualified, accomplished peers in similar industry, functional, and demographic groups.

While some differentiating factors might be apparent from your resume, e.g., if you work in an industry or function that is relatively underrepresented, the essays are where you can most vividly portray your distinctiveness.

There are three key avenues for differentiating yourself:

1. Distinctive Factual Points

These are the unique facts of your experience, such as industry niche, pertinent experience like managing through a global merger, special challenges like dealing with heavily regulated industries or an unusual organizational structure.

How to determine whether an aspect of your experience is a differentiating factor?  Dig past the top soil. For example, say you are in consulting.  It’s likely in any top EMBA program that a good percentage of students will come from that industry, and so it may not seem like much of a differentiator.  But going deeper into your consulting experience for the specifics – e.g., you consult on IT strategy for the defense sector – you’ll likely find details that are differentiating, whereas general management consulting would not be.

To get the most mileage out of a differentiating factor, don’t just state the fact in your essays, but also provide illustrative detail and anecdote to truly show what is special and different about it (let the reader really see it).

2. Your Individual Perspective

Individual perspective is a way that everyone can differentiate himself. In most essays you will have to reflect on your experiences to some extent. When doing so, don’t just highlight the facts and accomplishments – identify the key learning, growth, and/or insight you gained from each change or important event; clarify your decision process when taking career steps. This individual view is inherently unique, even if the experience you are describing may seem commonplace. Do keep such perspective relevant; for maximum impact, it should align with your decision making vis-à-vis your career path and/or goals. So be selective in adding insights, learning, etc. according to that criterion.

In the essays, you can either weave this individual perspective and insight into the narrative, or present the narrative and then add a paragraph focusing on your reflection.

3. Your Goals

The goals essay will be the backbone of your application. (Rather than a specific goals essay, some EMBA applications feature a Statement of Purpose or Statement of Intent, which typically will also include some goals discussion.)

For each phase of your goals, in the essay you should discuss:

a. What you expect to do at that level,

b. How you hope to grow,

c. Most important – what you hope to accomplish (for the company and/or industry and/or market and/or consumers and/or community, etc. – this is about external, real-world impact).

Of course, the points above are not completely separated in reality; but they all should be addressed. The last point is most important because it’s what will get the adcom rooting for you.

Provide specifics: titles or positions, specific markets, likely number of people to manage, budget size or P&L responsibility, etc. Also describe how this particular step builds on your previous experience.

How do you make your goals do “extra duty” by differentiating you? Through the vision for what you want to achieve, what impact you want to have – it goes back to that last point c above. While other candidates will likely present similar goals, only you will present this specific vision. For example, if your goal is to become a senior manager at a major pharmaceutical firm, don’t just explain why this a logical and likely step. Get the reader excited about the prospect of your taking this role. Perhaps you perceive certain trends in the regulatory systems or certain production opportunities in developing regions… Being a decision-maker addressing such issues will allow you to maximize chances for your company to continue innovating and marketing new drugs.

In summary, for effective goals essays, keep three short words in mind: what, how, and why.

I hope you’ve found this series of EMBA posts helpful and that it gives you some traction as you start the application process.  A key area of my expertise is working with EMBA applicants.  If you would like more guidance, I would be honored to assist you – as would my colleagues at Accepted. It can be helpful to have an outside perspective to guide you through the application process. Good luck with your applications!

**Image Designed by Freepik

Image
By Cindy Tokumitsu, co-author of The EMBA Edge, and author of the free special report, Ace the EMBA. Cindy has helped MBA applicants get accepted to top EMBA programs around the world. She is delighted to help you too!

Related Resources:

• Why MBA, free guide

• Excellent Executive MBA Admissions Advice, podcast

• EMBA Program Variety

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post 3 Key Ways to Stand Out Through Your EMBA Essays appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 576 [0], given: 74

3 Key Ways to Stand Out Through Your EMBA Essays   [#permalink] 08 Mar 2016, 12:00

Go to page   Previous    1  ...  30   31   32   33   34   35   36  ...  65    Next  [ 1288 posts ] 

    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
EXPERTS_POSTS_IN_THIS_TOPIC MBA Acceptance without a degree? Eschraud 4 06 May 2017, 21:47
EXPERTS_POSTS_IN_THIS_TOPIC MBA Interview Acceptance ? pupanmama 2 15 Apr 2013, 08:10
MBA advantages? Admission acceptance? gesswho810 0 16 Nov 2012, 03:06
EXPERTS_POSTS_IN_THIS_TOPIC Personal MBA Coach Updates PersonalMBACoach 7 07 Sep 2017, 10:03
1 EXPERTS_POSTS_IN_THIS_TOPIC Aringo.com MBA Updates Aringo 77 02 Aug 2015, 04:00
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Accepted MBA Updates

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.