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Joined: 20 Apr 2003
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Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business – Webinar On-Dema [#permalink]

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New post 11 Aug 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business – Webinar On-Demand!
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At our recent webinar on how to get accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business, Accepted’s founder and CEO, Linda Abraham shared critical advice on how to create a successful Stanford application. In case you missed it – or if you want to review – the webinar recording is now available on our website!

Watch Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate of Business today – and don’t forget to check out our MBA admissions services for more info on how we can help you!

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Good luck with your Stanford Application!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business – Webinar On-Demand! appeared first on Everything you need to know to get Accepted.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 581 [0], given: 74

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And You Thought You Already Loved Our Blog… [#permalink]

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New post 11 Aug 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: And You Thought You Already Loved Our Blog…
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Well now that you see our brand new look, you can see what true love is really all about!

New Blog Day has arrived and we want to know…what do you think??

We’ve worked to make everything clearer and more organized, which in turn will give you a better handle on our resources which will really help you get accepted.

Love at first sight feels pretty amazing, doesn’t it?

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Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post And You Thought You Already Loved Our Blog… appeared first on Everything you need to know to get Accepted.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 581 [0], given: 74

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Pokémon Go to Graduate School? [#permalink]

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New post 12 Aug 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Pokémon Go to Graduate School?
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Whether you’ve been a Pokémon devotee since childhood and downloaded Pokémon Go the very first day, or whether you wouldn’t know a Jigglypuff from a Charmander from your housecat, it’s hard to miss the fact that Pokémon Go is a phenomenon.

What does it have to do with admissions? There are actually some similarities and admissions lessons to be learned from PokémonGo.

• Some Pokémon are not that difficult to find, while others are vanishingly rare.

In the admissions process, you’ll find that your credentials make you a strong match at some schools, while some other schools are a reach. Conduct an honest assessment of your profile and see which programs you can match. Take into account your GPA and test scores, your work experience (if you’re applying to a program that requires work experience), your research (if you’re applying to a PhD), etc. Compare your profile with what the program is looking for, and with their admitted student data, if they make that information available. Be honest about your chances: is this school within your reach? Or is it one you’ll never catch?

• Some Pokémon require time/effort on the player’s part to hatch, develop or evolve. In the game, this means walking. (Which is good for you! You should do it!)

In the admissions process, developing as a candidate means taking stock of what you need to do to improve – and doing it. Maybe that means taking another course, or retaking a standardized test. Wherever you identify gaps or weaknesses, work on strengthening your skills – and you’ll evolve as an applicant.

If you’re a re-applicant, you’ll need to make sure your application evolves from what it was last year: show how you’re a stronger candidate this time around. (This also means that you should not simply resubmit last year’s materials!)

For some grad school applicants – in fields from computers, to business, to medicine, to game studies – the app itself might lead you to fruitful areas of investigation. For instance:

• A children’s hospital in Michigan has been using the app as a way to get patients out of bed, and encouraging them to interact with each other (and with staff). If you’re going into the health sciences: how do you see the role of technology in improving patients’ quality of life? Does the use of this app in a hospital setting raise any questions for you?

• The app draws on a technology called Augmented Reality, which has numerous other potential applications.

• Game Studies is a growing interdisciplinary field, incorporating approaches from the social sciences and humanities along with technology.

• The Pokémon Go app was developed by a Berkeley Haas alum. Are you a budding entrepreneur or programmer with the next brilliant idea?

Whether you’re collecting Pokémon or studying for the GRE – or studying for the GRE while you collect Pokémon – we wish you luck in your quest to be the best!

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By Dr. Rebecca Blustein, Accepted consultant since 2008, former Student Affairs Officer at UCLA’s Scholarship Resource Center, and author of the ebook, Financing Your Future: Winning Fellowships, Scholarships and Awards for Grad School. Dr. Blustein, who earned her Ph.D. at UCLA, assists our clients applying to MS, MA, and Ph.D. programs. She is happy to assist you with your grad school applications.

Related Resources:

• Analyzing Your Skills Before Applying to Graduate School

• Focus on Fit [Episode 162]

• Choosing Graduate Programs to Apply to

Tags: Admissions Consulting, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Pokémon Go to Graduate School? appeared first on Everything you need to know to get Accepted.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 581 [0], given: 74

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A Wharton Student With a Rock-and-Roll Approach [#permalink]

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New post 12 Aug 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: A Wharton Student With a Rock-and-Roll Approach
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This interview is the latest in an Accepted blog series featuring interviews with MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Allie Miller member of Wharton MBA Class of 2017…

Accepted: [b]We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad?[/b]

Allie: Hello, aloha, and bonjour. My name is Allie Miller, and I’m originally from Los Angeles. I studied Cognitive Science at Dartmouth College, where I was also introduced to the concept of winter.

Accepted: [b]Can you share three fun facts about yourself?[/b]

Allie:

1. I have traveled to all seven continents.

2. I have sung the national anthem for Barack Obama.

3. On a 5th grade field trip to Philadelphia, despite several signs instructing otherwise, I touched the Liberty Bell and was promptly escorted out of the building.

Accepted: You are currently attending Wharton. What year are you in?

Allie: I am a member of the esteemed Class of 2017.

Accepted: [b]What is your favorite thing about Wharton? Is there anything you’d change?[/b]

Allie: People tend to equate city life and large class size with an impersonal community. Thankfully, Wharton is nothing like that. It’s a big, vibrant, international network, but with a small-school vibe. Wharton does an incredible job of making a school with 1,700 students feel intimate and like a family.

Even the way Wharton structures student life promotes this camaraderie. The class is grouped into four clusters of about 210 students, each with its own mascot and Student Life Director. The clusters compete against each other for the Cluster Cup (think: Harry Potter) in everything from flag football to trivia to 40-person dance routines. Each cluster is further divided into three cohorts of ~70 people. These are the people you take the most classes with, but they’re also the friends that were at my birthday brunch, the ones who made posters for me when I sang in Battle of the Bands, and the classmates I cheer on when they go after their stretch experiences (like a poetry slam reading or boxing match).

What would I change? There is almost an absurd number of interesting events happening at Wharton (and Penn in general), so I think my primary vote would be to politely request the Physics PhDs to warp the space-time continuum and make every day 40 hours long. If that’s too tall an order, I’d vote for more fresh fruit and vegetables in the cafeteria.

Accepted: [b]Where are you currently working? What role did Wharton play in helping you secure that position?[/b]

Allie:

I am currently beefing up my artificial intelligence muscles as an Offering Manager Intern at IBM Watson, splitting my time between Boston and Austin.

While I didn’t find my internship through Wharton’s Career Board, I would say Wharton Career Management (WCM) helped me formally and the Wharton network helped me informally. For example:

1. WCM helped me understand the recruitment process, finesse my resume, clarify my role goals, select target companies, gather in-depth research on those companies, and negotiate offers.

2. Wharton’s Tech Club formed “Hot Groups,” placing people with similar goals together to hold mock interviews. The other members of my group, for example, ended up at Amazon, Apple, Microsoft, and Rent the Runway, mostly in PM roles.

3. Second-year students also serve as an incredible resource for networking within companies, cover-letter writing, interview prep, and internship advice.

4. My best friends helped me dress for success, debriefed with me after each interview, and kept me (relatively) sane during the recruiting process.

After I accepted my IBM Watson offer, Wharton reached out to gather information about the process and my internship assignment to help benefit next year’s class. They are relentless in their recruitment efforts for the students—it’s extraordinary and does not go unnoticed.

Accepted: Looking back at the application process, what would you say was your greatest challenge? How would you advise other applicants who may be experiencing similar challenges?

Allie: If you’re like me, your gut instinct is to try and portray yourself as this invincible superhero. My best advice? Don’t. Each of us is human. It’s okay (and maybe even desirable!) to point out something from your less-than-perfect side—not simply to show humility, but to illustrate honest self-reflection and how you’ve dealt with that aspect of yourself.

There are millions of smart people in the world, but I think top business schools are looking for people who use their intelligence and creativity for good, for change. People who can recognize their flaws and try and improve themselves, and who persevere and rise to the occasion when the odds are stacked against them.

Accepted: [b]What are some of your most rewarding extracurricular activities (both before entering Wharton and current activities)? How have those activities helped shape your career?[/b]

Allie: My most rewarding personal activity is singing and songwriting. I’ve been a singer since second grade and, while it initially came with crippling stage fright, music has given me confidence and stage presence. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve stood on stage about to give a presentation and whispered in my head, “Alright, Allie. Let’s rock and roll.”

And this rock-and-roll approach has helped me out immensely—be it speaking up as a junior hire at my first job, giving business pitches, taking never-before-seen rigorous venture capital courses, making my opinion known in team discussions, or seeking out a career where boldness is a job requirement. Being able to come up with out-of-the-box ideas is one thing, but having the confidence to raise them to a room full of skeptics makes me value all of the practice I’ve had putting myself out there and giving it my all.

Accepted: [b]You’ve won two national advertising competitions. Tell us about that experience.[/b]

Allie: I have! And I’ve lost a few, too. I think these competitions are a testament to my initiative, creativity, and willingness to say, “Why the heck not?” and give things a shot.

In both cases, I was sitting by myself at home, saw the competition posting, thought it sounded fun, and got to work. And in both cases there was an analytical, business-type problem to solve and the need for a creative solution to that problem. I love using both sides of my brain and appreciate opportunities to get to do just that.

That’s one of the things I’ve liked the best about my time at Wharton: my days are not only dedicated to diving deep into the rigors of finance but also coming up with rhyming cheers for our cluster competitions. To me, it’s not just frivolous fun—it’s a meaningful way to bond with my classmates and engage in deeper creative and analytical thought.

You can reach Alli via her email address. Thank you Allie for sharing your story with us – we wish you continued success!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

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Related Resources:

The “Wharton Difference” Blog series

• 2017 Wharton Business School Class Profile

• Wharton 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post A Wharton Student With a Rock-and-Roll Approach appeared first on Everything you need to know to get Accepted.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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2018 Harvard Business School Class Profile [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2016, 14:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 2018 Harvard Business School Class Profile
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Let’s take a look at who makes up Harvard’s class of 2018 (from the HBS website)…

Applications received: 9,759

Students enrolled: 942

Percent admitted: 11%

Women: 43%

U.S. minorities: 26%

Countries represented: 69

International students: 35%

Median GMAT score: 730

Middle 80% GMAT score: 690-760

Average undergraduate GPA: 3.67

Average age: 27

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Do you want to be counted among Harvard’s next crop of students? Watch a recording of our webinar Get Accepted to Harvard Business School to learn the steps you need to take to discover your competitive advantage and GET ACCEPTED!

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Related Resources:

MBA Selectivity Index

• What Harvard Business School is Looking For [Blog Series]

• HBS 2016 Grad Reflects on Her Experience as a Harvard MBA [Episode 154]

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post 2018 Harvard Business School Class Profile appeared first on Everything you need to know to get Accepted.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 581 [0], given: 74

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Joined: 20 Apr 2003
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Add Detail to Your Social Enterprise/Community Service Goals [#permalink]

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New post 15 Aug 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Add Detail to Your Social Enterprise/Community Service Goals
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Whether you’re applying for an MBA, a PhD in Public Policy (or many other doctoral fields), or a Masters in Social Work, you’re likely to talk about social enterprise, or community service, goals in your application. For some, this will be your primary objective – those of you seeking careers in the non-profit sector, for example. For others, community service may be secondary, but you’re likely to mention service-related goals in the context of how you’ll contribute to the program or in outlining your post-degree volunteer/philanthropic efforts.

Bringing Social Enterprise Goals to Life

Regardless, you should follow a simple piece of advice: Use rich specifics to bring your social enterprise goals to life. I can’t tell you how many essay drafts I’ve seen with something like “…and I look forward to giving back by helping those in need in my community and addressing major global issues like poverty and global warming.” You may as well write, “I’m a good person, I swear.” It would have about as much impact.

Instead, use powerful details to paint the picture of your goals. For those of you whose careers will focus on social enterprise, this is especially important. For example, if your future path is related to microfinance (i.e., managing micro-loans to entrepreneurs in emerging economies), on top of the places where you would seek employment talk about the specific countries on which you would like to focus (e.g., India, Mexico, African regions), the target segments and types of entrepreneurship you would seek to fund (e.g., women selling handiwork), and the partnerships you would try to forge (e.g., with banks and NGOs).

Okay, you may say, but my social enterprise goals are harder to define because they’re not in a well-established field like microfinance. For example, you may be an IT engineer who wants to use technology to improve the lives of those in underserved rural regions of a country like India. In that case, do your best to specify how you’d like to do this, including by using statistics on relevant trends. You may point out that though internet use is still minimal in rural India, the mobile phone subscriber base has grown by 70% a year (made-up stat; you should use a real one), representing a great opportunity to do…whatever it is you’d like to do.

Dealing with Fuzzier Social Enterprise Goals

Hold on, you may say, what if I don’t know exactly what I want to do within social enterprise? Well, you should probably have some  idea, but it doesn’t need to be highly specific. This is where you can rely on existing examples to lend richness to your essays. Remember, the majority of successful people didn’t reinvent the proverbial wheel; they just figured out new and better uses for it. So find examples of people doing the kinds of things you’d like to do, and (briefly) tell their story to support yours.

For example, take a look at the One Acre Fund, a non-profit organization started by Kellogg MBA alumnus Andrew Youn that is attacking Africa’s hunger problem by providing individuals seed and fertilizer on credit, weekly on-site agricultural training, and improved market access, with all operations and results assessed with quantitative measures.

It’s ideal to paint your own vision of your career path, but it’s wise to use such examples when you’re venturing into new territory or truly don’t know exactly what you want to do.

Bridging Past Community Service Experience with Future Goals

And remember: Those of you for whom social enterprise will be a sideline or something you do primarily while in the program (e.g., all top business schools have multiple community service clubs and activities), you’re still not exempt from using specifics. Point out how you’ll build on past community service activities with specific efforts at the school and beyond: “At Kellogg I’ll build on my hospital volunteer work with Lion’s Club by driving healthcare initiatives for the Social Impact Club. Post-MBA I look forward to joining NGO X to drive AIDS awareness efforts in rural India.” You get the idea.

So while community service goals are admirable, they won’t have much impact unless you use strong specifics to paint their picture. And we can help you! Check out our catalog of application services here.

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Related Resources:

Linda Abraham on Fit in Admissions, podcast episode

From Example to Exemplary, a free guide

• Ten Do’s and Don’ts for Your Application Essay

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Add Detail to Your Social Enterprise/Community Service Goals appeared first on Everything you need to know to get Accepted.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

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What Does “At The Very Center of Business” Mean for CBS Applicants? [#permalink]

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New post 15 Aug 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: What Does “At The Very Center of Business” Mean for CBS Applicants?
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Columbia Business School Essay 2 asks you to watch a short video entitled, “The Center” and then use it to answer the question, “How will you take advantage of being ‘at the very center of business’?” The video and the essay question have enabled Columbia to regain its brand and market share.

Over the years, Columbia strayed from its core strength: its geographic location and the access that the school offers its students. As a reaction to New York’s financial industry shrinkage and then, a drop in applications, they began pitching teams, clusters, and close-knit communities. I’m sorry, but those words do not even begin to describe Columbia.

CBS is just like New York: historical, large, gritty, and filled with surprises. It doesn’t coddle its students, and its students don’t expect to be coddled. They are smart, resourceful, and assertive.

So what does it mean to be at the very center of business? Well, you have the usual suspects: access to corporate world headquarters, brown bags with executives, subway rides to everything. But I ask you, where else can you have an accidental meeting at a cultural event with the Morgan Stanley’s CEO, James Gorman, or award winning entertainer and entrepreneur Dr. Dre?

Columbia wants its students to embrace New York and at the same time not allow the abundance of everything to intimidate them.  Years ago, I watched a Columbia Business School PowerPoint presentation. The closing slide displayed a world map. The Columbia campus was superimposed on a big red apple that spread over half the Atlantic Ocean and an arrow pointing to the apple as the “Center of the World.” I keep that image in my mind as I offer my Accepted clients my best rendition of the song, New York, New York, “if you can make it there, you can make it anywhere” (High kicks and all. Fortunately they can’t see me when I dance).

As a former admissions dean and director, I would expect to see an answer to that essay that would enable me to identify (and admit) people who thrive in the hustle bustle of New York. I would want my applicants to capture the energy of the city that never sleeps. I would hope that the applicant understands the living laboratory we fondly call, “The City.” At the same time, I would filter out students who would be intimidated by New York. I would want my students to love their NYC experience: rats, roaches and all.

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By Natalie Grinblatt Epstein, an accomplished Accepted consultant/editor (since 2008) and entrepreneur. Natalie is a former MBA Admissions Dean and Director at Ross, Johnson, and Carey.Columbia’s Adcom Chats With Accepted, podcast episode

• The Applicants That Stand Out At Columbia Business School

• Columbia Business School 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post What Does “At The Very Center of Business” Mean for CBS Applicants? appeared first on Everything you need to know to get Accepted.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

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Attention International Students: TOEFL to Offer Free Online Course [#permalink]

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New post 16 Aug 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Attention International Students: TOEFL to Offer Free Online Course
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International students planning to study at an English language institution or university, candidates for scholarships or professional certification, English language learners who want to follow their progress, and students or workers applying for visas in certain countries can now take advantage of a free online TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) course. Called “TOEFL® Test Preparation: The Insider’s Guide,” the course will begin on September 7, 2016 and continue for six weeks.

More than 9,000 institutions of higher learning, government agencies, and organizations throughout the world accept TOEFL scores. This course was developed by the experts who create, administer, and score the TOEFL test. It is designed to help English language students improve their skills.

Course Structure and Content

Participants will be guided through each section of the test: Reading, Listening, Speaking, and Writing. The course will consist of a mix of short lectures, including “Inside the TOEFL Test” videos for each type of question, as well as sample questions from past tests, including explanations for each answer. There will also be several short quizzes so test-takers will have a good understanding of what to expect on the day of the test. By completing the course, participants will understand the sections of the test and receive valuable insider tips to prepare for the TOEFL test.

Registration is now open for this free course. To register, or for more information, visit TOEFL® Test Preparation: The Insider’s Guide.

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Related Resources:

• Magoosh’s Free Practice Questions for the TOEFL

• What Score Do You Need on the TOEFL?

• Prepare for the TOEFL With This Infographic!

Tags: College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Attention International Students: TOEFL to Offer Free Online Course appeared first on Everything you need to know to get Accepted.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 581 [0], given: 74

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Joined: 20 Apr 2003
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MIT Sloan Fellows 2017 Essay Tips [#permalink]

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New post 16 Aug 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: MIT Sloan Fellows 2017 Essay Tips
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In my experience assisting MIT Sloan Fellows applicants for over a decade (Successes every year, and last year all of my MIT Sloan Fellows clients were accepted), I have seen consistently that the adcom values applicants who, among other things, demonstrate consistent outstanding impact and are on track to become leaders in their company and even industry (“high performing” per the MIT SF website). While your application as a whole should convey these points about you, the essays are an ideal opportunity to make the case affirmatively and directly, with example and detail.

Simultaneously, use the essays to convey fit with MIT Sloan’s enduring emphasis on being a proactive, innovative leader and agent of change – as the Sloan Fellows’ website says, “individuals who aren’t satisfied with the status quo and have demonstrated their ability to effect change.”

The essays together should create a vibrant, holistic view of your candidacy:

• The Statement of Objectives, which serves as a lens and sets the context for understanding your candidacy

• Two “story” essays delving into different aspects of your experience – at least one of these should be relatively recent, to strategically show you performing at your highest level organizationally

• A video essay focusing on (for most applicants certainly) a non-work aspect of your life and showing how you engage people personally.

As you select your essay topics and prepare the essays, keep this holistic picture in mind – especially important given the expectation that each MIT Sloan Fellow contribute substantially and distinctively among highly accomplished peers.

ESSAYS

Statement of Objectives: What are your immediate and ultimate professional objectives and, specifically, how will the MIT Sloan Fellows Program help you to achieve them?  What unique contributions will you bring to enrich the experience and diversity of the Sloan Fellows community? (500 words or less, limited to one page)

Let’s break this question into its three parts:

First, your professional objectives. Be specific about position, company/industry, expected scope of responsibilities, and vision for what you want to accomplish. Give more detail for the 1-5 year segment. For the longer term goals, show direction – but not as detailed.

Second, your objectives’ fit with the program. Identify and describe specific aspects of your objectives that align with the values and purposes of the program. Focus on the 2-3 key elements of this fit – fewer, with thoughtful discussion, is far better than a “laundry list” of fit points.

Third, your potential contributions to the community. Again, focus on the 2-3 key aspects. “Unique background” certainly could refer to professional background, and it can also include other relevant, interesting factors and experiences if they represent a potential contribution, such as intimate knowledge of a poorly represented geographic region. This section can be tricky – interesting facts alone don’t show potential contribution; you need to add your insight to make it meaningful; after all, that’s really what you’ll be bringing to the table.

Essay 1:

hink about an instance when you were on a team which did not work well together. What challenges did you face and what did you learn from this experience? (500 words or less, limited to one page)

In selecting a story for this essay, keep the focus on the difficult team dynamics. In addition, be strategic – look for a story that shows an aspect of your work that is particularly interesting and/or impactful and/or represents diversity in some way and/or impressive. (Keep in mind essay 2 to ensure you are portraying different elements.)

Use a story-based structure, which is both efficient and engaging for the reader. First, set the scene briefly – what, where, when, who – and clarify what was at stake for the team. Next, narrate the story, clarifying your specific role in the events. The challenges you faced should be woven into the story. Provide your perspective at key moments: what were you thinking, feeling, saying. Conclude the story with the team’s results.

After the story, add a short paragraph reflecting on what you learned from the experience. I recommend 1-3 points derived specifically from the story. Avoid generic lessons here.  And ideally add a sentence or two noting how you applied one of those lessons subsequently.

Essay 2:

Please describe a time when you made a significant positive impact to an organization that demonstrates your ability to lead. (500 words or less, limited to one page)

When you discuss a “significant positive impact” for a MIT Sloan essay, I suggest finding one that is “bottom line plus.” By that I mean, one you can quantify in some way or for some aspect, but that also extends beyond mere numbers to include change, even in some small way. And this change will likely be related to your demonstrated ability to lead.

Here too (as in essay 1), follow a straightforward story approach to structure the essay –make it a story of your leadership. Use your leadership role as the lens for telling the story. Unlike essay 1, you do not need to include anything about what you learned. I’ve found that it’s almost intuitive for people to add that that the end (“What I learned from this experience is…”) even when it’s not asked. I’ve found pretty consistently that with only 500 words and a compelling story, it’s a much more powerful to just end, if additional reflection isn’t requested. It lets the story reverberate, and it conveys confidence.

Video Essay:

Please choose one of the questions below, and upload a video (90 second maximum) of you responding to the question.

• What are you passionate about?

• Tell us something that we would be surprised to learn about you.

• What do you like to do for fun?

Video can be uploaded on the Multimedia tabVideo: .avi, .flv, .m1v, .m2v, .m4v, .mkv, .mov, .mpeg, .mpg, .mp4, .webm, .wmv

In deciding your topic, respond to the “tone” of the question – it’s kind of begging for something that will make the viewer of the video smile. It doesn’t have to be hilarity – it can be a warm smile or a delighted smile or a charmed smile or a moved smile or a surprised smile.

You can certainly, with an effective presentation, simply discuss your chosen topic on the video. Given the wording of the question, “…of you responding to the question…,” you must be in it and should be the key visual component. But since it’s a visual medium, you could, and I believe should, if the topic warrants, show some aspect of your topic as well (e.g. if you’re discussing your hands-on restoration of an old farmhouse in answer to “tell us something we would be surprised to learn about you,” set the video in the location and walk us through). Keep in mind that it is a visual presentation, not just an essay spoken aloud.

If you aren’t accustomed to doing video presentations, practice and expect to put some effort into visual elements like background and lighting. Keep the background simple, clean, and uncluttered. Have the light behind the camera and shining on you.

Additional Information (a separate question in the application):

Please use this section to include any additional information that you believe is important for the Program to have when evaluating your application that you have not been able to address elsewhere.

If needed, use this space to address a weakness in your profile or qualifications. You can also use it to explain things that are not weaknesses but still need explaining (lack of recommendation from a boss or gap in resume for understandable reason). This question also allows you to discuss a diversity element in your personal background or simply some unique – and relevant — area of interest.

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

MIT Sloan Fellows Deadlines:

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By Cindy Tokumitsu, author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.

Related Resources:

Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One [Free Guide]

• MIT Sloan 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• Individual Mobile Test Prep and the MIT Sloan MBA Who Created It [Episode 156]

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Harvard Kennedy School – Where the Bottom Line is Making a Difference  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Harvard Kennedy School – Where the Bottom Line is Making a Difference to Society
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Today’s guest is Matt Clemons, Director of Admissions at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. He’s joining us to discuss the programs HKS offers and what it takes to get accepted. Welcome, Matt!

Can you give us an overview of the MPP program? [1:25]

The MPP is the largest master’s program at HKS. It’s a 2-year, full-time, early career program. There’s a strong focus on giving people a set of skills to address real world problems. Students complete a professional project (rather than an academic thesis).

Students have an average of 3 years of work experience before starting the program. Work experience is important – it helps students make informed decisions and also prepares them to contribute to the program (there’s a lot of group work).

How do the MPA and the MPA/ID differ? [2:50]

The programs are similar in structure: core curriculum in the first year, professional development in the summer, and a professional project in the second year. For the MPA/ID program, the professional development is in a developing country or with a development organization. The coursework for the MPA/ID is very quantitative: similar to what a first year PhD student in economics would do – with an emphasis on practical applications to challenges that are faced in the developing world. They touch on theories, but the focus is on solutions in a developing world context.

What’s the difference between the MPP and MPA? [4:18]

The acronyms shouldn’t confuse people. The programs provide similar skillsets.

Broadly, a public administration program focuses on a macro-level overview, and MPP programs are more technical. But students can structure and tailor their programs to address the problems that they see.

What is the mid-career program? [5:45]

The mid-career program is a 1-year MPA. It draws some people who’ve been public servants, and some who are making the move from the private sector to the public sector. We require 7 years of work experience, and the average is 13.

You have joint programs with HBS and HLS. Is HKS also a case-based school? [6:35]

It’s a mix. The faculty teach to their strengths. You’ll encounter cases in the classroom, but it’s not the predominant teaching method.

What distinguishes the MPP from an MBA? [7:52]

Policy degrees teach candidates tools to manage strategies and policies that impact people and populations. Similar to what one would learn in b-school, MPA students learn economics, policy analysis, and quantitative analysis.

In b-school, students learn similar analytical skills, but they’re focused on the bottom line. In policy programs, your bottom line is society’s bottom line.

HKS offers lots of joint degree opportunities (law, med, business). Why might an MBA want both degrees? [11:50]

The intersection of business and government is increasingly important. Also, people are interested in being social entrepreneurs – outside the traditional channels of non-profits – they want to create their own opportunities to make a difference in society.

We have a new social innovation fellowship to help students start their own companies.

In general, policy professionals should be able to speak with people across fields.

HKS offers joint degree programs within Harvard (HBS, HLS) and concurrent degree programs with few schools at Harvard and with several outside of Harvard (MIT Sloan, Stanford, etc). How do concurrent programs work? [13:30]

All concurrent programs require two separate applications – there are no shared committees or shared evaluations (even for programs within Harvard). We don’t look at applications together with the other programs.

If an applicant is accepted to both programs, they let us know they want to pursue both programs, and we give them a contract.

If you’re not admitted to the second program, you can reapply during your first year at HKS (except for HBS).

Where do HKS grads get jobs? [17:25]

There’s no such thing as a typical grad. But about a third of our grads work in the public sector, a third in the non-profit sector, and a third in the private sector.

One recent grad of the MIT Sloan-HKS program is working for Deloitte – technically in the private sector – but she’s working on a public sector project. So many of our grads cross sectors like that.

Do a lot of grads spend some time in various sectors? [18:45]

One example: A mid-career grad who had a career in government (White House, Pentagon, etc.) is now the CEO of the Pittsburgh Penguins, where he has a reputation for building strong ties between the franchise and the local community.

Is there a recent grad whose experience typifies the opportunities HKS opened up? [20:35]

We had a student who worked in marketing and consulting before coming to HKS, and was interested in government. She got a job in the Boston mayor’s office, working on a task force related to citizens’ relationship to government. She helped create “City Hall To Go”—a mobile government office. (Now there are two mobile units.) She’s still working in the mayor’s office – now working on pay equity initiatives.

What is HKS looking for in its applicants? [23:15]

Four things:

1. Public service: A track record of service and contribution.

2. Leadership: People who are established as leaders. (Not measured by your title, but by your impact.)

3. Quantitative aptitude: We want to know you can do the work.

4. Work experience we want people to be making decisions based on experience in the real world.

What about grades and test scores? [25:20]

The real issue is: can you learn what we teach? And do you fit what the Kennedy School is about?

We don’t have cut-offs, and we don’t publish average GPAs or test scores.

It doesn’t mean a lot if you have great test scores and a 4.0 without a track record of public service and leadership.

We do look at ranges: approximately the top third on the GRE or GMAT. But it’s not the critical component in admissions.

What are the top “pause points” when you review an application? [29:40]

Since 50% of our applicants are international students, for those candidates, we pay particular attention to their English abilities to make sure they can keep up the pace.

For all applicants, we want to make sure they have the quantitative skills to succeed. HKS is a very extracurricular-oriented experience, and you won’t be able to take advantage if you fall behind. Each program asks for a quantitative resume or quantitative statement (we provide examples on our blog).

Finally, we’re looking for a real commitment to public service. If somebody’s compass isn’t pointed in that direction, that makes us pause.

When is the application available, and when is it due? [31:50]

It will be live in early September, and the deadline is December 1. The decision date will be in March. We provide regular updates and information on the blog.

Is there an advantage to applying early? [33:00]

We don’t start reviewing applications until after the deadline. But don’t submit at the last minute.

What are some common mistakes applicants make? [34:35]

The biggest mistake is not following instructions.

My pet peeve is people asking questions that are already clearly answered on the application or the website. We provide a lot of advice on the blog.

Another pet peeve: quoting Gandhi in your essay! I’m not trying to admit Gandhi to the Kennedy School – I’m trying to admit you.

What else should we know? [37:25]

My first job was as a fry cook at a Dairy Queen. I went to a public high school and saved money for college by working at a fast food restaurant. I borrowed money to go to a liberal arts college. I never had it in my mind that I would be working for an institution like Harvard.

I also share the story of being rejected from the Peace Corps – ultimately, the best thing that ever happened to me, because I ended up teaching English in Korea, where I met my wife.

Don’t let the name of the institution intimidate you. If you’re worried about cost, we offer nearly $25 million in financial aid. You miss 100% of the chances you don’t take. And if we say no, it doesn’t mean that other wonderful doors won’t open.

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Related Links:

Harvard Kennedy School of Government

HKS Admissions Blog

HKS Admissions Pause Points

HKS on Twitter

HKS Application Essay Tips

Related Shows:

HBS 2016 Grad Reflects on Her Experience as a Harvard MBA

The Lauder Institute Changes to Reflect the World

Sustainability, Ross MBA & The Erb Institute: Business As A Force For Good

Focus on Fit

An HBS Student Helping HBS Applicants

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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Personal Statement Tip: Less is More [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Personal Statement Tip: Less is More
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Most of us have heard the saying “less is more,” but how many of us put it into practice when it counts? Your application essays are the perfect forum for reaping the benefits of this deceptively simple principle.

First, what does “less is more” really mean? It’s the idea that we must resist our natural tendency to overplay our hands, to choose complexity over simplicity, to include unnecessary details, to say what needn’t be said, to be redundant…See? Often, more information is of less value in getting your point across.

Every day we have multiple opportunities to explain ourselves, demonstrate our skills, or express something: speaking in class or at a meeting for work; trying to convince our friends, colleagues, parents, or children of something; or texting or tweeting where you just want to make your point fast and hit Send.

So how do you apply this to your apps?

Here are three key areas to practice less-is-more:

1. Open-ended essays

From personal statements to MBA goals essays, being focused and concise is essential. Focus on key details on your work experience, fit with the program, and lessons learned. DO NOT repeat the question or include vague generalizations: “You asked about my goals, so in this space I will tell you about my goals”; “Each of us faces many key decisions in our lives.” At best, admissions committees, who read far too many generic essays, will just gloss over these parts. At worst they will see them as evidence that you don’t express yourself in a compelling way. Also, don’t succumb to “pack-it-in-itis” and try to tell fifteen different stories in these longer essays. Pick the two or three most powerful stories about your experience and/or goals, and polish those until they shine.

2. Interviews

The same principle applies here, especially because our tendency to include the unnecessary is amplified by anxiety. A perfect example concerns the dreaded “Walk me through your resume” request. When we practice this with our MBA clients, over 90% of them start by telling us where they went to college and what their major was, then more or less read their resumes, sometimes point by point, to me, often taking close to 10 minutes. Huge mistake. A much better – and simpler – approach is to say something like, “My resume shows that I have a strong engineering background, with professional experience that has focused increasingly on business-related problem-solving and leadership.” Then proceed to illustrate each of those three main points with select, high-impact details from the resume. Two or three minutes, tops. Less is more.

3. Additional information essays

These are the essays typically used to explain weaknesses: low GPAs; poor test scores; gaps on the resume. Here again our fear of leaving out key information often compels us to include too much, thus diluting the answer. Don’t start this essay with something like, “Your school has very high academic standards, and I know you prefer that students meet these standards. My grades and test scores are below the standard, so here I wish to explain why and hope that you will not hold these against me.” Too late. Instead, remember that less is more and go straight to the main point: “My GPA and GMAT score do not adequately reflect my academic capabilities.” Then use key information, including numbers (a particularly effective way to practice less-is-more), to back up your claim.

Using less-is-more is a smart way to impress admissions committees and ultimately end up with more options for graduate school. We can help you focus your essays, trim them back, or help you from the very beginning – check out our catalog of application services here.

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Related Resources:

5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Personal Statement

How to Stay Within Essay Word Limits by Reducing Verbal Verbosity

• 3 Essential Components of a Personal Statement

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Personal Statement Tip: Less is More appeared first on Everything you need to know to get Accepted.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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An MIT Sloan Student Anticipating a Positive Global Future [#permalink]

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FROM Accepted.com Blog: An MIT Sloan Student Anticipating a Positive Global Future
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This interview is the latest in an Accepted blog series featuring interviews with MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Lisa Conn…

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad?

Lisa: I grew up in Laguna Beach, CA. I went to New York University where I studied Social and Cultural Analysis, American Studies, and Creative Writing. Basically, I studied social movements. My grandmother was an activist during the civil rights era in Virginia, and her bedtime stories left me obsessed with the power of people in scaling change. That obsession has since evolved to include technology: the power of people and technology, together.

Accepted: Can you share three fun facts about yourself?

Lisa:

1. The theme of my 7th birthday party was The Environment. I made partygoers spend the day choreographing and then rehearsing for a final performance of two songs: “Stop Destroying the Rainforest” and “Driving My Electric Car.” This was 1995. I wasn’t exactly a popular kid.

2. My grandparents owned carnivals, including the carnival featured at the end of the movie Grease!

3. I have driven a car in the Presidential motorcade six times. Once, President Obama made an off-the-record stop to buy all of us dinner at Roscoe’s Chicken and Waffles, a Los Angeles staple. It was just about the coolest thing ever.

Accepted: Which business school do you attend? What year are you?

Lisa: MIT Sloan. About to start my second year.

Accepted: What made you choose that program over others you applied to? How did you know it was the right fit?

Lisa: It’s pretty clear that the globe is in the midst of a big economic shift. Some call it a transition to the “knowledge economy,” in which economic growth is dependent on the intellectual, emotional, and professional skills of people. There’s a lot of pessimism out there about the future, and it’s easy to think that the outcomes predicted by pessimists are pre-ordained, but I disagree.

I believe that the future is a product of the choices we all make, and of the institutions that we set up. And I’m optimistic about our institutions growing to support the future. MIT is a unique place, a unique community, where some of the brightest people in the world are engaged with the future: virtual reality, augmented reality, synthetic biology, deep learning, digital currency, bio-hacking, drones, robotics, 3D printing. You name it.

In order to realize the best version of the future, I want to identify what doesn’t work about the institutions that underpin our society, and then transform them. MIT, a place of unparalleled innovation, struck me—and continues to impress me—as the best place to uncover this. One of my professors introduced me to the amazing radio veteran and NYTimes economics journalist, Adam Davidson. Now, we are working with a group of MIT and Harvard academics to produce a podcast on reasons to be optimistic about the 21st century economy. The potential for opportunities like that is why I chose Sloan.

Accepted: Tell me about your work with the MIT Media Lab & The Electome project.

Lisa: I started working at the Laboratory for Social Machines, part of the MIT Media Lab, in the Fall of my first year of business school. Well, I began showing up in the Fall. I cold emailed Deb Roy, who runs the Lab. We had an inspiring conversation, and then I started coming in almost every day, doing things, joining meetings, and eventually, running meetings. By December, Deb realized he wasn’t going to get rid of me, and we formalized my role.

We built The Electome with a grant from the Knight Foundation and Twitter. We have access to the entire Twitter archive, the so-called “fire hose.” We use machine learning and semantic data analysis at a massive scale to fish out election-specific tweets from Twitter’s massive stream, classify the election-related tweets (over 250,000 a day at this point) by topic, subtopic, candidate, tone, influence, and more, resulting in a unique picture of the issues that millions of engaged potential voters care about. We partner with news organizations like CNN and the Washington Post to publish stories about the “horse race of ideas.” I am The Electome’s product manager.

Accepted: You were lucky enough to work alongside President Obama (How cool is that!)… What was your role with his re-election campaign?

Lisa: I was lucky to play a role in President Obama’s re-election campaign as a field director. I started in 2011 in Los Angeles, and then moved to South Florida, where it was my job to help President Obama get as many votes as possible in the largest battleground state. I grew an incredible team of organizers and fellows, and together, we empowered tens of thousands of volunteers to persuade and turn out enough voters to ultimately win the state by some 500,000 votes. Yes, we organized some very fun (and logistically complicated!) massive rallies with the man himself, as well as Vice President Biden and First Lady Obama. The experience was challenging and deeply exhausting, but without any doubt, the most incredible thing I’ve ever done. I saw movement building in action.

Accepted: As a woman working in the tech and politics industry, you are overwhelmingly out-numbered by men. How have you made your mark to inspire other women to follow your path?

Lisa: I have three older brothers, so I’m used to being the only woman in the room, although I prefer not to be. I’ve learned to anticipate other people’s expectations of me, based on my gender, my age, my background, the way I dress, the color of my skin, the way I talk—everything. Because unconscious bias is a reality of life for all of us. I’ve found allies everywhere I worked. And I’ve learned to understand and own my competitive advantage—what makes me great, different, valuable.

My wonderful mentors have helped me discover this; they are invested in my success and growth. And they’ve inspired me to actively mentor others. I’ve been fortunate to build some incredible relationships with young, ambitious, talented women who I hope I inspire by helping to strategize about the future, reflect on their experiences, and remind them what makes them powerful and unique. They certainly inspire me.

In order to scale this, I’m co-leading MIT Sloan’s initiative on unconscious bias called Breaking the Mold. This year, we are organizing a hackathon that challenges the MIT community to build technology that can combat both individual and institutional unconscious bias.

Accepted: Is there anything else you’d like to share? A tip for those just starting out on their MBA journey?

Lisa: Your two years in business school are a gift. A chance to get to know yourself better, meet amazing people, deepen and broaden your skills, and accelerate your career, but you have to be ready for it. Because you have to be ready to say no.

Halfway through the first month, you’ll attend some kind of club day. You’ll learn about a zillion clubs that seem interesting. You’ll sign up for all of them. Shortly after that, recruiting will begin. There will be dozens of recruiting events a week at swanky locations. You’ll go to at least one a night. Everyone around you will be talking about summer jobs, and they will all sound great to you. Friend groups will start forming, fall break trips abroad will be planned, and fun-sounding parties will take place. So many incredible possibilities! You’ll want to do it all.

But you can’t. You’ll have to say no. And knowing when to say no is really hard. It will test your sense of self. Even the most self-assured will be briefly lost.

I came to MIT passionate about expanding the role of technology in politics. I had a refined theory-of-change, and a clear understanding of what I’m good at, what I like doing, and what energizes me. Still, by the end of month one, I had signed up for leadership positions at too many clubs and attended recruiting events for roles that had nothing to do with my interests. It was overwhelming and stressful, but I didn’t want to miss out.

I remember sitting at a recruiting event with over half my class trying hard not to fall asleep both because I was exhausted from doing too many things and because I wasn’t remotely interested in the mission of the company. I went home that night, un-RSVPed from the remaining events and confidently wrote break-up emails to the clubs I had over-enthusiastically signed up for. This momentary departure from my path helped me find myself again, with gusto this time, leading me to deepen my commitment to the activities I was passionate about and apply for internships at only two companies. I ended up landing my dream internship: Global Strategy at Facebook, with a focus on Government & Politics.

Business school will be really existentially challenging if you aren’t ready for it. You won’t be able to jump on the opportunities that are perfect for you if you are too distracted by those that aren’t. It will be a waste of a gift.

Don’t apply because you think you should go, apply because you are truly ready to make the most of the experience—which can only happen if you are prepared to say no.

You can read more about Lisa’s b-school journey by following her on Twitter or on LinkedIn. Thank you Lisa for sharing your journey with us!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

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Related Resources:

Things to Consider When Choosing an MBA Admission Consultant

• MIT Sloan 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• Insights into MIT Sloan MBA Admissions with Dawna Levenson [Episode 132]

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Chicago Booth 2016-17 Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Chicago Booth 2016-17 Executive MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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Chicago Booth EMBA gives you just one essay but with ample space to make your case holistically. This approach to the essay question indicates that they are looking for people who can organize their thoughts, build a credible and compelling case for their candidacy, and maintain an extended yet focused discussion. The Booth EMBA adcom clearly puts value on verbal expression and expects senior level managers to have mastered this skill. Give yourself time to develop and refine your essay accordingly.

Essays:

1. Why are you seeking an MBA from Chicago Booth and what unique knowledge and experiences do you hope to contribute to the program? (maximum 2 pages, 12 pt. Times New Roman)

The question zeroes in on the elements directly relevant to the adcom, but allows you to elaborate within those parameters. Considering the pivotal role the one required essay plays in your application, the key challenge is making good decisions about the following four elements:

• Within the overall space allowance, how much space should you allocate to each part of the question? It will vary person to person. For example, a person who has her own company will require some “backstory” for context setting before discussing future plans, so she would allocate more space to goals than someone who is rising up the ladder at McKinsey. Someone with atypical goals (such as my client who successfully applied to a different top EMBA program) will need to spend more time clarifying why he wants the Booth MBA than a more conventional applicant. Analyze your own case and block out the essay accordingly.

• You have to discuss your professional goals in order to explain why you are “seeking an MBA from Chicago Booth,” but how to present them? Since EMBA programs are part-time, an ideal place to start is your current work: what do you want to achieve and how do you want to grow during the years in the program? (This has the added benefit of giving the adcom a view of what you’ll bring to the table based on this work.) From there, move on to your goals for the 5-year period following graduation – give the most detail here; make it really concrete. Then sketch your longer-term career vision/plans, necessarily less detailed. Finally, explain how each of these career/goals phases require skills, knowledge, and perhaps relationships derived through the Booth EMBA.

• How should you structure this relatively long, complex essay? Simply and straightforwardly is usually best. Start with your current/immediate goals. (If you need to provide some backstory for context, as noted above, do so as succinctly as possible.) Then progress through your goals. Next, discuss why you need the Booth EMBA now, connecting your reasons to the previously stated goals. Finally, present your contributions.

• What “unique knowledge and experiences” should you talk about? Select two to four, and for at least two, give concrete examples. For all, discuss relevant insights – after all, that’s what you’re really bringing, not the fact of having done something. To select the best, consider what aspects of your experience would be interesting and/or useful to the Booth EMBA cohort and give them fresh insight or perspective. It could be related to industry, function, geographic/global experience, a formative personal experience, a particularly meaningful extracurricular (community or other non-work) involvement, etc. Choose points that expand the reader’s understanding of you, things they won’t necessarily glean from your resume, AND that have relevance to them.

2. OPTIONAL: If there is anything else you would like the Admissions Committee to know about you, please share that information here. (maximum 2 pages, 12 pt. Times New Roman)

This question invites you to present new material that will enhance your application, as well as to explain anything that needs explaining (e.g., gap in employment, choice of recommender if not using a direct supervisor, etc.). As far as enhancement points, there should be a clear value to the information you’re sharing – and it should not be content that more appropriately belongs in the main essay (contributions of unique knowledge and experiences).

3. REAPPLICANTS ONLY: Please give us an update on your professional, academic, and community activities since your previous application and highlight what you have done to strengthen your application. (maximum one page, single spaced, 12pt. Times New Roman)

Whatever developments you discuss, for each, describe the situation/experience concretely and clarify the impact you had. Also clarify how it demonstrates growth (i.e. not just “another” achievement), and why it makes you a stronger candidate.

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

Chicago EMBA 2016-17 Deadlines:

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By Cindy Tokumitsu, co-author of The EMBA Edge, and author of the free gide, Ace the EMBA. Cindy has helped MBA applicants get accepted to top EMBA programs around the world. She is delighted to help you too!

Related Resources:

• Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One

• Chicago Booth 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• 7 Signs An Experience Belongs In Your Application Essay

Tags: MBA Admissions

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CMU Tepper 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: CMU Tepper 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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You know how you’re always reading that “all MBA programs are different” but after you’ve spent weeks and even months reading all of their websites, they can start to seem like they are pretty much the same? Well, not Carnegie Mellon Tepper. Tepper continues to march to the beat of its own drummer. CMU is committed to the rhythm produced by a combination of analytical skills and leadership education. Unlike many other MBA programs that now allow students to enroll in electives from their first semester on campus, Tepper stands firm in its belief that students are better served by having a common and fixed foundation in the fundamentals for the entire first half of that first year.

Tepper’s class composition is also significantly different from many of its peer programs. Tepper has just 200 students in its class, while Wharton has 860 and HBS has 942. Moreover, while only 25% of Wharton’s class and 38% of HBS’s comprises former STEM undergraduates, a whopping 48% of Tepper students majored in STEM subjects in college. And the flip side of that: while 42% of Wharton’s MBA class and 21% of HBS’s class studied humanities subjects in their undergraduate degrees, only 9% of Tepper’s class did. Does that mean that Tepper isn’t interested in people from humanities backgrounds? No! It means that any applicant from a humanities background had better demonstrate their facility with complex analyses to prove capable of handling the challenging Tepper curriculum.

Tepper has only one required essay and one optional essay in its application:

Essay:

Imagine that you meet up with a member of the admission committee at an airport while on a layover. You have an opportunity to make a memorable impression. Use this essay to introduce yourself. Include any information that you believe is important for the committee member to know about you both professionally and personally. (Maximum 300-350 words, 12-point font, double-spaced)

350 words is a very short essay, approximately 3 paragraphs in length. Since the Tepper online application form contains a small section to discuss your career goals – the industry and function you are targeting and 150 words each about your target role and your plan B if that goal proves elusive – you do not need to address goals in this essay. Instead, strong answers to this essay prompt would include examples of situations in which you demonstrated the ambition and talent that Tepper is seeking in its MBA candidates. In addition, since Tepper’s class is so small, applicants who demonstrate their fit with a small, tight-knit community will pique their interest.

Optional Essay:

• Use this essay to convey important information that you may not have been otherwise able to convey. This may include unexplained resume gaps, context for recommender selection, etc.

• If you are a re-applicant, explain how your candidacy has strengthened since your last application.

With only one required essay of 350 words, I highly recommend using this space to share more about your background. You can use this essay to demonstrate your potential or experience in a particular field or even to share an example of your analytical and leadership skills.

If you would like professional guidance with your CMU Tepper MBA application, check out Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Tepper application.

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

CMU Tepper MBA 2016-17 Application Deadlines:

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools.

Related Resources:

Best MBA Programs, A Guide to Selecting the Right One

2016-17 MBA Application Essay Tips

• Ten Do’s and Don’ts for Your Application Essay

Tags: MBA Admissions

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3 Steps for Rejected Applicants [#permalink]

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New post 22 Aug 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 3 Steps for Rejected Applicants
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By now, many of you have received answers from early application efforts – either you got in…or you didn’t. If you got in, congrats – you probably feel amazing! However, if you face a fistful or rejections or waitlist notifications, then it’s normal and ok to feel disappointed and to express that disappointment. But I urge you to try and move on quickly. Rejection is not a tragedy; it’s not a judgment of your worth as a person or a sign that your future plans are not meant to be. It simply means that this particular school can’t take you for this particular class.

So what’s a proper response?

If you were rejected but ALSO have acceptances, then a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush: if you applied to these schools, then you should be happy to attend. So you should probably accept one of these acceptances and stop worrying about the rejections.

If you are dealing exclusively with rejections, then you need to get to work analyzing what went wrong.

There are 3 categories in which you can usually place your cause for rejection:

1. You weren’t competitive/qualified at the schools you applied to. You simply shot too high.

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO? Here you’ve got two choices. You can either spend the next year improving your qualifications and reapplying to these same schools next application season, or you can lower the bar and apply to less competitive programs.

2. You WERE competitive/qualified but didn’t present yourself well. In this case, you applied to the right programs based on your qualifications – that is, you had what it takes to get in – but for some reason, you didn’t tell your story well in your application or made some other application error. You didn’t apply effectively.

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO? If the problem is that you failed to tell your story well, then you need to make sure that when you reapply (either to these schools or to others), that you tell a more compelling story. You still have a chance to get into competitive programs this year, but you’ll need to make sure your application is 100% awesome.

3. You were a victim of sheer numbers. This can happen if you’re in an overrepresented group – bio major applying to med school, Indian IT guy applying to b-school, Political science majors applying to law school, etc. Being in such a category makes it harder to distinguish yourself, and harder to get in, even if you’re super qualified, and even if you’ve done a good job on your application.

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO? The thing here, is that if you’re a victim of sheer numbers, then you can’t just do a “good” job on your application; you need to do a slam-dunk, smash-hit, out-of-this-world job on your application. This is probably the most frustrating result. Because of intense competition with people of your background, and the fact that schools value diversity, you’re stuck. You can’t change who you are, but you can change the way you tell your distinct story. Apply to more schools this year or to the same ones next year, and make sure that your application shows the adcom why you’re different – and special – and a necessary asset to their next class.

And yes it is possible that you fit into more than one of these categories and have to address more than one of these issues.

One aspect of your response has to be the same regardless of the cause or category: You need to get over the disappointment and respond constructively to the situation. This may be scant comfort now, but you’ll end up stronger because of this healthy response…and hopefully with that much-deserved acceptance letter in the near future.

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Related Resources:

• Resilience: Moving On

Labels & Groups in Admissions

4 More Elements to Telling an Attention-Grabbing Story

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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Duke Fuqua 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 23 Aug 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Duke Fuqua 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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Leadership, teamwork, ethics, and a global approach to business are essential elements of the Duke Fuqua MBA, which is why you’ll need to make sure you express your passion for these ideals in your application essays. Impress the Fuqua adcom by positioning yourself as an innovative leader and team player, as someone who can see the big picture, work collaboratively, and shape global business.

My tips are in blue below.

Three short answer questions and 2 essays are required from all applicants.

• Responses should use 1.5 line spacing and a font size no smaller than 10-point.

• Do not copy the essay question in the document you upload with your application.

• Respond fully and concisely. Length requirements vary by question, and are detailed below.

• Responses must be completed before submitting your application.

• Prepare your responses carefully. The Admissions Committee considers your answers important in the selection process.

• All essays are scanned using plagiarism detection software. Plagiarism is considered a cheating violation within the Honor Code and will not be tolerated in the admissions process.

Application Tip: Check out Fuqua’s selection criteria.

Required Short Answers Questions

Instructions: Answer all 3 of the following questions. For each question, respond in 500 characters only (the equivalent of about 100 words).

1. What are your short term goals, post-MBA?

State what you see yourself doing immediately after you earn your MBA in terms of function and industry. If location or geography are important to your goal, include them. If you know the type of companies you would like to work for, you can include that information too, but don’t say you want to work for Company X, unless Company X is sponsoring you. Without sponsorship, a “Company X” answer is probably too narrow, but saying you would like to work for a firm like Company X would work.

2. What are your long term goals?

Your long term goals should flow logically from your short-term goals. They can be fuzzier both in terms of direction and timing. But you should have them. They can, but don’t have to, include larger aspirations and present a broader perspective on where you are headed. But please don’t go so general and say something like “I aspire to be a good person” or “I strive to leave a lasting impact on my community.” Nice sentiments, but way too vague.

3. Life is full of uncertainties, and plans and circumstances can change. As a result, navigating a career requires you to be adaptable. Should the short-term goals that you provided above not materialize what alternative directions have you considered?

What’s your Plan B? If you can’t get a job at a leading strategy consulting firm — your first choice — what do you want to do? If Plan A is investment banking, what’s Plan B?

First Required Essay: 25 Random Things About Yourself

Instructions: Present your response in list form, numbered 1 to 25. Some points may be only a few words, while others may be longer. Your complete list should not exceed 2 pages.

The “Team Fuqua” spirit and community is one of the things that sets The Duke MBA experience apart, and it is a concept that extends beyond the student body to include faculty, staff, and administration. When a new person joins the Admissions team, we ask that person to share with everyone in the office a list of “25 Random Things About Yourself.” As an Admissions team, we already know the new hire’s professional and academic background, so learning these “25 Random Things” helps us get to know someone’s personality, background, special talents, and more.

In this spirit, the Admissions Committee also wants to get to know you–beyond the professional and academic achievements listed in your resume and transcript. You can share with us important life experiences, your likes/dislikes, hobbies, achievements, fun facts, or anything that helps us understand what makes you who you are. Share with us your list of “25 Random Things” about YOU.

Have some fun with this list. It certainly allows a more creative approach than permitted by most essay prompts. Note that the questions asks you to go “beyond the professional and academic achievements listed in your resume and transcript.” So you can list your Pez collection or perhaps your brief membership in a rock band or the fact that you took violin from ages 6-18 or your membership in a gospel choir or your volunteer work in a hospital, your needlepoint, your favorite recipe or photo. Gosh the list is endless. Just let it reflect you. Think of this list as an introduction to potential friends.  For more insight into this question and the  motivation behind, please read Megan Overbay’s, the former Director of Admissions’, advice. Yes, it’s old, but I believe you will find it helpful. And very friendly.

Second Required Essay: 

Instructions: Your response should be no more than 2 pages in length.

Fuqua prides itself on cultivating a culture of engagement. Our students enjoy a wide range of student-led organizations that provide opportunities for leadership development and personal fulfillment, as well as an outlet for contributing to society. Our student-led government, clubs, centers, and events are an integral part of the student culture and are vital to providing you with a range of experiential learning and individual development experiences.

Based on your understanding of the Fuqua culture, how do you see yourself engaging in and contributing to our community, outside of the classroom?

Do your homework about Fuqua (and yourself) before responding to this question. What activities and groups appeal to you? How do you see yourself participating? Making a difference? Then look at Duke’s multi-faceted definition of “Consequential Leaders.” Which do you most identify with? Imagine how you would participate and sometimes lead. While you can reference similar activities in the past, keep the focus of this essay on what you would do at Fuqua.

One approach to responding to this question: Address a letter to a close friend or colleague and tell her how you would contribute to this very participatory culture. That letter could morph into this essay.

Optional Essay Question:

If you feel there are circumstances of which the Admissions Committee should be aware, please explain them in an optional essay (such as unexplained gaps in work, choice of recommenders, inconsistent or questionable academic performance).

• Do NOT upload additional essays nor additional recommendations in this area of the application.

• The Optional Essay is intended to provide the Admissions Committee with insight into your extenuating circumstances only.

• Limit your response to two pages.

Why isn’t your current supervisor writing your rec? Why is there a six-month gap on your resume? Why did your grades dip during the first semester of your senior year? What are your responsibilities while working for a family business after having left a prestigious investment bank, and why did you make the change? Answering any of those questions (but not all) could be the topic of your optional essay.

***Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

Duke Fuqua 2016-17 MBA Application Deadlines:

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If you would like professional guidance with your Duke Fuqua MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Duke application. 

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Related Resources:

How To Earn A Spot On Team Fuqua [Podcast]

• Culture, Location, and Support: A Duke MBA Speaks

• 2016-17 MBA Application Essay Tips

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Heads Up: Price Increase Ahead! [#permalink]

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New post 23 Aug 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Heads Up: Price Increase Ahead!
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We just wanted to give you a head’s up that we’ll be increasing our prices September 1.

So what does this mean for you? It means that you’ve got until Wednesday, August 31, 2016 to lock in a service at the current, low rate. Browse our catalog of services today to get an early start on your applications and to take advantage of our pre-increase rates!

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When you sign up for an Accepted service, you’ll receive the following advantages:

Move forward with your applications. Starting ASAP on your grad school or college applications means less stress, less rushing, and fewer careless mistakes. The early bird gets the worm!

Access years of professional experience. Our admissions consultants have years of admissions consulting experience that will give you wide-ranging perspective and new insights into the application process – from choosing where to apply to building a strong application strategy to advising you on scholarships and how to pay for school. And your consultant will apply that knowledge and insight to your specific situation.

Get convenience, confidence, and peace of mind. Our consultants work hard to accommodate your busy schedule. Your consultant will return your essay drafts within two business-days of submission, and your calls and emails as soon as possible. By taking the proactive step of engaging Accepted to help make your b-school dreams a reality, you’ll receive a healthy boost of confidence and the peace of mind that you are putting your best face forward.

Apply with an admissions pro on your side – purchase an Accepted service on or before Wednesday, August 31, 2016 at 11:59 PM PT, get the help you need on your applications, and take advantage of our pre-increase prices!

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Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

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Get Accepted To Wharton Webinar Recording Available! [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Get Accepted To Wharton Webinar Recording Available!
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Wharton hopefuls – this one’s for you! Our recent webinar, Get Accepted to Wharton, is now available for viewing on our website.

Who is the webinar for?

Get Accepted to Wharton is geared towards all Wharton applicants – U.S. applicants, international applicants, reapplicants, young applicants, older applicants…anyone with their eye on the Wharton prize.

The webinar is loaded with specific, concrete tips that will guide applicants through the Wharton admissions process, from creating a stand-out application to acing the Wharton group interview…and everything in between!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

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Stanford Graduate School of Business Class of 2017 Profile [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Stanford Graduate School of Business Class of 2017 Profile
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Who will be graduating next year from Stanford GSB? Let’s take a look at the class of 2017 (from the Stanford website)…

Applications received: 7,899

Students matriculated: 407

Women: 40%

International: 40%

U.S. minorities: 19%

Average GMAT score: 733

Range of GMAT score: 570-800

TOEFL: 112

Average undergraduate GPA: 3.75

Average work experience: 4 years

Range of work experience: 0-17 years

Breakdown of Undergraduate Majors:

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Previous Industries:

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Do you want to be counted among Stanford GSB’s next crop of students? Check out our free, on-demand webinar, Get Accepted to Stanford Business School, to learn the steps you need to take to discover your competitive advantage and GET ACCEPTED!

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Related Resources:

• Stanford GSB 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• Do Stanford GSB Grads REALLY “Change Lives. Change Organizations. Change the World.”?

• Understanding Stanford GSB’s Take on Demonstrated Leadership Potential

Tags: MBA Admissions

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A Georgetown McDonough MBA Student with a Passion for Public Policy [#permalink]

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New post 26 Aug 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: A Georgetown McDonough MBA Student with a Passion for Public Policy
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This interview is the latest in an Accepted blog series featuring interviews with MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Saat Alety….

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad?

Saat: I grew up in Naperville, Illinois, a suburb about 40 minutes southwest of Chicago. I received a bachelor’s degree in biological sciences from Loyola University Chicago, which, like Georgetown University, is a Jesuit university right on the water.

Accepted: Can you share three fun facts about yourself?

Saat: 

1. I’m a citizen of both the United States and the United Kingdom.

2. I’m a former Presidential campaign staffer (Romney 2012).

3. I’ve never spent either of the two days most associated with Washington, D.C, in Washington, D.C.: Independence Day and Election Day.

Accepted: Where are you currently in b-school? What year?

Saat: I’m a second-year student in the Georgetown University McDonough School of Business Evening MBA Program. The degree traditionally takes three years to complete.

Accepted: How did you know that Georgetown was the correct fit for you?

Saat: The Georgetown McDonough School of Business is the nexus of global business and public policy, an intersection I’d like to build my career on. When combined with top-notch professors, world-class facilities, and the opportunity to pursue a graduate business education in our nation’s capital, the choice was clear.

Accepted: You’re currently the Communications Director and Legislative Assistant to House Representative Ed Royce of California. How do you think this experience prepared you for the Georgetown MBA program?

Saat: Hill staffers tend to excel at being consensus builders who can bring multiple parties together to reach an equitable solution to a problem. Whether it be coordinating a joint press release with three other Members of Congress or clearing legislation with stakeholders before it’s introduced, these skills came in handy when it came to group projects. Georgetown does an excellent job of rotating students through different groups, which presents a new set of challenges each semester as well as the opportunity to get to know your entire cohort. I should add that being a Legislative Assistant for financial services policy issues has come in handy during some of my classes.

Accepted: What do you plan to do after you graduate? Would you like to continue to work in politics?

Saat: Public policy is my passion and I haven’t accomplished everything on Capitol Hill that I set out to just yet. I do plan on transitioning from public service to government affairs and corporate advocacy in the future. The Georgetown MBA has been integral in giving me a better understanding of business operations, how the private sector interacts with policymakers, and how both sides can better work together.

Accepted: Looking back at the entire application process, what would you say was your biggest challenge? How did you overcome?

Saat: I think one of the biggest challenges was simply – “Is this the year to apply?” Both full-time and part-time candidates need to make that determination after examining their careers, personal lives, and future plans. I had (and continue to have) the privilege of working in an office that is incredibly supportive of my pursuit of an MBA, which helped immensely.

Accepted: Lastly, what would be your top tip to those just starting out with the MBA application process?

Saat: I can’t stress how important it is to give your LOR writers plenty of advance notice ahead of your application deadlines. And when possible, apply early!

You can learn about Saat’s MBA journey by connecting with him on LinkedIn. Thank you Saat for sharing your journey with us – we wish you continued success!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

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Related Resources:

• Tips for Applying to Part-Time MBA Programs

• Georgetown McDonough 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• Too Old for an MBA? Check Out 3 Outstanding MBA and EMBA Alternatives [Episode 166]

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post A Georgetown McDonough MBA Student with a Passion for Public Policy appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

Kudos [?]: 581 [0], given: 74

A Georgetown McDonough MBA Student with a Passion for Public Policy   [#permalink] 26 Aug 2016, 10:01

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