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Why Write a Series About MBA Goals? [#permalink]

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New post 13 Sep 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Why Write a Series About MBA Goals?
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A few years ago, in the good old days when Wharton still offered feedback to rejected applicants, I talked with a potential client who happened to be reapplying to Wharton. I asked him whether he’d obtained feedback on his application, and he said yes. Well? “Actually they said they really liked my application. They said I was well qualified, and I would be a good fit for the school.” Pause. “The problem was my goals. Venture capital. They said it wasn’t a feasible goal for me.”

Like many people, this person dreamed of going into VC – he surely could do it, given the chance, and it would be wonderful for him – just that his chances of getting a VC job post-MBA were about zero. The adcom knew that, and he should have known it too.

Inappropriate goals, ineffectively presented goals, and impractical goals can get otherwise well qualified applicants dinged from top MBA programs. This story is not an isolated case. I have heard similar ones every year for thirteen-plus years.

How do you avoid this scenario? Effort. Thought. Research. Many people start their MBA application process with their goals sort of sketched out in their head. But sketched out won’t cut it, and if you focus only on what you’d like personally without figuring out how you’re going to make it happen, you might not realize that there are a few obstacles, as the person in the above story belatedly discovered. It’s not that you should never present complex or difficult goals in an MBA essay, but rather that if you do you should acknowledge that fact and have some concrete sense of how to achieve them. If the above applicant had said in his original essay that he knew how hard it would be for him to land a VC job and here’s how he was planning to go about it, and if it still didn’t work out, here’s what he’d do instead that would also take him to his long-term goals, he might have been admitted, considering how positively the adcom viewed the rest of his application.

So what exactly are well-articulated, credible, engaging – and ideally exciting – goals, and how do you craft them in the goals essay? The next four posts in this blog series will walk you through that process step by step.

“Why Write A Blog Post Series on Goals?” is excerpted from the Accepted guide, Why MBA? To download the complete guide, click here.

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By Cindy Tokumitsu, author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted and she would love to help you too. Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

• Focus on Fit, a podcast episode

• Do You Know the 4 Factors for Assessing Your MBA Profile?

• Business School Selectivity Index, a tool to help you discover the schools where you are competitive

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Why Write a Series About MBA Goals? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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The MBA Menu at Columbia's Business School [#permalink]

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New post 14 Sep 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: The MBA Menu at Columbia's Business School
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There’s something for everyone at Columbia Business School.

Today’s AST podcast is a first: an in-person interview! Our guest is Emily French Thomas, Director of Admissions at Columbia Business School, and we’ll be talking about the menu of programs available at CBS. Welcome, Emily!

What is the common thread that unites the many programs at CBS? [1:18]

When people think of getting an MBA, they’re often thinking about shifting careers, or building their network. And we definitely provide those strengths. But the more intangible benefit of a Columbia MBA is learning to see the world in a more holistic way – gaining a framework for all the decisions you’ll make in your future career.

Our goal is to cultivate an entrepreneurial mindset. That doesn’t just mean starting your own company – it’s about identifying opportunity. We’re training business leaders who think entrepreneurially.

Our core curriculum (accounting, marketing, big data, etc) teaches students how to look at a problem from multiple perspectives. It’s really a transformative experience.

We bring theories into the real world. And students have access to so many industries and business leaders in NY, to learn how the knowledge applies in the real world. And the networking opportunities from that are also invaluable. (For example, our students have regular coffee chats with alumni.) There’s just an incredible amount of access that comes from being at the center of business.

Can you give an overview of the fulltime MBA program? [6:05]

There are two streams. One is a 20-month traditional program with August entry: there’s a semester of core, a semester of electives, a summer internship, then the second year. We take about 550 students a year for the August entry. They’re broken into clusters of 60-70 students and further divided into learning teams. So you have a home base of people you get to know really well.

We do have exemption exams, so you can test out of specific core courses if you have expertise in the area, and replace them with an elective. But generally students are happier if they have at least some core courses, in order to build relationships with their learning team.

What about the January program? [9:00]

This is an accelerated 16-month program. The difference between this and the August entry is the summer internship. January students start one semester later and take classes in the summer, and are in the same place as the traditional students when they start the second year. It’s a great way to minimize the opportunity cost.

It’s a wonderful option for students who are sponsored by companies or who are coming from family business.

If you’re changing your career in a major way (industry-function-geography) – you can probably change one area but not two through the January program. For more radical changes, in general, you need the summer internship. However, there are also school year internships, and JTerm students can do those.

You’re in a stronger position to succeed if you have a very clear sense of your goals and are proactive – that’s one of the things we’re looking for in applicants (people who have direction).

What else are you looking for in an applicant? [16:20]

We’re looking at the whole application. Any one part of the application is just a data point.

We’re looking for academic achievement: we require either the GMAT or the GRE. (If you’re planning to retake, it’s best to stick with the one you already took.)

Linda: Is it better to cancel a low score or show improvement?

Showing hard work to improve is worthwhile. We don’t need people to be perfect.

In addition to academics, we’re also looking for professional experience – particularly what you’ve achieved in your work.

Recommendations are important. People are often hung up on getting recommendations from people with fancy titles: but get the recommendation from the person who knows you best. They can write something more interesting and constructive about who you are.

Our essays are personality questions – we want to think about you as a human being.

What makes qualitatively impressive work experience? [21:25]

We’re interested in seeing what a person has done with what they have. Is your work impressive relative to your peers? Do you have leadership experience and have you taken initiative? Sometimes people working in small family companies or small firms have had more opportunities for leadership.

What are the hiring strengths at Columbia? [23:00]

It comes back to that question of access.

A recent grad had a lot of coffee chats with alumni and had met a lot of people at his target company, so when he went for his interview, it was much easier and more natural, thanks to his extensive research and networking, and he got the job.

There’s also a very strong career management service and very active clubs.

There are three EMBA programs (NY, Americas, Global) at Columbia. What is common to the three? [25:20]

The Columbia EMBA programs have the same core as the FT programs. The EMBA NY takes in around 144 students, starting in August, for a 20-month program (meeting on Fridays and Saturdays for 9 weekends/semester). There’s also a program on Saturdays only for 13 weekends/semester. There’s no summer internship. The Saturday-only program is 24-months.

The other programs are modular, with a 1 week intensive format. The Americas program is designed for people coming from farther away (outside NY) – students come from all over the country, and also from Latin America. There are even some students from Europe. There’s one week of class each month for the first three semesters.

EMBA Global is modular, too. [30:00]

It’s a partnership with LBS, and incorporates LBS courses. Students can take courses from either school, and can tailor their electives to whatever structure works better for them (Saturday vs modular week).

Finally, there’s the EMBA Global Asia program, which is a joint program with LBS and Hong Kong University; students actually earn a joint degree.

Would you consider the EMBA a part-time degree or a degree for more experienced students? [32:25]

It really feels like a full-time program.

It’s also lockstep – students take courses with their clusters, developing relationships in a way you generally don’t in a part-time program.

It’s not necessary to have reams and reams of work experience, but we do look more closely at work experience than academics for the EMBA. If you’re junior in your career, just think about how you’d contribute.

If you can, come and visit – talk to students. It’s the only way you’ll know how you’ll feel in the program.

What’s the EMBA admissions process? [35:40]

It’s a rolling process (just like the FT MBA, but different from our peer schools with rounds). It becomes more competitive closer to the deadline.

For EMBA: we look at your academics. We do require a test. We now accept the Executive Assessment, which has been popular with EMBA applicants.

There are three required essays. Instead of the question we ask FT applicants (about how they would take advantage of the New York location), we ask EMBA applicants how you will balance work, life, and school.

And we weight work experience a little more than academics.

What is the career benefit of the EMBA? [39:00]

Bringing new knowledge back to work in real time, and applying what you’re learning right away. It’s also a benefit to the company.

EMBA students also benefit from networking opportunities.

We had a recent student who came to the program after working in finance, and started thinking about how tough it was for vets to get services. He hooked up with other students, created a tech platform, and launched a company – it’s a real success story.

How much do EMBA and FT students mix? And is there mixing among the different EMBA programs? [44:20]

There’s definitely mixing among EMBA students.

EMBA students can take FT electives, and vice versa. International Seminars bring EMBA students together.

There’s also interaction in electives and clubs. And there’s leadership from the EMBA class in student government.

A lot of what clubs do is recruiting-focused, but they also bring speakers to campus, and EMBA students get involved with that.

As an applicant, what should I do? [48:20]

Think about your strategy. Know what you’re investing in. Visit if you can, but if you can’t, learn about the program in other ways: talk to a student on the phone; come to one of our info sessions. You need to know what you’re investing in. Also, the more you know, the stronger your essays will be.

Early decision vs regular decision for the FT MBA – how to decide? [50:00]

It’s a rolling process, so it gets more competitive later in the process.

Don’t apply Early Decision unless you know that Columbia is where you want to be, because it is binding. So make sure there aren’t any other factors determining that decision (ie a partner who might not move to NY, finances, etc).

You can still apply on the early side of the rolling process without the binding requirement of Early Decision. There’s a deadline in January for merit aid – that’s when most people apply. The final deadline is in April – by then, it’s very competitive.

Any last advice? [52:40]

Be yourself in the application. Sometimes we read an application from someone who seems to be trying to push their story into a preconceived idea of what they think the adcom wants to read, and it doesn’t match up.

You’re not competing with anyone else (especially because of the way our rolling deadline works) – you’re competing with yourself. We want students who are nice and engaged. If we get a sense that you’re completely transactional, we’ll think that’s how you’d be on campus.

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Related Links:

• Columbia Business School 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• Columbia 2016-17 Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

Get Accepted to Columbia Business School [On-Demand Webinar]

Related Shows:

• Bruce DelMonico on The Yale School of Management

• Mission and Admissions at Yale School of Management

• Too Old for an MBA? Check Out 3 Outstanding MBA and EMBA Alternatives

• A 20-Year MBA Admissions Veteran Shares His Insights

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, MBA Admissions

The post The MBA Menu at Columbia Business School [Episode 171] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Prodigy Launches New $20k Scholarship for Student Borrowers [#permalink]

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New post 14 Sep 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Prodigy Launches New $20k Scholarship for Student Borrowers
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Prodigy Finance shared some exciting news with us, and we now want to share it with you. The community funding platform is launching a scholarship program where five of their student borrowers will receive a $20,000 scholarship.

To be eligible, students need to secure a loan from Prodigy before November 30th of this year that will go towards their studies at a business school in the US or the UK.

Candidates will be chosen based on their academic aptitude (GMAT scores), declared salary, advanced rate, minimum loan size, and whether a recipient has already been awarded a scholarship from that academic institution.

Prodigy will be announcing the first two recipients soon, but there are still three scholarships up for grabs!

Find more information on the Prodigy website.

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Related Resources:

• Making International Student Loans a Prime Investment

• How to Fund Your International MBA in the U.S., a free webinar

• MBA Scholarships: How Do I Apply and What Should I Emphasize?

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Prodigy Launches New $20k Scholarship for Student Borrowers appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

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9 Secrets to Standing Out in Your MBA Application [#permalink]

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New post 15 Sep 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 9 Secrets to Standing Out in Your MBA Application
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The MBA application process requires work and introspection – you need to think about your goals and how going to b-school will help you achieve them, and you need to think about how your unique talents will contribute to your target program. The adcom wants to see that you are their ideal fit, and they don’t want just anyone! They want someone outstanding. Someone extraordinary. Someone who will stand out and make an impact on their class, their b-school, and on the business world at large.

In our updated admissions guide, 9 Secrets to Standing Out in Your MBA Application, you’ll learn how to dig deep to discover your competitive advantage – those skills, traits, and experiences that may not be immediately evident but that truly embody who you are.

You need to hook the admissions reader from the very first moment. 9 Secrets to Standing Out in Your MBA Application will teach you how to do exactly that.

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Grab your free copy of 9 Secrets to Standing Out in Your MBA Application now!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post 9 Secrets to Standing Out in Your MBA Application appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 583 [0], given: 74

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UGH! THOSE @!#$* WORD LIMITS!!! [#permalink]

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New post 16 Sep 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: UGH! THOSE @!#$* WORD LIMITS!!!
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Now, now. Don’t get angry. Deal.

First and foremost, focus. And use writing techniques that convey your message and stay within the word limits. What writing techniques are those? Glad you asked!

1.  Minimize use of the passive voice.

Passive: Experience A has been complemented by experience B. (8 words)

Active: Experience B complements experience A. (5 words)

2. Use active, descriptive verbs.

Blah: I was the one who made the decision… (8 words)

Strong: I decided… (2 words)

3. Minimize use of the verb “to be” (Please note that I did not say “eliminate.”)

Overuse of “to-be”: She is a skillful negotiator. (5 words)

Strong Active Verb: She negotiates skillfully. (3 words)

4. Check whether you need the verb preceding an infinitive.

Surplus words: She was able to fix… (5 words)

More direct phrasing: She fixed… (2 words)

These few techniques will strengthen your writing, help you stay within those limits, and give you one less reason to curse your applications.

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By Dr. Rebecca Blustein, Accepted consultant since 2008, former Student Affairs Officer at UCLA’s Scholarship Resource Center. Dr. Blustein, who earned her Ph.D. at UCLA, has helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to top MS, MA, and Ph.D. programs. She’s also an expert on grad school funding and scholarships.Want Rebecca to help you get accepted? Click here to get in touch!

Related Resources:

From Example to Exemplary, free guide

• How to Edit Your Application Essays

• How to Use Good Grammar to Create Essays that Flow

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post UGH! THOSE @!#$* WORD LIMITS!!! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 583 [0], given: 74

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An HBS Grad Shares His Start-Up Experience [#permalink]

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New post 16 Sep 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: An HBS Grad Shares His Start-Up Experience
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This interview is the latest in an Accepted blog series featuring interviews with MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with HBS grad, Phil Strazulla.

Accepted: Thanks for the interview, Phil! Where are you from? Where did you attend business school? When did you graduate?

Phil: I’m originally from a small town south of Boston called Cohasset. I grew up there and then moved to NYC to attend NYU for college before coming back to Boston for HBS where I completed my MBA in 2014.

Accepted: If you could meet any famous person – past or present – who would it be and why?

Phil: Tough question. Definitely someone from the past because I just don’t think we know about what life was like back then very well and that’s always interested me. Probably some sort of “entrepreneurial” leader like Washington, Hannibal, or Jesus.

Accepted: How did you know that HBS was the right MBA program for you?

Phil: Obviously the brand is very strong, and incredibly strong internationally (seems like the further you get from Cambridge the more it helps). More than that, I wanted to start a company and in many ways HBS is the place to do it, even if Stanford is close to Silicon Valley. HBS startups have raised more money than YC companies, 1/3 of HBS alums start their own company, and there are insane resources on campus.

Accepted: You’re now a couple years post-MBA… How has the job market been for you?

Phil: I started my own company, NextWave Hire, out of business school. We deal with hiring so I see a lot of that data. I’ll say that the hiring market is still very robust for MBAs and there are a lot of opportunities. It may be tough still to break into PE, VC or hedge funds, but that will always be the case.

Accepted: You founded a startup called NextWave Hire. Tell us about it!

Phil: The average job seeker spends 2 hours researching a company before applying for a job. For most companies, they rely on generic job postings, bland career pages, and biased Glassdoor reviews. We partner with companies to build authentic employee stories to show job seekers what it’s really like to work at the company, and then push that content to career pages, social media, email marketing, etc.

I learned to code in business school and started this company with a friend of mine who I met originally through the Harvard Innovation Lab.

Accepted: What valuable information did HBS teach you about the startup world?

Phil: I learned that focus is the most important aspect of entrepreneurship. Everyday we have new ideas on how to build a better product, sell, etc – but we need to focus on 1-2 things at any given time first.

Accepted: Do you have any suggestions or tips for people who are considering an MBA and going the startup route?

Phil: Enjoy your time at school. It’s SO HARD to start a company while going to class. You only get to do b-school once, and it’s an amazing experience. Don’t dilute it by working part time on an idea…startups need your full attention to get going.

Definitely try to meet co-founders through clubs, dinners, parties, trips. Definitely learn new skills (coding, marketing, sales, product). And build your network of mentors, preferably entrepreneurs who have been there, done that.

You can follow Phil on Twitter (@philstrazzulla) or by checking out his blog. Thank you Phil for sharing your story and advice with us – we wish you much success!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

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Related Resources:

• Harvard Business School 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• Sample Essay from Admitted HBS Student: The Mechanical Engineer

• 5 Practical Lessons I Learned at HBS that Helped Me Launch My Startup

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post An HBS Grad Shares His Start-Up Experience appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

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UCLA 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 19 Sep 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: UCLA 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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The advice that UCLA Anderson provides below is excellent, not just for Anderson’s essays, but for most MBA essays. Read it carefully.

My tips are in blue below.

Your essays are the primary way for you to share your perspectives and plans with the admissions committee. The best essays are introspective, genuine and succinct in directly answering our questions and responding to our topics.

• You should try to distinguish yourself by showing what makes you different from others who share similar profiles.

• Personal expression is what we are looking for, not platitudes.

• Making a strong case for your future plans requires you to first do research on career paths and find one that resonates. Even if this target will change during business school, your application essays should lay out a clear trajectory for short-term and long-term goals. Do this by demonstrating how you expect to build on skills from your past, and those you expect to gain from the MBA.

• Essays are more compelling if they include specific courses, programs, groups, opportunities, activities, etc. from which you would benefit, if admitted to UCLA Anderson. These references are best found through website research, personal discussions and a campus visit (if possible).

• Content and clarity are key elements, as we seek superior communication skills.

• Style is a consideration too, although we understand that those who speak other languages may have different manners of expression in English.We do check your essays for plagiarism, so make sure you always submit your own work.

• Length does not equal strength. A well-written short essay can have even more impact than a longer essay. Please try to respect the word limits indicated below.

• All responses to essays must be on double-spaced pages that are uploaded as a document. We do not accept essays in any other media but written form.

Essay:

One essay is required, in written form only. One optional essay may also be submitted to supply information on extenuating circumstances.

We believe that the best results are achieved when you share success, think fearlessly and drive change.  With this in mind, what are your goals at UCLA Anderson and in your short-term and long-term career? (750 words maximum)

Anderson  gives you enough room to write a revealing response. Make sure this essay shows that you can answer the question articulately and belong at Anderson.

First think about Anderson’s motto: Share success. Think fearlessly. Drive Change. Think about the ways you can show that those values are your values. How do those values motivate you to pursue the path your are pursuing? To apply to UCLA Anderson’s MBA program?

A great way to approach this essay would be to discuss an experience or anecdote that reveals you acting according to these principles. Then connect that story and your values to UCLA Anderson’s program and culture and your reasons for choosing its MBA program. Conclude by connecting relevant aspects of the Anderson MBA experience and program to achievement of your short- and long-term goals. Conclude by addressing the last part of the question: How Anderson’s principles and “environment” will help you realize your post-MBA career goals.

Your particular story may benefit from a different order, and that’s fine. Just make sure that the reader can follow and that you include all the requested elements.

Optional Essay:

The following essay is optional. No preference is given in the evaluation process to applicants who submit an optional essay. Please note that we only accept written essays.

Are there any extenuating circumstances in your profile about which the Admissions Committee should be aware? Please use your best judgment. (250 words maximum)

If there are extenuating circumstances that would add perspective on, context for, or “explain” a weakness, you can discuss them here. A few years ago, UCLA added the following: “Please do not submit redundant information in the Optional Essay.” Good advice for all optional questions. For more suggestions, please see The Optional Question: To Be or not To Be.

Reapplicants – One Required Essay:

Reapplicants who applied for the class entering in fall 2014 or 2015 are required to complete the following essay:

Please describe your career progress since you last applied and ways in which you have enhanced your candidacy. Include updates on short-term and long-term career goals, as well as your continued interest in UCLA Anderson. (750 words maximum)

This is the key question in every MBA reapplication: How have you enhanced your candidacy? Career progress is an obvious place to start and something you must address, but if academics were a weakness, then what have you done since you last applied to show you can excel at Anderson?  Finally, if your career goals have evolved since you last applied, discuss that evolution.

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

If you would like professional guidance with your UCLA Anderson application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the UCLA application.  

UCLA 2016 Application Deadlines

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in your MBA Application Essay [Free Guide]

• UCLA Anderson Executive MBA 2016 Application Essay Tips & Deadlines

• Entrepreneurship at UCLA Anderson

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post UCLA 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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What Adcoms and Admissions Consultants Share [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: What Adcoms and Admissions Consultants Share
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While going through security at the airport recently, I had a TSA agent examining my ID suddenly… said, “I know you. You’re Linda Abraham from Accepted!”

Surprised, I replied, “You’re right. How did you know?” Accepted is not on my ID.

“I’ve attended your webinars.”

Why should I have cared, or actually been pleased, that someone recognized me for my work as an MBA admissions consultant?

I’m human. And like most people, I like recognition (of the positive kind) for my work and efforts. So if you recognize me, by all means say “hi.”

On the same trip and since, I’ve had several occasions to meet and talk with admissions committee members from a variety of schools including Harvard MBA adcom, Wharton, Stanford, Columbia Business School, NYU Stern, IE, and Cambridge Judge. Whether in private meetings or in a reception I attended for applicants, at some point each of the adcom members said, “I’m human. I’m reasonable.”

What was the context and what are the implications of this very basic, obvious piece of information. Why did they feel the need to say it?

All were responding to the occasional lack of authenticity in some applications. For example applicants who write they want to go into social enterprise with no evidence of interest in social enterprise make admissions readers wonder about sincerity. Highly paid applicants claiming noble, low-paying MBA goals who don’t seem aware of the pay cut awaiting them if they achieve their goals also are cause for wonder. And skepticism. When human beings are suspicious, they usually just say “no.”

Another point they all made: they know their programs. They want to admit people who will thrive and be happy at their schools. If you successfully portray yourself as someone you are not and they admit the phony you, they will have an unhappy customer on their hands. And you well spend tens of thousands of dollars and two years in the wrong place. So be yourself. Present your best self, but it still needs to be you.

Also, keep in mind that no human being likes to be lied to or wants to do something that will ultimately make him or her look bad. The admissions committee members are no different. If they think you are lying or that you aren’t a fit, your admissions chances just took a deep dive.

In my meetings, I asked about applicants applying with a criminal record or with academic infractions. In both cases the associate directors whom I met paused and thought for a minute. They said that they do not automatically reject people with these kinds of issues. Obviously the applicant has to be otherwise qualified, but in considering the infraction, the committee will look at when it occurred, what it was, and the applicant’s response to the event. Obviously, a misdemeanor eight years ago is very different from a felony last month.  Again, they both said, “We’re human. We’re reasonable. We know people can make a mistake.”

That humanity and that drive to help applicants end up in the right school are shared by admissions committee members and admissions consultants. Yes, the school representatives’ primary responsibility is to their programs, but to the extent they want you to end up at the right school for you and you want to end up at the right school for you, all our interests overlap.  As an admissions consultant, it’s my job to help you find the right school for you — and then to help you make your best case for acceptance with a self-aware, reflective, authentic, and articulate application.

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsFrom Example to Exemplary – A Free Guide

• Focus on Fit [Episode 162]

• Admissions Tip: BE YOURSELF!

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post What Adcoms and Admissions Consultants Share appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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Exactly What Are Goals? [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Exactly What Are Goals?
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“I want to move from the buy side to the sell side.”

“I want to shift from technology consulting to investment banking.”

Not goals.

An engineer once really said to me, “I want to go into either finance or consulting.”

Not goals.

A goal isn’t something you want, it’s something you do, something you want to achieve, an impact you want to have, and the process of getting there. Therefore, a goal needs to be specific. Start with two key components:

1. Industry

2. Function

A third key component for many people is geography, if it is integral to the goal (e.g., developing solar energy in northern Africa).

Then add the “do” part – what the work will actually consist of, and what you hope to accomplish.

Here are some examples that incorporate the above elements:

• I plan to return to operations but work at a higher, decision making level, such as Senior Operations Manager in an East Asian semiconductor firm or a related industry. In this role I would, for example, oversee $XXX operations, a global high-tech supply chain, and manage a diverse range of technical and business professionals.

• Currently I’m a BPR consultant; I plan to shift to strategy consulting at a top global firm such as Bain or McKinsey, ideally focusing on clients in the pharma/biomedical space, and help them setup operations in Eastern Europe.

To wrap up this section, I’ll add a couple of cautions about this phase of the process, developing core goals:

1. Your short-term goals are naturally a stepping stone, and hence people often focus solely on what they will learn, understand; experience they will gain; people they will meet. Short-term goals should also include the elements noted above – what you want to do and accomplish, contribute.

2. Ensure that your goals really require the MBA education. Of course any learning is helpful for almost any endeavor; but the adcoms want to see that you really need the resources they offer, which they view as precious and not to be squandered. (And they’re right!)

“Exactly What Are Goals?” is excerpted from the guide, Why MBA? To download the complete guide, click here.

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By Cindy Tokumitsu, author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBAand Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted and she would love to help you too. Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch! 

Related Resources:

• MBA Admissions A-Z: 26 Great Tips

• 6 Ways to Prepare for Your Compelling MBA Goals Essay

• MBA Application Planning: The Program Research Phase

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Exactly What Are Goals? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Prep for B-School: A 4-Year Guide for College Students & Recent Grads [#permalink]

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New post 21 Sep 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Prep for B-School: A 4-Year Guide for College Students & Recent Grads
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Looking for the secret to making your MBA admissions experience go as smoothly as possible?

The BEST thing you can do to make sure your MBA application efforts pay off is to give yourself the gift of TIME. By planning ahead, you’ll be able to designate the time you need to do the things you need to do to get accepted – important things like finding a job to support your goals, traveling abroad to gain exposure to international business practices, seeking out leadership opportunities, and more.

Yes, you need to have killer essays and awesome recommenders, but if you don’t make the most of these years you may simply get rejected and have to reapply, or you may only get accepted at your second or third choice schools – the ones that don’t provide the best network, ROI, and MBA experience.

Grab your free copy of Prep for B-School: A 4-Year Guide for College Students & Recent Grads, for the head start you need to create an effective timeline, apply confidently, and get accepted to top b-schools…when the time is just right for you.

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Tags: College Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post Prep for B-School: A 4-Year Guide for College Students & Recent Grads appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Sports, Media, and an MBA: NYU Stern Student Shares His Story [#permalink]

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New post 23 Sep 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Sports, Media, and an MBA: NYU Stern Student Shares His Story
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This interview is the latest in an Accepted blog series featuring interviews with MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with a second year MBA student at NYU Stern, Danny Breslauer.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad?

Danny: I am from Highland Park, New Jersey. It is a 1.8-square-mile town in central NJ right across the bridge from New Brunswick. I made the journey over the bridge for my undergraduate degree at Rutgers University. I was a double major in Journalism/Media Studies & Psychology, and the General Manager and Sports Director of WRSU-FM, Rutgers’ student-run, on-campus radio station.

Accepted: What’s your favorite non-school book?

Danny: I think Moneyball is one of the best books of all-time. I’m a huge Michael Lewis fan and a sports junkie, so that book got my attention right after its release.

Accepted: Can you share a favorite quote that inspires you?

Danny: “Don’t give up… Don’t ever give up” – Jim Valvano (1993)

Accepted: Where are you currently attending business school? What year are you?

Danny: I am an MBA2 at NYU Stern School of Business in New York City.

Accepted: What is your favorite thing about the NYU Stern MBA program?

Danny: Stern is an incredible place. It may sound cliché, but my favorite thing about the program is my classmates. I have made friends and trusted colleagues for life in a little over a year’s time. That’s very difficult to do. I give a lot of credit to Stern’s admissions team for putting together an awesome and diverse class.

Accepted: What was the hardest part of the application process? Any challenges or successes you’d like to share?

Danny: Historically, I was an average standardized tester… and below average if you matched up the scores to my grades in school. So, the GMAT was easily the hardest part of the application process for me. I worked with a personal tutor for dozens of hours and improved my score by more than 100 points. I think I was successful in an important part of the application process, which is keeping your story consistent and viable across all elements (essays, interviews, recommendations, etc.). A family friend with an MBA told me very early on in the process that top business schools are not looking for fresh starts. They want to see direction and conviction. I brought that to the table and I’m thankful that Stern understood my story.

Accepted: You work in the media industry! You’re a successful sports broadcaster, and were previously named the No. 8 collegiate sportscaster in the nation! How has this work prepared you for completing your MBA?

Danny: Working in the sports industry is like working in any sector of business. You work in teams and groups, like in any job and every MBA program. It’s all about maintaining genuine relationships and surrounding yourself with professionals who play the game of life in the most honorable and successful fashion possible. I was blessed to chase my sportscasting dream in the early years of my career and reached a lot of my goals. I was the voice of a Division 1 college program at 26 years old and on multiple producers’ lists for play-by-play talent across 12 sports for radio, television and OTT. I had an amazing time every day, but I reached a point in my life when it was time for a change in function and lifestyle.

Accepted: Do you have any idea what field you’d like to work in after graduation?

Danny: Media is my passion. I’m pivoting from the on-air side of the industry to a strategic advisory and business development role, and so far have used MBA internships at Wasserman and NBCUniversal to prepare me for life after Stern. During my MBA2 full-time job recruitment process, I will be targeting companies that are at the intersection of the businesses of broadcast media, technology and sports.

Accepted: Lastly, any last tips or advice you’d like to share with other professionals contemplating an MBA?

Danny: A full-time MBA is a major lifestyle shift. You’ll never have a two-year period in your adult life that allows for so much learning, experimentation and development in multiple facets of life. If that interests you, and you’re at a time in your life that you can afford the investment, go for it. It’s a life-changing experience if approached with a flexible plan in mind.

You can follow Danny on Twitter (@DannyBreslauer) or by connecting with him on LinkedIn. Thank you Danny for sharing your story with us – we wish you continued success!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

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Related Resources:

Get Accepted to B-School with Low Stats, on-demand webinar

• NYU Stern 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• Exploring the Part-Time MBA Options and NYU Stern [Podcast]

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Sports, Media, and an MBA: NYU Stern Student Shares His Story appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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From the Mouths of MBA Adcom Members [#permalink]

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New post 25 Sep 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: From the Mouths of MBA Adcom Members
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Looking for the best possible admissions advice?

How about admissions advice from the admission committee members themselves?

Linda Abraham, founder of Accepted and host of the Admissions Straight Talk podcast has a collection of highly enlightening interviews with directors of admissions and adcom members of top business schools!

Listen in as Linda asks her adcom guests pointed and to-the-point questions about the school, the admissions process, how to get in, and…how to get rejected.

Listen, enjoy, and apply successfully!

Columbia Business School
Emily French Thomas, Director of Admissions

Yale School of Management
Bruce DelMonico, Assistant Dean and Director of Admissions

USC Marshall
Keith Vaughn, Former Assistant Dean of Admissions

Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business
Shari Hubert, Associate Dean of Admissions and Doreen Amorosa, Associate Dean and Managing Director of Career Management



UCLA Anderson
Jessica Chung, Associate Director of Admissions 

MIT Sloan
Dawna Levenson, Director of Admissions

Rotman School of Management
Niki da Silva, Recruitment & Admissions Director

Tuck School of Business
Dawna Clarke, Director of Admissions

Univ. of Michigan’s Ross School of Business
Diana Economy, Senior Associate Director of Admissions, and Terry Nelidov, Managing Director of the Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise

The Fuqua School of Business
Liz Riley Hargrove, Associate Dean for Admissions

HEC Paris
Philippe Oster, Director of Communication, Development and Admissions

Johnson at Cornell University
Ann Richards, Associate Director of Admissions and Director of Financial Aid

For a varied menu of thought-provoking and informative conversations with business leaders, entrepreneurs, MBA students, and more, check out the Admissions Straight Talk Podcast:

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post From the Mouths of MBA Adcom Members appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
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Sports, Media, and an MBA: NYU Stern Student Shares His Story [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2016, 02:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Sports, Media, and an MBA: NYU Stern Student Shares His Story
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This interview is the latest in an Accepted blog series featuring interviews with MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with a second year MBA student at NYU Stern, Danny Breslauer.

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad?

Danny: I am from Highland Park, New Jersey. It is a 1.8-square-mile town in central NJ right across the bridge from New Brunswick. I made the journey over the bridge for my undergraduate degree at Rutgers University. I was a double major in Journalism/Media Studies & Psychology, and the General Manager and Sports Director of WRSU-FM, Rutgers’ student-run, on-campus radio station.

Accepted: What’s your favorite non-school book?

Danny: I think Moneyball is one of the best books of all-time. I’m a huge Michael Lewis fan and a sports junkie, so that book got my attention right after its release.

Accepted: Can you share a favorite quote that inspires you?

Danny: “Don’t give up… Don’t ever give up” – Jim Valvano (1993)

Accepted: Where are you currently attending business school? What year are you?

Danny: I am an MBA2 at NYU Stern School of Business in New York City.

Accepted: What is your favorite thing about the NYU Stern MBA program?

Danny: Stern is an incredible place. It may sound cliché, but my favorite thing about the program is my classmates. I have made friends and trusted colleagues for life in a little over a year’s time. That’s very difficult to do. I give a lot of credit to Stern’s admissions team for putting together an awesome and diverse class.

Accepted: What was the hardest part of the application process? Any challenges or successes you’d like to share?

Danny: Historically, I was an average standardized tester… and below average if you matched up the scores to my grades in school. So, the GMAT was easily the hardest part of the application process for me. I worked with a personal tutor for dozens of hours and improved my score by more than 100 points. I think I was successful in an important part of the application process, which is keeping your story consistent and viable across all elements (essays, interviews, recommendations, etc.). A family friend with an MBA told me very early on in the process that top business schools are not looking for fresh starts. They want to see direction and conviction. I brought that to the table and I’m thankful that Stern understood my story.

Accepted: You work in the media industry! You’re a successful sports broadcaster, and were previously named the No. 8 collegiate sportscaster in the nation! How has this work prepared you for completing your MBA?

Danny: Working in the sports industry is like working in any sector of business. You work in teams and groups, like in any job and every MBA program. It’s all about maintaining genuine relationships and surrounding yourself with professionals who play the game of life in the most honorable and successful fashion possible. I was blessed to chase my sportscasting dream in the early years of my career and reached a lot of my goals. I was the voice of a Division 1 college program at 26 years old and on multiple producers’ lists for play-by-play talent across 12 sports for radio, television and OTT. I had an amazing time every day, but I reached a point in my life when it was time for a change in function and lifestyle.

Accepted: Do you have any idea what field you’d like to work in after graduation?

Danny: Media is my passion. I’m pivoting from the on-air side of the industry to a strategic advisory and business development role, and so far have used MBA internships at Wasserman and NBCUniversal to prepare me for life after Stern. During my MBA2 full-time job recruitment process, I will be targeting companies that are at the intersection of the businesses of broadcast media, technology and sports.

Accepted: Lastly, any last tips or advice you’d like to share with other professionals contemplating an MBA?

Danny: A full-time MBA is a major lifestyle shift. You’ll never have a two-year period in your adult life that allows for so much learning, experimentation and development in multiple facets of life. If that interests you, and you’re at a time in your life that you can afford the investment, go for it. It’s a life-changing experience if approached with a flexible plan in mind.

You can follow Danny on Twitter (@DannyBreslauer) or by connecting with him on LinkedIn. Thank you Danny for sharing your story with us – we wish you continued success!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

Image

Image

Related Resources:

Get Accepted to B-School with Low Stats, on-demand webinar

• NYU Stern 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• Exploring the Part-Time MBA Options and NYU Stern [Podcast]

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Sports, Media, and an MBA: NYU Stern Student Shares His Story appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

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From the Mouths of MBA Adcom Members [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2016, 02:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: From the Mouths of MBA Adcom Members
Image
Image

Looking for the best possible admissions advice?

How about admissions advice from the admission committee members themselves?

Linda Abraham, founder of Accepted and host of the Admissions Straight Talk podcast has a collection of highly enlightening interviews with directors of admissions and adcom members of top business schools!

Listen in as Linda asks her adcom guests pointed and to-the-point questions about the school, the admissions process, how to get in, and…how to get rejected.

Listen, enjoy, and apply successfully!

Columbia Business School
Emily French Thomas, Director of Admissions

Yale School of Management
Bruce DelMonico, Assistant Dean and Director of Admissions

USC Marshall
Keith Vaughn, Former Assistant Dean of Admissions

Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business
Shari Hubert, Associate Dean of Admissions and Doreen Amorosa, Associate Dean and Managing Director of Career Management



UCLA Anderson
Jessica Chung, Associate Director of Admissions 

MIT Sloan
Dawna Levenson, Director of Admissions

Rotman School of Management
Niki da Silva, Recruitment & Admissions Director

Tuck School of Business
Dawna Clarke, Director of Admissions

Univ. of Michigan’s Ross School of Business
Diana Economy, Senior Associate Director of Admissions, and Terry Nelidov, Managing Director of the Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise

The Fuqua School of Business
Liz Riley Hargrove, Associate Dean for Admissions

HEC Paris
Philippe Oster, Director of Communication, Development and Admissions

Johnson at Cornell University
Ann Richards, Associate Director of Admissions and Director of Financial Aid

For a varied menu of thought-provoking and informative conversations with business leaders, entrepreneurs, MBA students, and more, check out the Admissions Straight Talk Podcast:

Image
            Image

Image

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post From the Mouths of MBA Adcom Members appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Two-Year MBA Programs Report Drop in Application Volume [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Two-Year MBA Programs Report Drop in Application Volume
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GMAC (Graduate Management Admissions Council) has released its 2016 Application Trends Survey. This is the 17th survey since 2000 and includes analysis of information submitted by 872 graduate management programs. These programs represent 335 business schools and faculties in 49 countries worldwide, including 42 U.S. States and Washington, D.C.

Survey findings are related to applications for grad business and management programs for the 2016-2017 academic year. Included in the survey are 509 MBA programs, 334 business masters (non-MBA) programs including one non-business masters, 19 doctoral programs, and three joint-degree programs.

The report included the following topics: application volume trends for 2016 compared with 2015 for the 10 most common graduate b-school programs with the highest survey response rates; applicant pool composition by country and gender; and targeted candidate outreach, tuition assistance, and employer funding.

Highlights from GMAC’s 2016 Application Trends Survey:

• Worldwide, almost half of all graduate business programs (49%), received more apps in 2016 compared to 2015. 43% received less. 8% of the programs reported no change in quantity for the same period.

• For the first time since 2012, less than half (43%) of the full-time two-year MBA programs had year-on-year application volume growth.

• The bulk of full-time one-year programs (57%) reported an increase in the number of applicants this year. This continues the trend begun last year when 51% of programs reported an increase.

• Looking at all program types, 65% of European programs had a larger number of applications this year. This is in comparison with application volume growth in 46% of U.S. programs and 41% of programs in East and Southeast Asia.

• The good news is that more than half (52%) of all graduate business programs are planning to increase their admission rates for the incoming class of 2016. This seems to be in response to the increase in application volume. 70% of the programs with increased numbers of applications intend to increase their class size by a median of eight students. However, 53% of programs that report fewer numbers of applications will reduce their class size by an average of seven students.

• 70% of full-time two-year MBA programs recruit international students. China, India, and the U.S. are the top three countries in which these programs do international recruiting.

• Merit scholarships are the most common type of tuition assistance. 80% of full-time MBA programs offer this kind of aid.

• Two-thirds (69%) of programs report that the percentage of their 2016 incoming students receiving employer tuition reimbursement will be similar to 2015. More good news: 99% of all professional MBA programs report that some segment of their incoming students will receive full or partial tuition funding from their current employer.

Following are some additional highlights from Poets and Quants:

• The 49% of business schools reporting an increase in applications is down from a high of 61% of schools in 2014. 48% of schools have experienced a decline in the number of applications in 2016.

• Despite the overall decline in applications, there are differences by program size. The majority of large schools (57%), which enroll more than 120 students, report increased volume this year. In contrast, only 33% of small and 40% of midsize programs reported higher application volumes.

• Large programs are more likely to see growth from all application demographics – domestic, international, male, and female – than smaller programs. The most significant of these trends is among female applicants. 75% of large full-time two-year MBA programs report a higher number of female applicants, versus 45% of mid-sized and 42% of small programs.

• Non-MBA and new MBA program formats are drawing candidates away from traditional MBA programs. 9% of online programs are new this year, according to the survey.

• This year, 52% of students applying to full-time two-year MBA programs are international candidates.

• European MBA programs are increasing in popularity.

• The Masters in Data Analytics degree program has seen an increase in application volume this year. There are also nine new programs that will be welcoming their first class this year. More than half of the European (65%) and U.S.-based Master of Finance programs report application volume increases for the second year in a row. (For more on MIT’s MBAn, please see Contemplating a Career in Data Science/Business Analytics? )

Analysis

A few trends seem to be at work with these results:

1. Globalization is increasing the value of international experience and education so more people are looking for international exposure, which just happens to frequently be available a one-year program in Europe.

2. The ever-increasing cost of the MBA is pushing people to less-expensive options like online programs and one-year MBA programs as well as specialized graduate management programs.

3. The growth of the Masters in Management and other early career options may also be slightly reducing the applicant pool for MBAs. The early-career, one-year programs have a lower opportunity cost than the MBA because students are at the beginning of their careers when their salaries are relatively low and lower tuition.

While this report presents good news to MBA applicants concerned about intense competition, if you are applying for an MBA at a well-ranked program and thinking it will be a cinch to get in this year, don’t break out the champagne quite yet. The overwhelming majority of highly ranked programs are in the larger program category. That was the group where 57% report an increase in application volume. Indeed, MIT Sloan announced at the AIGAC conference in June that its application volume increased by a whopping 35% last year.

I don’t have all the application volume data from the top 25 schools, but if application volume at these programs declined, it didn’t decline by much.

For applicants applying to top programs, you still have intense competition. And you still need to show that you both fit in at your target programs and stand out.

For all MBA programs, large and small, perhaps these results also contain a message: They need to stop raising tuition at rates that exceed the cost of living and the rate of increases in their graduates’ salaries.

One can hope.

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsPrep for B-School: A 4 Year Guide for College Students & Recent Grads

Business School Zone Pages: All the Info About the Top B-Schools in One Place

• GMAC Releases Tool That Organizes, Compares & Explains Major Rankings

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Write an MBA Goals Essays that Turns the Adcom into Your Cheerleaders! [#permalink]

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New post 27 Sep 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Write an MBA Goals Essays that Turns the Adcom into Your Cheerleaders!
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By following the advice in the previous post you can create goals that are clear, credible, and convincing, but they won’t necessarily be exciting. They won’t make the adcom reader think as she reads, “Wow, it would be great if he could do that!” And this latter reaction is really what the goals essay should aim for. As all my clients have probably heard me say, you want to make your reader your cheerleader.

To generate such a response, deliver goals plus – show how goals developed from experience, and describe motivation and vision for goals.

• Experience means when, where, and how your goals developed.

• Motivation is the pivot point when something gained traction with you; when you became engaged and captivated in some way so that you want to pursue a given path.

• Vision is the broader impact of achieving the goal, beyond your own immediate efforts.

These three elements are separate words but in actuality will likely be intertwined. Here is a brief example, taken from a sample goals essay:

Last year, when I was in Taiwan advising a global financial services company on consolidating its Asia strategy, I found myself thinking what a shame it was that my relationship with the client proved responsive rather than proactive. With my knowledge of the region’s changing demographic and logistical realities, I could have recommended strategic opportunities a year ago to prevent the client from getting bogged down in redundant acquisitions and incompatible markets. Following that experience, I envisioned a new consulting paradigm resembling primary care medicine, based on a long-term, prevention focused relationship between the consultant and client.

Adding experience, motivation and vision turns the goals from static to dynamic. There are three other advantages of “goals plus”:

1. The experiential basis enhances credibility.

2. They create a story, which is more engaging and memorable than pure exposition.

3. Your goals inherently differentiate you, because it’s your story, it’s naturally unique.

“Goals on Steroids” is excerpted from the guide, Why MBA? To read the complete guide, click here.

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By Cindy Tokumitsu, author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and guides, including Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.

Related Resources:

• MBA Admissions A-Z: 26 Great Tips

• 6 Ways to Prepare for Your Compelling MBA Goals Essay

• Business School Selectivity Index, a tool to help you discover the schools where you are competitive

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Write an MBA Goals Essays that Turns the Adcom into Your Cheerleaders! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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How to Know When You’re Ready for GRE Test Day [#permalink]

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New post 27 Sep 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How to Know When You’re Ready for GRE Test Day
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The whole point of GRE prep is, of course, to be ready for GRE test day. But how do you know when you’re ready? How do you know when you’ve had enough prep?

Many people who take the GRE before they’re truly ready have the wrong answer to “Have I done enough prep?” But have no fear. I’m here to walk you through GRE readiness, and how to measure it.

GRE Readiness In Terms of Your Target Score

Some graduate programs set an exact minimum score you need to meet in order to be eligible for admission. This can seem pretty simple. Once you’re consistently getting to that target score in practice, you’re ready for test day, right?

Well.… maybe. With grad school, figuring out which score will really get you accepted is not quite that simple. Graduate programs are much more competitive than undergrad degrees. Getting the minimum required GRE score prevents you from being disqualified outright. However, in the most competitive graduate schools, the average GRE score of the applicants is what really matters. If you’re in the bottom half of GRE scores in a given application period, you’re much more likely to be turned away, even if you meet or exceed the minimum score requirements.

And of course, averages keep changing from year to year. So even when a school does publish the average GRE scores of accepted applicants, you have to set your own target score carefully.

GRE Target Scores in Terms of GRE Percentiles

Fortunately, there are ways to find the score that will probably get you accepted into the schools you apply to. Before you think of your ideal score as a specific number, think of the score in terms of GRE percentiles. GRE percentiles are numbers that indicate what percent of students got a lower score than a given score. For example, if a score is in the 95th percentile, that means that 95% of all GRE test-takers got a score lower than that score.

Percentiles for all of the people who take the GRE don’t fluctuate nearly as much as term-to-term average GRE scores at individual schools. So these percentiles are a much more reliable measure of what GRE score makes you truly ready to take the test and get accepted into your dream school. As a general rule of thumb, you can match GRE percentiles to school rankings. Review the education rankings from US News and World Report. If a program is in the top 10% of all programs of its kind (top 10% of all ranked MFAs in Creative Writing, top 10% of all MS Engineering programs, etc…), then aim for the 90th percentile or higher in terms of GRE score. (Somewhat below the 90th percentile might also be acceptable if the rest of your application is very strong.)

So look at the US News and World Report graduate school rankings and compare them to ETS’s most recent data on GRE score percentiles. Then start doing the most authentic practice tests you can. To ensure that your tests resemble the real exam, use official GRE prep materials from ETS. Also try to take the exam under conditions that are similar to those in the testing center—keep your practice tests within test center limits for time, breaks, note-taking, etc…. Reach your target percentile consistently on realistic practice exams, and you’ll know that you’re ready for test day.

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David is a test prep expert at Magoosh. He has a Bachelor of Social Work from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and a Masters in Teaching English to Speakers of other Languages from the University of Wisconsin-River Falls. He has been teaching K-12, University, and adult education classes since 2007 and has worked with students from every continent.

Related Resources:

• Planning on Taking the GRE? How Much it Can Run You?

• Where to Find Good GRE Practice Questions

• 5 Tips for Improving Your AWA Essay on the GRE

Tags: Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post How to Know When You’re Ready for GRE Test Day appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Haas MBA: How to Get In! [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Haas MBA: How to Get In!
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Our guest today is Peter Johnson, Assistant Dean of the Full-Time MBA Program and Admissions at Haas School of Management. He has been on the admissions team almost continually at Haas since 2004, becoming the director in 2006 and the Assistant Dean of Admissions in 2012. Welcome, Peter!

Can you give us an overview of the full-time MBA at Haas? [1:30]

It’s a traditional two-year full-time MBA, with an internship between the first and second year. We’re located in Berkeley, which if you’re not familiar is 12 miles NE of downtown San Francisco.

We have a special focus on developing entrepreneurial leaders who can make a positive impact on their organizations. We’re one of the smaller programs in the top-10 – we just welcomed an incoming class of 252 students.

Haas’s mission is “leading through innovation.” What does that mean, practically, to students? [2:55]

“Purposeful differentiation” is what makes organizations successful. We give students a strong b-school foundation (fundamentals of management, etc), plus opportunities to explore areas of specialization – an understanding of the changing dimensions of business and changing technology, so that they can explore ways to become entrepreneurs (or intrepreneurs, within established organizations).

You don’t become successful by doing what’s always been done – the key is to bring new ideas into your organization.

How does Haas take advantage of its connection to UC Berkeley and Silicon Valley? [5:35]

When people talk about Silicon Valley, they’re really talking about the Bay Area innovation ecosystem, which encompasses San Francisco and the whole area, both established tech companies and disruptive startups. We have faculty and adjunct lecturers who come from that environment; we know what those companies are looking for in employees.

We are on the Berkeley campus, and we’re fully part of the grad environment there. We have ties with engineering, etc. One example of that is our Clean Tech to Market program, where our students work directly with students in the sciences. Another collaborative project is the Blum Center for Developing Economies – our students work with students from Public Policy and other programs.

What does “global focus” mean at Haas? [8:30]

Cases in class connect to a global focus; businesses’ growth strategy is a global strategy.

Some things that are most impactful are experiential, such as our International Business Development Program. Through this program, over half of our full-time students work on a project for an international company or organization – they spend a semester on the ground in Berkeley and then go overseas to produce a deliverable for the client company.

Students can also spend a semester abroad with a partner school, and can go abroad during breaks. We also offer joint programs in business and International Area Studies.

“Leading Through Innovation” – what does it mean to applicants? [10:50]

People assume it means they need to be planning to launch a startup, but that’s not the case. We’re looking for people who challenge the status quo – who can become innovative leaders.

We have a course called “Problem Finding/Problem Solving.” We’re interested in students who are interested in developing themselves as this type of leader.

And what does the mission (“leading through innovation”) mean to alumni? [14:37]

You’re connected with a network of people who have a similar “innovation” skillset. Fellow alumni can become partners for cross-company collaboration or entrepreneurial activity.

A lot of alumni come back and talk about what it’s meant to them in their career. Hearing stories of how people put these skills to work is really meaningful.

What’s one of your favorite stories? [16:25]

There are so many, but I think of Chris Barton, the founder of Shazam – the app that identifies a song and provides links to purchase it.

They developed this technology a while ago, in the early 2000s. It works really well in the smartphone era – but when they first launched, they needed the phone company to provide a number to dial (you would call in, play the song, and the service would identify the song). It was clever, but there was no direct link to the purchase of the music, and it wasn’t easy to use.

But in the smartphone era, it connects to how you purchase the music, and the company is successful. You have to have a lot of vision for that kind of stick-to-itiveness.

Can you give more examples of experiential learning at Haas? [20:20]

Beyond the International Business Development Program I’ve already mentioned, we have a number of opportunities.

There’s the Haas at Work program, where teams of students work on solving problems for businesses (similar to the international program, except US businesses). In the Clean Tech to Market program, students work with scientists and engineers to figure out how to bring a new technology to market. Basically, they’re taking skills learned in class and using them on the ground.

We also have the Lean Launchpad program for students with entrepreneurial ideas – there’s an entrepreneur in residence to help develop the idea.

Social Sector Solutions provides consulting for non-profits. And our Board Fellows Program trains and places students on the boards of Bay Area non-profits.

Those are just a few of the ways we give students the opportunity for experiential learning.

What are some areas Haas students can specialize in? [23:05]

It’s diverse: finance, marketing, clean tech, real estate, entrepreneurship, global management.

We offer joint programs such as the JD/MBA, and one of the more popular ones, the MBA-MPH (a lot of students in that area are going into biotech, managed care, etc). It really depends on people’s individual goals.

We see our role as helping people develop in the direction they want to go.

Can you pass out of some required courses? [24:40]

Yes, and the core only takes up about 40% of the total units (mostly in the first year). And you also take some electives in the first year.

What’s coming down the pike at Haas? [25:20]

We have a new building opening soon – a soft opening in the new year, and fully open in the next academic year. It’s entirely devoted to student-focused space (event space, meeting space, core classrooms). And that added space will allow us to grow our program. We expect to increase our class size to 275 next year and 300 in 2018.

We’re excited about expanding the class – it will give us critical mass for some new initiatives, and help us create a larger pool to attract recruiters.

We also want to strengthen our core principles:

1. Challenge the status quo

2. Confidence without attitude

3. Students always

4. Beyond yourself

We’re going to spend more time talking to students intentionally about how you think about these principles as a leader – the broader implications of what you do in your career.

Based on the Accepted Selectivity Index, Haas is the 3rd most selective b-school in the country. Do you anticipate the acceptance rate increasing when the class size goes up? [33:25]

The application rate has been increasing, and we expect that to continue. I don’t expect it to get easier to get in.

How is Haas adapting to changes in recruiting? [34:35]

You’re right that the opportunities are expanding in ways that people wouldn’t have envisioned a few years ago, and it creates challenges for career management.

Our top three areas are tech, management consulting, and financial services. But if you put those together, it’s maybe half the class. So there’s a huge diversity.

Companies are doing less formal on campus recruiting. So our Career Management has transitioned to help students find the right opportunities.

We’ve extended our staffing – hiring more industry experts and business development specialists. We maintain relationships with companies and help them see the value that an MBA brings.

In such a rapidly changing environment, this requires constant attention.

How can applicants show they fit? [38:05]

Strong academics are the first step (GPA, GMAT/GRE).

What makes people uncomfortable is the essay or interview question: why do they want the MBA and why Haas – too often people are looking for the one “right answer.”

We’re looking for people who are self-aware enough to articulate their goals and why our program is right for them.

Start early: get the GMAT/GRE out of the way. And then be introspective about the process. It takes some effort and thought.

What’s the worst advice you’ve heard given to MBA applicants? [41:10]

“Tell them what they want to hear.” It results in an application that doesn’t reflect what the applicant believes or values, and they fall apart in an interview. If you’re not passionate about the goals you’ve stated in the essay, you won’t be able to talk about them passionately in an interview, and the application won’t make sense.

One of the things we spend time with students on is how to articulate their story and goals: it’s not just valuable to business schools, but also to employers. The people who are able to articulate that well are the people who get the job they want.

What advice do you have for applicants? [45:40]

Get standard stuff out of the way early.

Allow plenty of time for essays.

Give yourself plenty of time to think about your motivation and goals.

Why did you leave Haas, and why did you come back? [46:35]

I wanted to develop my own skillset, so I went to work at Central European University in Budapest. It was a different set of challenges – there, I also worked in student and academic affairs.

Then, I was fortunate to come back to Haas in the Assistant Dean role, combining my former role with some of the work I did while I was away.

Sometimes you need to stretch yourself a bit to grow. I’m thrilled to be back at Haas.

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Related Links:

The Berkeley MBA

• UC Berkeley Haas 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips and Deadlines

• UC Berkeley Haas Business School Zone Page

Related Shows:

• Haas, McCombs, and Case Interviews

• Mission and Admissions at Yale School of Management

• A 20-Year MBA Admissions Veteran Shares His Insights• UCLA Anderson: Cool, Chic, and Tech

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, MBA Admissions

The post Exploring the Haas MBA: An Interview with Peter Johnson [Episode 173] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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UCLA Anderson Executive MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: UCLA Anderson Executive MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines
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For its essay questions, the UCLA EMBA adcom is bucking the “less is more” trend in terms of length. The two main essays are both a hefty 750 words, long enough to allow – indeed to require – some in-depth exposition, reflection, analysis, and description.  These two questions together cover past, present, and future, in that order. Essay 1 addresses the past by asking for a particular story, and essay 2 addresses the present and future by asking about why-goals-now. The questions indicate that the adcom believes the personal informs the professional; who you are defines your career and your work. Consequently who you are as a person matters.

It helps to see these essays as two phases of a continuum:

• In essay 1 portray qualities, skills, and experience(s) that support your goals;

• In essay 2 show that the goals fulfills the mission and purpose of the character portrayed in essay 1.

Essays:

1. Legendary UCLA basketball Coach John Wooden once said that one’s leadership is derived from one’s character. Give an example of how you have inspired others to follow your lead by your character, personal leadership style, and the example you have set. (750 words max)

There are two keywords in this question: lead/leadership and character. The implication in the latter word is that UCLA seeks applicants who not only have the requisite track record of leadership and impact that is commonly sought by top EMBA programs, but also gravitas, depth as a human being. Your chosen example should include leadership/impact and gravitas/depth.

You can select a topic for this essay either from your work experience or outside it. That said, for most people I suggest going with a work example, in order to give the adcom a glimpse of you in your interesting work environment, handling important and high-stakes situations. Go with a non-work example if it has some specific strategic value for your application. Also, use a relatively recent experience if possible, to let the adcom see the person who will show up in the classroom.

Let the story itself carry most of the weight in the essay – depict not just the story of leadership but how you inspired others to follow through your character, example, and personal leadership style. At the end, write a short concluding paragraph summarizing your leadership style explicitly.

2. Why is it important to pursue an MBA at this particular time in your career? (750 words max)

You may want to start by briefly discussing your current career situation as a starting point. Then explain how you’ll move on to your future goals. In describing your goals at any given point, indicate why you are taking that step or pursuing that role. Give more detail about the roles you plan immediately post-MBA and the several years following; they should include specific positions, company, scope of responsibilities, and desired impact (i.e. what your desired “footprint” in that role would be). Longer-term goals need less detail, but they should present a clear direction, building on the earlier roles.

There is clear emphasis on “at this particular time in your career.” If you develop your goals effectively, actually “why now” should be quite apparent, but do directly address this point directly with at least a sentence and at most a short paragraph.

In discussing why you want to attend the program and study at the UCLA Anderson campus, be specific: describe what skills and knowledge you need, and how the program meets those needs. Refer to the features of the program that are most important to you, detailing how they will support you and your goals. The question’s mention of “the Anderson campus” also invites discussion of aspects of the program beyond the specifically academic – the location, the culture, etc.

Re-applicants:

Please describe your career progress since you last applied and ways in which you have enhanced your candidacy. Include updates on short-term and long-term career goals, as well as your continued interest in UCLA Anderson. (750 words max)

Discuss professional developments such as promotions, awards, and new projects, as well as any significant community involvements and/or educational endeavors. Describe the activity/experience, and note its positive impact if any. Try to include an anecdote for at least 1-2 of the activities discussed – given the word allowance, you have room for some detail. Finally, be selective and present only those activities that are relevant and enhance your application and candidacy in some way.

Optional:

Are there any additional circumstances in your profile about which the Admissions Committee should be aware? (750 words maximum)

If there are extenuating circumstances that would add perspective on or “explain” a weakness, you can discuss them here. Context can make a lot of difference when reviewing a transcript or trying to interpret information. Don’t let admissions committees come to erroneous conclusions about what caused a gap in employment or a drop in grades, or why a specific project was particularly challenging. Tell them. At the same time, if there are no “additional circumstances” to discuss, don’t feel compelled to write this essay.

**Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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By Cindy Tokumitsu, co-author of The EMBA Edge, and author of the free guide, Ace the EMBA. Cindy has helped MBA applicants get accepted to top EMBA programs around the world. She is delighted to help you too! Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch! 

Related Resources:

• Too Old for an MBA? Check Out 3 Outstanding MBA and EMBA Alternatives

• 5 Key Qualifying Factors the EMBA Adcoms Look For

• Tips for Executive MBA Reapplicants

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post UCLA Anderson Executive MBA Application Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Chicago Booth Student on Finding the Right Fit, Achieving His Goals [#permalink]

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New post 30 Sep 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Chicago Booth Student on Finding the Right Fit, Achieving His Goals
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This interview is the latest in an Accepted blog series featuring interviews with MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with a first year MBA student at Chicago Booth, Delano Saporu….

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad?

Delano: I am originally from Blaine, Minnesota but was working in Des Moines, Iowa prior to starting my MBA Journey at Chicago Booth. In undergrad I majored in Finance, Banking, and Portfolio Management at the University of Nebraska at Omaha.

Accepted: [b]If you could describe yourself in 3 words, what would they be?[/b]

Delano: 

Goal Oriented: Setting and achieving goals is a huge aspect of my life and something that drives me daily. I tend to set my life goals in increments of 4-5 years and 10 years.

Family Focused: Family is a huge part of my life and my success is largely due to the guidance of my parents. My parents came to the United States from Nigeria in 1981 and instilled work ethic and discipline in myself and all my siblings.

[b]Active: [/b]I love to stay active whether it be through sports, class, socializing. I am always on the go until it’s time to sleep.

Accepted: [b]Where are you currently in b-school? What year?[/b]

Delano: I am currently a first year student at the University of Chicago Booth class of 2018. The past few weeks at Booth have been amazing with a whirlwind of orientation activities and meeting classmates.

Accepted: [b]What drew you to the Chicago Booth MBA program? How did you decide it was the right “fit” for you?[/b]

Delano: I was drawn to Chicago Booth for many reasons but the ones that currently come to mind are location, people, and the flexible curriculum. Being a lifelong mid-westerner I have always wanted to live in the great city of Chicago. Booth is located in a great city but still manages to maintain a great class cohesiveness.

I knew Booth was the right fit for me when I visited during First Day (admitted student day). I immediately felt at home when interacting with other admitted students and current students. Additionally, all my interactions with faculty and staff were pleasant and welcoming. It just felt right.

Booth has a very unique curriculum that allows students to be in the driver’s seat of their academic experience. I was highly attracted to that part of Booth.

Accepted: [b]You’re in the finance industry! How will obtaining your MBA help shape your career?[/b]

Delano: An MBA from Booth is unmatched in opening doors to a myriad of companies within the finance industry. Access to an engaged and helpful alumni network as well as a great career services team also make the Booth experience like none other.

Accepted: [b]Who are some of the people, or what are some of the experiences that inspired you to follow your chosen career path?[/b]

Delano: I would say a couple of big factors that inspired me to follow this path. The first would be my parents who have been telling me from undergrad that an MBA was needed for my career. Next would be MLT (Management Leadership for Tomorrow), which is a minority fellowship that helps minority professionals reach top MBA programs and further their careers.

Accepted: [b]What was your greatest challenge through the MBA application process? How did you overcome it?[/b]

Delano:  The biggest challenge was navigating the process while working and handling other responsibilities. It was great to have a supportive MLT network as well as others who really rallied around me and helped me finish strong. Also, it’s important to take a breather once in awhile with family and friends, don’t become consumed – which is easier said than done.

Accepted: [b]Any last pieces of advice for MBA applicants?[/b]

Delano: Stay engaged with admissions officers early. Make sure to create a relationship with your target schools and stand out to them. Additionally, make connections with first and second year students. Focus on your complete profile not just one aspect. Schools want well rounded diverse individuals.

You can follow Delano on Twitter (@DelanoSaporu), Facebook (Delano Saporu), Instagram (@Delano_Saporu) and connect with him on LinkedIn. Thank you Delano for sharing your story with us – we wish you continued success!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

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Related Resources:

• The MBA Career Search and Life as a Chicago Booth MBA [Episode 158]

• Chicago Booth 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• Exactly What Are Goals?

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Chicago Booth Student on Finding the Right Fit, Achieving His Goals appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 583 [0], given: 74

Chicago Booth Student on Finding the Right Fit, Achieving His Goals   [#permalink] 30 Sep 2016, 09:01

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