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  • Typical Day of a UCLA MBA Student - Recording of Webinar with UCLA Adcom and Student

     December 14, 2018

     December 14, 2018

     10:00 PM PST

     11:00 PM PST

    Carolyn and Brett - nicely explained what is the typical day of a UCLA student. I am posting below recording of the webinar for those who could't attend this session.
  • Why Do YOU Need an MBA?

     December 14, 2018

     December 14, 2018

     10:00 PM PST

     11:00 PM PST

    Download Why MBA and learn how to determine your MBA goals and weave them into a compelling essay!

Accepted MBA Updates

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How Will You Pay for Your International MBA in the U.S.?  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jul 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How Will You Pay for Your International MBA in the U.S.?
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Are you applying to American MBA programs as an international student? Not sure how you’re going to pay those massive tuition bills? Sounds like you could use some expert tips on how to make your business school experience more affordable!

REGISTER FOR OUR UPCOMING WEBINAR: How to Fund Your International MBA in the U.S.

We called in an expert to provide the answers you need – MBA funding guru Zack Hirschfeld, of Prodigy Finance. Zack has years of experience helping international students pave the financial road to b-school.

What you will learn:

• How to plan your budget

• Resources for funding your studies in the U.S.

• How to understand interest rates and loan terms

• The benefits of international student loans with Prodigy Finance

LIVE WEBINAR: Wednesday, July 27, 2016 at 10am PT/1pm ET

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post How Will You Pay for Your International MBA in the U.S.? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Focus on Fit  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jul 2016, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Focus on Fit
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In today’s episode, Accepted’s founder and director, Linda Abraham, shares the 4 not-so-easy steps of showing fit in your application.

While they are not simple to do, these steps are necessary if you want to get accepted to a program where the acceptance rate is less than 100%.

STEP 1: Understand the school’s mission and criteria for acceptance. [1:20]

Almost all schools have a mission stated clearly on their site. For example, Stanford GSB’s is “Change lives. Change organizations. Change the world.” It’s everywhere on their site. Not surprisingly, to me the defining characteristic of accepted Stanford applicants is initiative, the willingness and ability to effect change in the face of need or opportunity.

Similarly, when we spoke to the admissions directors for any number of medical schools they all emphasized the importance of their schools’ missions.  (See links below for examples.)

The other key is to understand the school’s criteria. Some schools clearly state their criteria on their site. [2:50]

An example of a criteria list: Harvard Business School’s has its “Who are We Looking For?” page where it says all its students share the following characteristics: Habit of Leadership, Analytical Aptitude and Appetite, Engaged Community Citizenship.

Another example: UCLA Geffen School has a page devoted to Basis of Selection, which goes beyond course requirements, grades, and MCAT. It explicitly states that qualities like “Life Experiences (Research, volunteerism, etc.) are considered.” Furthermore “Preference is given to students who present high achievement in college and a capacity to develop mature interpersonal relationships.”  [Emphasis added]

Clearly UCLA is looking for academic achievement and this “capacity.” Teamwork is probably one important way to show an ability to develop mature interpersonal relationships.

If you listen to episode 155 with representatives of Temple’s Katz School of Medicine, you will quickly learn that Temple values teamwork.

Know what your target school is looking for: [4:33]

It’s just that simple. So if Stanford is looking for initiative, your essays, descriptions of activities and jobs should highlight those aspects of your experiences that show initiative. For HBS, it’s a habit of leadership and engaged community citizenship that the written parts of your app will most likely reveal.

And the same process holds for law school and other graduate programs.

The foundation of fit: [5:25]

This basic understanding of what the program values and what it is seeking in applications is the foundation of fit.

STEP 2: Show you can do the work: usually grades and test score. [5:40]

This is usually a stated requirement and criterion for most schools. However, it is so important that I have to mention it. Some applicants believe that “the stats” are the be all and end all of admissions. Others believe that anything but the stats count.

Both groups are wrong. You need stats and qualitative fit at competitive programs.

Schools want to admit students who can succeed in their programs and who will make the admissions offices proud to have as alumni.  Stats give them that confidence easily and quickly. In that sense they are part of showing you belong at a particular school and demonstrating fit.

The Accepted Selectivity Index [7:30]

Accepted recently developed a fairly simple tool to help you compare schools on their selectivity. You can see schools’ selectivity scores.

We have it for MBA and law schools and should have the med version ready any day.

But for the values, mission and soft criteria, that’s for you to show in the non-quantitative parts of your application, mostly the essays, experiences, activity histories, and interviews.

STEP 3: Show that you share the school’s values as presented in its mission and criteria [8:20]

For medical schools [8:45]

The secondary applications are all about showing fit: Show that you share the school’s values, identify with its mission, and meet its criteria. The best way to do so is to highlight activities that support its missions that reflect similar values and consequently prove that you meet its criteria.  You can learn more about secondary applications and showing fit through these critical essays during next week’s webinar on secondaries.

For MBA applicants [9:45]

It’s the job of the essays, sometimes the video, and the job history to reveal that you belong at school X like a hand in a glove.

Use examples and specifics to answer the schools’ questions and prove that you belong at your target schools. (For webinars on fit at HBS and Columbia, see the links below. I’m presenting a webinar TODAY, 7/13, on showing fit at Stanford GSB, so if you hear this recording on 7/13, we might still have a few seats available. If not, be sure to catch the recording when it’s available.)

Fit in grad applications [11:04]

For grad applicants of all kinds knowing professors’ areas of research interest and the department’s focus is critical to success. If you have any doubts on that topic, listen to Accepted consultant and former head of graduate admissions at Hofstra, Carol Drummer in episode 113 talk about her experience as a new head of graduate admissions many years ago. One of the first lessons she learned was that even exceptional candidates will get dinged if their experience is not a good fit for the department they’re applying to (even in terms of theoretical orientation within the same field).

Interviews everywhere and for every program and degree are about fit. [12:55]

Types of interview: For blind interviews, you can use examples from your applications as well as new examples. For non-blind interviews, you need to have additional examples and bring new insight to the experiences discussed in your application. With medical schools’ multiple mini interviews, the goal is the same: show fit.

STEP 4: Show that the school can help you achieve your goal. [14:05]

For most MBA programs [14:10]

It is critical that you show that this MBA program can help you achieve your post MBA goals. B-school is not a place to figure out what you want to do with your life. What if you discover you don’t need an MBA to achieve your goal? The MBA program will have an unhappy customer, and you will have spent a lot of time and money for something you don’t need.

Consequently, in addition to knowing the schools values you have to understand its placement strengths and how its programs, extra-curricular activities, and alumni network contributed to those strengths and will help you realize your goals.

Med schools also want to know that you want to practice medicine. [14:55]

That’s why they insist that pre-meds have clinical experience before accepting them. They also generally prefer that med students have some direction in terms of their focus in med school (primary care vs specialization, research vs clinical focus), but they don’t require you to be committed to a specific specialty.

If you do have an idea what specialty you’re interested in, check out Medhound’s story at accepted.com/143 where I interviewed the founders of a site devoted to helping med school applicants find med school results data that can help you find the best school for you.

For other grad applicants [15:45]

This is why you have to write a statement of purpose. Without that purpose, this is an extraordinarily difficult to write. You have to understand the program and the direction of most of its grads to show this kind of fit.

For law school applicants [17:13]

Showing that you have an understanding of what law school is going to help you do is becoming more important, but still is not as important as for business school or academic grad programs.

Review the 4 Steps to show fit in your grad school applications: [17:35]

1. Understand your target schools’ mission, values, and criteria.

2. Show you can do the work required at your target program.

3. Reveal that you share the school’s values and believe in its mission.

4. Show that the program can help you achieve your goals and even your dreams.

Please feel free to post your questions in comments!

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Related Links:

• Get Accepted to Harvard Business SchoolGet Accepted to Columbia Business School• Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business• Secondary Application Strategies for Essays That Score Interviews• Multiple Mini-Interview Webinar• Are You Asleep When You Apply?• Business School Selectivity Index• Law School Selectivity Index

Related Shows:

• Sophie Davis School Of Biomedical Education• Baylor College Of Medicine: A Holistic Approach To Admissions• Attn Med Applicants: A Class Is Matriculated Every Single Year• 3 Ways Temple Can Help You Become an MD• How to Think Like A Dean of Admissions• MedhounD Hunts the Right Med School for You

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Tags: Admissions Consulting, Admissions Straight Talk, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Focus on Fit [Episode 162] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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July is Hotter Than Ever With This 10% Off FLASH Sale!  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jul 2016, 09:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: July is Hotter Than Ever With This 10% Off FLASH Sale!
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We hope you’re enjoying your summer! Fall is coming fast though (sorry, but it’s true), and with it, those Round 1 deadlines, so you need to get to work on those MBA applications! And now, for one week only, you can get a 10% discount on all MBA non-rush application services.

Using coupon code MBAFlash, you can save hundreds of dollars off of our professional consulting services – we’ll match you with a consultant who’s perfect for you and who will help you discover your competitive advantage and use it to get accepted.

This discount won’t last long though. MBAFlash will expire on Wednesday, July 20th, so let’s get started preparing for your MBA application now!

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Browse our catalog of MBA admissions services here.

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post July is Hotter Than Ever With This 10% Off FLASH Sale! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

MBA Admissions Consultant
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Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5160
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Getting a Student Visa for Your MBA Overseas  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jul 2016, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Getting a Student Visa for Your MBA Overseas
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Make sure you know what you need when applying to your school of choice.

It’s been a long time since travelling between countries was easy. Over the past decade and a half, it’s become harder to obtain the necessary permits to travel abroad – even for graduate level students. And, yes, that applies to prestigious degrees, such as MBAs. And it still applies after acceptance to highly-ranked, globally-known institutions such as Harvard, INSEAD, and London Business School.

Getting Your Hands on a Study Visa

Just because you’ve been accepted, you’re not entitled to a visa to enter the country of that institution. Well, that’s not strictly true; you won’t get a visa for the United States simply because you’re enrolled at Wharton, but your admission to schools in Singapore come with the right to enter the country to study. That’s not the norm, however. You won’t find it as easy at Rotman in Canada, Cambridge Judge in the United Kingdom, or IE Business School in Spain.

You will need to have a few things in place before applying for your visa to study in most countries. At the very least, that stack includes an acceptance letter from your university, proof of funding, health insurance, and all of the standard papers required when applying for a visa.

Student Visas are Just the Beginning

International students often select universities based on the job opportunities available to them post-graduation. While many plan to return to their home countries at some point, the return path is often not as direct as voyage out to business school. Accordingly, MBA candidates should consider how easy it is to obtain study visas and post-graduate visas to remain in the country while looking for employment.

USA – Apply for an F-1 study visa for your MBA. After graduation, most students are eligible to stay for 12 months as part of an Optional Public Training Program – as long as they work or intern in their field of study. If you secure a job during your studies, your employer will need to sponsor your H-1B visa. There is a cap on the number of these visas available annually, and there are strict deadlines for application.

Canada – MBA applicants with an offer from Canadian universities will need at least two months to apply for their study permit. These expire 90 days after graduation. If applications are done in time, graduates qualify for one-year work permits. Rotman grads are automatically given three-year visas.

UK – Students outside of the EEA will need to apply for a Tier 4 visa. After graduation, a Tier 2 visa enables you to remain in the UK for six months to pursue employment. Once you accept a position with a UK company, you can remain on the Tier 2 visa as long as you have company sponsorship.

France – Unless you are an EEA or Algerian national, MBA candidates must apply for a Visa de long séjour pour etudes (VLT-TS); applications are completed through Campus France. MBA grads are entitled to an Autorisation provisoire de séjour (APS) which allows for a little more than part-time work for a year. Full-time employment permits require grads to earn a salary more than 1.5 times higher than national minimum wage and are subject to categories of work.

Germany – Obtaining a visa for MBA study in Germany is a two-part process. Students require a Visum zu Studienzwecken for the first 90 days. During this time, they will need to apply for a residence permit at the local Alien Registration Office. Graduates from German universities can apply for an 18 month extension to work in Germany. Once formally and indefinitely employed, an EU Blue Card may be secured.

Spain – The procedures for obtaining Spanish study and post-MBA work permits are remarkably similar to those in Germany, including the two-part process. Keep in mind that most students cannot get their initial study permit after landing in Spain and must make a plan beforehand.

Australia – Applicants require at least six weeks to obtain an Australian study visa and must apply using form 157W. This is valid for the duration of study. Requesting a two- or three-year work permit after graduation is relatively straightforward – as long as you’ve completed two years of study in Australia.

Singapore – Students enrolled in Singapore MBA programmes will receive their visa along with their acceptance letter. But, they will need to apply for a Student Pass within one month after the course begins. Luckily, this allows for work during study. Graduates with jobs will receive employer-sponsored visas; while those with degree in hand but no job offers can apply for an “Approval in Principle Work Visa” that enables them to search for employment.

Anyone pursuing an MBA outside of their country of residence should be prepared to become an expert in visa applications. You don’t have a choice, especially if you plan on additional exchanges, internships, and study trips. And, yes, you’ll have to apply for visas to all those countries too.

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Katie Schenk studied human rights and graduated with a bachelor’s degree from Kent State University while working with NGOs in Geneva. Although she has since settled in South Africa, with work towards a master’s in forced migration thought the University of Witswatersrand, nothing stops her from being a proud American. Katie has been part of the Prodigy Finance team as a content specialist since 2013. She also loves rugby, sloppy Mexican food and Tudor history, which means you could find her in any section of a bookstore.

Related Resources:

• International Student Loans with Community-Based Financing

Making International Student Loans a Prime Investment, a podcast episode

3 Long Term Tips For Financing Your MBA Abroad

* This blog post is sponsored by our friends at Prodigy Finance

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Getting a Student Visa for Your MBA Overseas appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
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Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5160
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The MBA Admissions Journey of a YouTube Data Scientist  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jul 2016, 09:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: The MBA Admissions Journey of a YouTube Data Scientist
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This interview is the latest in an Accepted blog series featuring interviews with MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Jerry Lu…

Accepted: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad?

Jerry: I was born and raised in San Jose, California and graduated from UC Berkeley in 2013 with both a BS and MS degree in Industrial Engineering and Operations Research (IEOR).

Accepted: Can you share three fun facts about yourself?

Jerry:

1. I’ve traveled to 10 countries before the age of 5.

2. I’ve been a fitness enthusiast ever since I lost 80 lbs during my junior year of high school.

3. I’m on Soundcloud 24/7 (username: jerryylluu). In my spare time, I’m a blogger and music curator for Treehouse Vibes, a worldwide music collective.

Accepted: You are currently applying for business school for the fall of 2017. What stage of the MBA application process are you up to now?

Jerry: I’m currently in the process of brainstorming and outlining what I am going to write about for each school. Reading the prompts alone have made me quite introspective about the whole application process. It’s been these past few weeks that I’ve started to ask and question myself why it is I’m getting an MBA, why I am applying to this school and not the other, where do I see myself in the next five to ten years. I’ve always had some inkling of why I wanted an MBA but never have I had to formulate these thoughts and put them down on paper. Just thinking about the questions in a broader context, I’ve made it a habit to think back to when I was a kid and jot down highlights of my past as they come. Using this timeline, I am able to pick one or two key moments that have made an impact on my life and defined who it is I am today.

Because of this exercise, I’ve tried to allocate as much time as possible for the essay portion of the application process, being able to jot down my thoughts, craft them into drafts, go through multiple revisions, and then finally submit. It’s the biggest chunk left that I have to do and probably the most time consuming as well.

Accepted: What B-schools are you considering applying to?

Jerry: The schools that I’m considering applying to as of now are, in no particular order: Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, U Chicago, MIT, Northwestern. I do plan on applying during Round 1 so applications are all due in September. MIT is the only school that has not yet released their deadlines.

Accepted: Where are you currently working?

Jerry: I currently work at YouTube on the data science team. I’ve had the privilege of contributing to the launch of our paid subscriptions products, YouTube Music and YouTube Red, and currently my focus is on driving the understanding and growth of the product and improving customer retention.

Accepted: Share your experiences being an engineer at Google and YouTube.

Jerry: My first job after college was working at Google as an anti-abuse analyst for Google’s Cloud Platform. I worked in that role for two years and definitely learned a lot both in terms of putting my technical background to use as well as giving me an introduction into general management. As an anti-abuse analyst, my mission was to help fight spam and abuse. Working cross functionally with product, marketing, and engineering, my role was highly consultative and I was able to leverage both my analytical skill set and project management abilities to driving insights and influence business strategy.

After two years working in abuse, I really wanted to transition into a role that was more product focused. Being a heavy YouTube user myself, there was no better match than the current role I am in. Rather than fighting abuse and keeping spammers out, my mission now was to focus on product and user analysis to grow a business. There are many exciting things about YouTube, just to name a few: 1. it is a small company in the larger Google corporation and it’s fun working closely together with other people driven by the same mission 2. I get to see tangible results from the work that I’m doing 3. being surrounded by my fellow colleagues who are PhDs in Stats, rocket scientists, and college professors, I’m constantly learning every single day.

The reason why I am applying to business school is that having been in a technical role for the past 3 years now, I want to transition from being an individual contributor to a product manager, a position in which I will be spending more of my time creating an environment that enables other people to be successful and leading a product from conception to launch.

Accepted: Can you tell us about your experience taking the GRE? Were there any surprises? What were your most and least favorite parts of the exam?

Jerry: I took the GRE a year after taking the GMAT. There weren’t any surprises I would say but it was good for me to take both to identify what my strengths and weaknesses were. Each test is different in the sense that they both have their challenges. The GRE puts emphasis on vocabulary while the GMAT more so on critical reasoning. As nerdy as sounds, I actually enjoyed studying and taking the GRE, namely because at the end of the day, what I got out of it was an enhanced and new found set of vocabulary words to use in my every day to day.

For those who find that they didn’t do well on either the GMAT or the GRE, I would highly advise you to consider taking the alternative. You may find that your aptitude and skillset is more align with a certain test and as more business schools accept both tests for admission, you shouldn’t be afraid to take one test over another.

Accepted: When did you start your blog bschooleng? Why did you decide to blog about your experience? What do you hope others will learn?

Jerry: The application process has always been quite intriguing to me. There are so many degrees of freedom yet not everything is in your control. Of course, there are certain thresholds that need to be met with each and every school but there are just as many opportunities for an individual to get into any school they want. Every school has that one student who might not have the stats that fit the mold but as a total package is the perfect candidate.

Although it’s only been a week of blogging, the reason why I started the blog was mainly as an avenue to document my thoughts of this entire process and on the side, hope it encourages and gives advice to readers who are in a similar boat. I was mainly inspired after perusing various gmat forums (accepted, gmatclub, beatthegmat) and reading other bloggers as well.

Reading the websites of various business schools gives you a certain degree of insight but as an applicant, you connect with people who either are in or have been in a similar experience as yourself. That is not to say that anything on my blog is the absolute truth but all my thoughts are just my personal opinion. What I hope is that reading the perspectives of multiple bloggers (myself included) will allow the reader to formulate their own opinion on why it is they want to apply to business school and if business school is ultimately the right decision for them.

Accepted: What else would you like to share?

Jerry: The more I research what each school has to offer: the professors, the courses, the clubs, the alumni, the more excited I am about attending. My grandfather has always said to me that “life is a learning opportunity” and I know that whichever business school I attend, I will continue to embody his philosophy.

You can follow Jerry by checking out his blog and Soundcloud account. Thank you Jerry for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

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Related Resources:

Get Accepted to B-School with Low Stats, on-demand webinar

• Should You Take the GMAT or the GRE?

• 3 Ways to Determine Which B-Schools are a Good Fit for You

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post The MBA Admissions Journey of a YouTube Data Scientist appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
Subscribe to Accepted's Blog

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Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 5160
Location: Los Angeles CA
FT Top Masters in Finance Programs in 2016  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jul 2016, 09:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: FT Top Masters in Finance Programs in 2016
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Financial Times just came out with their rankings of Masters in Finance programs around the world. Below are some highlights, followed by the top 10 rankings.

Masters in Finance 2016 Highlights:

• This year there were 55 programs included in the FT rankings for Finance programs for pre-experience professionals, up from 50 programs last year. Minnesota Carlson was one of the new programs added to the list with their new MiF degree program. This year, the program received 150 applications for the 27 seats available, before the school had even advertised the new program.

• There are 5 ranked programs for post-experience professionals.

• After five years of being #1, London Business School has dropped to the #2 slot of the Post-Experience rankings, allowing Cambridge Judge to take the top spot. London Business School, does however still boast the highest earners, making just under $137,000 average salary three years post-graduation.

• For Pre-Experience programs, HEC Paris takes the #1 spot for the sixth year in a row.

• University of Hong Kong made the biggest leap this year, jumping 16 spots to 29th place. Lancaster University Management School was also a big jumper, climbing 10 spots to 30th place.

MIT Sloan hit a record in application volume for its Masters in Finance course at 2,083 applications, an increase of 22% over last year. MIT Sloan also boasts the highest average salary for pre-experience Finance programs at $117,000 three years post-graduation.

• Applications to finance-related masters programs at Warwick Business School are up 12% this year.

• MiF programs are extremely popular among international students. Lancaster University Business School, located in the UK, has no local British students in its MiF course this year. US programs have classified MiF programs as STEM courses, a status that enables non-U.S. students to tack on an additional 24 months to their visas.

• Due to an increase in demand, Masters in Finance programs frequently offer modules on entrepreneurship, crowdfunding, and other fintech- or startup-focused content.

Top 10 Masters in Finance Programs (Pre-Experience):

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Top 5 Masters in Finance Programs (Post-Experience):

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See these articles for more information:

• Masters in Finance 2016 Ranking: Judge and HEC Top FT Tables• Masters in Finance 2016 Ranking: Schools Gain from Industry Woes• FT Masters in Finance Rankings Methodology

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Related Resources:

Princeton University Master in Finance: Is It Right for You?

• MIT Master in Finance – Is It the Right Fit for You (and Vice Versa)?

• The Facts About Financial Services, podcast

Tags: Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post FT Top Masters in Finance Programs in 2016 appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
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5 Practical Lessons I Learned at HBS that Helped Me Launch My Startup  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jul 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 5 Practical Lessons I Learned at HBS that Helped Me Launch My Startup
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In exchange for that high cost, you can also extract high value.

Harvard Business School is often seen as a “finance” school, or a “consulting” school, or a “general management” school—and usually isn’t the first MBA program you’d think of when it comes to entrepreneurship. My experience, though, was that HBS had a great entrepreneurial curriculum—and despite the fact that I’d founded two businesses prior to the program, I learned some invaluable lessons that I’m applying every day to ZipBooks, my current startup.

1. Leverage the Innovator’s Dilemma

Even though the term “disrupt” is tossed around casually these days, it’s generally used outside of its original meaning. Founders, TechCrunch articles, and even investors can get caught using it as a placeholder for “do something really awesome.” The term was coined, originally, by one of my favorite people at HBS, Professor Clay Christensen, and popularized in his book, “The Innovator’s Dilemma.” Disruption, used in this sense, means a new entrant to an industry serving—with a new technology—the bottom portion of the market that incumbents can’t or won’t serve, due to their profit-maximizing nature. Over time, that technology matures and is able to serve the most profitable portions of the market, “disrupting” those incumbents and displacing their technology.

As my team at ZipBooks creates strategy, we think deeply about the advantages and disadvantages we have as a new company, what portions of the market we can service, and how the dynamics of technology and pricing might play out over time. I think many founders and startups could do well to figure out how their own products can be “disruptive” in their own right.

2. Solve a real problem

As part of HBS’s first-year curriculum, students are required to form intra-section teams and get a small grant to start their own startup. My team focused on what most of our classmates were thinking about at the time—finding jobs for the summer and post-graduation! To help solve that problem, we built a product called “SpotRocket,” which gathered data all over the web about startups, then pushed that data through an algorithm to rank startups against others in similar geography.

We positioned it as a tool to help students find jobs at startups in different regions, and released it to the public. People loved it. It produced several thousand signups in just a couple weeks, and our team won our section competition. It was exciting to see the power of what you can accomplish with a product or service that really solves a problem—and often, looking at your own problems can be a good way to find one.

3. Build the right team

Nearly every course at HBS is taught using the “case method,” where students come having studied a “case” that lays out a real-world situation that a manager, entrepreneur, or other professional has gone through. Sometimes they describe successes, many times they describe failures.

And over the course of at least 300 cases, I noticed a common thread in the failures—it was a lack of a great team. Jim Collins preaches “getting the right people on the bus,” and I’m convinced that nothing is more important. The starting point for a great team at a startup is knowing what you’re good at, and more particularly, what you’re not. Then, take as much time as necessary to find the perfect complements to your own skill set. This can be frustrating, time consuming, and difficult—but it will be worth it.

4. Seek to be the fund returner

If you’re looking to raise venture capital for a startup, it’s helpful to know how early-stage investors think. In a venture capital course at HBS, we dived deep on the dynamic between early-stage VCs and their own limited partners (investors). An early-stage VC knows that many companies of their company will fail—literally return $0.00—after their investment in them. They also have pressure from their LPs to create 25%+ IRRs and lofty cash-on-cash multiples, due to the illiquidity, risk, and time horizon of early-stage investment.

That means that each investment they make has to have the potential to truly blow up and create sky-high returns. And the companies that create this dynamic—not one where this will “for sure” happen, but one where it could—are the ones that get the love from VCs.

5. Leverage who you know with what you know

An MBA is an expensive proposition. For many students, along with high tuition and living expenses, there is a substantial opportunity cost to attending an MBA program full-time. But in exchange for that high cost, you can also extract high value, especially if you take the time to create relationships with your peers and others you meet during your time at business school.

Those relationships, along with your own growing skills and knowledge, can create a powerful dynamic as you dive into entrepreneurship. That principle has proved itself again and again in my time since graduation, as I’ve taken what I learned at business school and augmented it through the expertise of others, or recognized where I’m deficient and bringing in outside help.

Final thoughts

There’s a lot you can get out of business school if you’re an aspiring entrepreneur. Despite popular belief, not all startup learning has to be experiential. In the classroom, you can learn from the successes and mistakes of others. And when the time comes, an MBA can be a surprisingly effective tool as you take on the world with your own new venture.

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Tim Chaves is the founder and CEO of ZipBooks, an intuitive online invoicing software that helps small businesses get paid faster.



Related Resources:


Why Do YOU Need an MBA?, free guide

• Harvard Business School 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• FT’s Top MBA Programs for Entrepreneurship

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Don’t Let Your 10% Discount Slip Away – Deadline is Tomorrow!  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jul 2016, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Don’t Let Your 10% Discount Slip Away – Deadline is Tomorrow!
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The time is running out for you to save hundreds of dollars on professional MBA consulting services during our MBA Flash Sale!

If you haven’t used your MBAFlash coupon code yet, then do it now.

Tomorrow, July 20th, will be the last day you’ll be able to take advantage of this incredible opportunity to work one-on-one with an experienced admissions consultant at a discounted price.

Just enter MBAFlash at checkout to receive these premium services – our consultants are standing by, ready to help you unleash your competitive advantage and get ACCEPTED.

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The last 24 hours are ticking away, so take advantage of this flash sale now!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

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University of Texas McCombs 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jul 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: University of Texas McCombs 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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McCombs combines its rigor with a passionate community. To create its desired community, it seeks a student body that is diverse in every dimension and comprises individuals who can bring their varied voices to form a cohesive group. The questions below reflect this value; they draw out applicants’ individuality, motivations, and ability to collaborate, while also addressing the practical matters of goals and why you are seeking an MBA at McCombs.

Essays:

[b]Essay 1.[/b]

The University of Texas at Austin values unique perspectives and cultivates a collaborative environment of distinct individual contributions. It is the first day of orientation. You are meeting your study group, comprised of five of your classmates from various backgrounds. Please introduce yourself to your new team, highlighting what drives you in your personal and professional life.

Select only one communication method that you would like to use for your response.

• Write an essay (250 words maximum)

• Share a video introduction (one minute)

First, choose from the two options – for the purpose of self-introduction, which medium is the most natural for you? That is the one you should use –both are equally good. Next decision: out of the universe that is you, what to say? I suggest a combination of distinctive professional and non-work points to reflect well-roundedness – points that show the adcom what you’ll “bring to the table.” Another effective approach is to focus on one key event or experience, if that one element bridges your work and non-work spheres. Both communication options require brevity, so focus on the essential.

Essay 2.

Based on your post-MBA goals and what drives you in your personal and professional life, why is the Texas MBA the ideal program for you and how do you plan to engage in our community? (500 words max)

Interestingly, this question integrates goals and motivation. I suggest starting the essay with your goals – straightforwardly discussion short and long term goals, with the short term goals more in-depth and detailed. Next, discuss how these goals, along with some personal drivers or characteristics, make the Texas MBA the right program for you. Be specific and thoughtful about how the program aligns with your needs, don’t just reword website copy.  

Finally, identify ways you will participate in the McCombs community – discuss a few key, specific clubs, programs, or other resources meaningfully including why they’re of interest, what you hope to gain from them, and what impact you can have.

Optional Essay.

Please provide any additional information you believe is important and/or address any areas of concern that will be beneficial to the Admissions Committee in considering your application (e.g. unexplained gaps in work experience, choice of recommenders, academic performance, or extenuating personal circumstances). (250 words max)

I encourage you to write the optional essay. Just make sure you are submitting an informative optional essay that complements the required essays and adds to the reader’s knowledge of you and your qualifications. If you do not have “an area of concern to address,” this optional would be a great place to explore a non-professional interest or commitment of yours not addressed in your application. As always, if you have nothing to say, don’t say anything.

UT McCombs MBA 2017 Application Deadlines:

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If you would like professional guidance with your UT McCombs MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the UT McCombs application.

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By Cindy Tokumitsu, author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.

Related Resources:

Navigate the MBA Maze, free guide

• 2016-17 School-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips

• Tips for Video MBA Essay Questions

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Why Study Abroad for Your MBA at All?  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2016, 09:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Why Study Abroad for Your MBA at All?
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Given the sheer number of elite MBA programmes in the United States, it’s hardly surprising that a lower percentage of Americans look overseas for graduate business courses than those in other parts of the world.

According to the GMAC 2015 Prospective Student Survey Report, only 17 percent of American MBA applicants plan to submit applications for international programmes. 93 percent submit applications for programmes in the United States. The only other region or country to report more intended domestic applications than foreign ones is Canada with 46 percent of prospective students applying outside of the country.

The numbers get a little murky inside of the European Union, where students may change countries but have virtually the same rights as domestic candidates. But even then over 50 percent of applicants send materials abroad.

Everywhere else in the world reports a higher percentage of international applications compared to domestic school submissions. At the very least, this should tell you that a significant number of MBA hopefuls consider international programmes – and, indeed, international graduate student numbers are on the rise.

But why?

MBA Candidates Have Different Reasons for Studying Abroad

No one chooses to go to business school for a single reason. There are always multiple factors at play, even though there may be some overpowering ones. According to INSEAD’s 2015 Employment Statistics Report, a whopping 80 percent of graduates changed their sector, function, or country post-graduation (and 26 percent changed all three).

The GMAC survey demonstrates the primary reasons why MBA candidates opt for international study. According to their results,

• 60 percent want an international career,

• 49 percent want and international network, and

• 36 percent want to study in a country with English language instruction.

Of course, that “international career” category may be largely built on students that apply to American, English, or Swiss schools because that’s where they want to be after graduation. It doesn’t have to be about securing a job that demands international travel or opens opportunities to relocate every couple of years.

Post-Graduation Salaries for MBA Candidates

Still, it can be argued that salary increases are one of the driving factors for choosing an MBA at all – and it almost goes without saying that the more elite the programme, the higher the post-salaries to be claimed.

It’s therefore almost a necessity for candidates from some areas to travel abroad to complete their studies. And it’s the number of students looking at international universities that may drive some of the beliefs regarding salary increases.

Although the numbers a few years old, a Business Insider article demonstrates the salary expectations of MBA graduates. In 2013, South African MBA candidates expected to increase the current “average” salary of US $32,000 by 387 percent to $122,000. (And that reflects a decrease from the previous year’s expectation of $162,000.) Those figures are certainly in line with the median salaries reported by Harvard Business School graduates, but it’s important to keep in mind that many of their grads remain in the United States post-graduation. For those that return to South Africa, it’s more likely that the figures reported by INSEAD of roughly US $75,625 (as a median in 2015) are more accurate.

That said, the Financial Times reports an average increase in salary from the University of Cape Town’s Graduate School of Business (UCT GSB) at 68 percent with a current average salary of US $138,466. Those are certainly big numbers, no matter how you slice it.

Of course you can argue that UCT GSB is the only African school to crack the FT’s top-100 full-time MBA list. South American and Eastern Europe have equally low numbers of highly-ranked schools. It all boils down to the fact that many MBA hopefuls find it almost essential to travel – and even those that aren’t “forced,” find the extreme benefits of international graduate studies something they just can’t imagine doing without.

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 Katie Schenk studied human rights and graduated with a bachelor’s degree from Kent State University while working with NGOs in Geneva. Although she has since settled in South Africa, with work towards a master’s in forced migration thought the University of Witswatersrand, nothing stops her from being a proud American. Katie has been part of the Prodigy Finance team as a content specialist since 2013. She also loves rugby, sloppy Mexican food and Tudor history, which means you could find her in any section of a bookstore.

Related Resources:

• International Student Loans with Community-Based Financing

• Making International Student Loans a Prime Investment, a podcast episode

• 3 Long Term Tips For Financing Your MBA Abroad

* This blog post is sponsored by our friends at Prodigy Finance

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Why Study Abroad for Your MBA at All? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
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What You Need to Know to Get Accepted to Wharton  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2016, 09:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: What You Need to Know to Get Accepted to Wharton
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Applying to Wharton? You are invited to attend our upcoming webinar!

On August 10th, Accepted CEO and b-school admissions expert, Linda Abraham, will share the secret to creating a standout application including:

  • The 4 ingredients of a successful Wharton application
  • Insights into what the adcom is looking for
  • How to ace Wharton’s TBD/interview
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Spaces are limited! Reserve your spot for Get Accepted to Wharton today!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post What You Need to Know to Get Accepted to Wharton appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
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A 20-Year MBA Admissions Veteran Shares His Insights  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2016, 12:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: A 20-Year MBA Admissions Veteran Shares His Insights
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Today we welcome Keith Vaughn, a highly experienced MBA admissions professional. He started as an Associate Director of MBA admissions in 1994 at USC Marshall, moved up to Director in 1997 and to Assistant Dean of MBA Admissions at USC Marshall in 1997. In addition, he served briefly at different points in time as Interim Vice Dean of the MBA Program and Interim Executive Director, MBA Career Services. And his experience is not at all limited to USC Marshall.  Keith also had multi-year stints on the board of GMAC and on the board of the Consortium for the Graduate Study in Management. He has met and worked closely with all the leaders at a array of full-time part-time, and executive MBA programs.

Breadth and depth in MBA admissions define today’s guest’s expertise.

Not only is Keith bringing his insights and qualifications to this episode – he also just joined Accepted’s consulting staff and will be helping Accepted’s clients one-on-one. Welcome, Keith!

His background & how he got into admissions [2:15]

I was a military brat – I was born in West Point. For college, I was accepted to the Air Force Academy, but went to Amherst instead. When I was studying for my MBA, the dean pulled me in to work on a career project. When you work on output, you have to work on input, so that’s how I got into admissions.

There’s a lot of travel involved with admissions work – I traveled over 3 million miles in my career, all over the globe.

Initially, I thought I’d do the job for about 3 years. After 3 years, I became the Admissions Director.

What did you wish wish applicants understood or knew that they just didn’t get? [4:55]

There are no tricks to this process, and there’s no formula. Admissions people are trying to get to know who you are. Even if you get a curveball question in an interview, it’s not meant to trick you – it’s meant to see how you think on your feet.

What did you review first when you reviewed an MBA application? [7:12]

The obvious first answer is the GMAT score. But just like I look at the average rating on Rotten Tomatoes to get a sense of how good a movie is – I would look at the AWA score, which gave me a good sense right from the start whether I was in for a good read. It was a great indicator of writing skills.

Then I would do a quick review of the resume.

How should MBA applicants approach the essays? [9:38]

Be authentic – tell your story in your voice. Think about the stories you’re telling. It can be helpful to show friends and colleagues to get input.

You don’t have to be an Olympic athlete – you’re unique. It’s about self-reflection.

Understand what motivates you and how. Peel the layers back and really get a sense of who you are.

Can you tell us a little bit about the Consortium for the Graduate Study of Management and applying via its application process? [11:55]

I’m actually a Consortium alum, in addition to having served on the board.

The mission of the Consortium is to increase the number of people of color in the ranks of business. Now anyone can apply if they support the mission: increasing the number of people of diverse backgrounds in management. You have to show how you’re helping, how you’re supporting the mission.

Again, there’s no trick to the application. The process is the same.

There are some benefits to applying through the Consortium: it costs less to apply to more schools. And you gain access to another network.

There are now 18 member schools.

What did your GMAC board experience show you about how applicants should choose the programs they will apply to and ultimately attend. [17:40]

Making decisions about schools is a very individual decision. People need to think about where they see themselves 5, even 10 years out.

Geography is a big consideration. There are great schools in Asia and Europe as well as the US.

And there are a lot of aspects to “fit”. What size school are they most comfortable with? What curriculum are they looking for? Across the globe, 1st year is pretty similar – you’ll get the nuts and bolts. But research whether the schools deliver what you’re interested in for specializations.

Try to visit if you can. (Not everyone is in a position to do so, but if you can, it is helpful.) Visiting can give you a gut feeling: what it’s like to be on that campus.

Being on the GMAC board – it was a time of transition. It gave me a sense of the political forces in the business environment. It also led to international opportunities for me, such as an exchange to LBS.

Realize that admissions committee members at different schools know each other and respect each other.

What’s your advice for MBA applicants invited to blind interviews? [23:30]

Preparation, preparation, preparation. Take it seriously.

Come prepared to ask questions – that aren’t answered on the website or materials you have.

Be able to relax. It’s not meant to be a stressful event. You need to be able to get across what you’ve prepared to get across.

With 2 months to Round 1 deadlines, what can students do now to prepare? [25:25]

For many schools, the essays don’t change that much. So even if you don’t have the actual prompt yet, you can start doing some brainstorming: think about the story you want to tell, and make notes. You can even start writing an initial draft.

And research the schools.

There are so many ways schools put you in touch with their students. For example, if you’re interested in the high tech club at School X, go on their website – they’ll list the president, and you can email them. Start making connections and researching opportunities.

You can also visit schools, or schedule school visits for when school is in session.

What should applicants look for when visiting? [28:20]

Check your gut feelings: walk around the campus and get a feel for the area.

Sit in on a class. Talk to students.

Talk to students in informal settings, such as cafes or lounges.

If you’re visiting a class – remember you’re there to visit, not to participate. Don’t draw attention to yourself in a negative way.

Any advice for reapplicants? [31:10]

Reapplicants should already be well-informed about the schools and the process.

Take advantage of “deny counseling” if the school offers it. Stay positive and do the things that are necessary to make a fresh package. There needs to be something new.

What irritated you when you were Assistant Dean of MBA Admissions? [33:00]

The difficult thing from an admissions perspective was yield management – handling the waitlist, along with people who may make deposits and then decide not to enroll. The earlier and more confident you can be that people are actually coming, the better you’re able to handle the waitlist.

Every interaction you have with admissions is a potential plus or minus in your application. [37:00]

The impression you make on the receptionist; the impression you make on students you interact with – it all comes back to the admissions committee. You want it to be positive.

What did you love about your career in admissions? [37:50]

There was a lot of learning and a lot of interaction with peers. You also get positive feedback from students. I’m in touch with so many students and alumni who are doing very interesting things. We work with a lot of great students.

It’s a challenging job, but it’s very rewarding.

Do you have any last advice for applicants? [39:45]

Stay positive. There’s more than one school you should be applying to and more than one school you could be at. Be positive you’ll make that match. Research the schools. You can get an MBA.

If you’re going to be successful, you’ll be successful no matter which school you go to.

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Related Links:

• Keith Vaughn’s Bio

• School-Speicific MBA Admissions Essay Tips

• MBA Admissions Guides

Related Shows:

• It’s MBA Season: Do You Know Where Your Applications Are?

• UCLA Anderson: Cool, Chic, and Tech

• The Lauder Institute Changes to Reflect the World

Subscribe:

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, MBA Admissions

The post A 20-Year MBA Admissions Veteran Shares His Insights [Episode 163] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

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Booth Dean Kumar to Become Johns Hopkins Provost  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2016, 08:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Booth Dean Kumar to Become Johns Hopkins Provost
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On September 1st of this year, Sunil Kumar will be leaving his post as dean of the Chicago Booth School of Business to become the next provost of Johns Hopkins University. Prior to his position at Booth (dean since 2011), Kumar had spent 14 years on the Stanford GSB faculty.

In a Chicago Tribune article, Kumar says, “While I am saddened to leave this great school that has been my home for the last six years, I am excited to begin this new opportunity in Baltimore.”

A Poets & Quants article on Kumar’s new appointment, states that his departure from Booth is “clearly a surprise” and that Kumar is “leveraging his Booth deanship into a bigger job as a university provost.”

The P&Q article continues to enumerate Kumar’s successes at Booth:

• Kumar raised more than $300 million and increased Booth’s endowment by 50% to $710 million from $435 million.

• Booth saw an 8% increase in faculty during his term, with greater emphasis on behavioral marketing and operations hires.

• He oversaw the redesign and launch of the Chicago Booth Review.

• He “put new life” into the Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship after receiving a gift of $35 million from alum Michael Polsky.

In a Johns Hopkins press release, President Ronald J. Daniels says: “Sunil is a proven academic leader with uncompromising standards for excellence, great integrity, and a deep-seated commitment to collaboration. He is a scholar and leader passionate about higher education, committed to values that align with the priorities of the Johns Hopkins Ten by Twenty‘ strategic vision, and well-suited to be a steward and champion of this extraordinary institution.”

Born in Bangalore, India, Kumar holds a PhD in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and according to the Chicago Tribune article, is reserved, academic, and a big fan of meatloaf.

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Related Resources:

Leadership in Admissions, free guide

Chicago Booth 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• The MBA Career Search and Life as a Chicago Booth MBA [Podcast]

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Booth Dean Kumar to Become Johns Hopkins Provost appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
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GMAC Releases Tool That Organizes, Compares & Explains Major Rankings  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: GMAC Releases Tool That Organizes, Compares & Explains Major Rankings
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Understand ranking methodologies for the 5 major rankings.

Rankings have always been a mixed blessing – they provide so much valuable information, but if you don’t know how to analyze or use that data properly, then best case scenario, they become worthless, and worst case scenario, they become harmful.

GMAC has just released a new tool, User’s Guide to Full-Time MBA Rankings, that will help prospective graduate business students better understand ranking methodologies for the five major rankings (Bloomberg Businessweek, The Economist, The Financial Times, Forbes, and U.S. News & World Report). The user-friendly, interactive tool compares the content of the five rankings, providing information on which rankings provide which features or priorities best.

“Our research shows that individuals applying to graduate management education programs consider rankings an influential part of their decision-making process,” said Sangeet Chowfla, President & CEO of GMAC in the GMAC press release. “Though rankings exist to provide useful information to judge the quality of MBA programs, the existence of multiple rankings contributes to confusion among applicants. We created this resource to clarify the differences among the various rankings, as no one ranking methodology can speak to the individual needs and aspirations of every candidate considering a business degree.”

Understanding the 14 Categories

The User’s Guide to Full-Time MBA Rankings looks at 14 standardized weighting categories, and examines how each of the methodologies assigns weight to these categories. One ranking may put more weight on ROI (like Forbes), while another weights employer opinion more heavily (Bloomberg Businessweek). Once each category has been weighted, users can then see which category or categories most differentiate one ranking’s methodology from the others – this is known as the “distinctive emphasis.” Making distinctions among rankings in this way can help prospective students understand which factors contribute to making each publication’s rankings unique.

The 14 categories are as follows, with the rankings for which this category is the distinctive emphasis in parentheses:

1. Admissions selectivity (U.S. News)

2. Alumni opinion

3. Business school leader opinion (U.S. News)

4. Career progress

5. Career services rating (The Economist)

6. Employer opinion

7. Employment rate (Bloomberg Businessweek)

8. Faculty quality (Financial Times)

9. Gender parity

10. Internationalization (Financial Times)

11. Network (The Economist)

12. Return on investment (Forbes)

13. Salary

14. Student/recent graduate opinion

More Features

The tool also shows users how volatile rankings can be. The positions of the programs within a particular ranking change year to year, sometimes quite dramatically, and once you understand the reasons behind these changes, you’ll understand that these shifts in position have little to do with the change in quality of education.

Some of the other features of the User’s Guide include:

• A list of which business schools are included in each ranking’s full-time MBA ranking

• Statistics on the number of students around the world using each publication, and the degree to which that publication’s rankings influences their decision-making

• Accessibility of rankings data

• Ranking dates and frequency

• Ranking history

Check out the new User’s Guide here, and please be in touch with us if you need further help figuring out which b-schools are best for you.

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Related Resources:

• U.S. News Ranks Best Business Schools in 2016

• Comparing Top 10 MBA Rankings [Infographic]

• 2016 Financial Times Global MBA Rankings

Tags: MBA Admissions

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The Answer to the BIG Money Question…  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: The Answer to the BIG Money Question…
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You have questions about how you’re going to pay for that MBA in the U.S. as a foreign student. And we’ve brought in the experts to give you the answers.

Join us on Wednesday, July 27th at 10am PT for How to Fund Your International MBA in the U.S., a webinar that will help you create the financial plan that will make your b-school dream obtainable.

This must-attend webinar will be presented by Zack Hirschfeld of Prodigy Finance. You don’t want to miss it if you are an international applicant aiming for an MBA at a U.S. b-school.

The webinar is free, but you must reserve your spot to attend.

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Tags: MBA Admissions

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An Non-Traditional CBS Grad Preparing for a Career in Media  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jul 2016, 08:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: An Non-Traditional CBS Grad Preparing for a Career in Media
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This interview is the latest in an Accepted blog series featuring interviews with MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Sonie Guseh a Columbia Business School….

Accepted: [b]We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad?[/b]

Sonie: I grew up in Durham, North Carolina, and attended the University of Pennsylvania for college. There, I majored in English, with a concentration in Journalism, and minored in Hispanic Studies, which was essentially a Spanish language and literature focus.

Accepted: Can you share three fun facts about yourself?

Sonie: 

1. My family is from Liberia in West Africa.

2. My first job was at Claire’s Accessories in the local mall, where I was an ear piercing specialist.

[b]3. I was almost a state champion in high school track and field – close, but not quite. I came close in a couple of events, but never quite made it happen! But I still love running to this day.[/b]

Accepted: [b]Where are you currently in b-school? What year?[/b]

Sonie:I just graduated from Columbia Business School in May 2016.

Accepted: [b]Why did you choose Columbia? How were you a good fit?[/b]

Sonie: I chose Columbia for two main reasons – first, I knew that from a career perspective, I wanted to work in the media industry and that New York is considered to be a media capital of the world, with the headquarters of many prominent media companies housed right here. I knew that from a recruiting standpoint, it would be extremely advantageous to be able to set up regular meetings throughout the week with professionals in my target industry. I also knew that the Media & Technology program at CBS brought industry executives to campus, so I would be able to interact with media professionals more easily as a student at CBS.

I also chose Columbia because of its core curriculum. Part of why I applied to business school was because I wanted the rigor that came with a mandatory set of courses that would ensure I learned and was exposed to a wide array of general management subjects and principles, from strategy to corporate finance to accounting to operations. The friends I made in my cluster, with whom I took all of my core classes, were so instrumental in the experience. Learning together was fun and challenging, and turned us into a family – there’s nothing like the professor asking a question about a particular industry and everyone knowing exactly who in the cluster came from that field who would be best positioned to reflect on the question. I loved that level of familiarity that came with the core experience.

Accepted: [b]What is your favorite thing about Columbia Business School? Is there anything you’d change?[/b]

Sonie: Coming into business school, I underestimated the value of traveling as part of the educational experience, but participating in three school trips that have taught me about doing business around the world – in Italy, Argentina, and the United Arab Emirates, in particular – has been incredibly rewarding. These school offerings have enabled me to learn more about the particular norms and customs of doing business in these regions, as well as the unique strengths and challenges in those geographical areas as part of the global economy. For instance, in Argentina, our group visited la Casa Rosada, the Argentine equivalent of the White House, where we met with the Chief of Staff of the newly minted Macri administration. Hearing from businesses and government officials there during such a pivotal time for the country was incredible, and felt as if we were observing live what would one day be written about in history books.

Accepted: [b]How did you decide to focus on media, strategy, and marketing? What about it appeals to you the most? We would love to hear a bit about working for ABC Eyewitness News and Interning at HBO.[/b]

Sonie: In high school, I realized I loved writing and news and wanted to become a journalist, so just before college, I started a four-summer internship program through the Emma Bowen Foundation at WTVD-TV/ABC 11 Eyewitness News in my hometown of Durham, North Carolina. The four-summer experience taught me the ins and outs of the local news business, from production to reporting and more.

After college, I pursued a slightly different path from what I’d originally intended. I landed in an advertising sales role at Google, which taught me a lot about the digital marketing world. From there, I worked at a public relations agency as a communications consultant. What was consistent about my two roles before school was that I was in the broader media world, and I was interested in working at a television network again in a more corporate role. During school, I interned at HBO in its Digital Distribution and Partner Marketing group, and also worked at Condé Nast as a Digital Strategy Fellow. Those two roles were great ways for me to learn what it’s like to work in marketing and strategy roles at top media companies, which I think will be great preparation for my next role at Comcast/NBCUniversal, and for a career in media.

Accepted: Looking back at the application process, what would you say was your greatest challenge? How would you advise other applicants who may be experiencing similar challenges?

Sonie: To be honest, when I was applying to business school, I wasn’t 100% sure that the MBA was for me. I considered marketing and communications programs, and ultimately realized that the MBA would be the best way for me to achieve my long-term goals. But I knew that with my major in English and my experience in more creative aspects of my industry, it would be challenging to show that I could tackle the quantitative aspects of the curriculum. As a result, I looked for ways to demonstrate my business acumen in my past roles and in my spare time through side courses and reading on my own.

I would encourage applicants to get to know the strengths and weaknesses in their applications and own them – be self-aware and look for ways to mitigate or combat areas of development. Ultimately, with lots of hard work, I actually performed well enough to tutor in business analytics, a subject I knew very little about in my life before school, so I was very proud of that accomplishment and progress. But I felt it was important to be able to show that I could handle the curriculum in my application, since I was coming from a more non-traditional background.

Accepted: [b]What are some of your most rewarding extracurricular activities (if any)? How have those activities helped shape your career?[/b]

Sonie: I’ve been fortunate enough to have taken on quite a few leadership roles during business school. I served as president of the Hermes Society of admissions ambassadors, co-VP of Speakers for the Media Management Association, and VP of Alumni Relations for the Black Business Students Association.  I also was a teaching assistant and did some international consulting work, but perhaps what was most rewarding to me was being a Career Fellow, a career advisor to my peers. I primarily met with students interested in the media world, but the role enabled me to lead meetings and workshops about general career management, pertinent across all industries. It helped me to develop leadership and public speaking skills, but also helped me meet and connect with dozens of students, which I really enjoyed. It was immensely rewarding to see students I had worked with land wonderful summer internships and full-time jobs in their target industries, and I was proud to have been a small component of their career development process.

Thank you Sonie for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

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Related Resources:

• Podcast Interview With the Columbia Business School Admissions Team

• The Applicants That Stand Out At Columbia Business School

• Columbia Business School 2017 MBA Essay Tips and Deadlines

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post An Non-Traditional CBS Grad Preparing for a Career in Media appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
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Ten Do’s and Don’ts for Your Application Essay  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jul 2016, 09:00
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Ten Do’s and Don’ts for Your Application Essay
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The Application Essay Do’s:


1. Unite your essay and give it direction with a theme or thesis. The thesis is the main point you want to communicate.

2. Before you begin writing, choose what you want to discuss and the order in which you want to discuss it.

3. Use concrete examples from your life experience to support your thesis and distinguish yourself from other applicants.

4. Write about what interests you, excites you. That’s what the admissions staff wants to read.

5. Start your essay with an attention-grabbing lead — an anecdote, quote, question, or engaging description of a scene.

6. End your essay with a conclusion that refers back to the lead and restates your thesis.

7. Revise your essay at least three times.

8. In addition to your editing, ask someone else to critique your essay for you.

9. Proofread your essay by reading it out loud or recording it and playing it back.

10. Write clearly, succinctly.

The Application Essay Don’ts:

1. Don’t include information that doesn’t support your thesis.

2. Don’t start your essay with “I was born in…,” or “My parents came from…”

3. Don’t write an autobiography, itinerary, or resume in prose.

4. Don’t try to be a clown (but gentle humor is OK).

5. Don’t be afraid to start over if the essay just isn’t working or doesn’t answer the essay question.

6. Don’t try to impress your reader with your vocabulary.

7. Don’t rely exclusively on your computer to check your spelling and grammar.

8. Don’t provide a collection of generic statements and platitudes.

9. Don’t give mealy-mouthed, weak excuses for your GPA or test scores.

10. Don’t make things up.

But wait. What if you are still not sure how to develop a unifying theme? Or perhaps you don’t know which experiences to focus on, or simply lack confidence in your writing skills, or have suddenly developed an acute case of blank-screen-it-is? Remember, you can have one-on-one, personalized assistance every step of the way. Accepted’s services will give you the guidance and direction necessary to draft a compelling story and the comprehensive editing needed to perfect it.

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Related Resources:

The Quick Guide to Admissions Resumes

How to Stay Within Essay Word Limits by Reducing Verbal Verbosity

• The 4 Must-Haves Of A Grad School Application

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Ten Do’s and Don’ts for Your Application Essay appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
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INSEAD September 2017 Intake MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jul 2016, 08:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: INSEAD September 2017 Intake MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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Communication is key for INSEAD – in no small part because it is a key factor that their recruiters look for. Hence the INSEAD application elicits your communication effectiveness holistically. First, INSEAD asks you to write reflective essays – and to do so succinctly. Balancing this emphasis on written communication is a new VIDEO COMPONENT – the adcom wants to see you communicate in a spoken, interpersonal setup as well. Ultimately, verbal acuity really matters in the INSEAD program because the ability to comprehend, synthesize, communicate, and act on complex ideas across cultures is central to global leadership.

Motivation is the second driving interest of the INSEAD adcom. The application form terms its three essays “Motivation Essays.” Keep that word “motivation” in clear focus as you draft those essays; it indicates that you should express not just what you’ve done but why – what drives you; what propels your choices, decisions, and actions. These written essays are the first “getting to know you” element. Later, upon submitting, you’ll address further questions sent to you by the adcom, likely addressing more professional aspects of your candidacy and your interest in the program – and, again, your motivation for applying. Taken together in both form and content, the written and video components should portray both sophisticated communication abilities and self-awareness of who you are and what inspires you, moves you, propels you forward.

Motivation Essays:

Essay 1.

Give a candid description of yourself (who are you as a person), stressing the personal characteristics you feel to be your strengths and weaknesses and the main factors which have influenced your personal development, giving examples when necessary. (Approximately 500 words)

This question essentially gets to a key point: how well do you know yourself, and are you able to openly acknowledge your motivations and shortcomings? (Perhaps one could interpret it as “Are you mature?”) Note that “strengths” and “weaknesses” are plural – and they should be personal, not professional, characteristics. A personal weakness such as “impatience with detail” could certainly have professional impact, but don’t cite a weakness that is purely work-related.

I suggest 2-3 strengths and 1-2 weaknesses. Provide examples for all of them – these examples can vary in length – sometimes a sentence will suffice. If you can choose one anecdote that reveals both a strengths and a weakness, it’s efficient with space and can strengthen the essay. Also, try to bring in anecdotes/examples from outside work and from work – not all work, and not all non-work.

The main formative factors you choose to cite may be related to and integrated with the strengths/weaknesses; in addition, you can discuss key elements of your background that differentiate or distinguish you and are truly key to your personal development.

(NOTE: There is potential for some overlap in this essay with Essay 2, so look at both questions together and organize content before writing them.)

Essay 2:

Describe the achievement of which you are most proud and explain why. In addition, describe a situation where you failed. How did these experiences impact your relationships with others? Comment on what you learned. (Approximately 400 words)

With only 400 words to describe 2 significant experiences, and the specified discussion points, you need to use stories that can be told without a lot of background information. And keep in mind Essay 1 – don’t use stories that reflect exactly the same messages.

“Achievement of which you are most proud“ is a high bar, and it can be from either work or outside of work. It also should be something that reveals qualities or attributes about you that are positive and relevant. I suggest using something from the last two to three years. Luckily you don’t have to write about the failure about which you are most ashamed… Image
  Discuss a failure that is specific, fairly recent, and meaty enough to have rattled you a bit. Again, work or non-work topic is fine.

In discussing what you learned from the experiences and how they impacted your relationships, identify one specific thing for each point for each story – there isn’t room for more. And there isn’t need for more, because one will be very powerful if it’s insightful.

Essay 3:

Describe all types of extra-professional activities in which you have been or are still involved for a significant amount of time (clubs, sports, music, arts, politics, etc.). How are you enriched by these activities? (Approximately 300 words)

Simply discuss the range of activities you participate (or have participated) in – those that are major passions, and those that are “just fun” – clarifying their relative role and importance in your life. Be straightforward in how they enriched you – insight is what’s important, not something seemingly “different” that no one has ever felt or experienced before…. Imagine you are meeting with clients or superiors – between the business dealings (and perhaps over a drink), you and they chat about non-work interests – approach this essay like such a conversation. Not quite as casual as with a peer, but still conversational, straightforward, and intended to connect on a person-to-person level.

Optional Essay:

Is there anything else that was not covered in your application that you would like to share with the admissions committee? (Approximately 300 words)

Use the optional essay to explain anything that needs explaining and/or to give them one more reason to accept you. DON’T use it for a superficial summary, a restatement of your other essays, or anything similarly boring and trite. If you choose to write it, produce a tight, focused essay revealing something you haven’t yet discussed.

Video component:

After you hit the “submit” button on the application, you will receive on your dashboard 4 randomly selected, recorded questions within one hour (a link will also be emailed to you). These questions will not be the same for all applicants. You’ll have a week to complete this component, and after you do so your application will be deemed complete. This component will likely be a place to discuss your familiarity and fit with INSEAD and your motivation for applying  – though don’t necessarily expect a “why INSEAD” question – it may not be that direct. In addition, it will be a place to portray your international perspective – another key interest of the adcom. Finally, presentation matters. If they only wanted the content, presumably they would have had written questions. Plan and find that perfect balance – be yourself, but be professional. Polished, but not slick or contrived. This “perfect balance” will be different for different people, depending on their culture, their personality, their profession. To prepare, if you haven’t had any formal training in presentations or communication, it would be a good idea to try some self-videos with random questions and analyze them, looking as well as listening.

INSEAD Application Deadlines for September 2017 Intake:

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INSEAD Application Deadlines for January 2017 Intake:

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If you would like professional guidance with your INSEAD application, check out Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the INSEAD application.

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By Cindy Tokumitsu, author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.com.

Related Resources:

• MBA Admissions A-Z: 26 Great Tips

• Tips For Video MBA Essay Questions

• Life After INSEAD: Catching Up with Hasmita

Tags: MBA Admissions

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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MBA Debt Numbers Grow “Embarrassingly” Large  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jul 2016, 09:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: MBA Debt Numbers Grow “Embarrassingly” Large
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According to a Poets & Quants article, graduating MBAs have more debt than ever, “so much so that a record number of the leading business schools now decline to even share the embarrassing burdens they have put on their students.” Combined, students who graduated last year from the top 10 U.S. business schools borrowed $317.4 million (just in graduate loans); six-figure debt is becoming the norm, at least at these top schools. In 2011, there were only two schools that reported this staggering six-digit debt; last year there were 13.

Here are some highlights from the P&Q article:

• At the higher end of the six-figure range, UPenn Wharton’s grads left school with an average debt of $122,370; at the lower end, UVA Darden grads were left with $100,083 in debt.

• Wharton’s class of 2015 borrowed about $47.5 million. Columbia’s class of 2015 borrowed roughly $59.3 million.

• Schools that no longer disclose their debt data include USC Marshall, Dartmouth Tuck, Columbia Business School, Georgetown McDonough, and Northwestern Kellogg.

• Six of the 25 schools with the highest levels of student debt were public university business schools. MBAs from UCLA Anderson averaged debt of about $88,654, about $5,000 more than the students at Stanford GSB.

• One consequence of this rising debt is that MBAs are pushing off marriage. According to Dora Gicheva, an economist at UNC, the likelihood of getting married within seven years of graduating decreases by 3-4% for every $10,000 in debt that the person carries.

• Another consequence: students are turning down acceptances at highly ranked schools to attend schools with lower tuition or where they were awarded more scholarship money. (The AIGAC 2016 Applicant Survey shows that 30% of applicants consider costs when selecting a program, and are subsequently turning to other types of programs other than the traditional two-year U.S. MBA programs.)

• Some schools have kept their debt numbers down (relatively speaking) by offering more scholarship money. For example, only 47% of Stanford class of 2015 graduates and only 55% of HBS grads borrowed money, compared to a whopping 70% at Yale.

• The average debt burden for graduates of UWisconsin’s Business School in Madison was only $15,481, more than $108,000 less than the average debt at Wharton. Meanwhile, the median first-year compensation package for Wisconsin MBAs was $114,481, only $31,609 less than the Wharton grad salary.

Here’s the data from P&Q on the average amount of debt and percent of MBAs in debt at the top schools:

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(See original graph here)

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Related Resources:

• Making International Student Loans a Prime Investment

• GMAC Releases Tool That Organizes, Compares & Explains Major Rankings

• 3 Long Term Tips For Financing Your MBA Abroad

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post MBA Debt Numbers Grow “Embarrassingly” Large appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
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Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Webinar on Funding an International MBA in the U.S.: LIVE on WEDNESDAY  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Webinar on Funding an International MBA in the U.S.: LIVE on WEDNESDAY!
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Have you reserved your spot for tomorrow’s webinar, How to Fund Your International MBA in the U.S.? If you want to learn how to pay those high U.S. business school tuition bills as an international student, then you’ll want to tune in on Wednesday, July 27th at 10am PT for Prodigy Finance’s IMPORTANT webinar.

Need to save money? Need to pay the bills? Need to pay for b-school in the U.S.? Learn how on Wednesday. REGISTER for How to Fund Your International MBA in the U.S. now!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Webinar on Funding an International MBA in the U.S.: LIVE on WEDNESDAY! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
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Webinar on Funding an International MBA in the U.S.: LIVE on WEDNESDAY &nbs [#permalink] 25 Jul 2016, 09:01

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