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Get the Answers to Your GMAT Questions! [#permalink]

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New post 02 Oct 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Get the Answers to Your GMAT Questions!
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Is the GMAT a make-it-or-break-it part of your application?

Does it predict your future success?

Your success in b-school?

Join Linda Abraham on Thursday, October 27 for The GMAT: Low Scores, Retaking & Strategies for Success, the free webinar exploring your questions about the GMAT. (When should you retake it? When should you cancel a score? What should you do if you can’t raise it? And more!)

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Have GMAT questions you’d like addressed at the webinar? Let us know in the comments section!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Get the Answers to Your GMAT Questions! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 581 [0], given: 74

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User avatar
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Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5757

Kudos [?]: 581 [0], given: 74

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The Goals Essay: Writing Nitty-Gritty [#permalink]

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New post 05 Oct 2016, 13:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: The Goals Essay: Writing Nitty-Gritty
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Short- and long-term goals

Before you start drafting your MBA goals essays, work out three levels of goals: short-term, intermediate, and long-term. It helps to have this whole picture in your mind regardless of where you’ll “zoom in” for a particular essay. Short-term is immediately post MBA to about two years later; intermediate is about two to five years post MBA; and long-term is the rest. Usually essays ask for short- and long-term goals, but you’ll need intermediate as the bridge between them.

Short-term goals are the most specific, for obvious reasons – they’re closer in time and they’re also the direct link to the MBA program. As you describe successive steps, use less and less detail in each, because the further out you project, the less certain things are. Don’t go beyond what’s practical, e.g., describing in detail what you’ll be doing in twenty years. Adapt each phase to reality too. If your targeted industry (say, healthcare) is in great flux, that point should be reflected in your goals.

Responding to specific goals questions

Different sets of essay questions will emphasize different aspects of the goals; they’ll require different lengths and have different tones. Some are open; other are focused and directed. They key is to “read” not just the words but the tone of the question. Anecdotally, I’ve noticed a trend toward short, focused goals essay questions; there are fewer 1,000 word goals essays, fewer essays asking for your “vision.” Most want the facts, straight.

Read the question carefully, and emphasize in your essay what the question emphasizes (e.g., short-term or long-term equal or do they just mention post-MBA goal?). In other words, be guided by the question. That doesn’t mean you can’t bring in other elements, but they should support your main points.

Often the question asks why you want an MBA or want to attend the particular program. Link these points directly to your goals. If you can weave in your school visit and/or interactions with students and alumni, great!

“Goals Essay – Writing Nitty-Gritty” is excerpted from the guide, Why MBA? To download the complete guide, click here.

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By Cindy Tokumitsu, who has advised hundreds of successful applicants gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA, master, law, PhD and medical programs, with special emphasis on MBA and EMBA and other business programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch! 

Related Resources:

• MBA Admissions A-Z: 26 Great Tips

• 6 Ways to Prepare for Your Compelling MBA Goals Essay

• Write an MBA Goals Essays that Turns the Adcom into Your Cheerleaders!

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post The Goals Essay: Writing Nitty-Gritty appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 581 [0], given: 74

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Writing a Lead That Pops [#permalink]

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New post 06 Oct 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Writing a Lead That Pops
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How many times have you wandered through a bookstore, opening up a book to read the first few lines only to quickly close it again? How often have you read one of those free samples on your Kindle, only to decide after a paragraph that you’re glad you didn’t buy it?

Similarly, how many times have you met someone for the first time and made a judgment in the first five minutes – whether it’s based on how they look, speak, or carry themselves? Even if you know it’s wrong to do so, how many of us have said to ourselves, “they just don’t seem like my type,” and started to look at the clock before you’ve even ordered coffee?

We all do this, dozens of times a day. In our extremely fast-paced world, we are forced to make quick decisions: whether it’s which brand of pasta sauce to buy at the store, which book to read or which movie to watch. There’s always another link to click on if we’re not grabbed right away by the content on the page, or another pair of shoes right next to the ones our eyes first laid sight on, or another person to talk to at a party if the person who approached us first just wasn’t that interesting. We can often only base our decisions on a “snap judgment”: a two-minute movie trailer, the label on the pasta sauce jar, or the first few lines of a book.

Unfortunately, admissions committee members often have to make very quick decisions; they simply have too many applications to wade through to spend more than a few minutes on each one, which means you – the application essay writer (anyone applying to an law school, b-school, med school, grad school, or college) – need to remember this:

Make those first few lines count. Make them sing. Grab your reader’s attention before their attention wanders away.

Now, I know this can sound like a lot of pressure, and in a way, it is. Much like a movie trailer or first few lines of a newspaper article, you only have a short space in which to convince your reader to keep reading.

The challenge of reeling in your readers

Try thinking of it as a fun challenge. Think of it as catching a fish: you must “hook” your reader first before reeling them in. You do this in a brief, to the point, compelling few sentences that start the essay off with a punch. This is called a lead.

The strongest leads are usually personal anecdotes about YOU. Not the details of your GPA, or the technical facts of what you researched in the lab, but a STORY that makes the reader sit up and say, “Ah! An interesting human being with a voice!” For many of you, the essay will be the main way to “introduce” yourselves to the admissions committee, and it may be the only way that they get to “meet” you. So, it needs to really shine.

A good lead:

• Gives your reader an idea of your “agenda” or main points – i.e. who you are, your story, and at least a strong hint as to what you are interested in doing with your life/career/studies

• Uses some sort of creative detail or description

• Makes your reader interested in reading the rest of the essay

Examples of good leads

Here are some examples of interesting first lines:

“It was absolutely pitch black outside…”

“Money was flowing…out the window.”

“Finding a green, scratched 1950s Cadillac in a dump last summer was the moment I realized that mechanical engineering was for me.”

Many clients have expressed fear when I suggest this idea of an anecdotal introduction, as if it appears too “soft,” too “personal”, or “creative.” I would argue that it should be both creative and yet very strong if it’s the right anecdote: the story that ties where you’ve been to where you’re going. And, a bit of descriptive language can go a long way to spice up a straightforward story.

How to Find Your Lead That Pops

I’d suggest that you first make a list of some turning point moments in your life that relate to the professional goal(s) you now have. These can be taken from anywhere – from recent or older work experiences, cultural background, to “aha moments.” An engineering applicant could describe the first moment he experienced a lack of light in his rural home and realized he wanted to become an electrical engineer; an MBA applicant might have had a very profound experience in a recent work situation that made her see why she wants to pursue a career in the nonprofit sector; a law school applicant might have witnessed a courtroom scene during an internship that inspired him to pursue a certain type of law…the possibilities go on and on.

As you make your list of anecdotes, try to jot down as many small, precise details as you can about each memory or experience. Why was this moment important on your journey towards your dream career or school? How did it help shape you, and what did it teach you?

Then, try starting your essay with the anecdote itself. This “hooks” the reader with a real-life human experience, adding in some needed color, personality, and ideally, voice.

Think about the time in the bookstore when you simply had to know what happened on the next page, so you bought the book and read it straight through. You want the admissions people to feel the same way. Once they’re hooked, you can take them anywhere you please.

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Related Resources:

• From Example to Exemplary [Free Guide]

• Generic-itis Prevention [Warning: If Untreated, Can Cause Rejection]

• What Adcoms and Admissions Consultants Share

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Writing a Lead That Pops appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

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Why Some High-Scorers Still Retake the GMAT [#permalink]

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New post 06 Oct 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Why Some High-Scorers Still Retake the GMAT
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This may seem hard for some test-takers to believe, but sometimes even the high-scorers contemplate retaking the exam. It’s not unheard of for someone with a score of 700 – or even higher – to retake the GMAT to see if they can hit a higher number.

But should they? As is usually the case with admissions issues…it depends.

Who are YOU? An Applicant with a Distinctive Background

Were our applicant here a Latin American brand manager or an African pharmaceutical salesperson – that is, if their demographic had little representation in the business school applicant pool – then there would really be no reason to retake the exam. Once they’ve demonstrated competence in each section of the GMAT and present a total score of 700+ – meaning, their quantitative and verbal scores placed them above the 80th percentile in each section – then their GMAT score really becomes a (nearly) non-issue and retaking the test becomes a waste of time that could have been better spent elsewhere.

Who are YOU? An Applicant with a Standard Background

But here’s the thing: if you have a more typical background, and especially if you find yourself in an over-represented part of the applicant pool at top business schools, then the above advice just may not apply to you.

You need a higher score.

Who might be in this group? Indian males in engineering and computer science. Investment bankers. Management consultants. All these group tend to do well on the GMAT and send lot of applications to business schools.

Are YOU applying to Top 10 Programs?

The GMAT score has risen dramatically this year. A couple of years ago you could talk about a balanced 700 being competitive in the top 10. No more:

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Of the eight schools in the US News top 10, four programs now have average GMAT scores of 730+ and only two are under 720. The year-over-year increases are the largest I can remember. Those increases sent me scurrying through back issues of U.S. News to see if my memory was playing tricks on me. It wasn’t. These are the largest average increases in the last five years.

What Should YOU Do?

So, if you score a 700 on the GMAT, should you retake the exam? It depends on the schools you’re applying to, and it depends on your demographic, not to mention the strength of the rest of your application. If you are applying from a common sub-group in the applicant pool with a fairly typical background and extracurricular profile, and you are aiming for a top 10 program, a 700 score will be a negative for you. You should consider a retake. For other applicants, that 700 will be just fine.

Do your research, be as objective as possible, and figure out the target score – and the target schools – that are best for YOU.

And if you’re still not sure, come to The GMAT: Low Scores, Retaking & Strategies for Success, a live webinar that I will present on Oct. 27. We’ll go into other factors to consider in deciding whether to retake or not.

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsWhat to Do if You Belong to an Overrepresented Applicant Group

Should You Retake the GMAT? [Short Video]

The GMAT and the Law of Diminishing Returns

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Why Some High-Scorers Still Retake the GMAT appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 581 [0], given: 74

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Obtaining MBA With Healthcare Goals in Clear View [#permalink]

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New post 07 Oct 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Obtaining MBA With Healthcare Goals in Clear View
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This interview is the latest in an Accepted blog series featuring interviews with MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Aditya Marathe, MBA class of 2018 at UCLA Anderson…

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad?

Aditya: I am from Mumbai, India and I graduated from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India) in 2008. I graduated with a Bachelor in Technology with a major in Electrical Engineering.

Accepted: If you could meet any famous person – past or present – who would it be and why?

Aditya: I have always wanted to meet Albert Einstein, and have been fascinated by his research in astrophysics. I spent a lot of my time in high school reading about him and his work on gravity and the concept of space-time.

Accepted: If you could describe yourself in 3 words, what would they be?

Aditya: Social, Funny, Curious.

Accepted: Where are you currently attending b-school? What year?

Aditya: I am currently a first year full-time MBA student at UCLA Anderson.

Accepted: Why was UCLA Anderson the right “fit” for you? What is your favorite thing about that program?

Aditya: While researching business schools, I reached out to as many current students and recent alumni as I could. All the Anderson students and alumni I reached out were extremely prompt in their responses and very helpful in helping me submit a strong application. On talking to several people, I got a sense of Anderson’s values of “Sharing Success,” “Thinking Fearlessly” and “Driving Change.” I knew that MBA programs could get really competitive, and that was exactly the kind of environment I wanted for the two years I would spend at business school. Also, UCLA Anderson seemed to be the perfect fit for my professional goals for its associations with the healthcare and technology industries in California. UCLA being home to one of the best healthcare facilities in the United States only made the case stronger.

Lastly, Los Angeles! I cannot talk enough about how amazing this city is. While I did apply to business schools in various cities and towns across the US, I always knew that I wanted to experience business school in a big city. Having grown up in Mumbai, a city on the west coast of India, and also known as the financial and entertainment capital of India, I always had a fascination for Los Angeles – which coincidentally is Mumbai’s sister city. Professionally, I firmly believe Los Angeles (and California in general), is the place to be for healthcare research and innovation, the industry I aspire to work in post-MBA.

Accepted: Where are you currently working? Do you plan on staying in that field of work after graduation? Or shifting to another realm?

Aditya: Before I joined Anderson for the MBA program, I was working as Associate Director at Dr Reddy’s Lab (a $2 billion Indian multinational pharmaceutical company), helping the organization take data-based sales and marketing decisions. While I do plan to stay within the larger healthcare industry, I wish to work in the healthcare-technology space (biotech, medical devices or other evolving healthcare technologies) at an innovator organization. I want to work on technologies that help patients manage their diseases better and improve the quality of their lives.

Accepted: Can you share a couple of your top GMAT tips for success?

Aditya: I actually have a blog post that I wrote down right after my GMAT specifically capturing my mantras for success. I definitely recommend reading through my blog post, but there are a few tips that I think are more important than others.

1. GMAT is a test of logic and your ability to reason, more than being a test of your math or verbal skills. If you remember this mantra, you would be able to appreciate the study material better.

2. Speaking of study material, stick to the Official Guide and the original GMAT Prep Tests only. Nothing comes closer than those two resources to the actual GMAT.

3. Carry a bar of chocolate, and an apple to snack on in the break you get during the GMAT.

Accepted: Lastly, looking back at the application process, is there anything you wish you would have done differently? Any challenges?

Aditya: I started thinking about applying for MBA programs at a much later stage than I probably should have, but I did not let that reduce my chances to get admits from top business schools. I used my eight years of experience in the healthcare industry to highlight the value I would bring to the MBA program and alsohow the MBA program would be necessary to take me from where I was to where I wanted to be.

You can read more about Aditya’s journey and advice by checking out his blog, Aditto’s Blog. Thank you Aditya for sharing your story with us – we wish you continued success!

For one-on-one guidance with your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

Image

Image

Related Resources:

9 Secrets to Standing Out in Your MBA Application

• UCLA Anderson: Cool, Chic, and Tech

• How to Study Like the Highest-Scoring GMAT Test Takers

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Obtaining MBA With Healthcare Goals in Clear View appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 581 [0], given: 74

Expert Post
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
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Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5757

Kudos [?]: 581 [0], given: 74

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Obtaining an MBA With Healthcare Goals in Clear View [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Oct 2016, 13:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Obtaining an MBA With Healthcare Goals in Clear View
Image
Image

This interview is the latest in an Accepted blog series featuring interviews with MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Aditya Marathe, MBA class of 2018 at UCLA Anderson…

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad?

Aditya: I am from Mumbai, India and I graduated from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India) in 2008. I graduated with a Bachelor in Technology with a major in Electrical Engineering.

Accepted: If you could meet any famous person – past or present – who would it be and why?

Aditya: I have always wanted to meet Albert Einstein, and have been fascinated by his research in astrophysics. I spent a lot of my time in high school reading about him and his work on gravity and the concept of space-time.

Accepted: If you could describe yourself in 3 words, what would they be?

Aditya: Social, Funny, Curious.

Accepted: Where are you currently attending b-school? What year?

Aditya: I am currently a first year full-time MBA student at UCLA Anderson.

Accepted: Why was UCLA Anderson the right “fit” for you? What is your favorite thing about that program?

Aditya: While researching business schools, I reached out to as many current students and recent alumni as I could. All the Anderson students and alumni I reached out were extremely prompt in their responses and very helpful in helping me submit a strong application. On talking to several people, I got a sense of Anderson’s values of “Sharing Success,” “Thinking Fearlessly” and “Driving Change.” I knew that MBA programs could get really competitive, and that was exactly the kind of environment I wanted for the two years I would spend at business school. Also, UCLA Anderson seemed to be the perfect fit for my professional goals for its associations with the healthcare and technology industries in California. UCLA being home to one of the best healthcare facilities in the United States only made the case stronger.

Lastly, Los Angeles! I cannot talk enough about how amazing this city is. While I did apply to business schools in various cities and towns across the US, I always knew that I wanted to experience business school in a big city. Having grown up in Mumbai, a city on the west coast of India, and also known as the financial and entertainment capital of India, I always had a fascination for Los Angeles – which coincidentally is Mumbai’s sister city. Professionally, I firmly believe Los Angeles (and California in general), is the place to be for healthcare research and innovation, the industry I aspire to work in post-MBA.

Accepted: Where are you currently working? Do you plan on staying in that field of work after graduation? Or shifting to another realm?

Aditya: Before I joined Anderson for the MBA program, I was working as Associate Director at Dr Reddy’s Lab (a $2 billion Indian multinational pharmaceutical company), helping the organization take data-based sales and marketing decisions. While I do plan to stay within the larger healthcare industry, I wish to work in the healthcare-technology space (biotech, medical devices or other evolving healthcare technologies) at an innovator organization. I want to work on technologies that help patients manage their diseases better and improve the quality of their lives.

Accepted: Can you share a couple of your top GMAT tips for success?

Aditya: I actually have a blog post that I wrote down right after my GMAT specifically capturing my mantras for success. I definitely recommend reading through my blog post, but there are a few tips that I think are more important than others.

1. GMAT is a test of logic and your ability to reason, more than being a test of your math or verbal skills. If you remember this mantra, you would be able to appreciate the study material better.

2. Speaking of study material, stick to the Official Guide and the original GMAT Prep Tests only. Nothing comes closer than those two resources to the actual GMAT.

3. Carry a bar of chocolate, and an apple to snack on in the break you get during the GMAT.

Accepted: Lastly, looking back at the application process, is there anything you wish you would have done differently? Any challenges?

Aditya: I started thinking about applying for MBA programs at a much later stage than I probably should have, but I did not let that reduce my chances to get admits from top business schools. I used my eight years of experience in the healthcare industry to highlight the value I would bring to the MBA program and alsohow the MBA program would be necessary to take me from where I was to where I wanted to be.

You can read more about Aditya’s journey and advice by checking out his blog, Aditto’s Blog. Thank you Aditya for sharing your story with us – we wish you continued success!

For one-on-one guidance with your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

Image

Image

Related Resources:

9 Secrets to Standing Out in Your MBA Application

• UCLA Anderson: Cool, Chic, and Tech

• How to Study Like the Highest-Scoring GMAT Test Takers

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Obtaining an MBA With Healthcare Goals in Clear View appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 581 [0], given: 74

Expert Post
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
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Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5757

Kudos [?]: 581 [0], given: 74

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4 Ways to Display Teamwork in Application Essays [#permalink]

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New post 09 Oct 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 4 Ways to Display Teamwork in Application Essays
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Teamwork, and its close cousin, leadership, are highly prized by graduate programs and universities. Haven’t worked in teams on any regular basis? Don’t worry! There are more ways than you may realize to prove your chops in this area. Consider the following 4 options:

1. Remember: No Man is an Island

Unless you’ve been living alone on an island for the last several years, you have undoubtedly participated in various groups. You may have been a member of a sports team or dance troupe, a member of a committee on either a volunteer or workplace basis, helped to organize an event, planned a triathlon, or been a tutor, Big Brother, or Big Sister. In each case, you were working with other people, even if it was only one other person, and had opportunities to display teamwork.

2. Put Your Listening Ears On

Teamwork and collaboration involve effective listening, so if you can discuss a time when you took the time to listen to others, patiently and skillfully, and how doing so eased tensions and increased collaboration, that will demonstrate your teamwork abilities.

3. Discuss Morale Boosting and Conflict Resolution

Talk about the steps you took to improve morale or motivate. If you helped to generate enthusiasm for a project when enthusiasm was flagging, or brainstormed an idea to strengthen a group or project, that’s also teamwork. If you were a member of a committee and figured out a way for two warring members of the committee to stop fighting and start working together, that would also constitute teamwork. Any time you took the initiative to get involved with other people (especially when they are difficult!) to find a better way to get things done, find a middle ground, brainstorm a new idea, it’s all teamwork.

4. Think Small

Effective teamwork can also be shown in very small groups. A client once wrote about her efforts to heal a serious rift in her family after her father passed away and siblings fought for control of the successful family business. An ugly succession fight was underway. The client’s ability to patiently coax cooperation in such an emotionally charged environment, including her “shuttle diplomacy” and active listening among family members, displayed skilled teamwork and leadership. Another client wrote about having organized a trip with a few friends, and how she dealt with a dispute between two of the participants whose bickering threatened to ruin the trip for everyone. Her effective listening, and creatively figuring out an activity that both of the “combatants” would not be able to resist, helped defuse the situation and save the trip from descending into a hellish situation for everyone. In both these situations, the “teams” were small but the stakes for those involved were high.

So do not feel stymied when asked for examples of how you have displayed teamwork – as you now see, you’ve been working in teams more often than you realize!

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Related Resources:

• How to Prove Character Traits in Your Application Essays

Two Ways to Reveal Leadership in Your Applications [Short Video]

The Importance of Teamwork

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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Should You Retake The GMAT? [Short Video] [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Should You Retake The GMAT? [Short Video]
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Not sure if you should retake the GMAT? Check out this video for the three key factors to examine when evaluating your GMAT score:



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Related Resources:

MBA Admissions Tip: Dealing with a Low GPA

• Low GMAT Score? Don’t Panic…Yet.

• GMAT, GRE, SAT, and All Things Test Prep

Tags: MBA Admissions

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How Much More Can MBAs Make? Career Switching, Compensation Increase & [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: How Much More Can MBAs Make? Career Switching, Compensation Increase & More
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If you’re thinking of a full-time MBA, chances are you’re looking to switch careers. If you’re like most people, that is – because an incredible 87% of all MBA students report switching careers by changing either their job function or industry. Even more incredible, 7 of 10 MBAs reported successfully switching both job function and industry simultaneously.

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Data shown is percentage of all MBAs that reported pre- and post-MBA data

These numbers are staggering, and validate the value proposition of the full-time MBA as one of the best mid-career reset buttons available. If you’re evaluating your career and looking to make a change or two, how else can you navigate the sometimes massive leap? A full-time MBA program is a costly, but apparently effective lever.

So, where do the switchers go, and what backgrounds do they come from? One of the most popular post-MBA functions is consulting – in fact, many firms hire dozens or even hundreds of MBA associates each year. MBAs love the varied experience, mentorship, and high pay that many consulting firms offer. We took a deep dive to break down what switching into consulting looks like for a full-time MBA student or applicant.

Consultants tend to return to consulting, with bigger wallets and less debt

About 40% of pre-MBA consultants stay in consulting for their post-MBA gig. Many of these are sponsored by their firms, returning to their pre-MBA companies for a few years in exchange for a loan-free postgrad life. Most of these folks do enjoy a decent pay bump for their troubles, too – an additional +89% total compensation on average, including signing and performance bonuses.

But interestingly enough, those that leave consulting received a slightly higher pay increase of ~90%. Where do they go? Well, there’s no “clear winner” for those that leave the consulting roost: the highest ranked function is “corporate strategy” – probably attracting a lot of former consultants with much better work-life balance (49 hours/week vs. 57 in consulting) and lower travel (16% travel ratio vs. 46%).

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This validates the high degree of optionality that attracts so many to consulting in the first place. We won’t say you can really go “anywhere” like some firms seem to promise, but the options do seem abundant based on the data.

Want to break into consulting?

What about those going into consulting, or desiring to? Well, a similarly varied set of backgrounds can lead you there post-MBA – the most popular pre-MBA careers for newly-minted consultants are operations and marketing, but it’s a fragmented field after that.

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We would never make the claim that your pre-MBA background doesn’t matter to these firms, but those who break into consulting don’t fit any one specific mold (except, perhaps, that they can ace a case interview).

What about other functions?

Stop me if you’ve heard something like this before – either from an admit or a student: “My background is in [thing] and I really want to go into [completely unrelated thing] – is that possible?”

This is what we’re working on at TransparentMBA. Giving students access to better compensation, satisfaction and work-life balance data is essential, but it’s not enough. Students need to understand what options an MBA program can open to them based on their background – plus, where their career path might take them two jobs down the line, or even three or four. It’s a data-driven world, and if you accept a job offer without knowing the options it could create (or reduce) in the future, you’re doing yourself a disservice.

You can sign up to get more data on this, but for now here are some data-driven anecdotes from our study:

• Private Equity has a reputation for being tough to break into. Our data confirms this – only former investment bankers, investment managers, and PE associates reported PE offers after getting their MBA.

• MBAs with technical backgrounds gravitate towards product management. We often get questions about whether a tech PM role is a realistic outcome for those without technical backgrounds. While it largely depends on the company – non-technical PM roles are more widely available at Amazon, but scarce at Google – our data shows that almost 50% of graduates who land PM positions do in fact come from technical roles pre-MBA.

• Investment Bankers come from all over – in fact, it’s almost evenly spread between former consultants, those in general management roles, and corporate finance. As long as you survive the recruiting process and can pull the hours (76 hours/week on average), banking appears to be a relatively accessible career path for MBAs of various backgrounds.

How much more will I earn post-MBA?

Salary is king, so let’s start there – the average full-time MBA grad reported a respectable 46% increase, or $41,000 higher salary, versus their prior job. Considering the cost of a full-time MBA (~$140,000 according to Investopedia), this may be more necessary than generous.

The average increase in total compensation – defined as salary, equity, performance bonus, signing bonus, relocation bonus, and other compensation – came in at a whopping +83%, or ~$95,000.

Much of this gap from the salary increase is due to larger companies with developed MBA hiring pipelines, which are able to recruit early and lure debt-laden students with large signing bonuses. The largest bumps came, predictably, in investment banking, with the average total compensation increase – driven by sizable performance bonus potential – clocking in at a ludicrous +265%, or $220,000. Other large increases in total compensation came in Venture Capital (+$200K increase), Investment Management (+$118K), and perhaps surprisingly, Sales (+$124K)

So, is an MBA worth it?

For TransparentMBA users, it appears so. While there are always outliers in a large data set, it’s easy to see a directionally ROI-positive picture, with payback period in year 6 after graduation based on our pre- and post-MBA average compensation. Granted, this assumes no debt burden – so factor that into your own ROI if you’re borrowing.

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But perhaps the most interesting ROI calculation comes from the overall satisfaction scores we collected. MBA students and alumni report their happiness with their pre-MBA job at a paltry 4.9/10, but happiness ratings for their post-MBA gigs skyrocket an incredible 58% to 7.8/10 – an increase you can’t put a price on. And this is despite working 9% more hours – ~4 hours/week – than they did in their pre-MBA jobs.

Of course, whether an MBA is actually a good financial investment depends on you and your personal situation. Whether planned or not, MBAs overwhelmingly change their careers – so if that’s your goal, it’s worth entertaining the idea. And if you want access to more data like this, including company- and position-specific stats, sign up for free and start exploring more.

This analysis shows user-reported, verified data collected in 2016 on pre- and post-MBA jobs for our users. Please note that this data reflects full-time MBA programs in the United States.

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 TransparentMBA is a free platform allowing MBA students, prospective students, and alumni to evaluate the most granular career data possible. Use our intuitive dashboards to view compensation, satisfaction, and work-life balance data for the jobs you care about most – by industry, function, or even company.

Related Resources:

• Business School Selectivity Index, a tool to help you discover the schools where you are competitive

• What You Need to Know About Finding a Job Post-MBA [Episode 164]

• Two Years After My Harvard MBA

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post How Much More Can MBAs Make? Career Switching, Compensation Increase & More appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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HBXCore: Teaching the Language of Business [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: HBXCore: Teaching the Language of Business
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At the AIGAC conference in June, I spoke to a couple of people on the HBS admissions staff and asked them how applicants with less than stellar records can show they are “new and improved” – focused, mature, and ready for business school. They responded that while HBX CORe doesn’t guarantee admission, completing it with high marks does show that you can perform in an HBS kind of environment. They clearly saw it as a credible credential.

I wanted to learn more about this innovative program and credential. So I invited HBX CORe’s director to join me. Fortunately he accepted the invitation. Today’s guest is Patrick Mullane, Executive Director of HBX CORe. Patrick served as a captain in the USA Air Force in the early 90s, earned his MBA from HBS, and then moved into the world of business. Today he is back at HBS as the director of HBS’ exciting new online learning program. Welcome!

Can you give us an overview of HBX CORe? [1:48]

It’s a 3-course program: economics, accounting, and business analytics. The courses were chosen by faculty as foundational areas people needed for business. The program was originally created to be directed at people late in undergrad, studying the liberal arts, or people preparing for b-school who needed to refresh their knowledge in these disciplines.

How do students learn in HBX CORe? [3:10]

It’s an asynchronous, online program. HBS built it from scratch rather than using existing online platforms. And we use case content, rather than having lectures and texts.

There’s no textbook – it’s fully self-contained. Students can download study sheets.

If there’s no textbook, how are fundamentals taught? [6:00]

Students get everything through the case. Fundamental concepts are given real world structure that makes them easier to grasp.

We also have a closed Facebook group connected to the experience.

How long does the course last, and how many hours? [7:15]

It’s 170 hours of on-platform time, and students report that they spend extensive time off-platform studying. We have courses that last varying lengths of time, as little as 8 weeks or as long as 18, but the number of hours required is the same.

We gate the material and we have quizzes so students work through the course in a cohort.

Do some people have more background in a particular area of business? [9:15]

We use people with background in disciplines for benchmarking: on final exams, those who had previous experience only outperform new students by a few points, which shows us that students are learning new material well.

Study groups are very important at HBS. Is there anything similar at HBX? [10:13]

On the platform, we try to approximate this through the “peer help” function. It’s very different from a bulletin board – it’s very contextual. And students interact through the Facebook group.

Students also coordinate getting together in the city they’re in – in person – to form a study group, just like on campus at HBS.

HBX CORe doesn’t require GMAT/GRE, but does have an application process: what are you looking for? Who do you want to admit? [12:40]

A big part of HBX has to do with the HBS mission: educating leaders that make a difference in the world. The advent of technology has helped us extend that mission. There are more than 900 people (the approximate size of the HBS class) who can excel in the content here and benefit from it.

The purpose of having an application is that we want to be selective but not exclusive.

In the application, we want to test people’s engagement and how excited they are. There’s light testing of analytical ability. We want to see their reasons for doing the program, and test language ability, since the program is only in English.

How do applicants show verbal abilities and analytical skills? [15:25]

The analytical test is chart reading; verbal abilities are shown through essays.

How else do you encourage engagement in an asynchronous course? [16:20]

Beyond the peer help and the Facebook group, it really goes back to building the platform from the ground up and focusing on making it student centered. We want the participant to be leaning forward in their seat.

We’ve created the course to include many short segments and activities – in 100 minutes of curriculum, we have many more activities than the standard MOOC. We spend a lot of time and effort on interactions and animations that explain things in ways you couldn’t in a classroom. It has the side benefit of helping faculty think through how to explain things in new ways.

The interactive platform also replicates the classroom experience of the “cold call.” As students proceed through the course, they can randomly get a notification that they’ve been selected for a “cold call.” Then a question pops up and they have 2 minutes to answer. Their answer is visible to their classmates, who can engage/comment.

CORe stands for “Credential of Readiness.” What is the credential and what does it prepare holders to do? [23:15]

We think of the credential as honoring the fact that you went through something rigorous. (Quizzes, an in-person final exam, cold call answers, shared reflections: all are included in your work.) So the program includes heavy assessment, which distinguishes it from many online programs, which often provide a certificate of completion.

The online learning community awards a lot of certificates. We believe ours is the highest value because of the level of assessment and engagement. We would like, over time, to determine the value more scientifically, beyond the anecdotal data we hear from students, which is positive.

Do you have entrepreneurs taking HBX in place of b-school? [28:00]

I met a church pastor who planned to start his own church (which you might not immediately think of as a business, but it’s a business enterprise), and the program was helpful to him.

We’ve had people use it as a way to get business fundamentals. People self-report their titles in their organizations, and we have a lot of chief executive titles, from people who have started their own organizations.

Can current college students get credit for the program? [29:55]

Yes, but we’re not the ones who give credit. We work through two partner schools to offer credit right now: Harvard Extension and Boise State.

Does anyone take the course but not aim for the credential? [31:00]

A small percentage take the course but don’t sit for the final.

Any students’ stories stand out to you? [31:44]

I’ve heard from people with learning disabilities or physical disabilities who found that the asynchronous program was a godsend.

It’s also a great way for people interested in b-school to test their interest.

We had a woman who was an art history major, and knew nothing about business and had always assumed she would hate it. She loved the accounting class and said she thought she’d missed her calling.

As an HBS alum, what do you think has stood the test of time from your experience? [33:50]

The power of the case method. I’ve found it a powerful way to think about problems in a holistic way.

And study groups are very valuable. They allowed us to divide the work and brief each other. As a manager, you’re never going to know everything yourself, and the ability to work with people that way is crucial.

The network you build when you’re there is essential.

Are you looking to incorporate an offline element in the CORe program? [37:50]

We’ve thought about it. The in-person interaction that is evolving organically is working well.

What percent of your students are US and international? [38:30]

40% of our students are international.

How does the credential affect MBA admission? [39:00]

It’s like any other academic pursuit – if it shows you’re interested, motivated, and did well, it’s a positive. It’s not a guarantee of admission.

I think it’s great for anyone applying to an MBA program.

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Related Links:

HBX CORe

The Best Little Secret of the Harvard MBA, Patrick’s post on study groups

, a short video

Harvard Business School Zone Page

Harvard Business School 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

Related Shows:

• HBS 2016 Grad Reflects on Her Experience as a Harvard MBA

• HKS – Where the Bottom Line is Making a Difference to Society

An HBS Student Helping HBS Applicants

5 A’s for Your Low GPA

Subscribe:

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post HBX CORe: Teaching the Language of Business [Episode 175] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Final Miscellany – Plan B, Research, Professional Support [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Final Miscellany – Plan B, Research, Professional Support
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I will wrap up this series with a few miscellaneous points.

Plan B

Think you’re done with MBA goals? Think again… In the current global economic volatility, having a Plan B for your immediate post-MBA goal can be not only good planning for you, but also enhance your goal essay’s credibility. It’s particularly important if you’re targeting a difficult-to-enter industry (remember that VC-dreamer in the first post?) or changing careers. In fact, adcoms have specifically said that they welcome this recognition of reality; it gives them more confidence that you can get employed.

The challenge, however, is to discuss a Plan B without using a lot of precious space and without sounding undirected. In the goals essay, focus mostly on your main short-term goal. Then add one to three sentences about a reasonable alternative that you’d also consider, explaining how it also would be a good step toward your further goals. Example: an applicant is targeting an IT manager role post-MBA with the long-term goal of CIO; a Plan B could be a tech strategy consulting post-MBA job.

Preliminary research

I’m always surprised at how few people do roll-up-the-shirtsleeves research on their goals before writing essays. Digging around on the web for a couple of hours or talking to people in careers related to your goals can yield rich detail for your essays. Moreover, mentioning this research in your essays enhances the sense of commitment to your chosen path. I suggest reading up on the industry and its current and future challenges, and conducting informational interviews regarding the industry or business function.

Taking this step will enable you to write sharply and engagingly about your goals. It enhances the interest factor of the essay. Also it will prevent big mistakes like those of that Wharton reapplicant in the first post in this series. By presenting selected tidbits of your research in your essay you’ll show you’re resourceful and committed, and equally important you’ll show you have something to say, i.e., contribute.

Professional assistance

I’ve said a lot of “do this” and “do that” in this series. If you feel that having knowledgeable, experienced, committed assistance as you walk through this process would be helpful, please consider using Accepted’s MBA admissions consulting & essay editing services to help you perfect your application.

“Final Miscellany – Plan B, Research, Professional Support” is excerpted from the guide, Why MBA? To download the complete guide, click here.

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By Cindy Tokumitsu,Cindy Tokumitsu has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

9 Secrets to Standing Out in Your MBA Application

• Hone Your MBA Admissions Goals! [Short Video]

• Do You Know the 4 Factors for Assessing Your MBA Profile?

Tags: MBA Admissions

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An Engineer Analyzes Fit at MIT Sloan [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: An Engineer Analyzes Fit at MIT Sloan
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This interview is the latest in an Accepted blog series featuring interviews with MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Sri Challa, MIT Sloan class of 2017…

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad?

Sri: I was born and raised in Hyderabad, India and studied Mechanical Engineering for undergrad at Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Hyderabad.

Accepted: If you could meet any famous person – past or present – who would it be and why?

Sri: Without a doubt JFK, 35th President of the US. His quotes have inspired millions and propelled the world into progress. I have always been fascinated by his vision and how he articulated it. Following are my favorite JFK quotes:

• “Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.”

• “We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard.”

• “I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth.”

Accepted: Where are you currently in b-school? What year?

Sri: MIT Sloan, 2017

Accepted: Why did you choose Sloan? How did you know it was a good “fit”?

Sri: I chose MIT for three reasons – strong and integrated curriculum, focus on entrepreneurship (especially in technology) and open culture. The school, faculty and community have exceeded my expectations since!

As a manager by experience with an engineering background, I was looking for a school that had a systematic and scientific approach toward management. Sloan’s core principles and the program curriculum resonated well with my background and needs. The onsite preview workshop organized by the MIT EMBA program team was outstanding and tremendously helpful in making the decision.

Accepted: Why an MBA? What made you want to pursue a graduate degree?

Sri: Prior to applying for the program, I considered myself to be a manager by experience and was successful in my industry and career. However, as my responsibilities in the organization increased and my interests exploded, including venturing into the world of entrepreneurship, I realized that my education and experience was not going to take me much further. It was clear to me that I needed formal management training, not just from any school, but from a school where theory and application were treated equally. “Mens et Manus” (Mind and Hand) – the foundational principles of MIT – were just was I was looking for.

Accepted: What do you plan on doing after graduation?

Sri: Prefer not to disclose at this time.

Accepted: Did you face any unexpected challenges in the application process? How did you overcome them?

Sri: As an engineer, I took pride in being objective and succinct. But I realized during the application process that a bulleted list of my accomplishments and aspirations would not be enough to tell my entire story. Accepted and their consultants were a tremendous resource in helping me tell my story through the various essays. The consultants were very professional, understood my background and mental model quickly and gave me specific feedback to improve the application. The guidance and feedback I received from Accepted was one of the key drivers for my successful application.

Accepted: Do you have any last words of wisdom or tips for MBA applicants?

Sri: It is probably a cliché, but it is extremely important for you to be yourself. Anyone aspiring to apply for an MBA program should spend enough thinking in clear terms about the following –

1. Why do you need an MBA now? What specifically in your professional tools set is lacking that you expect to acquire through an MBA?

2. What will you do after the MBA? Think hard on this question!

3. Last, but most importantly, spend time understanding the school and program very well. What aspects of the curriculum and the school relate to you? How will you take advantage of these? What will you bring to the school that will enrich the experience for your classmates and advance the mission of the school?

You can connect with Sri via his LinkedIn profile page. Thank you Sri for taking the time to chat with us – we wish you much success!

For one-on-one guidance with your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

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Related Resources:

• 9 Secrets to Standing Out in Your MBA Application

• MIT Sloan 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• Insights into MIT Sloan MBA Admissions with Dawna Levenson [Episode 132]

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Should You Retake the GMAT Exam? [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Should You Retake the GMAT Exam?
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There’s no yes or no answer here, but I will give you some points to consider that will help you make your decision.

You probably should retake the GMAT if…

1. You have other weaknesses in your profile and you feel a high GMAT score will help you compensate for them.

2. You have the time to prepare, study hard, and change the outcome.

3. You are a reapplicant who has received feedback that suggests you need to boost your GMAT score.

4. You blame you’re not-so-brilliant score on a bad day and know that if you retook the GMAT you’d have a meaningfully higher score.

You probably shouldn’t retake the GMAT if…

1. You proudly overshot the 80-80 hurdle. (If you scored above the 80th percentile in both the verbal and quant sections of the GMAT, then you generally don’t need to retake the GMAT, even if you apply to a school at the tippy top of the tier.)

2. You’ve already taken the GMAT 3+ times. (Think about the law of diminishing returns.)

3. You are aiming too high and know deep down that you should probably just apply to b-schools with lower average GMAT scores. If your GMAT is high enough for schools that you would be happy to attend, then you don’t need to retake it.

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Related Resources:

• Should You Retake The GMAT? [Short Video]

• Why Some High-Scorers Still Retake the GMAT

• Low GMAT Score? Don’t Panic…Yet.

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Showing Fit in Your Application: 4 Not-So-Easy Steps [#permalink]

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New post 19 Oct 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Showing Fit in Your Application: 4 Not-So-Easy Steps
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The most popular post of the last six months is “Focus on Fit,” and since Linda is taking a brief vacation, we are reposting it for this week. In this show, she shares the four not-so-easy steps to make sure you show you belong at your target programs.

Whether you heard it the first time or not, this podcast is a must-listen if you want to show fit in your application and get accepted!

You can listen to it here. To review the show notes, please see Focus on Fit.

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Related Links:

• Get Accepted to Harvard Business SchoolGet Accepted to Columbia Business School• Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business• Secondary Application Strategies for Essays That Score Interviews• Multiple Mini-Interview Webinar• Are You Asleep When You Apply?• Business School Selectivity Index• Law School Selectivity Index

Related Shows:

• Sophie Davis School Of Biomedical Education• Baylor College Of Medicine: A Holistic Approach To Admissions• Attn Med Applicants: A Class Is Matriculated Every Single Year• 3 Ways Temple Can Help You Become an MD• How to Think Like A Dean of Admissions• MedhounD Hunts the Right Med School for You

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Tags: Admissions Consulting, Admissions Straight Talk, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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University of Michigan Ross Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: University of Michigan Ross Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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The Ross EMBA essay questions are straightforward and succinct. Your essays should embody these qualities – and indeed they’ll have to be succinct, given the 400-word length limits. Taken together, they provide both a forest-level (essay 2, goals) and tree-level (professional achievement) view of your career. Both also reflect you as a person and an individual. Each question gives a specific lens through which to focus and shape your answer. Thus, while you address the two questions’ particular points and nuances, keep in mind the larger picture of your career and your character that they portray together.

Essays:

1. What is your proudest professional achievement? (up to 400 words)

Although this essay asks you to discuss your proudest professional achievement, it also, indirectly, is personal, because what is important to you in any area of your life reflects your values, your concerns, your interests, your passions. Accordingly, even though the question doesn’t ask it, I suggest clarifying WHY the chosen achievement is your proudest. It might even be a phrase or sentence, but “why” is what will ultimately make it resonate. I suggest selecting a more recent achievement, if there is one that can rise to the superlative (proudest) level, as it’s a chance to show the reader your impact in a higher-level context that you’ll also be bring to the “EMBA table.” If it’s an older experience, it should be truly pivotal, and perhaps add a sentence about how the experience has influenced you going forward. With only 400 words, keep the structure simple – start with the story and just tell is directly, saving the words for detail here and there rather than editorializing.

2. What are your career goals and how will a Ross MBA help you achieve these? (up to 400 words)

You may want to start by discussing, briefly and engagingly, your current career situation. Then explain how you’ll move on to your future goals. In describing your goals at any given point, indicate why you are taking that step or pursuing that role. Give more detail about the roles you plan immediately post-MBA and the several years following; it should include specific positions, company, scope of responsibilities, and desired impact (i.e. what your desired “footprint” in that role would be). Longer-term goals need less detail, but they should present a clear direction, building on the earlier roles.

In discussing how the program will benefit you, be specific: describe what skills and knowledge you need, and how the program meets those needs. Also refer to the structure and special features of the program that are most important to you, detailing how they will support you and your goals.

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

Michigan Ross EMBA Deadlines:

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Cindy Tokumitsu  has advised hundreds of successful applicants, helping them gain acceptance to top MBA and EMBA programs in her 15+ years with Accepted. She would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

Ace the EMBA, a free guide

• 5 Key Qualifying Factors the EMBA Adcoms Look For

• 3 Key Ways to Stand Out Through Your EMBA Essays

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Do You Have GMAT Anxiety? [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Do You Have GMAT Anxiety?
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Do you know how your GMAT score will affect your chances of gaining admission to your top choice MBA program?

How do you know when you should retake the GMAT?

Do you need to be concerned that the GMAT is going to block your path to your target schools and dream career?

It sounds like you could use some expert advice.

Join us Thursday, October 27 for our free webinar on The GMAT: Low Scores, Retaking & Strategies for Success, when Linda Abraham will answer these questions – and more.

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It’s completely free – but spaces are limited, so reserve yours today!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Do You Have GMAT Anxiety? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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2016 Economist MBA Rankings [#permalink]

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New post 21 Oct 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 2016 Economist MBA Rankings
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Let’s see how well our top schools did this year in The Economist 2016 global MBA rankings:

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Some Highlights:

• There was quite a lot of jumping around in the top 10 with four new schools joining the top of the chart. Numbers 7-10 above are all newcomers to the top 10. IESE, NYU Stern, Stanford, and Columbia were all pushed out of the top 10.

• Schools present in last year’s top 25 that aren’t present this year are Michigan Ross (#20 last year, #27 this year), IMD (#21 last year, #32 this year), and CMU Tepper (#22 last year, #30 this year).

• New to the top 25 this year are IE Business School (jumped from 36th to 17th place this year), Warwick Business School (18th this year, 37th last year), and Henley Business School (22nd this year, 34th last year) – all non-US schools.

• Most of the top 25 schools are in the US, but the number of non-US schools represented is growing. Spain and the UK each have three schools on the list, Australia two and France one.

• School #26 (not shown above) is the University of Hong Kong Faculty of Business and Economics, so while Asia didn’t quite make it to the top 25, it wasn’t too far off. Asia is well represented in the second half of the rankings where we’ve got Nanyang Business School in Singapore (#59), the Indian Institute of Management Ahmadabad (#60), HKUST (#78), the NUS Business School in Singapore (#87), the International University of Japan (#90), the SP Jain School of Global Management in Singapore (#95), and in 100th place, the Chinese University of Hong Kong Business School.

Are you using the rankings correctly? Click here to find out now.

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Related Resources:

• GMAC Releases Tool That Organizes, Compares & Explains Major Rankings

• Busting Two MBA Myths

• U.S. News Ranks Best Business Schools in 2016

Tags: MBA Admissions

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310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Cambridge Judge MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 23 Oct 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Cambridge Judge MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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If you are seeking a one-year MBA program that will enable you to transition to a new country, function, or industry, then the Cambridge Judge MBA program may be the program for you. Judge is particularly strong at placing its graduates in the Consulting (29%) and Finance industries (32%) and has a strong showing in the Technology (10%) and Internet/E-commerce (7%) fields as well.

Judge is seeking applicants with proven academic abilities, ambition, the ability to thrive under pressure, international experience, and strong interpersonal skills. So use your essays to demonstrate that you have these qualities, but keep in mind that Judge is one of the few programs that is extremely strict about its word limits: not one additional word can be entered into the essay spaces beyond their word limits.

Here are Judge’s questions, with my tips in blue below.

Essays:

1, What did you learn from your most spectacular failure? (up to 200 words)

To fail, you must take ambitious risks. This is a very concise space to demonstrate that you accept and learn from your mistakes. I’ve seen first drafts where applicants wrote about failures that were completely out of their control or essentially blamed other people for the failure. These do not make good failure essay topics since they will not demonstrate your maturity or your openness to learning. Choose an example in which you could have done better and then show that you’ve internalized that lesson.

2. Describe a situation where you had to work jointly with others to achieve a common goal. What did you learn from the experience? (up to 200 words)

This is your opportunity to demonstrate your interpersonal skills, and possibly your international team leadership and ability to thrive under pressure. For this essay, show the challenges of both the project and the personalities and how you leveraged the latter to solve the former.

3. Personal Statement (not to exceed 500 words)

What are your short and long term career objectives and what skills/characteristics do you already have that will help you achieve them?

What actions will you take before and during the MBA to contribute to your career outcome?

If you are unsure of your post-MBA career path, how will the MBA equip you for the future?

This is a straightforward goals essay. Strong essays will demonstrate clear goals, insight into what skills you need to gain to succeed in those roles, and an understanding of the Judge curriculum and other campus activities that will help you acquire those skills.

I personally love the phrasing of this question because for some applicants this is the first notification that they need to take an active role in their post-MBA job search. Only 48% of Judge graduates credit the school’s career services office with helping find their post-MBA job. The rest of the class landed their roles through a combination of networking, using LinkedIn, professional headhunters and even traditional responses to advertisements. The admissions office cannot accept students who expect the school’s name and career services office to open every door for them, so applicants need to demonstrate in this essay that they are comfortable with that reality.

4. Additional Information: Please provide information on any aspect of your candidacy that requires further explanation, or information that you would like the Admissions Committee to know (300 word limit).

I personally always recommend taking advantage of optional essay space when offered it. This would be a great opportunity to share more about your international experiences, your interpersonal skills, or your activities outside of work.

One additional area to expand beyond the tight word limits of Judge’s essay questions is within the job description boxes in the application form: Judge has no word limits for your responses to your greatest challenge and accomplishment for each position, so you can share details that provide full perspective on these, including how you applied your business and interpersonal skills to succeed.

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

The application dates for the 2017/18 cohort are below:

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Jennifer Bloom has been a consultant with Accepted for 17 years and a Certified Professional Resume Writer since 2005. She is an expert at crafting application materials that truly differentiate you from the rest of the driven applicant pool. If you would like help with your applications, Jennifer can suggest a number of options that work with any budget. Want Jennifer to help you get accepted? Click here!

Related Resources:

• 3 Hacks to Transform Your MBA Application [webinar]

• 2016-17 School-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips

• How Do You Deal with Criticism? MBA Admissions Committees Want to Know

Tags: MBA Admissions

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5 GMAT Myths Busted [#permalink]

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New post 23 Oct 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 5 GMAT Myths Busted
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Think you know the GMAT? There are a lot of misconceptions about this exam. Before you begin your GMAT prep, be aware of the five most common GMAT myths.

Myth # 1: The GMAT is just like the GRE, but with more business content.

Many GMAT misconceptions stem from confusion between the GMAT and GRE. Often, B-school hopefuls make the mistake of assuming the GMAT is a business-oriented clone of the GRE. Sure, there are some obvious parallels between these two tests: both have a Verbal Section, as well as a Quant Section, and an AWA Essay Section. Beyond that though, there are some very significant differences between these two exams. The GMAT has an extra section called Integrated Reasoning, and the GMAT’s AWA section has a single Analyze an Argument Task, while the GRE has both Argument and Issue Essays.

There are also some subtle but important differences between GMAT/GRE Quant and GMAT/GRE Verbal. Confusion about these two sections are a source of two additional myths. We’ll get to those next.

Myth # 2: GMAT Math and GRE Math are more or less the same.

It’s a mistake to think of the math on the GRE and the GMAT as equivalent. Most obviously, the GMAT’s Integrated Reasoning (IR) tests math skills in a way that isn’t at all GRE-like. IR involves reading highly-technical business reports and doing advanced math. Moreover, the math in both GMAT IR and GMAT Quant is harder than GRE math, on average. And to make GMAT Math even more challenging, you can only use a calculator on Integrated Reasoning—not on the actual Quant section. (In contrast, Calculator use is permitted in GRE Quant.)

Myth #3: GMAT English is easier than GRE English.

Without a doubt, GMAT Verbal is structurally different than GRE Verbal. But it’s hard to say which Verbal section is truly easier, because the two exams’ Verbal sections focus on different skills. GMAT Verbal is much more grammar-oriented than GRE Verbal, and focuses less on vocabulary skills.

It’s also wrong to assume that GMAT AWA is easier just because it only has one essay task. Although the GMAT has just one task, if you are weak in argument analysis, then getting a good score on GMAT AWA will be harder than scoring well on GRE AWA– you’ll have to put all your effort into a task you’re not strong in. In addition, GMAT essay prompts are much more business and math oriented than GRE ones. If you’re not comfortable dealing with numbers or juggling specialized business lingo as you write, there’s another reason you may find GMAT AWA more difficult than its GRE counterpart.

Myth # 4: You only need to submit your highest GMAT score to schools.

Most standardized tests issue a separate score report every time you take an exam. GMAT score reports, on the other hand, are more like an academic transcript. Your GMAT score report won’t just show your most recent score– it’ll also show the scores for any additional times you’ve taken the GMAT in the last 5 years.

This may or may not be a problem. Some schools only consider the highest score on your GMAT “transcript.” But other schools look at all recent GMAT scores. If you’re worried that a record of a disappointing GMAT score could hurt your chances of admission, ask your target school about their policy on past scores (or their policy on disappointing retake scores).

Myth # 5: You Need Lots of Expensive Books to Pass the GMAT.

Because GMAT test-takers have a strong interest in business, they often approach their GMAT prep with an “investment mindset”; purchasing an array of GMAT prep books. In reality, you should apply a much more basic business principle when gathering your GMAT study resources: the principle of thrift.

Rather than investing money into your studies, invest time. Organize your study regimen by following a pre-outlined GMAT schedule; peruse the endless amount of study guides out there, then whittle down your selection to the ones you know you’ll use; dedicate an hour every few days to studying. If you’re organized and approach GMAT prep with a clear head, you’ll find the process much more enjoyable.

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David is a test prep expert at Magoosh. He has a Bachelor of Social Work from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and a Masters in Teaching English to Speakers of other Languages from the University of Wisconsin-River Falls. He has been teaching K-12, University, and adult education classes since 2007 and has worked with students from every continent.

Related Resources:

• Should You Retake The GMAT? [Short Video]

• How to Study Like the Highest-Scoring GMAT Test Takers

• GMAT & MBA Admissions: True or False?

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post 5 GMAT Myths Busted appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Should You Retake the GMAT? [#permalink]

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New post 26 Oct 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Should You Retake the GMAT?
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Well, should you? You’re not sure?

There’s still time to register for The GMAT: Low Scores, Retaking & Strategies for Success and learn how to view your scores from the adcom’s perspective and to answer that painful, nagging question: Should you retake the GMAT?

But time is running out – register now.

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Should You Retake the GMAT? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Should You Retake the GMAT?   [#permalink] 26 Oct 2016, 10:00

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