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The “Chicago (Booth) Approach”: The Three I’s [#permalink]

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New post 13 Nov 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: The “Chicago (Booth) Approach”: The Three I’s
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Inquiry, Insight, Impact – Booth’s MBA adcom uses those “three I’s” to express Booth’s approach and culture. Taken together, in that order, they also represent a process:

• from inquiry,

• one gains insight,

• and applies this insight to achieve impact.

To put it another way, insight is the bridge, connecting the intellectual dimension, inquiry, and the practical dimension, impact. Now, there’s good and bad impact. You don’t want just any impact!  (The impact of texting while driving is you-know-what). But impact resulting from thoughtful insight based on serious inquiry, you do want. While Booth, and University of Chicago broadly, are known as intellectual hothouses, Booth, being a business school, is ultimately focused on practical, real-world … yeah, impact.

Let’s break it down as Booth does:

INQUIRY: The Booth website characterizes inquiry as “rigorous” (naturally) and exploring and understanding “fundamental disciplines that underlie how organizations function.” The program seeks not only intellectual elasticity, but a hunger for thorough understanding that starts from the ground up, through all the layers and facets. Inquiry is the foundation of the program’s “educational philosophy.”

INSIGHT: Within this educational philosophy, insight is derived not only from rigorous inquiry but also from the willingness to put aside preferences and assumptions to go where the data lead. The enthusiastic embrace of objective debate, examination, analysis, etc. shapes the program’s culture.

IMPACT: This “Chicago Approach” prepares you to have impact in any industry and function, at any time – it’s deeper than learning content about a given topic; it’s a process and approach that frees you, ultimately, to lead in a landscape of unknowns and ambiguities.

Given this “Chicago Approach,” how do you show fit with the program?

Don’t explain how you pursue inquiry, gain insight, and act on it to achieve desirable impact.

• Do show how you pursue inquiry, gain insight, and act on it to achieve desirable impact.

Anybody can say they do these things. Showing that you do them makes it credible. And, because showing will necessarily involve detail and anecdote, it will also make your application interesting. Finally, because only you will have that specific experience, showing will also differentiate and distinguish you from other applicants, even those from similar geographic, industry, and functional backgrounds.

Keep in mind, your application should show your fit with this Chicago Approach holistically. You don’t have to – indeed shouldn’t – apply it like a formula. Some aspects may emphasize one or the other elements. Here are some practical tips for integrating the Chicago Approach into your application naturally:

Your resume should identify results, a synonym for impacts. Also, if you discuss research (academic or as part of a work project), you might also weave in a phrase about your insights or findings.

• In your main essay, in selecting and conceptualizing your topic, look for something that centers on and illuminate experiences that reflects the “Chicago Approach.” Build your case with anecdote and example. Each anecdote and example need not reflect the whole cycle of inquiry-insight-impact; they might well reflect one or two of these elements. They key is that the essay overall reflects these elements.

• If your recommenders welcome input, discuss with them this Chicago Approach so that they can select points that will align with it.

In your interview, discuss your fit with the Chicago Approach directly if/when asked why you want to attend Booth. If you are asked about your goals, you might also explain how they necessitate the approach that Chicago employs. Also, find opportunities to weave in examples and stories that reflect elements of the Chicago Approach.

Good luck with Chicago Booth! Having worked with many successful Chicago Booth MBA applicants, I would be glad to help you craft an application that brings out your unique fit with this great program.

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

• Chicago Booth 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• The MBA Career Search and Life as a Chicago Booth MBA [Episode 158]

• Chicago Booth Student on Finding the Right Fit, Achieving His Goals

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post The “Chicago (Booth) Approach”: The Three I’s appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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With the “Chicago Approach,” Who Gets into Booth? [#permalink]

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New post 14 Nov 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: With the “Chicago Approach,” Who Gets into Booth?
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This is part 2 in a series about the “Chicago Approach.” If you missed part 1, check it out here.

Introducing 4 Chicago Booth Students: 

Qi:  A female Chinese investment banker (who is also a fashion blogger).

Goals: A leadership role in Chinese PE or VC focusing on consumer goods following a stint in private equity in the US.

Jay: An American male clean energy entrepreneur/independent consultant.

Goals: Join a young clean-energy venture still in growth phase, leading business development.

Sandeep: An Indian male working in global supply chain IT.

Goals: Strategy consulting, with focus on manufacturing.

Marya: A Russian female high school assistant principal.

Goals: Start up an Internet-based language-instruction venture.

As you can see, despite Booth’s reputation as a finance school, it seeks and admits people from a wide range of industries and sectors. And these four examples (to preserve confidentiality, these profiles are fictional composites of successful Booth applicants I have worked with, not actual clients.), from my perspective shaped by 17+ years of experience, together represent the exciting and impressive scope of admitted Booth students.

They’re not all even quant geeks!  Then what do they have in common?

• They all demonstrated in their applications an affinity for rigorous analytic exploration of issues, problems, challenges, and opportunities, for two reasons: they are curious to learn the truth, and they find the analytic process itself exciting. E.g., Jay discussed in his essay how his consulting led him to feel that existing business models for wind and solar power were less than robust, even though he deeply believed in the need for these technologies, and he started to analyze the situation. These qualities relate to the INQUIRY component of the Chicago Approach (see preceding post).

• They all conveyed their ability to grapple with the reality that they find – and it was clear that they are energized by doing do, even when it’s difficult. E.g., while Sandeep was delivering efficiencies in global pharmaceutical supply chains, he learned that a plant in Romania was consistently encountering quality failures. Although product quality failure was not his responsibility, he decided to review the plant’s supply process to verify its integrity, and discovered a sourcing inconsistency due to an ingredient shortage. Along with alerting the senior managers immediately, he talked individually and confidentially with parties involved to learn as much as he could qualitatively about the failure. His reaction relates to the INSIGHT component of the Chicago Approach.

• All these successful applicants presented in their applications (in essay, resume, etc.) positive outcomes that they have achieved and constructive differences they have made both at work and outside work. E.g., while leading a key stream of due diligence for a prospective transaction, Qi discovered possible environmental lapses in the African subsidiary of an otherwise attractive company. Citing the potential for liability, she convinced her boss, who dearly wanted the deal, to give her resources for more intensive investigation. She not only prevented a dangerous transaction for her company, but she raised her supervisor’s awareness about the need to address this issue in evaluating companies. This story, and the quality it reflects, represent IMPACT in the “Chicago Approach.”

While I’ve emphasized one element of the INQUIRY–INSIGHT–IMPACT Chicago Approach triad in each of these stories, it’s clear that all these people (and Marya too!) reflect all these elements. Equally important, they have effectively presented that fact in their Booth applications. In doing so, they have made themselves, among other things, INTERESTING – another “i” that Booth greatly values.

I would welcome the chance to help you do likewise in your Booth applications.

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Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get accepted to Chicago Booth? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

• Focus on Fit [Episode 162]

2017 Chicago Booth Class Profile

• Chicago Booth 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post With the “Chicago Approach,” Who Gets into Booth? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Where’s the Poetry? The Secret Ingredient in Your Graduate Application [#permalink]

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New post 14 Nov 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Where’s the Poetry? The Secret Ingredient in Your Graduate Application Essays
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Strategy will necessarily guide your selection of essay topics, anecdotes/examples, and structure. Yet an essay built on calculation alone, even if the strategy is spot on, will often disappoint. Logically it all makes sense. But it doesn’t take flight.

Poetry can be the secret ingredient to make your application essay sing – right into the heart of its readers. By poetry I mean a phrase, a sentence, or a short paragraph that captures some essence of you that the expository process can’t reach. Poetry reveals, and the reader “sees” the writer anew.

Poetry is NOT (unless you want it to be) flowery, ponderous, esoteric. It can be funny; it might even be something that at first seems out of place in such an essay.

To inject poetry in your essay, engage in “play;” experimentation, free expression. These processes take time – to maximize the potential impact of the poetic element in your essays, start them early and put them down, go back to them. You need time to play with ideas, explore experiences and thoughts, and then revisit the drafts more objectively.

Several years ago, I worked with an MBA applicant who was a highly accomplished female Korean-American engineer in a defense contractor firm. One essay question for a top 5 MBA program said to describe a setback or failure and how the applicant handled it. My client portrayed a simmering conflict with a supervisor that finally erupted. How did she deal with it? “Walked out at five, got home, poured a Campari, put on my eye mask, cranked up Cyndi Lauper.” I laughed out loud with pleasure on reading this; it was so her, so human, so real. Who could forget it? She then continued with something like, “When I was ready to deal with reality, I made the following plan to rectify the situation.”

Other readers of the essay urged her to remove this short section, saying it was risky, inappropriate. I saw it as real, genuine, conveying humanity and personality – poetry in an application essay – and made my case for keeping it (my case included its deflating of the Asian-nerd image). She did, and she also got admitted to the program, her top choice.

That raises one more point: keeping the poetry in can sometimes be risky. Yet most top MBA, law, medical, and other graduate programs value qualified candidates who are gutsy, confident, and have a point of view. But mostly they just want to meet a real human being. When they do, it’s magic. It’s poetry.

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Cindy Tokumitsu, has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA, master, law, PhD and medical programs, with special emphasis on MBA and EMBA and other business programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

• Tone Up Your Writing: Confidence vs Arrogance

• Dangerous Cliches to Avoid [A Poem]

• Writing Techniques From a Pro

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Where’s the Poetry? The Secret Ingredient in Your Graduate Application Essays appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Seats Filling up at the Chicago Booth Webinar [#permalink]

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New post 15 Nov 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Seats Filling up at the Chicago Booth Webinar
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Don’t miss out on the important advice that will propel you above the competition and into your seat in the upcoming class at Chicago Booth!

So here’s what you need to do:

1. Go here: reports.accepted.com/mba/chicago_booth_mba and register for the webinar.

2. Mark your calendar for Wednesday, November 16th at 10am PT/1pm ET and at 5pm PT/8pm ET (that’s tomorrow).

3. Remember to show up on time, refreshed, energized, and ready to take some notes on what you can do to optimize your chances of getting accepted!

See you on Wednesday!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Seats Filling up at the Chicago Booth Webinar appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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5 Ways to Know If a JD/MBA Is Right For You [#permalink]

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New post 15 Nov 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 5 Ways to Know If a JD/MBA Is Right For You
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Many schools offer combination JD/MBA degrees where students can complete both degrees in four years (as opposed to 3 years for a JD and 2 for an MBA). While the idea is tempting – if you are getting one degree, why not get two? – you should consider whether or not these programs are a good fit for you and your goals.

1. Application Process: For most JD/ MBA programs (with the exception of a few top schools, like NYU), you must apply to both the law school and the MBA programs separately. As a result, you should be prepared to complete both applications – including taking both the LSAT and the GMAT.

2. Time: While some schools like Columbia University or Penn offer a three year JD/MBA program, at most schools, a joint degree takes four years – as opposed to 2 years for an MBA and 3 years for a JD. This means that you will be out of the workplace for four years, a serious consideration if you are interested in business or other entrepreneurial positions. On the other hand, if you feel that you are in a good place to take the time away from your career, a joint degree may be right for you.

3. Career Goals: Most jobs do not require a JD/ MBA. You do not need a joint degree to be a partner at a law firm, for example. Many applicants assume that a joint degree will allow them to “split the difference“ and choose between two equally good jobs. This is a mistake. Instead, if you are applying for a joint degree, you should be specific about your career goals and be clear why you need both degrees. Joint degrees are very useful if you plan to enter non-profit management, for example, or work as a corporate general counsel, or plan to go into entertainment management where an understanding of licensing is as important as management skill (See Business, Law and Beyond: An Interview with John Engelman.)

4. Flexibility: On the other hand, JD/ MBA degrees are fantastic in terms of flexibility. Increasingly, the market is demanding that lawyers have business acumen, and a law degree can enhance your power in the business market. If you are interested in leadership positions, then this degree may be right for you.

5. Cost: The cost of a joint degree can go both ways. On one hand, you are paying for four years of school, which can be expensive. On the other hand, your earning potential may be higher when you graduate. Some law firms will give bonuses to individuals with JD/MBAs.

A JD/MBA is an appealing option for someone who has the time and commitment necessary to succeed in two challenging programs at an accelerated pace. If you are considering applying to a joint degree, however, you should think through your career goals and decide whether this degree is right for you.

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Jessica Pishko graduated with a J.D. from Harvard Law School and received an M.F.A. from Columbia University. She spent two years guiding students through the medical school application process at Columbia’s PostBacc Program and teaches writing at all levels. Want Jessica to help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

• The Lauder Institute Changes to Reflect the World

• Wharton JD/MBA Student Interview with Craig Carter

• How Much More Can MBAs Make? Career Switching, Compensation Increase & More

Tags: Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post 5 Ways to Know If a JD/MBA Is Right For You appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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College Students, Recent Grads Interested in Business: London is Calli [#permalink]

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New post 16 Nov 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: College Students, Recent Grads Interested in Business: London is Calling!
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Over the last ten years we have seen a lot more options in graduate management education. I’ve highlighted some on previous shows like the recent shows we have had on the CEMS Masters in International Management or UVA’s MS in Global Commerce or MIT’s MS in Business Analytics.

Today it’s my pleasure to have back on Admissions Straight Talk Jamie Wright, Senior Recruitment and Admissions Manager at London Business School – Early Career Programs. She has been working with London Business School’s early career programs since 2009 and became the Senior Recruitment and Admissions Manager in 2012. She’s joining us today to discuss the expanding and evolving menu of early career options at London Business School. Welcome!

Can you give us an overview of the three early career options? [2:10]

Our flagship program is the Masters in Management (MiM), which is a one-year general management degree focusing on the fundamentals of business (finance, economics, marketing, entrepreneurship, leadership, etc), all with an aim to help students pursue careers in business. Most grads go into finance or consulting, but we’re seeing more of an interest in industry roles (tech, entrepreneurship, healthcare, etc).

The Global Masters in Management is a two-year degree. Students spend the first year in London, then go to Shanghai and spend the second year at Fudan University. At the end of the program, they receive two degrees: a MiM from LBS and a masters in International Business from Fudan University. Students gain insight into how business is done in both Europe and Asia.

The newest program is the Masters in Finance Analytics (MFA). It’s a specialist degree within the early career program, intended for students from heavily quantitative backgrounds (math, tech, finance, engineering).

Is knowledge of Chinese required for the Global MiM? [4:39]

It’s not required. We’re seeing people with various ranges of skills in Mandarin (some have studied abroad). We do offer language courses through the program, so it’s a great way for students to develop their skills together.

What is the difference between the MiM and an MBA? [5:50]

On average at LBS, MBA students have five to six years of work experience, which they are expected to bring into the classroom. Most early career students have internship experience, but not that same exposure to the business world.

Both programs address business fundamentals (the MBA program in the first of two years).

If I’m a potential applicant, how do I know when I’m better off going for the MiM or the MBA? [7:40]

It’s a very personal decision. Some companies and industries prefer MBAs, and it can be difficult to gauge at the early career stage if you’ll need an MBA someday in order to advance in your career.

If you have a dream job right out of college and you see the potential for promotion, it might be worth pursuing that and then going for the MBA later. But if you don’t quite know the direction you want, and you want to explore the recruiting landscape, or if you need to develop your business acumen or your soft skills, the early career programs can be a great support.

What if I did a MiM and then realized later that I need an MBA – could I go straight into the second year of the MBA program? [10:40]

There’s not currently a way to do that at LBS. But we are starting to see MiM grads go on to MBA programs in the US and Asia – to gain new networks, different faculty insights, and a new perspective. They’ve already had a European perspective.

How is the MFA different from the Masters in Finance at LBS? [11:40]

They’re aimed at people at two different points in their career. The MFA is for individuals who have less than one year of experience. And the Masters in Finance is for experienced professionals – on average, six years of work experience. They’re expected to bring that experience into the classroom.

How is the curriculum different? [13:00]

The MFA is more introductory. The curriculum is based around five pillars: corporate finance, asset management, accounting, financial markets, and financial econometrics.

You mentioned that most MiM grads go into finance and consulting, while the recruiting is diversifying. What careers do Global MiM grads go into? [14:30]

Actually, the first class of GMiM students just went to Shanghai for the second year of their program, so it’s too early for employment information.

But we will be running webinars this year with students there to see what their life is like in Shanghai.

Can you share any success stories from MiM grads?

We see success in many different ways. [16:05]

I was in Poland last week to meet with alumni, and saw an alum who’d worked with Goldman Sachs in London, and moved to a private equity firm just opening a new office in Warsaw. So he’s drawing on his experience and starting a new venture at the same time.

We have a lot of interesting stories of entrepreneurs. About 30 companies have been developed by MiM grads in diverse areas: a high-end shoe company, online services, a mobile salon (which recently partnered with designers for London Fashion Week). It’s interesting to see the directions students are going.

Have grads had success getting jobs outside the EU, or in the UK if they’re not UK citizens? [19:05]

Visa issues can complicate the search, but we have a fantastic career center. You need to be flexible (regarding location and company).

Students who are most successful in the job search are those who understand that there’s a Plan A, and five routes to get there. And if it doesn’t work, there’s Plan B, and a lot of routes to get there. And that flexibility is relevant to location as well.

There are a lot of opportunities at LBS, and we encourage students to take advantage of them to explore their interests. We also have a great alumni community in 42 countries – there’s always someone to talk to. Lots of resources, lots of opportunities.

Are you concerned about the impact of Brexit on LBS’s ability to place students in the coming years? [23:10]

It’s definitely something we’re keeping an eye on. Our career center is talking to hiring managers and doing research. We don’t have a lot to go on at this point.

The two areas for us will be hiring practices and immigration. We will continue to keep an eye on this as it develops.

What are the early career programs looking for in applicants? [25:10]

Applicants for all three programs need to meet basic entry requirements: GPA, GMAT/GRE, English proficiency.

Beyond that, we’re looking for individuals who are motivated to excel in the community here, can demonstrate that they motivated themselves to succeed in their undergrad careers (both inside and outside of the classroom); people who are engaged; people who are ambitious, and have pushed themselves to excel both in and out of the classroom. That out-of-the-classroom engagement can be professional, community service, sports, music – we’re looking for people who are passionate and have pursued those passions.

Do you have any preference when it comes to the GRE or GMAT? [27:35]

For the MFA, the CFA level 1 can substitute for the GRE or GMAT.

There are some industries (such as consulting) that prefer the GMAT, so if that’s your goal, it is worth going for the GMAT.

For the MFA, because we want students from very strong quantitative backgrounds, we look closely at applicants’ undergraduate programs.

What do you wish applicants understood? [30:00]

The main thing we’re trying to do is connect the dots: how your undergrad experience led to the MiM/MFA and how that will lead to your career, your rationale for pursuing the experiences you’ve had, and how the masters will fit.

We want to get a sense of your story and your voice: who you are as an individual. Not the voice you think we want to hear at the business school – but your voice.

What can applicants expect at the interview? [32:10]

The interview is competency-based. The interviewer will have read your application in depth. You may be asked about your experiences – why you pursued XYZ internship, what your motivation is to pursue the degree and career you’re interested in.

Do you have any tips for students applying for 2017, or looking ahead to 2018? [33:50]

For current juniors: use the time to prepare for the GMAT/GRE. And take some time to do research on the programs. We have student ambassadors – speak to students and alumni about the programs.

For seniors applying this year: keep in touch with us. Send us your CV for review. Don’t get overwhelmed with the application – look at each piece one at a time. Prepare for the GMAT one section at a time. Take some time to reflect on the application questions, and think about whether this is the right program for you. The MiM and MFA have two essays, and the GMiM also has a video component.

And stay in touch with us – ask us questions. We’re happy to give advice.

If you have any concerns over whether the early career degree is the right path, we’re happy to talk with you! We ultimately want you to submit the best application you can. [38:00]

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Related Links:

• London Business School Masters in Management

London Business School Global Masters in Management

London Business School Masters in Financial Analysis

London Business School 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips

London Business School Zone Page

Related Shows:

The Scoop on the London Business School Masters in Management Program

The CEMS MIM: A Truly International Masters in Management

UVA MS in Global Commerce: 3 Continents, 2 Masters, 1 Amazing Year

The Schwarzman Scholars Program: Leaders of the Future Unite

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post College Students, Recent Grads Interested in Business: London is Calling! [Episode 180] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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MBA Scholarships: How do I Apply and What Should I Emphasize? [#permalink]

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New post 17 Nov 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: MBA Scholarships: How do I Apply and What Should I Emphasize?
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While each school has its own unique scholarship offerings (merit only, merit and need, need only), they do so for a variety of reasons. Similar to admissions, a director will consider your academic indicators, your work experience, your extra-curricular activities, your goals and your community service. They also consider socio-economic factors for need-based and outstanding accomplishments for merit-need-based scholarships.

Merit-based general scholarships give the schools an opportunity to attract a candidate that they may not have the opportunity to enroll without the scholarship. For schools with deep pockets, it helps the admissions office attract and maintain individuals that without the scholarship, the school could easily lose to other schools. It also helps some schools fill their enrollment requirements. Regardless, scholarships enable the admissions director to create his or her mosaic.

In addition to general scholarships, each school may also have specialized scholarships. Those scholarships often will be given to students that diversify the population through their goals or their backgrounds. In addition to school scholarships, outside organizations may partner with the school to offer scholarships or offer scholarships autonomously. Many organizations offer scholarships for students with disabilities (National MS Society, Setoma, SBA), women (Forte, AAUW) under-represented minorities (Consortium, Tiogo, American Association of Indian Affairs, The Congressional Hispanic Caucus, NSHMBA, NBMBA, Pfizer, Hispanic College Fund, and international students (Fulbright). Specialized scholarships can be found on a national level (GFAO, Peace Corps, GI Bill, Fisher House), state level (New York State Scholarship Fund) and local level (Shanghai municipal scholarship) as well as through charitable and religious organizations.

Each school also has scholarship dollars that are designated by a corporate donor, alumnus or friend of the school for specific reasons. Ernst and Young gave one school for whom I worked an endowment to distribute to candidates with accounting backgrounds, and another school for whom I worked had an alumnus who offered the school a fund designated for incoming Brazilian student scholarships.

I had the most difficulty distributing scholarships to local students with very specific backgrounds. For example at one school, an alumnus gave us a generous fund to offer scholarships to students with accounting backgrounds from a specific county in the state in which the alumnus grew up. The county was quite small and we rarely had applicants that applied to our school from that county with accounting backgrounds. We couldn’t distribute that scholarship for several years in a row and when we did find a candidate that matched the criteria, that candidate received the scholarship regardless of need or merit.

Your best sources for scholarships are Fastweb.org, Scholarships.com, and the school you plan to attend. However, check with each school’s scholarship policy before applying for admission. Some schools may have you write an essay or check a box to show interest in scholarships. Others distribute scholarships based on your admissions application and you don’t need to indicate an interest in scholarship at all.

Regardless of how you piece together your school funding, don’t pay for a scholarship search. The information is free on the Internet or through your school’s admissions and/or financial aid office. Also, keep in mind that you must complete the FAFSA for U.S. scholarships and loans or the international equivalent through your country’s ministry of education. And if you have multiple offers with scholarships, you have some negotiating power. If you need additional information, please contact me.

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By Natalie Grinblatt Epstein, an accomplished Accepted consultant/editor (since 2008) and entrepreneur. Natalie is a former MBA Admissions Dean and Director at Ross, Johnson, and Carey. Want Natalie help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

• Tips for Planning Your MBA Budget

• Quick FAFSA Facts

• Paying for Your MBA Resource Page

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post MBA Scholarships: How do I Apply and What Should I Emphasize? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Who Wants to Save $500? [#permalink]

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New post 17 Nov 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Who Wants to Save $500?
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Want to apply with the confidence? Now is the perfect time to team up with an admissions expert who will help you get accepted!

For one week only (November 16-22), when you purchase MBA, med school, law school, grad school, or college services at Accepted, you’ll get significant savings…up to $500 off!

By using promo code SAVEBIG at checkout, you will save:

• $100 on orders over $1000*

• $200 on orders over $2000*

• $500 on orders over $5000*

With all those savings, you can go ahead and buy…well, more awesome Accepted services!

Are you ready to save big this fall?

Choose from our catalog of services here – and don’t forget to use SAVEBIG at checkout!

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*Sale applies to non-rush orders only.

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Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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Kellogg Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 18 Nov 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Kellogg Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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Kellogg’s EMBA application essay questions may seem deceptively simple. They’re short – but complex, and together they draw out a holistic view of you as a person and as a professional, including both what you’ve done and how you think and perceive. To the extent possible, ground your essays in detail and concrete experience, and use reflection as the thread weaving those details and experiences together into a vivid whole. 

There are no word limits, which may be good – or not (as Linda Abraham has said about long essays and no word limits, “They give you lots of rope…”). The open word limit means you must supply your own discipline. Outline your Kellogg EMBA essays, and start by thinking, not, “Great, I can get everything in,” but, rather, “What are the 2-3 most important points I must make in this essay,” and stick to those points, with thoughtfulness and depth. Quell the instinct to include “everything.” Depending on your expression style and your unique case (e.g. someone with goals at a well-known company will need fewer words to describe the company than someone planning to join a young startup with which the adcom will not be familiar), 400-800 is a good range to target.

Instructions: Please include the essay prompt in bold at the top of the page. Please use 12-point Times New Roman font, line spacing at 1.5 lines and 1-inch margins. 

Essays:

1. What do you want to achieve in your professional life? What have you already done to get there and how do you think Kellogg can help you?

“What you want to achieve” means your career vision; therefore, discuss the impact you hope to have. Support this vision by, succinctly, discussing your goals in specific terms: likely positions, which company or companies, desired location, and possibly anticipated challenges. Then connect the dots: explain how this stated path will enable you to achieve the vision.

In asking what you have already done to pursue these goals, the adcom is essentially seeking evidence that you are truly committed to this career, and that it’s not just something you thought of yesterday. Answering this part allows you to show that you are proactive, strategic, and resourceful. Don’t cite everything you’ve done in this regard, but identify the 2-3 most important things – and what you gained from them. In discussing why Kellogg will be the next important step on that path, link the resources of the Kellogg EMBA to your specific learning and professional needs arising from your planned path. (And keep in mind essay 2, to avoid redundancy.)

2. What is Kellogg’s value proposition for you and how will you make Kellogg stronger by being part of our community?

This question gets to how you think, essentially. A poor answer is to select a quality of Kellogg EMBA (e.g., commitment to diversity) and heap praise on it. Rather, identify one or two of Kellogg’s characteristics or programs, and then link it to your own experience and goals to show how and why it’s valuable to you. The adcom already knows how great the program is; they don’t yet know you, and this essay should help them do so.

The contributions can reference your experience from work or outside work; think of what about you would be most meaningful and interesting to prospective classmates. This element of your response is an opportunity to show that you understand the program.

Optional Essay: Please feel free to add anything else that you think the admissions committee would like to know about you. 

This question invites you to present new material that will enhance your application, as well as explain anything that needs explaining (e.g., gap in employment, choice of recommender if not using a direct supervisor, etc.). Beyond such necessary points, if you write about other things you believe are important to illuminate your candidacy, there should be a clear value to the information you’re sharing. Finally, keep it short.

Deadlines:

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If you would like professional guidance with your Northwestern Kellogg EMBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Package, which includes advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Kellogg EMBA application. 

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Cindy Tokumitsu  has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted to Kellogg’s EMBA Program? Click here to get in touch!

 Related Resources:

• Excellent Executive MBA Admissions Advice

School Specific Executive MBA Application Essay Tips

• Executive MBA Pros & Cons

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Kellogg Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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GMAT Success Strategies are Yours for the Taking! [#permalink]

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New post 20 Nov 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: GMAT Success Strategies are Yours for the Taking!
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Our recent webinar The GMAT: Low Scores, Retaking & Strategies for Success was a huge success – Linda Abraham demystified the GMAT and provided loads of helpful advice.

If you missed it live, the recording is now available!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post GMAT Success Strategies are Yours for the Taking! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Have You Saved $500 Yet? [#permalink]

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New post 20 Nov 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Have You Saved $500 Yet?
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Time is running out for you to save up to $500 on non-rush Accepted orders!

Between now and Tuesday, Nov. 22nd, you can save BIG when you purchase Accepted services. And yes, this applies to ALL of our applicants – whether you’re applying to business schoolmed schoollaw schoolgrad school, or college.

Use coupon code SAVEBIG at checkout to save:

• $100 on orders over $1000

• $200 on orders over $2000

• $500 on orders over $5000

Browse our catalog of services now and let us know if you have any questions! We’re here to help you get ACCEPTED…at up to $500 less than usual.

Happy fall!

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Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Make the MBA Adcom Fall in Love with You [#permalink]

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New post 21 Nov 2016, 11:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Make the MBA Adcom Fall in Love with You
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How are you going to convince the admissions committee members that they would love to have you in their class? I’ll tell you exactly what you need to do in my next webinar.

On Wednesday, December 7th at 10 AM PT/1 PM ET, join me for, 5 Ways to Make Top B-Schools Love You.

If you want to create a b-school application that will make the adcom swoon, then reserve you spot at the webinar.

During the FREE webinar, I will be offering specific advice on how to convince top b-school adcom that their next MBA class simply NEEDS you in order to thrive by creating an application that will take their breath away!

Reserve your spot for 5 Ways to Make Top B-Schools Love You now!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

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Review Your Essays Like an Admissions Consultant: Use the Editing Funn [#permalink]

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New post 22 Nov 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Review Your Essays Like an Admissions Consultant: Use the Editing Funnel
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Most of you are now — or will soon be — editing your critical application essays and personal statements. When Accepted consultants review and edit your essays, they go through a process I call the editing funnel. When you edit your own essays, you should follow a similar process.

Here’s how it works…

1. Start with the Big Picture (Top of the Funnel)

At the top of the funnel you evaluate your essay in the context of the application. Does it add to the reader’s knowledge of you? Does it introduce the reader to a dimension not revealed in the boxes, numbers, and transcripts? If you are submitting more than one essay in your application, do they complement each other?

2. Then Begin to Narrow Your Focus (Middle of the Funnel)

Going deeper into the funnel, your focus should narrow to the individual essays. Check that each essay has a clear theme and logical structure. Ensure that it addresses the question(s) posed. Finally, look for the specifics that will add life and distinctiveness to your writing and your application.

3. Move to the Nitty-Gritty (Bottom of the Funnel)

At the narrowest part of the funnel, check writing mechanics: clarity, grammar, style, word usage, spelling, punctuation, and all the nitty-gritty details of writing. You may be a little bleary-eyed at this point and almost unable to view the essay(s) objectively. To restore a little objectivity, put the draft away, preferably for a couple of days; if you don’t have that much time, then at least a couple of hours. When proofing your essay, read it out loud. Doing so will slow you down and allow your ear to catch some of the little errors that your eye may miss.

If you want professional editing that saves you time and guides your essay(s) through the editing funnel while maintaining your voice, check out Accepted’s professional personal statement and application essay editing.

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Related Resources:

How to Edit Your Application Essays

• Dangerous Cliches to Avoid [A Poem]

• Writing Techniques From a Pro

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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Stand Out! A Critical Goal for Your Application [#permalink]

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New post 23 Nov 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Stand Out! A Critical Goal for Your Application
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I covered the importance of showing fit in Episode 162 “Focus on Fit,” the second most popular show of 2016 and the most popular show of the second half of 2016. But there is a second focus you need if you want to apply successfully to highly competitive programs. You need a corollary to fit. You need distinctiveness. That’s what today’s show is about.

If you only fit in or only stand out, you are unlikely to get accepted at programs that reject 80, 90 or 95% of applicants. [1:20]

Why do you need to stand out? [1:45]

Schools value diversity. Diversity creates a richer learning environment for those lucky enough to get in. If you are applying to any elite professional or academic graduate program, once you show you can do the work and that you fit in, you will be competing against others who have made the same case and who show they can stand out – that they can bring a distinctive element to a school’s class and community.

Programs with 2-3% acceptance rate are not looking just to see who has the highest numbers – they want students who will contribute. Contribution takes different forms as you’ll see later in this episode.

Many admissions professionals consider themselves enrollment managers. [2:50]

They are creating a class and they view the class as a mosaic. Every individual student is an individual stone in this mosaic. And just like each stone in a mosaic has a distinctive hue and role to play in creating the whole picture, so does each individual accepted to a program.

Stand out by showing you have something distinctive to contribute. I’ll show you the ways to do that: [3: 37]

1. Excel – do better than your peers. I realize that this is easy to say and hard to do.  But it is one effective way to stand out. Actually I wanted to say “an outstanding way,” but thought better of it.

2. Have distinctive experiences. Maybe you have professional experience, community service, involvement in the arts, sports, religious organizations, or political activism that is unusual in your field. And if you showed leadership, teamwork, initiative, innovative spirit. creativity, and impact, you probably have something distinctive to write about.

Please note that being a member of an organization or committee is less impressive than assuming responsibility and taking a leadership role where the buck from something stops with you. Highlight the latter, not the former.

You don’t have to climb Mt. Everest or swim the English Channel, although if you did those activities, they would certainly be distinctive. The key thing is that you have a distinctive experience where you took an active role.

3. Draw on your unusual personal experience or background (something you are as opposed to something you have done). Have you overcome disadvantage? Do you come from a part of the world or an ethnic background that is under-represented at your target program? How does that aspect of our life enrich you? Change you?

4. Show your distinctive perspective, whether it is personal or professional (what and how you think as opposed to what you’ve done or are). Two caveats here: 1) Don’t preach. 2) If you have a distinctive perspective, where have you put it into action? What difference does it make? For example, did you look at a report or data and see something in those numbers that no one else had seen previously? Is your research bringing a unique perspective to your field?

5. Show a habit of contribution. When have you made a difference in the past? A fundamental premise of admissions: Past behavior predicts future behavior. If you have not been active in the past, the adcom will have reason to be concerned that you won’t be engaged with their campus community, either.

There are two parts to submitting a competitive application: [9:00]

1. Have competitive qualifications. Have the ingredients that make you competitive.

2. Present those ingredients effectively.

We’ve been focusing on standing out and what will make you stand out. But again, you need to present those qualifications effectively. I’ve seen so many applications where applicants with dynamic, fascinating stories actually came across as boring and dull because they failed throughout their app – essays, CV/resume, short answers, job and activity histories, and the interviews – to present their experiences effectively.

I’m not talking writing Shakespearean English. But admissions committees want to meet and admit individuals.

It’s not enough to have distinctive experience, you also should present it distinctively — and that doesn’t mean weird or forced. So what are techniques that will help you present your story authentically, distinctively, and persuasively throughout the entire application? [9:55]

The first step to presenting yourself distinctively is:

Write in specifics: Use succinct anecdotes and detail to bring you to life. Because it’s your story, no one else has it. So many applicants will write in declarative sentences and generalities. That kind of writing bores, and the applicants blend in to a gray mass of blah.

But if you write in specifics, you automatically individuate.

Focus on achievements and not responsibilities when describing your professional and non-professional experiences.

The results of your efforts will distinguish you. Merely describing your responsibilities makes you like every other person with a similar job title. Highlight your successes, achievements, and results, and you will automatically stand out –in a very impressive way.

An example of how the way your write makes a difference: an EMT applying to medical school. If you just describe the job, you will blend in with all the other EMTs also applying to medical school. But if you describe your specific accomplishments (perhaps delivering a baby, doing CPR to save the life on a child after a pool accident), you will stand out.

Furthermore, quantify those results and achievements when possible. The numbers will add concreteness and credibility to your story. (For more advice on how to fit in, check out Focus on Fit.)

 

I’ll summarize the ways to stand out, and the ways to present your experiences effectively [15:45] :

Substance of distinction:

1. Excel

2. Reflect distinctive experiences.

3. Show an individual point of view.

4. Reveal a habit of contribution.

Presenting yourself so that you stand out:

1. Use specifics, anecdotes and details.

2. Focus on results and achievements, not just responsibility descriptions.

If you’d like Accepted to advise you individually so that you apply confidently showing that you both fit in and stand out, visit accepted.com/services to get started.

Please fell free  to post any questions you have in the comments!

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Related Links:

Accepted’s Services

Get Accepted to Harvard Business School.

Get Accepted to Columbia Business School

Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Secondary Application Strategies for Essays That Score Interviews

12 Tips for Multiple Mini-Interview Success

• The Ultimate Guide to Medical School Interview Success

Related Shows:

College Students, Recent Grads Interested in Business: London is Calling!

Focus on Fit

Get Into INSEAD, the International Business School

Get Accepted to Hofstra Medical

Johns Hopkins Medical: How to Get In

Exploring the Haas MBA: An Interview with Peter Johnson

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Stand Out! A Critical Goal for Your Application [Episode 181] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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$15 Million Endowment Gift to NYU Stern School of Business to Benefit  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Nov 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: $15 Million Endowment Gift to NYU Stern School of Business to Benefit Veterans
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Alumnus Lorenzo Fertitta (MBA ’93) and his brother Frank J. Fertitta III have given New York University’s Stern School of Business a $15 million endowment gift to create a new program exclusively for U.S. military veteran and active duty students who will be entering the school’s full-time MBA program next year. The school predicts that approximately 20 entering full-time MBA military students who are accepted into the Fertitta Veterans Program will receive scholarship assistance that reduces their tuition to $30,000 per year. Students qualifying for veteran benefits, including Yellow Ribbon funding, will continue to be entitled to receive those benefits.

The Fertitta Veterans Program is thought to be the only program of its kind in the U.S. Besides providing scholarship money, the program will also offer academic and professional support specially made for veterans to assist the transition from the military to business school and eventually the business world. The program will start in summer 2017 for students in the full-time MBA class of 2019. This specially designed summer session will include:

• An early start on some of the coursework

• Career programming including access to corporations and alumni

• Meetings with veteran alumni mentors

• Social activities

At the end of the summer session, veterans will be completely assimilated in the full-time MBA program, beginning with Stern’s week-long MBA orientation known as LAUNCH.

Stern already has a strong support system for its military students through scholarships and community. Stern’s Military Veterans Club provides an active and tight-knit community of MBA student support. The class that began in fall 2016 included the highest number of military students in its full-time MBA program ever.

The Fertitta family supports various local and military charities personally and through their ownership of Station Casinos and their previous ownership of the Ultimate Fighting Championship. Military-based charities supported by the Fertitta family include:

• Veterans Village, housing and services for homeless veterans

• Fisher House Foundation

• Nevada Military Support Alliance

• Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund

• Wounded Warriors Project

See the NYU press release for more info. For more about NYU Stern, check out Accepted’s NYU Stern B-School Zone.

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Related Resources:

An NYU Stern Grad and Strat Consultant Helping Vets Get Into School

• NYU Stern 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

Wearing My Military Uniform in the Business World

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post $15 Million Endowment Gift to NYU Stern School of Business to Benefit Veterans appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Happy Thanksgiving! [#permalink]

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New post 24 Nov 2016, 11:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Happy Thanksgiving!
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Today is Thanksgiving in the United States, a national holiday during which we give pause – at least for a brief moment – to count our blessings.

Wherever you are, that is a good exercise.

An attitude of gratitude is worth cultivating throughout the year. I firmly believe it provides benefits from an interpersonal, professional, and even an admissions perspective. Probably the biggest beneficiary, however, of that positive slant on life is the person who holds it year round. This U.S. holiday just gives everyone a chance to focus for one day on this specific quality.

For me personally I feel blessed. Since last Thanksgiving, my family has expanded with the birth of two grandchildren. We enjoy the company of our local children and their families frequently. And we manage to see those children and grandchildren who live elsewhere too. Fortunately, all are healthy and happy. And that is a blessing for which my husband and I are deeply thankful.

As I have done annually for the last few years on Thanksgiving, I want to highlight one of my favorite posts: Admissions Tip: Thanksgiving Appreciation.

And with that, let me wish anyone reading this blog today a Happy Thanksgiving!

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsAccepted’s Podcast: Admissions Straight Talk

4 Ways to Show How You’ll Contribute in the Future

Writing About Overcoming Obstacles in Your Application Essays

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Happy Thanksgiving! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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How to Apply to B-School With a Low GPA, Part 1 [#permalink]

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New post 28 Nov 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How to Apply to B-School With a Low GPA, Part 1
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Not proud of your undergraduate GPA? Concerned it may ruin your chances of getting into a top MBA program? It’s time to tackle this issue head-on and create a plan for successfully applying to business school with a low GPA.

How Low is Low?

Maybe you’re a perfectionist so you’re bummed about your 3.9 GPA, so let’s be clear about what “low” really means. First, please – if your GPA is more than 3.7, you’re FINE (in this area at least). Save your worry-energy for something else.

For our purposes, a low GPA is:

1. One that is .3 on the U.S. 4.0 scale or more below your target school’s average GPA for accepted students.

2. One that is below your target school’s 75th or 80th percentile.

You can find this info on the school’s class profile online or in some of the b-school rankings.

It’s All Relative

Both of these definitions require you to look at your numbers relative to those of the schools that you are targeting. So if you have a 3.2 and the average GPA of the entering class is a 3.2, you do not have a low GPA. However, if you have a 3.2 and the school you are aiming for has an average GPA for accepted students of 3.6, then all of a sudden your average 3.2 GPA transforms into a low 3.2 GPA.

Putting it in Perspective: 5 Questions to Ask Yourself

Let’s analyze that GPA

1. Did you have a hard time adjusting to college so your GPA took a hit your freshman year, but improved the following year, and then every year after that? Did you end up recovering from that first clueless year by landing on the Dean’s List for the last two years and having a 4.0 GPA the last year?

2. Did an illness in the family or other circumstance beyond your control cause a drop in your grades for a specific period of time, thereby dragging down an otherwise tip-top GPA?

3. Did you declare the wrong major and have poor grades in that major until you realized your true calling, at which point you started to excel?

4. Were you working part-time to support yourself or did you have a major sports commitment in order to qualify for an athletic scholarship that you needed to maintain in order to stay in school?

5. Did your GPA have a downward trend, starting out strong in your first year, and then declining as you lost your motivation throughout the following years?

These questions present several causes that could explain a low GPA in order of difficulty in overcoming them (easiest to hardest). The degree of severity of your case will influence how much effort you need to put in to mitigating the situation.

Stay tuned for our next post, Addressing Your Low GPA.

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Related Resources:

• 5 A’s for Your Low GPA [Podcast Episode]

• MBA Admissions Tip: Dealing with a Low GPA

• MBA Admissions A-Z: U is for Undergrad Grades

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post How to Apply to B-School With a Low GPA, Part 1 appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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How to Apply to B-School With a Low GPA, Part 2 [Addressing Your Low G [#permalink]

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New post 29 Nov 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How to Apply to B-School With a Low GPA, Part 2 [Addressing Your Low GPA]
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Not proud of your undergraduate GPA? Concerned it may ruin your chances of getting into a top MBA program? It’s time to tackle this issue head-on and create a plan for success.

In our last post, we discussed how to determine if you really do have a “low GPA.” Now that you have a better perspective of what that number means, it’s time to take the next step.

Let’s Get to Work: Addressing Your Low GPA

Your goal will be to convince the adcom that your GPA isn’t an accurate reflection of your abilities, and that you’re capable of much, much more.

1. Ace that GMAT

You need a high GMAT score. The test score indicates you have the raw talent and aptitude for your chosen field.

2. Get yourself some A’s

Take a class or two (or more) in a quant or verbal class (depending on where your weaknesses are greater). Maybe even pursue another degree. But no matter what you do, make sure you’re ready to study hard and earn those A’s. This is your last shot at demonstrating that you are a good student with strong skills and you’ve got what it takes to excel in b-school.

With an above average test score and evidence that you can perform academically, you are well on your way to dealing with that low GPA.

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Related Resources:

• What to Do About a Low GPA [Podcast Episode]

• Top 5 GMAT Practice Resources: Why Practice Doesn’t Always Make Perfect

• How MBA Adcoms Evaluate Your GPA

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post How to Apply to B-School With a Low GPA, Part 2 [Addressing Your Low GPA] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Want a Kellogg MBA? [#permalink]

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New post 30 Nov 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Want a Kellogg MBA?
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Before I introduce today’s guest, I would like to invite you to a webinar I’m presenting on December 7. Whether you are planning to apply this application cycle or aiming for next year or later, this webinar, 5 Ways to Make B-schools Love You, will give you critical strategies to strengthen your profile and application. Reserve your spot today.

Today’s guest is Melissa Rapp, Director of Admissions – Full Time MBA & MSMS Programs at the Kellogg School of Management. Melissa has an extensive background in communications and admissions. She joined Kellogg in 2012 as Assistant Director of PT MBA admissions. She became the Director of Admissions for the PT MBA in 2015 and in January 2016 became the Director of Admissions for the FT MBA AND MSMS programs. Welcome!

Kellogg has two required essays, an optional information section, and now also requires a video. What do you learn from the video that you don’t learn from the written essays? [2:12]

We introduced the video about three years ago for a couple of reasons. The first was to introduce the adcom to all of our applicants from all over the world – it provides the opportunity for facetime, and is more unfiltered. We also wanted to expose our future students to new technologies. We’ve heard from our career management team that more companies are using videos in their recruitment process (Goldman Sachs is an example), so we wanted to expose our future students to the technology they can expect in that screening/interview process.

Increasingly, we’re also seeing videos used as a screening and application tool a lot in the tech industry – for example, LinkedIn, Amazon, Apple.

Do you have advice for applicants sitting down to work on their Kellogg applications? [3:55]

The most important thing is for students to be reflective about why they want an MBA, why it’s important for their career. Be genuine.

The first essay asks why they want an MBA, why now, and why Kellogg. The second surrounds leadership and teamwork – are they a good fit for the team-based environment at Kellogg? Think carefully about experiences that demonstrate those qualities.

Given that focus on post-MBA goals, is employ-ability part of the admissions assessment? [5:13]

It’s important that students can handle the rigor of Kellogg and area fit for the culture here. Those things ladder up to people who have great outcomes when they leave.

Kellogg accepts roughly one out of five applicants. How do you winnow it down? [6:10]

We strive to interview all our applicants – we’re committed to a holistic review. We want to come out with a diverse class: gender, ethnicity, industry, function. We’re looking for high achieving, high impact, low ego leaders who are eager to be a part of our student driven culture.

What does “student driven” mean at Kellogg? [7:25]

There isn’t much that happens here that students aren’t involved in. One example is Day at Kellogg, a program for admitted students that provides an opportunity for our students to help impact the admissions process.

Students also bring speakers to campus, organize events, etc.

What is your advice for applicants planning ahead to apply next fall? [8:30]

I can’t speak to whether our essay questions will remain the same. But in general, it’s important to do research on schools and find the right fit – you’ll be most successful in the place you can thrive. Go to information sessions, talk to students and alumni. Think about why you need an MBA and what your goals are.

Can you give an overview of Kellogg’s degree offerings? [10:10]

Our portfolio is a reflection of our commitment to diversity. Our FT MBA is a traditional two-year program – immersive, flexible, broad-based. Students do a summer internship and have extensive opportunities for experiential learning. We also offer a one-year program, which gives students who already have prior knowledge the chance to go straight into the upper level and finish in one year. Our joint degree programs include: a three-year JD/MBA, and a MMM degree (joint program with the school of engineering). And we also offer part time and executive tracks.

Are you starting to see Masters in Management grads applying to the one-year MBA? [12:30]

Those programs do provide the base of business knowledge we’re looking for going into the program.

What are Kellogg’s Pathways? [13:20]

Pathways are a way to organize academic offerings in a way that’s not an academic department. So if you’re interested in entrepreneurship or data analytics, you can take courses across departments related to that pathway.

There’s no application to be on the pathway, and you can take as many (or as few) courses as you’re interested in. That flexibility is something we’re proud of.

Can you provide some examples of experiential learning at Kellogg? [15:30]

Experiential learning gives students the opportunity to apply what they’ve learned in a real world environment, but with less risk.

One example is NUvention, where our students work with other grad students from across Northwestern (law, medical school, engineering), on an entrepreneurial business concept. This leads to exciting things in social impact and medical innovation.

We also have a variety of lab courses. Sponsors include the Chicago Bears, United Airlines, and other major companies. In all, we have 1000 different experiential learning opportunities.

Kellogg is of course famous for its prowess in marketing and strategy. However, your recently released employment report shows that tech is increasingly popular, with 22% of recent grads going into tech careers. What opportunities at Kellogg prepare students for management and entrepreneurial careers in the technology industry? [17:30]

We’re always innovating our curriculum and providing cutting edge content to prepare them. One example is our Digital Marketing & Commerce class, which provides the opportunity for students to work directly with industry experts (including from places like Google) and real online customers.

What’s next at Kellogg? [18:41]

It’s an exciting time. We’re continuing to develop strong class profiles – over 40% women in the last two years, and 26% US minority diversity representation. I’m excited to think about these strong classes in our new Global Hub, which is a reflection of the values of Kellogg – a reflection of our collaborative, student-driven culture.

We’ll have our first classes in the new Global Hub building this spring, and the class entering next fall will have their full MBA experience there. So the new building is the most exciting thing.

What makes the new Global Hub special? [20:25]

It’s over 400,000 square feet of space, designed to encourage collaboration. There are varying room sizes, to encourage meetings and interaction. And there are some tech-free meeting zones, too.

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Related Links:

• Kellogg MBA AdmissionsKellogg MBA Application Essay Tips

Northwestern Kellogg Zone Page

Catching Up with Vandana About Kellogg, Apple & International Applicant Tips

Putting Learning Above All: A Talk with Rohan from Kellogg

Related Shows:

Get Into INSEAD, the International Business School

Exploring the Haas MBA: An Interview with Peter Johnson

Mission and Admissions at Yale School of Management

The MBA Menu at Columbia Business School

A 20-Year MBA Admissions Veteran Shares His Insights

What You Need to Know About Finding a Job Post-MBA

Subscribe:

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post Want a Kellogg MBA? [Episode 182] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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How to Apply to B-School with a Low GPA, Part 3 [Providing Context] [#permalink]

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New post 01 Dec 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How to Apply to B-School with a Low GPA, Part 3 [Providing Context]
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Not proud of your undergraduate GPA? Concerned it may ruin your chances of getting into a top MBA program? It’s time to tackle this issue head-on and create a plan for success.

In the previous posts, we discussed how to determine if you really do have a “low GPA” and how to address that low score. Now it’s time to provide an explanation.

Adding Context to Your GPA in an Optional Essay

“So, what happened? Why is your GPA so low? How do we know it won’t happen again?”

That’s what the adcom readers are thinking when they take that first look at your transcript. And now it’s your turn to respond.

You’ll respond by showing them the additional coursework and all those beautiful A’s. You’ll show them that awesome GMAT score. And maybe you’ll show them a recommendation or two that speak to your academic abilities.

You’ll also want to write the optional essay in which you provide context to your GPA, showing that whatever contributed to your poor performance is either not a factor in your life anymore or is something that you’ve learned how to deal with so that it doesn’t affect your performance any longer.

Whatever your reasons may be (extenuating circumstances or circumstances totally beyond your control), explain the situation in a straightforward, honest manner. For real mistakes that you’ve made, fess up, take responsibility for your actions, and indicate that you are a changed person who has learned lots and moved forward. No whining please!

Keep in Mind: A Holistic Matter

MBA admissions is about much more than your GPA. You cannot look at any single number and focus exclusively on it, certainly once you weigh in the circumstances that led to your low GPA and the trending direction of your GPA. Your GPA also doesn’t at all reflect the impact of your diversity and non-academic experiences – important factors taken into consideration by adcom members.

When you are admitted to b-school (or rejected, for that matter), it is due to the complete package, the holistic sum of all your parts. Yes, your GPA is extremely important, and you’d be unwise to think otherwise – but it’s not the be-all and end-all of your admissions profile. Work hard, demonstrate your academic abilities in other ways, and prove to the adcom that you’re ready to hit the books and ace the heck out of b-school.

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Related Resources:

5 A’s for Your Low GPA [Podcast]

MBA Admissions Tip: Dealing with Low GPA

• How To Write About Overcoming Challenges Without Sounding Like A Whiner

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post How to Apply to B-School with a Low GPA, Part 3 [Providing Context] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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Kudos [?]: 581 [0], given: 74

How to Apply to B-School with a Low GPA, Part 3 [Providing Context]   [#permalink] 01 Dec 2016, 10:01

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