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MBA Admissions Consultant
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Joined: 20 Apr 2003
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International Student Loans with Community-Based Financing [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jan 2016, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: International Student Loans with Community-Based Financing
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Prodigy Finance is the leader in borderless student loans for international postgraduate students. Through our community platform, we offer financing to thousands of MBA and other Masters degree hopefuls, enabling them to attend the world’s top business schools and universities.

Traditional banks are reluctant to lend to international students. That’s where Prodigy comes in. We assess each applicant’s future earning potential (based on the historic achievements of similar postgraduate students) to determine every individual’s personalized loan offer.

Below, we look at the stories of seven MBAs from the USA, Zimbabwe, India, Brazil, Argentina, Colombia and the Ukraine, and learn how Prodigy Finance enabled them to study at London Business School, INSEAD, Oxford Saïd Business School and HEC Paris.



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Liz Reid is Prodigy Finance’s Student Brand Manager. Prior to joining the Prodigy team in March 2013, she worked in the tech startup industry, primarily specializing in the development of online tools for driving performance management and employee engagement. She loves travelling, whether it’s for leisure or work – but especially when it’s to meet the students that Prodigy helps to fund their degrees.

Related Resources:

• Making International Student Loans a Prime Investment

• Financing Your INSEAD MBA

• A Funding Plan for Business School

*This blog post is sponsored by our friends at Prodigy Finance.

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post International Student Loans with Community-Based Financing appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Joined: 20 Apr 2003
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Quick FAFSA Facts [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jan 2016, 11:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Quick FAFSA Facts
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Help them help you by applying!

It’s January. The holidays are over, people are working on (or already breaking) their new year’s resolutions… and it’s time to file the FAFSA. Here are a few must-know facts and tips:

• The FAFSA is the first step towards qualifying for federal and state financial aid (grants, student loans, work study, etc). Many universities also require that you file it in order to determine your eligibility for their own internal financial aid (scholarships, grants, etc).

• You must file a FAFSA each year, with current financial information. Have your tax information ready.

• In order to qualify for federal aid, you must be a US citizen or eligible non-citizen. Certain other restrictions apply.

• If you’re an international student—and not FAFSA eligible—your university’s financial aid office may have a financial statement you can submit in order to establish your financial need.

• Both undergraduates and graduate students should file the FAFSA.

• If you’re an undergrad, you will most likely need to provide your family’s financial information. But graduate and professional students are most often considered “independent” for financial aid purposes.

• Know your deadlines! The application is available each January at fafsa.ed.gov. The FAFSA deadline is in June, but states have individual deadlines as early as February and March. Also be sure that you check the deadlines posted by your university or any scholarship programs you’re applying for—some of them have early deadlines!

• Many private scholarship programs require the FAFSA as a way to establish your financial aid eligibility.

• Don’t assume that you will not qualify for aid! The only way to access federal student aid—including federal student loans— is with this application.

• The FAFSA is a free application. There are some services that will charge you for assistance with the form, but it’s a straightforward process that you can complete yourself for free. The Department of Ed has a guide to help you.



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Related Resources:

Paying for Your MBA: Before, During & After [webinar]

• Financial Aid and Health Insurance for International Students

• New Federal Financial Aid Regulations Promote Transparency

Tags: College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Quick FAFSA Facts appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 581 [0], given: 74

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Should You Apply to B-School Round 3 or Next Year? [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jan 2016, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Should You Apply to B-School Round 3 or Next Year?
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Two compelling options. Choose wisely.

The answer, as is often the case in MBA admissions, is…it depends.

You didn’t think we’d give you a clear cut yes or no answer did you?

FACT: The chances of gaining acceptance decrease as the rounds progress. This means that acceptance rates during R3 are generally lower than during R1 and R2. Similarly, grants and scholarships are harder to come by later in the admissions game.

Now, this doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t apply. Your chances of acceptance will be zero if you don’t apply. They are greater than zero (even if not much greater) if you do apply.

4 Reasons Why You Should Apply R3:

1. You have a class of 2018 or bust attitude. If you really have your heart set on joining the b-school class of 2018, then you should definitely apply R3 (or even R4 if your target program offers that option). Again, you’ll have ZERO chance of getting in if you don’t apply.

2. You’re an admissions dream come true. If you are a truly exceptional candidate – stats-wise, diversity-wise, experience-wise, etc. – then you should apply R3/R4. Not everyone is rejected (or there wouldn’t be such a thing as late rounds) and if anyone is going to get in, it’s going to be those applicants with extremely impressive profiles.

3. You have nothing to lose. If you don’t mind spending the extra money, time, and energy to apply now, get rejected, and then apply again during R1 of the next application season, then you really don’t have much to lose going for it this year. In fact, if you’re lucky enough to get feedback (that is, if you’re unlucky enough to get dinged), then that feedback will prove extremely valuable when you reapply next year.

4. You were rejected R1 and have a new plan. You understand that you simply aimed too high and are now ready to apply to less competitive programs.

6 Reasons Why You Should Wait Until Next Year:

1. Your essay’s still not quite right. Maybe you don’t have the time to create flawless essays before the R3 buzzer. In that case, it’s much better to wait until you can submit something closer to perfect than to rush and send in a sloppy essay early.

2. You plan on retaking the GMAT. If you’re not happy with your current GMAT results, then you should wait until you can apply with that (hopefully) higher score.

3. Your recs won’t be ready. If you won’t be able to secure the best recommendations by the R3/R4 deadline, it’s better to wait for the ideal recommenders than to go with less-impressive ones early.

4. Your work experience is weak. Applying next year will give you more time to bulk up your work experience and personal profiles.

5. You’re uncertain about your goals. If you’re fuzzy as to why you want an MBA or your reasons for choosing particular schools, get clarity, and then apply – preferably round 1.

6. You have international issues. If you are an international applicant and may have trouble getting the necessary visa and financing, it might be worth taking extra time.

If you need more help making this decision, please contact us for more advice.

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Related Resources:

• MBA Admissions A-Z: 26 Great Tips [free guide]

• Application Timing: When Should You Submit?

• MBA Maze: Application Timing

* Image Designed by Freepik

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Should You Apply to B-School Round 3 or Next Year? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 581 [0], given: 74

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Joined: 20 Apr 2003
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5 A’s for Your Low GPA [Episode 137] [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jan 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 5 A’s for Your Low GPA [Episode 137]
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Not proud of your undergrad GPA? Concerned it will hamper your chances of graduate acceptance?  Get ready to find out what to do about it.

The 5 A’s for your low GPA:
1. Assess your GPA (2:40)

Is it really low?

I define a low GPA as one that is .3 on the U.S. 4.0 scale or more below your target school’s average GPA for accepted students.  This information can usually be found in the posted class profile and sometimes in U.S. News rankings.  An alternative definition, which also works in my book, is a GPA that is below the target school’s 75th or 80th percentile, if you have that information.

Let’s take a look at either these definitions and discuss what’s good and bad about them.

The Good

Either of these definitions is relative to the schools that you are targeting.  So if you have a 3.3 and the average GPA of the entering class is a 3.3, you do not have a low GPA. However, don’t tune out yet. If you have that same 3.3 and the schools you are aiming for has an average GPA for accepted students of 3.7+, as do several medical schools, Stanford Business School, a few law schools, and other graduate programs, then you have a low GPA. And you should definitely listen in to the rest of this show.

The Bad

While I like this definition, I also have to issue some warnings and caveats.

• Admissions is about much more than GPA, as you will see later in this show. You cannot look at any one number and focus exclusively on it.

• By focusing on the average, the definition doesn’t reflect the impact of trends in GPA or extenuating circumstances.

• It doesn’t reflect the impact of diversity and non-academic experience on how schools view these numbers.

• Doesn’t reflect how far away you are from the average. A little below is less of a problem than a full point below.

The elements that are not included in my definition – really the fuzzier aspects of admission and the flaws in my definition– provide opportunity for those of you who may have a low GPA and still want to attend the program of your dreams.  They allow you to show that your GPA doesn’t define you or your capability.

2. Analyze the cause(s) of your low GPA (6:19)

Ask yourself:

• Did you have a hard time adjusting to college so your GPA took a hit your freshman year, but improved every year with your landing on the Dean’s List for the last two years and having a 4.0 the last year?

• Did illness or circumstances beyond your control cause a drop in your grades for a specific period of time?

• Did you declare the wrong major and have poor grades in that major until you realized your true calling? Then you started to excel.

• Were you working part-time to support yourself or did you have a major sports commitment in order to qualify for an athletic scholarship?

• Did you start out strong, maybe earning a 3.9 during your freshman year, but then lost your motivation? Did your grades drop steadily so that your GPA average during your senior year had declined to a 3.1? This trend is a red flag even if the overall GPA is a 3.4 or 3.5.

The list above presents several causes in order of difficulty in overcoming them (easiest to hardest).

The causes of your low GPA – as well as how low it is – will influence how you deal with it and how much effort you must expend to mitigate it.

3. Address your low GPA (8:10)

The basic goal in addressing your GPA is to show it isn’t an accurate reflection of your ability, to show you are capable of much, much more.

There are two basic steps to make that case:

1. Ace your test. Whether it’s the MCAT, GMAT, LSAT, GRE or whatever, you need a high test score.  The test score indicates you have the raw talent and aptitude for your chose field.

2. Take classes in your chosen field and earn A’s in them.  For some of you that means a few classes. For others it could mean a masters degree.  Pre-meds and those in healthcare may want to consider a full post-bac program for academic enhancers. (See accepted.com/82 for our podcast on “All Things Postbac.”) For future MBAs, aim for A’s in business-related classes. For law school applicants, you could take a few undergrad law classes or classes that require writing and analysis.  Regardless of degree goal, you want to show that you have the self-discipline, study skills, and motivation to apply yourself and excel in an academic setting related to your chosen field of study.

I sometimes like to say that the test score indicates you have the head to succeed and the grades indicate you have the derriere to succeed. You need both.

How many classes should you take? Well that depends on how bad your GPA is relative to your target school’s average as well as how much time has elapsed since you graduated. If there is a big gap between your GPA and your target school’s average, you may want to enroll in a master’s program or as I mentioned for pre-healthcare applicants, a formal postbac program.  If you have put several years of relevant achievement between you and your undergrad performance, you may need fewer classes to assure schools that you’ve changed, especially if you have a nice high shiny GMAT, GRE, LSAT, or MCAT.

With an above average test score and evidence that you can perform academically, you are well on your way to dealing with that low GPA.

4. Add Context to Your Low GPA (11:58)

Schools may still wonder “What happened? Why was the undergrad GPA low? How do I know it won’t happen again?”

You need to respond to those concerns proactively.  Worried admissions readers tend to vote “Deny.” This is especially true if we’re talking about a declining undergrad GPA.

How can you deal with these worries? Factually give context to the person evaluating your application. Your goal should be to show that whatever contributed to the poor performance either is not a factor in your life anymore or is something that you’ve learned how to deal with it so that it doesn’t affect your performance any longer.

You can break these causes down into a few categories:

[b]• Circumstances beyond your control: Illness, accidents, family problems. If these are the factors that contributed to a drop in grades, hopefully they are behind you. What you should do: You need to straightforwardly and simply say what happened and point to evidence that it is behind you or that you’ve learned to deal.[/b]

• Circumstances at least partially within your control: Poor decisions early in your college career.  A bad choice of major.  Inferior time management and study skills.  The need to work 20+ more hours per week. What you should do: Take responsibility for mistakes, if any, and point to evidence (like your recent A’s and professional achievement) that you have matured and have developed into a more mature, responsible, grounded adult. If you had to work to support yourself or your family, no need to apologize, but do state how many hours per week your worked and try to provide evidence of grades when you weren’t working so hard and actually had the time to study.

[b]• A low or declining GPA with no extenuating circumstances. As I said earlier, that’s a major red flag. What you should do: While you can be happy you didn’t have to handle situations like those mentioned in 1 and 2, you do have to take responsibility and assure the school that it won’t happen again. You need to have more classes with A’s to show that you are now motivated. You may need to discuss what caused the lack of motivation, but the goal has to be to persuade the admissions reader that those circumstances are behind you and you have your motivation and mojo back.[/b]

I’ve harped somewhat on the serious impact of declining GPA and that is intentional. Still I do want to distinguish between a minor fluctuation and a declining GPA. I was recently asked by someone who had a 3.9 in his freshman year if he would have a problem because the rest of his college career he averaged a 3.8. No. That is a fluctuation, not a declining trend. It is an outstanding GPA and not at all a cause of concern.

Applicants sometimes worry that an “explanation” will seem like whining or be defensive. The concern is justified. You don’t want to whine or provide excuses. However, providing context just lets the admission reader understand the environment in which you operated. Perhaps the challenges you faced would make your 3.0 look like a 3.8. You need to give the adcom the ability to make that judgement.

To avoid whining, make your description of the circumstances straightforward, take responsibility for any mistakes, and focus on what you’ve done to show your ability.

I’ve given your 4 As for your GPA in the form of to-dos. I also want to give you an A for things to Avoid.

5. Avoid these Mistakes in Handling a Low GPA (17:30)

The biggest mistake is to think that schools don’t consider the GPA. There is a grain of truth to that assumption for executive MBA programs, because applicants to those programs are typically 10 years or more from college graduation. But most of you are applying within 5 years of graduation, and your GPA is the school’s window into how you perform academically. It is also something that all graduate applicants will have, and it is one common means of comparison, admittedly imperfect because of differences in grading scales and courses of study, but it is something you all have in common.

The second most common mistake is one applicants make in adding context to their mediocre performance.  They err by proudly proclaiming that they were too busy to study and take their classes seriously.  Variations on this theme:

• Took too many units so that they could finish faster or collect an additional degree.

• Enrolled in advanced classes where they didn’t have the prerequisites.

• Were so active in extra-curricular activities that they didn’t have time for classes and classwork.

• Were too busy with their start-up to attend class.

The key failing in all of these “excuses” (and these are excuses) is that there is no acknowledgment of or taking responsibility for a mistake, poor time management, or bad decisions. You did it this way and are happy you made these choices and would do it again. While you’ll get an A for honesty, your reasoning will basically tell the admissions reader that you are likely to exhibit the same behavior in grad school. Your candor will not warm the heart of an admissions reader.

A closing point (19:55)

This is not one of my A’s for your GPA, but I have to close on this note. A successful application to a competitive program is not exclusively about ameliorating weaknesses. It also requires that you give schools a positive reason to accept you.  A few months ago an MBA applicant called me up and asked me about his handling his GPA. He would not hear this part of my response. He was so focused on that negative element in his profile that he ignored everything I said about the necessity of giving the admissions committees good reasons to get excited about the prospect of having you as a member of their class. Don’t make the same mistake.

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Related Shows:

• • What You Need to Know About Post-bac Programs• Train The Brain, Nail The GMAT [Or GRE]• The GMAT, the GRE, and the Guy Who Knows Them Well

Related Resources:

• Round 3 vs Next Year, upcoming webinar for MBA applicants

• MBA Admissions A-Z: U is for Undergrad Grades• Boost Your GPA for Medical School Acceptance• Tips for Medical School Applicants with a Low GPA• MBA Admissions Tip: Dealing with a Low GPA

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Tags: Admissions Consulting, Admissions Straight Talk, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post 5 A’s for Your Low GPA [Episode 137] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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Open Letter to 2017 MBA Applicants [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jan 2016, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Open Letter to 2017 MBA Applicants
To: All 2017 MBA Applicants

From: Linda Abraham

It’s time for my annual memo/harangue/plea/rant.

If you are planning to apply Round 1 but have not yet thought about why you want an MBA, taken the GMAT/GRE, researched schools, or evaluated your qualifications, please please please keep reading. And then do what I advise….and get started!

I would like to help you avoid the harried hassle and diminished application quality that those who start their applications just a few weeks before the deadlines experience. Instead follow the example of those many applicants who start their applications months before applying and who work steadily to complete them by their deadlines.

My 20+ years in this business tell me that those who start the application process 9-12 months before they apply:

• Get into more and “better” schools

• Are more likely to get scholarship

• Are more prepared for b-school when they arrive on campus

They simply do better in the MBA application process than those who wait until the eleventh hour (or even the tenth).

Those better prepared applicants – they are your real competition. And the best way to compete is to start the race now.

Not tomorrow. Not next week or month or quarter. Now.

Start Your GMAT or GRE Prep

Once you determine that you have a goal that requires an MBA, start preparing for the GMAT or GRE. Don’t wait for the summer or “later.” Your test score is a critical element in your application. Choosing schools without knowing that number leads to all kinds of aggravation, stress, and unpleasant surprises.

Every year I get calls, emails, and comments from applicants who bombed the GRE or the GMAT and don’t have time to retake and are torn between applying to the programs they really want to attend, but where their test score (and perhaps other elements) are less than competitive, and applying to programs where they are competitive, but where they aren’t dying to go.

It’s a dilemma you can avoid by allowing yourself the time to retake the GRE/GMAT, if necessary.

Lower than expected test scores can throw a major monkey wrench in your plans when you take the test within in two months of your target deadlines. However if you bomb it in the spring, you will still have months to prepare again and retake the exam before the deadlines – even the first round deadlines.

Where to Apply: Dartboard vs. Intent

And then there are the applicants who don’t understand the importance of fit in the application process. They just know they want an MBA from a Top X-ranked school. They may or may not have a specific goal or reason to pursue an MBA, and they really could just as easily be throwing darts at a list of schools to determine where to invest their time and money.

Or maybe they just started too late to do the research and reflection that they could’ve and should’ve done had they started earlier. Like now.

In any case, this superficial approach could lead to rejection, a very expensive mistake, or a less than optimal MBA experience.

Apply purposefully to specific programs that support your goals and at which you are competitive. Don’t apply to rankings. You won’t attend rankings. You’ll attend a graduate business school.

Writing is Rewriting & Requires Time

Some of you know why you want an MBA, have good reasons for selecting the school you will apply to, and will get the GMAT or GRE score that you want the first time you take the exam; so you may be feeling a little smug. Okay, so you got the first part of the application process done. However, if you slack off and wait for the last minute to complete your applications, you will end up rushing the writing process for your essays, short answer questions, and resume or the shooting/editing process for video options on your application. Either way, you will end up rushing.

Not a good idea.

Writing – whether long essays, short essays, scripts, activity descriptions, or resumes – benefits from time. Temporal distance between revisions improves critical analysis and editing. In contrast, scrambling to slap something together leads to sloppy thinking and writing.

Getting the GMAT or GRE out of the way, thinking profoundly about fit, and starting your essays early are all important steps, but you can’t just assume that ticking items off of your checklist will get you into b-school. You need something more comprehensive than that…

A Holistic, Purposeful Approach to the MBA Application Process

Proceed purposefully, methodically, and thoughtfully so that you submit a superior MBA application to the most appropriate schools at the most desirable deadline for you.

We’ve all made resolutions this year, but do yourself a favor and make the highlighted line above the 2016 resolution that you stick to.

I’m going to help you keep this one by laying out the process holistically from January through September so that you can present a superior application. It’s not just the test score or the GPA or the years of work experience or solid extracurriculars. It’s all of the above.

I’ve mapped out the process for you here. [Click on image to view full size]

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If you are aiming for the Round 1 deadlines, you can download the PDF, print, and tape it on your mirror, wall, fridge, or wherever you’ll regularly see it. Alternatively we have created a public Google doc that you can copy and paste and modify to suit your needs. Then using the timeline as a guide, add these tasks to your calendar. And do them.

If you follow this MBA timeline, your MBA dreams will not be a mad, breathless sprint to the finish line, but a long, steady jog that allows you to successfully complete the MBA application marathon.

What do you think? Is this a reasonable request? Was this helpful? Please let me know below.

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsImage

Related Resources:

• Round 3 vs Next Year: The MBA Debate [Webinar]

Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One [Free guide]

• MBA Maze: Application Timing

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Open Letter to 2017 MBA Applicants appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

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Round 3 or Next Year Webinar Reminder! [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jan 2016, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Round 3 or Next Year Webinar Reminder!
Don’t forget to register for next Wednesday’s webinar, Round 3 vs. Next Year: The MBA Admissions Debate. Remember – this is a MUST-attend webinar for anyone facing the difficult decision of applying to b-school R3 or next year.

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During the webinar, Linda Abraham, founder & CEO of Accepted, will provide the pros and cons of each option, as well as loads of examples of how she would advise different applicants with various profiles/backgrounds.

 

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Mark your calendars!

Date: Wednesday, January 27th, 2016

Time: 10:00 AM PST/1:00 PM EST

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Round 3 or Next Year Webinar Reminder! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
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8 Full-Tuition Scholarships for Civic Scholars at Chicago Booth [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jan 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 8 Full-Tuition Scholarships for Civic Scholars at Chicago Booth
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Earlier this week, Chicago’s Booth School of Business announced the launch of the Civic Scholars Program, a new annual scholarship program that will award full-tuition scholarships to eight Weekend MBA students in nonprofit and government sectors.

The new program will be funded in part by a $4-million gift from the Neubauer Family Foundation. The awardees will be known as Neubauer Civic Scholars, and will continue to work full-time in these traditionally underrepresented MBA fields as they pursue their studies in the weekend program.

Neubauer Civic Scholar candidates will have approximately 6-10 years of professional experience when applying to the program. They will take the same courses as the rest of the Booth student body, as well as new, experience-based courses that involve research and consulting for social sector and government organizations. There will also be projects at the scholar’s own organization, new extracurricular activities, and partnerships with other on-campus research centers and faculty members.

According to the press release, “The program will bring important voices to the classroom and community by providing broader perspectives on issues such as understanding the role of business in society, the implications of expanding public-private partnerships, and the opportunities for business leaders to engage productively with government and nonprofit organizations.”

View more information on Booth’s Civic Scholars Program here.

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Related Resources:

• Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One [Free Guide]

• Chicago Booth 2016 Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• UCLA Anderson Bags $100 Million Gift

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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3 Ways to Determine Which B-Schools are a Good Fit for You [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jan 2016, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 3 Ways to Determine Which B-Schools are a Good Fit for You
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Research, Research, Research! Save yourself time and money!

There are loads of MBA programs out there. How do you decide which ones are best for you? It’s time to unlock the secrets to the elusive “fit” factor. “Fit” is determined by how well your needs and desires match up with what a school has to offer. What features are you looking for in an MBA program? Does School X exhibit these features? Likewise, what applicant characteristics are School X’s adcom members looking for? Do you embody these characteristics?

Applying to schools where you don’t fit will be a waste of time, effort, and money – you probably won’t get in, and if you do get in and decide to attend, you likely won’t benefit from the program as much as you could have.

The following 3 tips will show you how to find a b-school that’s a great fit:

[b]1. Evaluate your career objectives and educational needs. [/b]Look critically at your work experience and think about what you would like to do in the future. Explore the classes, tracks, and research centers at the programs you are interested in – do they match up with your interests and goals? Talk to current students and alumni about their experiences, goals, and job prospects/careers. If you are interested in non-profit management, be sure that there are classes or tracks relevant to that career goal. If you are planning to make a career change, taking extra classes in your new area of interest (and then sharing those straight A’s with the school) may make you a better fit.

[b]2. Appraise your qualifications as an MBA applicant. [/b]Visit the websites of the programs that you may be interested in and look at the class profiles. Verify that your GMAT score, GPA, and years of work experience fall within the parameters set by the school. If a school is looking for candidates with a GMAT score of 700 and a 3.5 GPA, your 620 and 3.0 will make you less competitive at that program, and probably a weak fit.

[b]3. Explore the intangibles. [/b]Again, turn to the school websites and look at student profiles. Can you see yourself working, studying and teaming up with these students? If so, the school may be a great fit for you. Schools have different philosophies and different approaches to the b-school curriculum – think about your own learning style and how their courses will fit your needs. Visit the schools and sit in on classes. If you are comfortable with the teaching methodology and philosophy, then that’s another point in favor of your fit with the school. Other factors like class size, approachability of professors, and the school’s environment (its size, location, etc.) will also play into your unique fit metric.

Once you have decided what factors are important to you and assessed their comparative weights, you can determine a school’s fit for you. Remember that fit is relative. Not all of the elements that you want in a school are equally important, and some are more open to compromise than others. Find the programs that most closely match your personality and career goals.

Doing your due diligence prior to applying to MBA programs can help you avoid a costly mistake – participating in a program that does not meet your needs. The goal is to find that program that is a great fit for both of you.

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Related Resources:

• What to do About a Low GPA

• GMAT & MBA Admissions [resource page]

• Go for the Goals in your Statement of Purpose

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post 3 Ways to Determine Which B-Schools are a Good Fit for You appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
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310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Time is Running Out… [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jan 2016, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Time is Running Out…
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Time is running out for you to register for tomorrow’s webinar AND for you to make your big decision about applying to b-school R3 of this year or waiting until R1 of next year’s application cycle!

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This is a big decision…and we can help you sort out the advantages and drawbacks so that you apply at the optimal time for YOU.

Round 3 vs. Next Year: The MBA Admissions Debate airs live tomorrow, Wednesday, January 27th, 2016 at 10:00 AM PST/1:00 PM EST.

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Don’t miss out. Your future depends on this.

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Tags: MBA Admissions

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An Interview about Interviewing at HBS: An Accepted Student Speaks [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jan 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: An Interview about Interviewing at HBS: An Accepted Student Speaks
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Make sure you are up to date on current events for your industry.

Want to know what it’s like to interview at Harvard Business School? Harbus, the HBS news organization, interviewed a Class of 2018 applicant during the Round 1 wave and graciously shared the interview with Accepted. Our anonymous interviewee (who was accepted!) is a female manufacturing engineer at a high profile global healthcare company in the U.S.

HBS is about to send out their Round 2 invites…if you’re lucky enough to get one, then you’ll want to see this first-hand advice!

What happens at an HBS interview? Can you walk us through the day?

The morning of the interview I attended a discussion group and then class. Interacting with current students, seeing the case method in action, and getting a feel for a day in the life of a student was very beneficial, especially before the interview. The admissions committee does a great job creating a comfortable environment where interviewees can get light snacks and refreshments, mingle with other prospective students, and attend events throughout the day. Applicants are taken to a separate waiting room once the interview time approaches. The 30-minute interview goes by very quickly. There is typically one interviewer and one observer, with the interview itself being very conversational.

Was there anything that took you by surprise in the interview?

Rather than generic behavioral questions, the interviewer prepares tailored questions based on your application. This can make the interview more challenging in that the questions are more difficult to predict and prepare for. However, this approach also allows the interviewer to use the time most effectively to get to know you.

What is the single worst thing one can do during the interview? And can you give some examples of unexpected ways one can impress the panel?

The easiest way to derail the interview is probably by not being authentic, either through scripted answers or lack of familiarity with one’s own application. Ways to impress the panel include knowledge of current events in your industry and in other industries, getting them excited about your professional aspirations, and being able to articulate why you chose certain paths.

What are some of the things you should do when you receive an interview invitation (on the week of the interview and on the day before the interview) in order to ensure that one is best prepared for what is to come?

In the weeks leading up to the interview, it is important to familiarize yourself with current events and monitor news for your industry. There are some great resources online with typical interview questions, however I recommend not crafting specific answers but instead focus on high level bullet points. The week of, continue your normal news routine, read your application daily, and reflect on possible questions. The day before, go over the top things you want the interviewer to remember about you, any breaking news, and try to relax as much as possible.

Can you tell us a little about your post-interview reflections?

I made some notes after the interview with key things I wanted to capture in the reflection. The reflection is a good opportunity to recap one’s strengths, clarify anything from the interview, and thank the admissions team. I was glad to have some time before my flight the following day to refine the reflection before the 24-hour deadline.

What were some of the trickiest questions you were asked?

What industry are you interested in besides your current industry? Follow-up question: What is a company you admire in that industry?

If you couldn’t work in [your target industry], what would you do instead?

Do you have any other advice for those who have gotten as far as the interview stage?

Take time to celebrate this achievement. The HBS application and interview process is intense. While it’s important to stay focused through this final hurdle, it’s also important to find outlets to relax so that you don’t burn out leading up to the interview.

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Related Resources:

MBA Interview Prep: How to Ace Your Interviews [Free Guide]

• An HBS Student Helping HBS Applicants

• Harvard Business School 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post An Interview about Interviewing at HBS: An Accepted Student Speaks appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Tips for Planning Your MBA Budget [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jan 2016, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Tips for Planning Your MBA Budget
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Financing your MBA is more than just paying for the school.

Getting into business school is hard; paying for it should not be. There are many things to consider when planning your journey to business school. Whether you plan to use savings, scholarship or a loan to afford school, understanding your budget for the upcoming year(s) is crucial to an education free of financial pain.

What you should include in your budget:

It’s important to consider the total cost of your business school experience. The following costs may apply to you:

• Deposit

• Flights to campus

• Visa documentation

• Tuition

• University fees

• Books and other academic materials

• Living Expenses

• Social and academic club fees

• Trips

Furthermore, there are a number of ways to pay for these costs. The following are types of funds that students often use:

• Personal Savings

• Scholarship

• Company sponsorship

• Zero-interest gift from friends or family

Loan

• Line of Credit

You’ll need to create a budget based on your understand of all costs associated with the degree, and then assess your personal finances to see if you need outside help to afford the costs.

Resources for planning your budget:

1. Talk to current students. Pro tip: When trying to understand all upcoming costs for your business school experience, reach out to a current international student at the school. They will be able to share advice on transportation to campus as well as how much you should anticipate for cost of living, social events, and trips.

2. Understand the Cost of Attendance for your school. For the other expenses, each school publishes an official figure, called Cost of Attendance, which consists of all tuition, fees/books and expected living expenses. Cost of Attendance is important in a number of ways.

Firstly, this figure will be used on your I-20 visa application, on which you will have to prove you have sufficient funds to afford the costs of your program while in the United States.

Secondly, Cost of Attendance plays a large role if you plan to use a scholarship, company sponsorship, or a loan during your studies. Schools will only allow you to use these three types of financing up to the amount of Cost of Attendance. For example, if Cost of Attendance for your first year is $100k and you are awarded $30k in scholarship and $30k in company sponsorship, the maximum allowable loan you could use to finance your first year would be $40k. The school’s Office of Financial Aid will not allow any combination of those funds above the Cost of Attendance figure.

What does COA include?

Unfortunately, Cost of Attendance figures can be conservative estimates of living costs on campus. If you expect a more expensive cost of living, or you have dependent family members, please consult the school’s Office of Financial Aid. You may be able to formally request an increased Cost of Attendance.

In addition, Cost of Attendance does not include social events and trips. As a result, if these social activities are important to you, it is prudent to ensure you have additional savings available to pay for these activities.

The total cost of business school can be daunting. However, if you take the time to break down the costs and use information from both the Office of Financial Aid and current students, you will be able to better understand the full costs. Once you have this information, you can feel comfortable knowing exactly how much money will need to afford an enjoyable business school experience.

If you decide that you need a financial assistance, Prodigy Finance can help with affordable, no-cosigner loans specifically designed for international students.

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Zack Hirschfeld is Prodigy Finance’s Student Relations Manager (North America). He was born in San Francisco, and having explored 35 countries across 5 continents, now lives in New York. Given his extensive travels, it should come as no surprise that he has a degree in International Relations from Bucknell University. Zack loves his job, and believes it’s a great privilege to speak with students from around the world, helping them to reach their goals.

Related Resources: 

• Making International Student Loans a Prime Investment

• A Funding Plan for Business School• The Truth About Student Loanshttp://blog.accepted.com/2015/10/29/a-funding-plan-for-business-school/

* This blog post is sponsored by our friends at Prodigy Finance

Tags: MBA Admissions

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
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Harvard MBA, 2+2 and How to Get In [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jan 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Harvard MBA, 2+2 and How to Get In
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Applying to HBS? Join us for a conversation about Harvard Business School, entrepreneurship, leadership, and admissions.

Our guest today is Adam Nathan, who earned his MBA from Harvard Business School in 2015 as a Baker Scholar and joined Accepted a few months ago. Adam graduated from Duke in 2010 and was accepted to the inaugural 2+2 class at HBS. Before starting at HBS he worked briefly for the White House and then as an Associate and Senior Associate Consultant for The Bridgespan Group, the non-profit associated with Bain Consulting, and finally he worked in Network Strategy for Hawaiian Airlines.  While at HBS, he started Ace Travel.

A Duke grad’s journey to 2+2 [2:30]

Why a b-school education is significant—leadership roles, potential to solve problems in both the public and private sector. He sees an important social role for business.

What is great about HBS[4:13]

The intentional application of management principles to every experience; great professors (and a culture that truly values teaching); the case method. And the people: your classmates are obviously smart and accomplished, but also genuinely nice, good people.

What he misses about HBS: the opportunity to devote time to thinking about big questions, reading, absorbing experiences. [8:48]

Any changes he’d like to see at HBS? [11:09]

More of a focus on helping people develop a sense of purpose—who they want to be, what they want to do, how they want to help other people. He thinks Harvard can start working on this by beginning to shift the definition of success—and that the application process is part of that (asking applicants to present themselves as humans with values rather than just resume items).

HBS social life- is it expensive/elitist? [17:11]

He explains that there is a bit of a “pay to play” culture, but that most people see it as an investment that will pay off later. I.e., people spend money on trips, retreats, and so on—budgeting up to $20-30k above tuition costs. Many people come into b-school already well-off, but he concedes this can be tough for students from non-traditional and less affluent backgrounds.

How is the admissions process evolving? [19:33]

It’s moving away from just numbers and resumes to focusing on who students are as people— their values, what inspires them, how they think about things. Most HBS applicants could probably handle the academics, but that’s not sufficient—the committee’s looking for human virtues.

He was part of HBS’s inaugural 2+2 class. Would he do it again? [22:12]

YES! it was definitely the right choice for him. Knowing he was HBS-bound allowed him to pursue work he was especially interested in before beginning his MBA.

Start-up: Ace Travel [24:23]

He’d worked at Hawaiian Airlines before b-school, so he had an understanding of the challenges facing the airline industry. At HBS, he wanted to design a better business model for the travel industry and developed Ace Travel, which allows customers to design their travel experience end to end. How did HBS help him launch Ace Travel?  HBS provided a small amount of money for initial research, seed investors, and also additional support from the HBS network and alumni.

The secret to HBS admissions[31:28]

Be true to yourself. If you’re just saying what you think will make the adcom like you, you’ll blend in. It’s clear when someone’s genuine. Think about what your goals are and how b-school fits into your life.

Specific advice for 2+2 applicants? [35:50]

It’s OK to be the undergrad that you are—remember the stage you’re at.

Closing admissions tips [36:56]

Have an extra set of eyes look over your essays—an impartial reader is really valuable. “Impartial” is important—it’s best that your reader is not a loved one.

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Related Links:

Adam Nathan• Get Accepted to Harvard Business School [webinar]

• Harvard Business School 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• HBS Zone Page

Related  shows:

• An HBS Student Helping HBS Applicants• Jon Medved & Ourcrowd: The Remarkable Story of an Entrepreneur

• Breaking Some HBS Stereotypes: An Interview with Ben Faw

• An HBS Entrepreneur Promoting Career Flexibility

• MBAs Across America: The Coolest HBS Internship

• An Interview with Our Own: Esmeralda Cardenal

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, MBA Admissions

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Ace Your Summer Internship [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jan 2016, 12:02
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Ace Your Summer Internship
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Dress to impress – and then work and impress!

This post is aimed at college sophomores and juniors who are thinking about earning an MBA in the future, and who will be working as an intern this coming summer.

In my opinion, there isn’t a better way to test out your career interests than by working in your intended field for a few months. From a company’s perspective, it is the most effective way to determine your potential as a future leader.

If you are serious about seeking an MBA in the future, it is important to note that many companies that hire MBAs value quantitative and analytical skills. During your internship, volunteer for assignments that will allow you go gain experience in quantitative analysis.

What are additional skills employers seek and what can you do to earn that full-time job offer upon completion of your internship?

1. Execution. Good leaders not only have creative ideas; they know how to execute and transform those ideas into action. Accept every assignment with a positive attitude and work hard to produce the best results. If you find yourself with extra time, ask for an assignment, or make a suggestion for work you can do that fills a gap.

2. Teamwork. The most effective leaders help others to shine. Offer assistance to fellow interns, co-workers, and your boss. Commend others for work well done.

3. Inspire. Show your commitment to your work and the company by arriving early, staying late if there is work to be done, and most importantly, completing your projects with creativity, thoroughness and excellence.

4. Communication. Make the effort to be social and communicate with your co-workers, administrative assistants and managers. Effective communicators appreciate differences and learn how best to motivate and inspire a diverse work group.

A few other tips:

5. Ask questions. When you don’t know how to do something ask for clarification. It’s important to be able to work independently, but sometimes you need more information before you can move forward.

6. Be professional. When you answer a phone at work, say your name and department. When you leave a phone message, speak clearly, and again, say your name, department and phone number.

7. Double-check your emails to eliminate all typos. Copy your email into Microsoft Word and use the spelling and grammar tool.

8. Dress similarly to the full-time staff and skip the perfume and cologne. Cubicles are often shared and are small!

9. Finally, smile. Display your positive attitude with body language and energy.

If you receive a full-time job offer from your internship employer, ask for the time you need to compare your offer to other upcoming opportunities (fall semester job interviews). Companies will often pressure you to respond right away, but there is nothing wrong with using your negotiation skills and informing them of a date by which you will respond. Many career management centers have policies in place, including offer decision deadlines, with which companies are asked to comply.

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With 30 years of career/admissions experience at four universities, including Cornell’s Johnson School, Karin facilitated students’ entry into the world’s best companies. As a member of the adcom, she also evaluated applications. She knows what schools and employers seek.

Related Resources:

• Why MBA?, a free guide

4 New Ways to Display Teamwork in Application Essays

MBA Admissions 101

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
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Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Year 2 at Wharton, Google, Deloitte & More: Catching Up with Ashley [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jan 2016, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Year 2 at Wharton, Google, Deloitte & More: Catching Up with Ashley
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This interview is the latest in an Accepted blog series featuring interviews with current MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Ashley Wells, a second-year student at Wharton. We first met Ashley last year – you can read our first interview with her here.

Accepted: Last we spoke, you were just beginning your first year at Wharton. Can you bring us up to speed? How was the rest of your year? How does year 2 differ from year 1?

Ashley: Wharton has presented me with several exciting growth opportunities over the past year. Along with two other incredible MBA women, I serve as a co-president of Wharton Women in Business – the largest club at Wharton with 700+ inspiring women and a 30+ person executive board. I have had the privilege to work hands-on with 24 first year students and seven undergraduate students as a formal coach and mentor, which has been both fun and rewarding. I got further exposure to the startup space, working with an SF-based dating app startup last spring, mentoring a team of high school entrepreneurs, and working on classmates’ startup ideas in my entrepreneurship courses. In short, it has been busy and filled with “stretch experiences” (as we say at Wharton) to both learn from others and lead among my peers in multiple dimensions.

If I could summarize the difference between first and second year at b-school, I would say that your priorities are already defined in your second year and you are much calmer, you invest heavily in relationship-building, and your recent reminder of the “real world” via the summer internship makes you treasure your down time.

Accepted: Is there anything you wish you would’ve known as a first year student? What advice would you give to incoming students so that they make the most of their time at b-school?

Ashley: I have two fundamental pieces of advice:

1. Make one positive impact on the school that will last beyond your two years there. This is advice that second years gave to me. It has helped me to become self aware that our two years at school are short and therefore lasting impact can be challenging; however, through prioritizing what is essential and important to you, you can achieve a meaningful impact beyond your two years.

2. Admit weakness. Some of the best connections, conversations, and learnings I have had at Wharton have come from admitting weakness. Don’t understand leveraged buyouts? Have the courage to ask your former banker friend to explain the concept. Don’t know how a company makes money before an interview? Ask a former employee of the company to coffee for a full explanation. Feel overwhelmed that everyone seems to understand everything and is not struggling? Admit that you are, as likely the other person feels the same way. Too often MBAs are like ducks – we seem to be effortlessly gliding along the surface, when really we are kicking as hard as possible below to seem perfect. Through admitting weakness and being willing to ask for help, I have been humble to learn more than I ever would have on my own.

Accepted: Where did you end up interning this past summer?

Ashley: I had an internship strategy that – for full disclosure – the MBA Career Management office told me “they would not recommend to anyone else, but to me, it seemed to make sense.”

Essentially, I determined that I wanted to do something where I would make an impact. My three focus areas were tech, startups, and social impact, or some combination of these three. Yes – this was intentionally broad. I wanted to be totally open to possibilities where I could be uniquely positioned to personally make an impact at a company making an impact on the world. Through this broad strategy, I ended up with interviews and offers with tech startups, big tech, social impact organizations, media companies – you name it. While this was not an “easy” approach, as I had to learn about each industry and individually prepare for each role/interview, I knew that I pursued roles that I was authentically interested in.

I also chose to pursue recruiting not from a position of being stressed, but from a position of being excited. How amazing was it that hundreds of companies and organizations were recruiting from Wharton to hire people like me! This was like nothing I had ever experienced and I had a lot of fun with it. Through this lens, I also made a related decision – to not apply for any “safety” options. Coming to Business School, I wanted to aim high for potential dream roles. Because my “dream roles” were defined broadly enough, I refused to apply for anything that did not genuinely excite me.

At the end of my summer internship recruiting journey, I ended up at Google in Mountain View in their gTech practice in a “strategy & scaling” role. I selected Google for three reasons: 1) I believe in Google’s mission and values and that this was a role and company where I could make an impact, 2) I wanted to be immersed in the tech sector for the first time at a world class tech company, and 3) Google values MBAs more highly than many other tech companies (notably, their CEO, CFO, and People Operations SVP all have MBAs).

Accepted: Do you have a post-MBA job lined up yet?

Ashley: Though I had an enriching summer internship at Google, which is an incredible company that I hold in extremely high regard, the role was not the perfect fit for me to launch my post-MBA career. That being said, in the future, I could envision myself in the right role in a big tech company such as Google.

After falling in love with the West Coast this past summer, I will be returning to San Francisco to Deloitte Consulting focusing on tech clients. I am sponsored by Deloitte, and worked in the DC Deloitte office before school. I am excited to go back, albeit in a new office and new client sector, because Deloitte can give me the experiences I need in the next step of my career: people management experience, and learning the tech sector broadly through working with multiple tech clients on a diversity of different challenges and opportunities.

Accepted: Other than having the actual degree (credentials), what skills do you think you’ve gained/learned at Wharton that will contribute to your career success?

Ashley: The obvious skills any MBA can provide you are the analytical/quantitative skills that give you a well rounded business acumen. The skills I have gained from Wharton specifically are a bit more nuanced. I’ve learned fascinating perspectives on human behavior and behavioral economics from several management courses. I’ve grown significantly from dozens of feedback experiences orchestrated throughout the Wharton curriculum, and that pursuit of constant, timely feedback will stick with me for life. Many classes and projects that I had labeled myself as “not interested in” were actually highly engaging, and consequently I’ve gained a level of openness I did not have before. Finally, I served as a formal mentor for 31 MBA and undergraduate students, which taught me how to be an effective coach and listener and to lead with empathy and humility.

Accepted: Can you recommend a cozy spot on or near campus that you recommend for studying?

Ashley: My favorite spot is United by Blue @ 34th & Walnut. There is almost a West Coast vibe – organic coffee, delicious granola, socially conscious mission, friendly baristas – I highly recommend it for a coffee date catch-up with a friend or for studying before an exam.

Accepted: Can you share a few more tips for our readers about securing an awesome internship/job?

Ashley: As I already wrote extensively about my internship search process, I will offer some thoughts regarding interviews and offer management:

1. Remember that your interviewer wants to hire you. They do not want you to fail, rather they want you to do well and they want to like you (think of the time, money, and energy they are investing to evaluate you as a potential fit!) I found this mindset very helpful, because when I hit tough moments during interviews, I remembered that the interviewer was “on my side” and was also motivated for me to perform well.

2. Think of three things you are grateful for before an interview. I was given this advice from a second year last year, which helps put you in a positive mindset, takes your mind off of the nerves for a moment, and gives you security and gratitude regardless of how the interview goes.

3. Don’t be afraid to say no, even to a great offer. The hardest decisions I made last year were regarding fantastic internship opportunities that I did not feel 100% right about. Saying no to a good job (especially when you do not yet have another one lined up yet!) is hard and involves some risk, but it is the path worth taking in order to get into the right role for you.

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages

Check out Ashley’s LinkedIn profile for more info. Thank you Ashley for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

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Related Resources:

• Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One

• Picking a Career, Interviewing Right, and More Job Talk

• Wharton 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

Tags: MBA Admissions

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2016 Financial Times Global MBA Rankings [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jan 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 2016 Financial Times Global MBA Rankings
Here are some highlights from the Financial Times‘ top 20 global MBA programs (with a few points on women in business school):

• This is the first time that a one-year MBA program (INSEAD) has taken the #1 spot. The other 4 schools in the top 5 remain the same as last year, each pushed down one spot this year compared to last.

• New to the top 10 this year is Cambridge Judge which jumped from 13th place last year to 10th this year.

• IESE dropped out of the top 10, moving from 7th place to 16th.

• 7 out of the top 10 global MBA programs this year are US programs. Of the top 20, 11 are in the US.

• In 2005, 30% of MBA students were women. In 2015, that number jumped to 35%. 27 schools boasted a 40% female population, compared to only 4 schools with those numbers in 2005.

• In China, 44% of students were women, while at Renmin University of China School for Business in particular, 59% were women.

• Only 27% of b-school faculty members are women. But at UC Irvine Merage, that proportion is 46% (the highest in the world).

• Pre-MBA, the average pay gap between men and women is 14%. This jumps to 19% three years post-MBA (from $9,000 to $22,000). The FT data shows that this pay gap exists for men and women at the same sector of industry and at the same level of seniority.

And now for the rankings themselves:

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Financial Times Methodology

157 international graduate business programs took part in the survey that was used to create the FT rankings. Data was collected from the schools themselves as well as 9,800 alumni. Alumni were three years post-graduation (class of 2012), so b-schools needed to be at least four years old to qualify.

You can see the ranking criteria and their equivalent weight below. For more details, see the FT methodology page.

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Related Resources:

• U.S. News 2016 Best Graduate Business Schools

• Comparing Top 10 MBA Rankings [Infographic]

• Forte Helps Women in Business Thrive: Interview with Elissa Sangster

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post 2016 Financial Times Global MBA Rankings appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Are you Looking for PERFECT Answers to Your Upcoming MBA Interview Que [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jan 2016, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Are you Looking for PERFECT Answers to Your Upcoming MBA Interview Questions?
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You’ve come to the right place.

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Interviews come in all shapes and sizes, so while you can never totally predict which questions will or will not be asked, you can safely bet that certain popular questions will likely make an appearance (like “Why this MBA program,” “Walk me through your resume,” and the infamous “Tell me about your weaknesses.”).

And when those questions are asked, you need to have an answer ready.

That’s why we’ve created Perfect Answers to MBA Interview Questions, your free guide to how best to approach the most popular interview questions.

Remember, a more prepared interviewee is a more confident and more impressive interviewee. Let’s make sure that when you walk into that interview, you’re as prepared as possible.

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Download your free copy of Perfect Answers to MBA Interview Questions now!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Are you Looking for PERFECT Answers to Your Upcoming MBA Interview Questions? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
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Mark Your Calendars! Money-Saving Webinar on Wednesday! [#permalink]

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New post 01 Feb 2016, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Mark Your Calendars! Money-Saving Webinar on Wednesday!
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This is your final reminder! Put Paying for Your MBA: Before, During & After in your calendar now so you don’t forget to show up for this important webinar.

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B-school is expensive! Get the tools you need to organize your finances and smooth the road to a less-stress MBA financial journey!

Date: Wednesday, February 3rd

Time: 10:00 AM PST/1:00 PM EST

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Mark Your Calendars! Money-Saving Webinar on Wednesday! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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J.P. Morgan Tells Investment Bankers to Relax [#permalink]

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New post 02 Feb 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: J.P. Morgan Tells Investment Bankers to Relax
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The goal of the initiative is to improve work-life balance, reduce exhaustion, and minimize the threat of early burnout.

According to a Wall Street Journal article, J.P. Morgan is making new efforts to improve the work-life balance and make junior staff members, as well as more senior ones, feel more appreciated.

Pencils Down

As of last Thursday, the bank will officially be encouraging its employers (“everyone from analysts to managing directors”) to take weekends off –, “as long as there isn’t a live deal in the works” – in an initiative called “Pencils Down.”

The goal of the initiative is to improve work-life balance, reduce exhaustion, and minimize the threat of early burnout – important goals for investment bankers who are used to working 100-hour weeks.

Fast-Tracked Promotions

Carlos Hernandez, J.P. Morgan’s head of global banking, also announced a new promotions program in the global offices that will speed up “promotions for top performers in every position, reducing the time it takes for an analyst, the lowest rank at the bank, to rise up to managing director.”

Typically, investment bankers remain in the role of analyst for three years, followed by 3.5 more years as an associate, followed by three more years as a vice president, and then three more years as executive director, before finally becoming managing director. Those who exceed expectations can reduce that time by about one year for each position.

Team Connect

Another initiative, “Team Connect,” will improve the bank’s apprenticeship program and create more events for analysts and managing directors, with a focus on making the more junior members feel appreciated.

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Related Resources:

• The Hottest Skills that will Land You the Hottest Jobs

How To Become A Corporate Executive

• B-Schools That Rank for Landing Jobs in Investment Banking

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Stanford GSB Alum Transforming Online Dating for the Ambitious [#permalink]

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New post 03 Feb 2016, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Stanford GSB Alum Transforming Online Dating for the Ambitious
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With a hat-tip to Valentine’s Day, this show is about a dating app for the “smart, busy and ambitious” as well as life at Stanford GSB and start-ups.

Meet Amanda Bradford: [0:46]

She earned her bachelors in Information Systems in 2007 from Carnegie Mellon.  After getting her degree, Amanda worked for leading tech companies like Salesforce, Google, and Sequoia Capital. After earning her MBA from Stanford GSB, she founded The League, a dating app with privacy controls and “curation.”

What is The League? And how is it different from other dating apps? [1:16]

Online dating can be overwhelming, and offline dating can be inefficient; The League is designed to address both of these issues. It aims to provide “quality over quantity” and takes people’s professional privacy into account—the app serves up 5 matches a day, with no overlap from Facebook or LinkedIn contact lists.

What does “curation” mean in this context? [3:26]

Both the app’s admissions process—which limits the profiles on the app to “high quality” profiles (to eliminate the problem of fake profiles many sites have)—and the careful matching process.

Plans to Expand  [4:00]

They currently operate in SF and NY and have 100,000 people registered. They plan to expand to other large cities with a young urban professional demographic—such as LA, Boston, London, etc.

Amanda’s Story [5:56]

After various media reports about The League – not all flattering – Amanda wrote her own story on LinkedIn explaining why she founded The League. She decided to tell her personal story about dating as a career focused woman, and clarify the mission and values of the company.  “I’m Not An Elitist, I’m Just An Alpha Female” has been viewed over 235,000 times.

Why did she pursue her MBA? [8:24]

Working at Google, she had strong role models and saw the career paths of women she admired – many of whom had MBAs. And she was looking for the tight knit network that you build during an MBA.

Why Stanford? [9:49]

It’s known for cultivating entrepreneurs, and she wanted to help build something from the ground up.

What did she learn in b-school? [10:57]

You learn how to respond to situations – gain self-awareness and business acumen. The management skills she gained have been helpful.

The League’s initial funding [14:41]

Her Stanford network was definitely crucial! Stanford provides a lot of opportunities for networking with venture capitalists, and she did an internship in venture. A lot of the initial investors were connected to Stanford and people she met there.

Additional value: classmates [16:04]

Being around such smart, talented people also helped her develop the company – feedback from her classmates helped her with marketing, etc.

What do people get wrong about Stanford GSB? [17:05]

Often, people think b-school is just about partying and networking. But at the core, you’re meeting hardworking, smart people who are doing really interesting things. It’s a powerful network.

For people who want to go to Stanford GSB – is there a “secret sauce”? Something that students there have in common? [19:21]

A tendency to take risks: speak up in class; start an organization. People at Stanford are doers.

Qualities of entrepreneurs [21:20]

Hustle, scrappiness, hard work, grit/persistence. Don’t say you don’t know how to do something.

Advice for Stanford GSB applicants [24:01]

Apply Round 1. Start early! Allow plenty of time to write (and rewrite) your essays. And allow time for self-reflection. The MBA is a major investment.

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Relevant Links:

• The League• @theleague

• “I’m Not An Elitist, I’m Just An Alpha Femalehttps://www.linkedin.com/pulse/im-elitist-just-alpha-female-amanda-bradford• How to Get Into Stanford GSB, a webinar

• Stanford MBA essay tips• Stanford zones page• The Smart Timeline for MBA Applicants

Related  shows:



• Entrepreneurship at Stanford GSB: Carlypso Drives Down the Startup St.• Valentine’s Day, Economics, and Stanford GSB• An HBS Student Helping HBS Applicants Insights into MIT Sloan MBA Admissions with Dawna Levenson UCLA Anderson: Cool, Chic, and Tech

Subscribe:

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, MBA Admissions

The post Stanford GSB Alum Transforming Online Dating for the Ambitious [Ep. 139] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
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_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Good News for MBA, MAcc & MiM Grads [#permalink]

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New post 04 Feb 2016, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Good News for MBA, MAcc & MiM Grads
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MBA and MiM grads rejoice! They are still hiring!

GMAC’s Year-End Poll of Employers shows positive hiring outcomes from 2015 and strong employer demand for graduate business students worldwide in 2016. This study includes survey responses from 179 recruiters from 159 companies around the world.

Here are some highlights from the report.

The hiring picture looks good for MBAs:

• 75% of employers plan on hiring MBA graduates in 2016. 85% expect to hire as many or more than they did last year (in 2015).

• 56% of employers expect to increase annual starting base salaries for new 2016 MBA hires at or above the rate of inflation. 41% will maintain salary levels from 2015.

• 82% of U.S. companies surveyed said they are likely to hire MBAs, compared to 63% of companies in Europe.

• 73% of employers offer internships to MBA students, and 92% of those employers expect to maintain or increase those positions in the coming year.

The picture is also positive for MiM and MAcc grads:

• 71% of employers met or exceeded their hiring goals for Master in Management grads in 2015. 85% of employers expect to match or exceed their hiring count from last year.

• Employer demand for MiM graduates is 57% in Europe, compared to 25% in the U.S.

• For Master of Accounting grads, 76% of employers met or exceeded their 2015 hiring goals. 85% expect to maintain or increase their numbers this year.

• 50% of employers plan on increasing annual base salaries for new Master of Accounting hires in 2016, while 50% plan on maintaining 2015 salary levels.

You can see the full report here for more details.

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Related Resources:

• MBA Admissions A-Z: 26 Terrific Tips

• Payscale: How Much Can You Earn, and How To Earn It

• 2016 Financial Times Global MBA Rankings

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Good News for MBA, MAcc & MiM Grads appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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Good News for MBA, MAcc & MiM Grads   [#permalink] 04 Feb 2016, 12:01

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