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Accepted’s Selectivity Index: Are You Asleep When You Apply?  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jun 2016, 11:01
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Accepted’s Selectivity Index: Are You Asleep When You Apply?
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I recently heard a story about a gentleman who was about to purchase a certain piece of land with the intention of building a school on that property. It was wartime, and the theater of war was rapidly approaching the region in which he and the property were located.

A friend heard about his intended investment, and thought his friend had gone nuts.

“How can you make this purchase now? Are you dreaming?” he asked incredulously.

Replied the real estate investor, “I am dreaming, but I am not asleep.”

Although I heard this story in a context far removed from graduate school admissions, I couldn’t help but think that some of you are “asleep” when you apply – at least the first time.

Dreaming while asleep in admissions:

• Applying exclusively to schools where you are not competitive based on the stats and available information.

• Focusing on the one metric where you are either very strong or very weak. Focusing on the one number that either makes you feel great or makes you feel terrible is another form of “applying asleep.” In either case, you fail to choose schools realistically and consequently “invest” poorly in your overall application effort.

• Ignoring weaknesses when applying so that you fail to address or mitigate them.

Applying “awake” while still allowing for your dreams means that you assess your competitiveness at your target schools by comparing your test scores and grades as well as the non-quantitative factors in your profile to the known stats and stated criteria of the schools you want to attend.

Armed with this information, you:

• Apply to a few “dream” schools, but mostly to programs where you are competitive.

• Assess your weaknesses or strengths in the context of your overall application so that you neither obsess over a weakness nor fail to provide positive reasons for acceptance.

• You work to mitigate weaknesses before and during the actual application process while highlighting strengths and creating a strong case for acceptance beyond the stats in your application.

A few of you may be thinking:

“I know my chances aren’t great at my target schools. But I’m working and making good money. It doesn’t pay for me to apply to any but these schools.”

There are some applicants in this situation. It’s true, but there are very few. If you’re one of them, you are applying rationally.  If you aren’t one of them and you could achieve your goals at programs where you are competitive, then well, you may be dozing…

Introducing the Selectivity Index®

Accepted has developed a new tool, the Selectivity Index®, to help you apply realistically and effectively. The Selectivity Index takes the most recent US News rankings data and reflects the schools’ average GPA, test scores, and acceptance rates so that you can assess the relative difficulty of acceptance. You can also order the schools by average test score, GPA or acceptance rate.

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We focused on those key metrics not because they are solely determinative, because they are not, but they do mirror how difficult it is to gain acceptance to a school. They also suggest which schools may be focusing on a particular metric and which may not.

Weaknesses in the Selectivity Index:

1. It doesn’t reflect non-quantitative information, which plays a significant role in holistic admissions and can allow those with non-quantitative strengths to get in when those “more qualified” per the stats are rejected.

2. In doesn’t reflect the schools’ desire for diversity in their classes and community.

3. It doesn’t reflect the importance of showing fit with an individual school’s strengths, mission, and values.

I’m not sure if this is a strength or weakness, but the Selectivity Index does not measure or reflect ROI, educational quality, or career opportunity.

Finally, while the Selectivity Index does reveal the relative level of competition at different programs, it doesn’t excuse you from making sure that the schools where you are competitive also will help you achieve your goals. It does you no good to get into a program that won’t that won’t help you achieve your goals and realize your dreams.

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Related Resources:

• Linda Abraham’s Admissions Assortment

6 Tips for Talking About Your Weaknesses

Should You Apply to a Safety School?

Tags: Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post Accepted’s Selectivity Index: Are You Asleep When You Apply? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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AIGAC 2016 Take Aways  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: AIGAC 2016 Take Aways
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I’d like to share some conference “takeaways” from the Association of International Graduate Admissions Consultants (AIGAC) meeting in Cambridge, Massachusetts earlier this month. Held at MIT Sloan with visits to HBS, Tuck, and Babson and with presentations by representatives of Wharton, INSEAD, Georgetown, Carnegie Mellon, Haas, Vanderbilt, Darden, Rotman, Yale, UCLA, Columbia, McCombs, IESE, LBS, and Stanford, there were many information highlights.

• An MIT professor has coined the current student population as Generation “S.” One-third of MIT students take three or more electives in sustainability.

• Another MIT professor describes true entrepreneurs as innovation drivers – their companies interact with global markets, they produce products for export, and they have a sustainable competitive advantage. It is these companies that can transform an economy.

• MIT experienced a 35% increase in applications last year.

• MIT’s Master of Finance Program currently has 120 students, 40% women, 80% International, and 80% directly from undergrad. In contrast, the MBA program has 400 students of which 40% are women, 40% international, and students have an average of five years full-time experience.

It was discussed that there are four levels of listening during an MBA interview:

1. Cosmetic listening: This is when you’re not really listening. The mind is focused elsewhere. This sometimes occurs when interviewees are nervous or focused on giving a memorized response.

2. Conversational listening: This listening occurs when you’re engaged in conversation, listening, talking, thinking. An interviewee might actually miss the real point that the interviewer is trying to make because they are too focused on planning and giving their reply.

3. Active listening: During active listening, you are very focused on what the other person is saying and attuned to what is happening. During an interview, an interviewee will use paraphrasing and rephrasing to ensure understanding.

4. Deep listening: This listening is more focused on other, rather than self, where the listener is aware of both content and the overall situation. As an interviewee, it allows you to think more strategically about the interaction.

Here are a few tidbits from the AIGAC Survey results of 1,114 applicants for 2017 enrollment:

Expectations of applicants:

• Nearly half of the applicants expect a 50% increase in income

• 56.2% seeking to advance career

• 55.6% seeking better job prospects

• 51.1% seeking to broaden their professional network

The influence of admissions consultants:

• 32% said consultants advised to earn a higher GMAT prior to applying

• 29% applied to schools not previously considered

• 27% applied to more schools than originally planned

• 16% applied to higher ranked schools

• 15% applied to lower ranked schools

How applicants selected schools:

• 74% reputation

• 46% location

• 48% impact on career

• 38% culture of school

• 36% career placement statistics

• 35% alumni network

• 32% global programming

• 30% scholarship

The most challenging application components:

• 61% standardized tests

• 46% essays

• 20% interview

• 18% letters of recommendation

• 16% video submission

• 3% group exercise

There was consensus that most MBA schools accept either the GRE or the GMAT. However, some employers post-graduation prefer the GMAT (investment banking, consulting). Taking the GMAT is encouraged if the first-time practice score is fair and the applicants feel confident they can move “fair” to “good” or “competitive” for their target schools.

More schools are using application software that informs them whether the applicants wrote their own letter of recommendation (often at the request of the recommender). It is important to find recommenders that are willing to write a recommendation on your behalf.

Applicants ranked the following in order of how well a school got to know the applicant through the admissions process:

1. Tuck

2. IE

3. Kellogg

4. Duke

5. Cornell

6. Booth

7. IESE

8. Tepper

9. U of Toronto

10. Insead

11. Oxford

12. U of Texas

Attending AIGAC was an opportunity to learn more about some of the schools our clients are interested in. It also provided time to network with other consultants from many areas of the world to share insights on the factors resulting in successful admissions applications. I’d be delighted to share with you one-on one not only what I gleaned from the conference, but the lessons learned over thirty years in university and MBA career services and administration.

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With 30 years of career/admissions experience at four universities, including Cornell’s Johnson School, Karin facilitated students’ entry into the world’s best companies. As a member of the adcom, she also evaluated applications. She knows what schools and employers seek.

 

Related Resources:

Navigate the MBA: 9 Tips to Acceptance, free guide

6 Secrets to a Successful MBA Interview

Top Business School Zone Page

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post AIGAC 2016 Take Aways appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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NYU Stern to Offer a New FinTech Specialization in the MBA Curriculum  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: NYU Stern to Offer a New FinTech Specialization in the MBA Curriculum
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Beginning in fall 2016, NYU Stern’s full-time and part-time MBA students will be able to choose FinTech as a specialization and take electives from a curriculum of eight new courses. This is a first among top business schools.

In last week’s press release, Raghu Sundaram, Vice Dean of MBA Programs and Online Learning, says: “Technology continues to transform the business landscape at a breathtaking pace. Business education needs to innovate to keep pace with the rapid rate of change. The launching of the FinTech specialization, a joint creation of our Finance and Information, Operations and Management Sciences (IOMS) departments, is an important step in this direction.”

Professor of Information Systems and one of the Academic Co-Chairs of the specialization, Alexander Tuzhilin, adds: “FinTech is about how modern information technologies are disrupting the financial services industry. Stern has combined its considerable strengths in both finance and technology to create courses that discuss how these two areas blend together to enable new business models, innovations and opportunities.”

Courses in the new FinTech specialization will focus on areas including data management; trade strategies; risk management; mobile payments; financial data analytics; transaction security, and trade clearing and settlement; regulation and the impact of digital currencies on the financial services industry; and entrepreneurial crowdfunding. FinTech will be one of the more than 20 specializations now offered in the NYU Stern MBA curriculum.

NYU Stern faculty are presently doing research in FinTech, with a new FinTech faculty seminar series taking place this summer to encourage discourse about the subject. Stern faculty will also facilitate a Design Sprint challenge, a one-day event in and around the New York City community which will inspire innovators to think disruptively about the future of banks. The school will hold a FinTech conference on November 9, 2016, with the keynote being delivered by Stern alumnus and CEO of PayPal, Dan Schulman.

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Related Resources:

The Facts About Financial Services

NYU Stern 2016- 17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• Contemplating a Career in Data Science/Business Analytics?

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post NYU Stern to Offer a New FinTech Specialization in the MBA Curriculum appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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Resilience in the Face of Failure  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Resilience in the Face of Failure
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Made a mistake? Congrats, you are human.

Essay questions dealing with failure, risk, mistakes, and difficult interactions or conflict often cause applicants to cringe, squirm, and bite their nails. After all, you want to show yourself succeeding and conquering the world in your essays and personal statements, not falling down. But there’s a reason why these questions are common. Schools want to see how you get up and grow following a setback: Do you show resilience? Do you smile and try again, view the stumble as temporary, move on, applaud your effort, and accept a helping hand when offered? Thinking about setbacks is a way for them to learn about you.

Here are 3 tips to portray your setbacks as growth opportunities and occasions of achievement:

[b]1. Focus on how failures lead to successes. [/b]

All humans make mistakes, and these often lead to great things. You may accidentally stumble on a new idea or invention that you otherwise wouldn’t have encountered, or you may grow and learn from the failure or disappointment how to become a greater person. Thomas Edison, the inventor and businessman who invented the light bulb and phonograph, once said about his scientific experiments, “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.”  Edison took his failures in stride and reframed them to pave his way to success. You should do the same!

[b]TIP: Choose an experience for your essay where you experienced feelings of failure, disappointment, frustration, or inadequacy. Define your “blew it” moment, but use your “failure” to demonstrate success, accomplishment, resilience and character.[/b]

EXAMPLE: Perhaps you made a mistake in the lab that cost you weeks of work – but you learned something important about lab techniques, and now you’ve become a more fastidious researcher as a result. (Note: this needs to go way beyond the normal trial-and-error nature of research.) Or perhaps your failure was personal: maybe you neglected an important relationship, and as a result of that loss, you’ve made a point of treating people with particular respect.

[b]2. Focus on why something went wrong. [/b]

Another important theme to include in your essay is your deep understanding of your negative experience. By discussing what went wrong and why it went wrong, you’re showing the adcom that you don’t just place blame on circumstances, but that you look for real answers and real solutions.

[b]TIP: In your essay, reflect on the reasons behind your failure and the steps you took to avoid similar mistakes.[/b]

EXAMPLE: If you pushed to complete a work project resulting in resentment among colleagues, then you should write about the extra attention you now pay to the suggestions and efforts of your colleagues.

[b]3. Focus on what you’ve learned from the experience on a personal level. [/b]

Not only do your failures help you stay away from future failures, they also impact you as a person.

[b]TIP: Write about the importance of owning up to your mistakes. The humility and maturity that accompany owning up to your error are excellent self-improvement qualities to highlight.[/b]

EXAMPLE: If you made a programming error and a client caught it and you accepted responsibility for your actions, you can write about how you’ve since implemented more stringent quality assurance protocols, and how you’ve accepted that you need better QA – that you aren’t infallible.

 Of course, don’t just talk about “resilience.” Demonstrate it through anecdotes that show you picking yourself up, improving, acknowledging effort, persisting, and ultimately succeeding in one way or another. By portraying these qualities in your essay, you will convince the adcom that you can indeed conquer the world. Or at least pick yourself up after you stumble.

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Related Resources:

• Resilience: Moving On

6 Tips for Talking About Your Weaknesses

• Can You Get Accepted After Doing Something Stupid?

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Resilience in the Face of Failure appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Snag Your Spot at Harvard Business School!  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jul 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Snag Your Spot at Harvard Business School!
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If you’re aiming to attend Harvard Business School in 2016, we’ve got great news for you!

Our most recent webinar, Get Accepted to Harvard Business School is now available for viewing!

In her presentation, Linda Abraham, CEO & Founder of Accepted, offers loads of advice on how to gain a competitive edge to Harvard Business School, with a focus on how to answer Harvard’s one and only essay question.

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View Get Accepted to Harvard Business School now!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Snag Your Spot at Harvard Business School! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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5 Ways to Increase Your Admission Test Score  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jul 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: 5 Ways to Increase Your Admission Test Score
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Read often – and make sure you understand what you are reading!

Everyone knows that studying is necessary for a good test score. But there are plenty of other tips and tricks to boost your score into the next range. Make yourself more competitive at your dream school by following some of our favorite test prep strategies in this post!

1. Pick the test that plays to your strengths.

Did you know that some business schools accept the GRE instead of the GMAT? Or that some law schools are considering allowing the GRE instead of the LSAT? (The University of Arizona College of Law has already green-lighted the GRE for its applicants.) If you’re having a difficult time hitting the score ranges you need on traditional standardized tests, look into what other options might exist for you. It could be worth taking the alternative test!

2. Read as much as you can.

Dense, challenging texts are going to be part of any standardized test for graduate school or professional school. The best way to prepare? Incorporate these kinds of texts into your everyday reading material. Try picking up a few copies of The Economist, The New Yorker, or The Wall Street Journal (either in print or online). Don’t just skim, though – discern the author’s argument. Criticize main points. Find loopholes in the author’s conclusion. Identify counterarguments. You’ll find that any reading comprehension or critical reading section of your standardized test will be much easier once you’ve had sufficient exposure to difficult texts.

3. Pay attention to detail.

Standardized tests are full of questions that might appear to be “trick” questions, or traps. But for students who are prepared, these trick questions are easy to spot. Oftentimes, standardized test questions follow a pattern – and this pattern repeats itself across the test’s history. When prepping for a test, make sure you isolate how the test writers phrase difficult questions, and pay attention to any “easy” questions that you miss. One common trap that many students fall into is not reading the question stems carefully enough. A question might ask “All of the following support the author’s statement EXCEPT…” Paying enough attention to know that the question is asking for an exception is crucial to answering correctly!

4. Don’t let any one question sink all your time.

While taking practice tests, note how long it takes on average for you to complete both individual questions and sets of questions. If you find that a question or section is costing you a significant amount of time over that average, circle what’s giving you trouble, move on, and come back only if you have time at the end. We know it can be tough to walk away from a question that you’ve invested a lot of time in, but you might find easier points to pick up throughout the rest of the section. Give yourself enough time to find out!

5. Master the fundamentals.

If you’re just starting out with test prep, it’s important that you lay a strong foundation for your skills. That means if you’re a little rusty on basic formulas, equations, or vocabulary words, review these fundamentals until you’ve got the basics down. Leave the medium-level and tricky “challenge” questions for later, when you’re equipped to tackle them.

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Related Resources:

• Making Friends with the GRE: How To Overcome Test Anxiety and Perform at Your Best

5 Ways to Cut Stress After an Admission Test

• How to Study Like the Highest-Scoring GMAT Test Takers

Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post 5 Ways to Increase Your Admission Test Score appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
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Happy 4th of July!  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jul 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Happy 4th of July!
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Tags: Admissions Consulting, College Admissions, Grad School Admissions, Law School Admissions, MBA Admissions, Medical School Admissions

The post Happy 4th of July! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

Follow Accepted on Twitter
Friend Accepted on Facebook
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Understanding Stanford GSB’s Core Value Of Intellectual Vitality  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Understanding Stanford GSB’s Core Value Of Intellectual Vitality
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Do you have the smarts that Stanford GSB is looking for?

What are the qualities that Stanford GSB is looking for as they build their class? How do successful applicants stand out from the crowd? At a school as competitive as Stanford, it’s a fact that many smart, accomplished applicants won’t get in—so how can you demonstrate that you have that “it” factor? Let us walk you through Stanford’s evaluation criteria and give you some advice.

Criteria #1: Intellectual Vitality

You’re smart. But this isn’t about smart. Most of the people Stanford GSB rejects are smart (often very smart). A person of average IQ may have enormous intellectual vitality, while a person with a stratospheric IQ may have scant intellectual vitality. Pretty much everyone uses their raw intellect, whatever its degree, in practical application – to get things done. People with intellectual vitality do that and more – they nurture and refine their raw intellect to make it a force in itself, one that draws them into new and challenging territory. No wonder Stanford wants it.

So what does intellectual vitality consist of? Here are 5 key components (separated for discussion purposes only, as they’re interconnected).

1. Zest for ideas.

When you encounter a new or challenging idea, you’re tantalized. You have to find out more. What does it mean? Where did it come from? And how, and why? You relish ideas for their inherent meaning; they’re alive to you. You value them as a new lens to see through.

2. Dynamic, engaged mind.

You’re always mentally comparing and contrasting, probing limits and boundaries, seeing overlaps between disparate points and differences between similar ones. To you, an event is not static, but rather part of a continuum, with a history to explore and future ramifications to consider. And you never take things at face value!

3. But why…?

When you were a child, you probably were told you’re too curious. But curiosity underpins intellectual vitality. It drives you to learn more and more and more about something, to set off on thrilling learning journeys. (And you sometimes snag other people along for the ride!)

4. There’s a reason for what you believe and for what you do.

Back to ideas – they animate you. Whether you’re politically conservative, moderate, or liberal, you’re not that way because your family or friends are, but because you’re interested in and think about the issues – from multiple angles. Your thought process informs your decisions, beliefs, actions.

5. Open, as in unafraid.

So, you have your beliefs, your ideas. But you don’t hide behind them. You welcome them being challenged – it’s actually … fun. Intellectual fun. And you challenge back thoughtfully. You’re a skillful devil’s advocate, able to argue from multiple perspectives, even ones you personally disagree with. You relish learning what drives and underlies opposing ideas and beliefs (there’s that curiosity again…).

Hopefully the above points make clear that intellectual vitality is not something ponderous – it’s a thrill! Yes, it engages matters of seriousness and gravity. But it’s fundamentally invigorating. It fuels you. And it scintillates others.

Now, how do you let Stanford know you have it? The application essays are the perfect venue for showcasing this quality – integrate it into anecdotes, details, and reflections. If you are invited to interview, that’s an ideal place to demonstrate intellectual vitality.

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By Cindy Tokumitsu, author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.

Related Resources:

Stanford School of Business Zone Page

Stanford GSB 2017 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• Valentine’s Day, Economics, and Stanford GSB, podcast

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Understanding Stanford GSB’s Core Value Of Intellectual Vitality appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Linda Abraham
Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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CEMS MiM: 2 Countries, 3 Languages, 30 BSchools, 100 Institutions  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jul 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: CEMS MiM: 2 Countries, 3 Languages, 30 BSchools, 100 Institutions
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Meet today’s guest, Executive Director at CEMS Global Alliance, Roland Siegers. He studied in Germany and France and started working for CEMS in 2002, becoming the Executive Director in 2012. Welcome!

What is CEMS? [1:45]

It’s a joint program – a partnership among 30 leading b-schools. It’s provides a pre-experience master’s program (the students are straight out of undergrad). And students study at two of 30 campuses on 5 continents.

Currently there’s no US partner.

MIM program overview [3:13]

Students enroll at one of the 30 partner campuses. They do one term at their home campus, one term abroad, and one internship term (also usually abroad). There’s a very strong international focus.

And at the end, students earn two degrees: a master’s degree from their home campus and the CEMS Masters in International Management.

Most of the master’s programs are 1-2 years. If a student is in a 2-year master’s program, they can add the CEMS program in the second year of the 2-year program. [4:38]

If a student is doing a second degree, does it have to be related to business? [5:30]

Yes. We consider the CEMS MIM an advanced degree, and we go deep. But their undergrad degree can be in a different field.

What distinguishes the MIM from an MBA? [7:15]

Timing. While the MBA generally requires a few years of work experience, MIM students are young – generally straight out of undergrad.

What distinguishes the CEMS MIM from b-school linked Masters in Management? [8:25]

The international flavor. 100 institutions contribute to shaping the program – so there are many opportunities for your studies. You get to be exposed to students from 30 campuses and 70 nationalities.

The world is our home, and that’s reflected in our program.

What are the 100 institutions? [10:00]

There are 65 companies, 5 NGOs, and 30 schools. The companies participate in every aspect of the program: selecting students, mentoring, providing guest speakers, etc. And ultimately, hiring.

How does the internship term work? Is it in a third location? [11:15]

People do diverse things all over the world (including developing countries and countries where the program doesn’t have partner campuses, like the US). The internship gives them a chance to learn something practical about the working world.

What are you looking for in a student? [12:45]

Bright people with good academic records. We also want an interest and appetite for the international, as well as people with maturity, clear ethics, and a strong moral compass. People who have the capability of reflecting on challenges, and who have the desire to perform and compete.

The application process [14:10]

The application itself is carried out by member schools.

After applying, candidates are selected to an interview/assessment center. The interview could include a group discussion or team situation, or you could be asked to give a presentation. There’s also an interview with a school representative and a company representative.

Does the application vary by school (among the 30 campuses)? [16:10]

The application might vary – the school might have specific requirements you also must meet.

Some schools have essays. They all want to see you’ve done well in your studies and that you’ve also gained international exposure.

The GMAT/GRE? [17:20]

Both GMAT and GRE are OK. But some schools/countries don’t allow the tests at all, so it depends on the specific application.

What type of jobs do people get after earning the MIM? [17:50]

Given the international focus of the degree, many people are recruited by multinational companies. Recently, a lot of tech companies have been hiring our grads. And consulting is always a big field. Increasingly, grads want to join (or start) start-ups.

Some recent professional destinations [18:40]

Google, L’Oreal, Deloitte, McKinsey.

Is the MIM a terminal degree? [19:00]

Most of all, it’s a career accelerator. We’re doing research to track people’s next steps, and while a few people may later return for an MBA, not many do.

Advice for US students considering the CEMS program [21:30]

Consider your needs: is speed important? Consider a 1-year program.

Consider your interests: marketing? Finance? Look at campuses with strengths in your areas of interest.

And consider the locations that are most attractive to you.

Also, consider price. Some degrees are very inexpensive (or free), by law.

Advice to prepare for the application [24:00]

Travel! We want people with international experience.

Brush up on your languages. You need to have strong language knowledge/speaking ability.

Language requirements? [24:50]

You need proficiency in at least two languages (one must be English) when you come into the program, and then work on learning basic knowledge of a third while you’re in the program. The third is more of a cultural immersion.

Speaking another language is also thinking in another language: it’s about culture.

What’s coming up in the US? [25:45]

More educational innovation. Specialized master’s programs are great for schools and students.

The age of the wise man delivering knowledge is gone, and that’s a good thing! Schools are developing more individualized programs.

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Related Shows:

• CEMS MiM• CEMS: The Global Alliance in Management Education

• Jumpstart Your Business Career with a Masters in Management Program

Related Links:

• UVA MS in Global Commerce: 3 Continents, 2 Masters, 1 Amazing Year• The Scoop on the London Business School Masters in Management Program• The Wharton Lauder Institute Changes to Reflect the WorldThe Schwarzman Scholars Program: Leaders of the Future Unitehttp://blog.accepted.com/2015/10/28/the-schwarzman-scholars-program-leaders-of-the-future-unite-episode-126/• Making International Student Loans a Prime Investment• The Duke MMS: An Interview with Sheryle Dirks

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

The post The CEMS MIM: A Truly International Masters in Management [Episode 161] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
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Understanding Stanford GSB’s Take On Demonstrated Leadership Potential  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jul 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Understanding Stanford GSB’s Take On Demonstrated Leadership Potential
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What are the qualities that Stanford GSB is looking for as they build their class? How do successful applicants stand out from the crowd? At a school as competitive as Stanford, it’s a fact that many smart, accomplished applicants won’t get in—so how can you demonstrate that you have that “it” factor? Let us walk you through Stanford’s evaluation criteria and give you some advice.

Criteria #2: Demonstrated Leadership Potential

Of course Stanford GSB seeks demonstrated leadership potential – don’t all b-schools? And naturally you’ve got leadership, or you wouldn’t be applying to Stanford.

Wait. There are some unique nuances to Stanford’s conception of leadership that are essential to understand in order to portray it effectively in your application. Let’s break the phrase down word by word, starting with the core principle.

Leadership.

Principle? Yes, not just a quality or an activity in Stanford’s eyes, but an actual principle. Whatever change you’re guiding the client to achieve, or whatever vision you’re advocating, or whatever project you’re driving the team through Hades to complete on time – it should be constructive and beneficial according to your own values and ideals. In GSB’s view, leadership isn’t just rallying the troops to achieve a given end – it’s having an end worth achieving (and, conversely, declining to pursue an inappropriate end). Therefore, if you are to provide such leadership, you must have core values or ideals and be guided by them as you lead, both how you lead and where you lead. GSB’s preferred leadership is essentially value- and ideal-driven, what it calls “directed idealism.”

Potential.

Even if you are already a leader per the above definition, you’re not satisfied. You know that improving will only enable you to achieve more of what you value – therefore you actively seek growth as a leader. You are open to critique and feedback, you are resourceful, you are humble, and you are hungry to learn.

Demonstrated.

Concrete evidence that allows the adcom to conclude that you will grow as a leader and provide leadership in the future. You must demonstrate both leadership and potential to grow as a leader. For the former, provide this evidence by portraying experiences in your application boxes, essays, resume, and recommendations that reflect your leadership to date. For the latter, in these same application components frankly reflect on where you are in your leadership development – you understand what parts are innate to you, and where you need to improve.

So “demonstrated leadership potential” is actually rather complex, at least per GSB’s perspective of leadership. Plan to spend some time and effort on a strategy to integrate these points into your entire application.

Check out the first post in this series, Understanding Stanford GSB’s Core Value Of Intellectual Vitality.

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By Cindy Tokumitsu, author and co-author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports, including Why MBA and Best MBA Programs: A Guide to Selecting the Right One. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted.

Related Resources:

• Stanford School of Business Zone

• Stanford GSB 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

4 Ways to Show You’ll Contribute in the Future

Tags: MBA Admissions

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FT’s Top MBA Programs for Entrepreneurship  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jul 2016, 10:00
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: FT’s Top MBA Programs for Entrepreneurship
This year the Financial Times published a ranking that is a spin-off from their 2016 global MBA ranking and features the top 25 MBA programs for entrepreneurship (last year they published only the top 10).

The rankings:

1. Stanford GSB

2. Babson Olin

3. UVA Darden

4. Dartmouth Tuck

5. UCLA Anderson

6. UC Berkeley Haas

7. UPenn Wharton

8. IE Business School

9. London Business School

10. IESE Business School

11. MIT Sloan

12. Oxford Saïd

13. Harvard Business School

14. Chicago Booth

15. Ipade Business School

16. Georgetown McDonough

17. Insead

18. Duke Fuqua

19. NYU Stern

20. USC Marshall

21. Birmingham Business School

22. Columbia Business School

23. HKUST Business School

24. Incae Business School

25. HEC Paris

Here is some additional data from the rankings:

• The data for the ranking was gathered during a larger ranking survey from students who graduated with MBAs in 2012. Schools were ranked based on the percentage of their MBA graduates who started a company, as well as how many of those companies were still trading at the end of 2015.

• The ranking looked at how important the school and alumni were in getting the company off the ground. This included everything from motivating the entrepreneur to assisting in finding staff and funding. A size threshold (answers from at least 15 entrepreneurs at each ranked school) was also applied.

• US schools took 15 of the 25 ranked spots, with Stanford being #1 for the second year in a row.

• Dartmouth Tuck’s #2 ranking was powered by its phenomenal alumni network.  On a scale of 1-10, Tuck has a 9.9 for the extent to which alumni helped secure financing. The next closest school, Stanford GSB, has an 8.6.

• Schools from China, Costa Rica, France, Mexico, Spain, and the UK were also included in the ranking. Spain’s IE School placed eighth, which is the highest ranking non-US school.

• When considering all MBA programs, ranked or not, 19% of graduates from the class of 2012 started their own business. They gave similar answers when asked how much they were driven by their MBA program to go out on their own.

• The amount of help received from their school and alumni network varied significantly between entrepreneurs of ranked and non-ranked programs.

• Overall, 56% of entrepreneurs from the top 25 MBA programs rated their school and alumni network as extremely helpful. By comparison, only 44% of entrepreneurs from other MBA programs rated their school and alumni network at the same level.

• Both groups consistently rated their alumni network as being more helpful than the business school. However, approximately 13% of entrepreneurs considered both their school and network as not helpful at all, and about 33% did not seek help from either.

Understand more about how rankings work, how you should use them, and mistakes to avoid when you download your free copy of MBA Rankings: What You Need to Know now!

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Related Resources:

MBA & Entrepreneurship Resource Page

• 2016 Financial Times Global MBA Rankings

U.S. News Ranks Best Business Schools in 2016

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Chicago Booth 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jul 2016, 09:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Chicago Booth 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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Chicago Booth has always prided itself on admitting students who can handle ambiguity and lack of structure. And its application reflects that principle. In spades. This year’s Booth application also mirrors Chicago’s pride in its distinctive culture. This essay/presentation question, a modified version of last year’s prompt, is about as open-ended and original as it gets.

The prompt wording has changed and become more succinct, but the intent is the same: Get to know you and see how you think. And how you will fit into Booth’s community. Booth shares more thoughts and advice on its blog.

My tips are in blue below.

Essay:

View this collection of shared Booth moments. Choose the moment that best resonates with you and tell us why.

Presentation/Essay Guidelines

Choose the format that works for you. Feel free to submit a traditional essay, slide presentation, or any format that you feel best captures your response. Please use the format you are most comfortable with, the Admissions Committee has no preference.

Determine your own length. There is no prescribed minimum or maximum length. We trust that you will use your best judgment in determining how long your submission should be, but we recommend that you think strategically about how to best allocate the space.

Technical Guidelines

File Size: Maximum file size is 16 MB.

Accepted Upload Formats: Acceptable formats are PDF, Word, and PowerPoint. We strongly recommend converting your piece to a PDF file prior to submitting.

Multimedia Restrictions: We will be viewing your submission electronically and in full color, but all submissions will be converted to PDF files, so animation, video, music, etc. will not translate over.

A few thoughts:

Should you write an essay or use a visual presentation? That depends on you. If you are talented visually and love graphics and powerpoint, use a visual medium as long as it will translate to PDF. If you are a “words person” who prefers expressing your thoughts in writing, write the response. Do what will make it easiest for you to express your essence.

Don’t take the lack of a word limit as a license to write the great American novel or your culture’s equivalent of War and Peace. Don’t use more words or take more of their time than necessary. Don’t mistake quantity for quality. This is a great place for you to show judgment — preferably good judgment.

Optional Essay:

Is there any additional information that you would like the Admissions Committee to know? If so, please address in an optional essay. (300 words maximum)

This is an open-ended optional question. You can use it to provide context for a weakness or blemish in your record. Or, you can use it to highlight an experience or aspect of your background that you didn’t have room for elsewhere and that you would like the Booth adcom to know about as they consider your application.

This question, unlike the required question, does have a word limit. Respect it.

Also keep in mind that the optional is not for repeating what’s found elsewhere. It’s for “additional information.” Don’t waste your readers time with repetition or the misplaced grand finale.

Reapplicant Essay:

Upon reflection, how has your perspective regarding your future, Chicago Booth, and/or getting an MBA changed since the time of your last application? (300 words maximum)

The answer to this question is critical for MBA reapplicants, and it’s different from most reapplication essays in that it’s more about your perspective than what you’ve done.  Chicago  wants to see growth and development. Same ol’, same ‘ol got you a ding last time and probably will again this time.

Let this brief essay show a maturation and evolution of your goals and reasons for wanting to attend Chicago Booth.  Let it also reveal that you meet Chicago’s criteria better this year than last.

If you would like professional guidance with your Chicago Booth MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Booth application. 

Chicago Booth 2017 MBA Application Deadlines:

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business SchoolsSchool-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips

Chicago Booth B-School Zone

Audio & Video in Admissions, a free guide

Tags: MBA Admissions

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Don’t Miss Out on Stanford Admissions Advice!  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jul 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Don’t Miss Out on Stanford Admissions Advice!
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A quick reminder that our webinar, Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business, is taking place next Wednesday, July 13 at 10am PT/1pm ET and at 5pm PT/8pm ET !

There’s still time to sign up. If you’re applying to Stanford, you won’t want to miss this opportunity to learn how to discover your competitive advantage and use it to impress the Stanford GSB adcom!

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The webinar is free, but registration is required. Sign up today and Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Don’t Miss Out on Stanford Admissions Advice! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
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Planning on Taking the GRE? How Much it Can Run You?  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jul 2016, 09:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Planning on Taking the GRE? How Much it Can Run You?
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In addition to planning your GRE prep studies and scheduling the exam, you also need to think about what it will cost to take the test. Fortunately, the GRE’s fee structures are very predictable. All scores have fixed prices and are clearly listed by ETS.

Test Registration Costs

Registering for the GRE costs $205 USD, unless you’re in China. Those who sit for the GRE in China will need to pay a little extra in GRE fees: $220.70. Of course, sometimes you may encounter complications as you register for the exam. And complications in GRE registration usually mean additional GRE fees.

One extra GRE fee related to registration is a standby fee of $50 USD. A test-taker may pay this fee to be put on a waiting list for a GRE test date and location that has no empty seats. If a seat opens up, the test-taker on standby can be called in to take the test. The fee for being placed on this waiting list is $50 USD.

Then there’s the late registration fee. If you want to take the GRE on a certain day, but you missed the registration deadline for testing on that day, you can still register for an extra fee of $25 USD.

Finally, you can pay a $50 USD fee to change the location or date of your scheduled GRE. Relocation and rescheduling are $50 each in most parts of the world. But here again, GRE fees are higher in China, priced at $53.90 for a reschedule.

Sending and Reviewing Scores

GRE fees related to scoring are cheaper than test registry fees, because many scoring fees are free! As soon as you complete the GRE, your test center will give you the option to send out four free test scores, free of charge. After test day, you can send additional score reports for a fee of $27 USD per report sent.

This infographic outlines the various costs to expect when preparing to take the GRE.

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You can also get a free GRE Diagnostic Report, which gives you details on how you performed on the exam—how long it took you to answer each question, which parts of the exam you were strongest and weakest in, and so on. You can view your scores online and print them as a downloadable PDF for free, too.

If you want to review your GRE performance and scores in greater detail, there are extra GRE scoring services for this, at an extra cost. If you take the exam on select test dates, you can receive a copy of the multiple choice questions on your GRE, with an answer key and a list of the questions you got wrong. The GRE fee for Question and Answer Review Service is $50 USD. Then there are score reviews for the AWA, Quant, or Verbal sections of your GRE exam. If your request one of these reviews, ETS will look for miscalculations in your GRE section scores and may potentially raise or lower your scores. A Quant/Verbal score review costs $50 USD, while an AWA review has a fee of $60 USD.

The Takeaway

There are a lot of different GRE fees that ETS could potentially charge you. However, the majority of test-takers will only need to worry about the registration fee. This is not to say that there aren’t other costs related to taking the GRE. Most test-takers will want to spend money on test preparation materials, and possibly other types of GRE prep support. To learn more, check out this full list of what your total GRE test cost could be in both fees and other expenses.

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David is a test prep expert at Magoosh. He has a Bachelor of Social Work from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and a Masters in Teaching English to Speakers of other Languages from the University of Wisconsin-River Falls. He has been teaching K-12, University, and adult education classes since 2007 and has worked with students from every continent.

Related Resources:

Gre Prep Tips

• Making Friends with the GRE: How To Overcome Test Anxiety & Perform at Your Best

Important Facts About GRE Scoring

Tags: Grad School Admissions, MBA Admissions

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_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

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A Brooklynite in Shanghai: Jesse Miller’s CIEBS Experience  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jul 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: A Brooklynite in Shanghai: Jesse Miller’s CIEBS Experience
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This interview is the latest in an Accepted blog series featuring interviews with MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Jesse Miller, a student at CEIBS.

ACCEPTED: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad?

Jesse: I was born and raised in Brooklyn, NY.  I did my undergraduate at Brown University, where I majored in Political Science.

ACCEPTED: Can you share a fun fact about yourself?

Jesse: I did stand-up comedy 3 times here in Shanghai, all in Chinese. The third time I actually kind of killed it, got a great response from the crowd. I never did it again after that.

ACCEPTED: You are currently attending CEIBS. What year are you?

Jesse: MBA class of 2017

ACCEPTED: Why did you choose that program? How were you a good fit?

Jesse: To me CEIBS has a very clear point of differentiation – that is China depth.

My classmates come from every major industry in China, for the CEIBS’ class of 2015 85% took jobs based in China, and there is a large of array of courses and activities at CEIBS with a China focus. Last semester I took a class on China’s economy with Professor Wu Jinglian who has been an adviser to the highest level policy makers in China for decades — that is an opportunity you only get at CEIBS.

At the same time however, CEIBS is also very international. That is actually what attracted me most to the school. While the majority of CEIBS students are Chinese, there are also students from all around the world, including many from other high growth regions like South East Asia, India, and Africa. Students are coming to CEIBS from all around the world because they see the important economic ties between China and their home country. The school also really pushes for international scope. CEIBS is one of the few top ranked business schools with an EMBA program in Africa, and that connection really benefits the entire CEIBS network.

I was a good fit for CEIBS because I had been working in China for several years and wanted a career focused on high growth markets where the biggest changes are happening that will have the most significant effect on the future of the world.

ACCEPTED: What is your favorite thing about that program? Is there anything you’d change?

Jesse: My favorite thing about the program is how international it is. I’m one of only a few Americans. So you are exposed to many different ideas and perspectives, and you are always working with a very multicultural team.

If there is one thing I would change it is the air quality. That is probably something most MBA applicants from the United States do not think about, but in China and in many places around the world the air you breath, the water you drink, and the food you eat are all a cause for concern. That is the reality of high growth markets, it is not just the big GDP growth numbers you see on a screen.

ACCEPTED: Can you share some tips for international students?

Jesse: Don’t think you can learn a little about China and then just waltz into a job here. Deep knowledge of business in China is a prerequisite, it gets you onto the field where you can compete. But to get a job here you really need other experience and skills to differentiate yourself, and the competition is fierce.

One way international students here are differentiating themselves is with expert knowledge of their own home country. 2016 has been a record year for Chinese investment abroad, and the international students at CEIBS can definitely feel it. A lot of international students have received offers from Chinese companies going abroad. For example I have a classmate who previously worked in India’s e-commerce sector and received an offer from a Chinese company looking to expand into that area, and a European classmate with a background in law who received an offer from a Chinese firm doing overseas M&A deals. That is the sort of differentiation you need.

Also, learning Chinese before coming here is of course highly recommended, not only for those who want to work in China, but also to get the most out of the CEIBS experience.

ACCEPTED: [b]What inspired you to become fluent in Mandarin?[/b]

Jesse: Working in Chenyang, Shangdong for 3 years. I was the only foreigner in the office so it was all Mandarin all day.

ACCEPTED: Where are you currently working?

Jesse: Currently I am doing a summer internship at a firm called Clean Energy Associates in Shanghai. They provide quality assurance, supply chain management, and engineering services to clean energy project developers around the world.

Next semester I will go for study abroad at the Indian School of Business. I am still pretty open about what I will do after graduation, I have some ideas but I don’t want to say anything too soon.

ACCEPTED: You recently organized a sustainability conference on campus. Can you tell us how that came about?

Jesse: We organized the Sustainable Energy Conference in order to bring guests and alumni to CEIBS from two industries that are booming in China – renewable energy and new energy vehicles. In 2015 China invested more in renewable energy than the US and Europe combined. China was also the world’s number 1 market for electric vehicle sales.

There is huge demand for clean energy and sustainable business in China. No one wants major air pollution and environmental degradation, but at the same time high growth countries are not willing to sacrifice their economic growth rate which is raising the standards of living for millions. This is a major challenge of our times, and the business leaders of our generation are looking for ways to deliver economic growth in a clean sustainable way. This is an area that is of interest to many CEIBS students, not only because clean energy is a booming market in China, but also because it directly relates to quality of life at home.

Bringing guests and alumni from the clean energy sector to our conference helped us to learn about careers in this dynamic and fast changing sector.

You can follow Jesse by checking out his LinkedIn profile. Thank you Jesse for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

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Related Resources:

2016 Financial Times MBA Global MBA Rankings

Making International Student Loans a Prime Investment

• 3 Ways to Determine Which B-Schools are a Good Fit for You

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post A Brooklynite in Shanghai: Jesse Miller’s CIEBS Experience appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
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A Brooklynite in Shanghai: Jesse Miller’s CEIBS Experience  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jul 2016, 16:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: A Brooklynite in Shanghai: Jesse Miller’s CEIBS Experience
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This interview is the latest in an Accepted blog series featuring interviews with MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Jesse Miller, a student at CEIBS.

ACCEPTED: We’d like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad?

Jesse: I was born and raised in Brooklyn, NY.  I did my undergraduate at Brown University, where I majored in Political Science.

ACCEPTED: Can you share a fun fact about yourself?

Jesse: I did stand-up comedy 3 times here in Shanghai, all in Chinese. The third time I actually kind of killed it, got a great response from the crowd. I never did it again after that.

ACCEPTED: You are currently attending CEIBS. What year are you?

Jesse: MBA class of 2017

ACCEPTED: Why did you choose that program? How were you a good fit?

Jesse: To me CEIBS has a very clear point of differentiation – that is China depth.

My classmates come from every major industry in China, for the CEIBS’ class of 2015 85% took jobs based in China, and there is a large of array of courses and activities at CEIBS with a China focus. Last semester I took a class on China’s economy with Professor Wu Jinglian who has been an adviser to the highest level policy makers in China for decades — that is an opportunity you only get at CEIBS.

At the same time however, CEIBS is also very international. That is actually what attracted me most to the school. While the majority of CEIBS students are Chinese, there are also students from all around the world, including many from other high growth regions like South East Asia, India, and Africa. Students are coming to CEIBS from all around the world because they see the important economic ties between China and their home country. The school also really pushes for international scope. CEIBS is one of the few top ranked business schools with an EMBA program in Africa, and that connection really benefits the entire CEIBS network.

I was a good fit for CEIBS because I had been working in China for several years and wanted a career focused on high growth markets where the biggest changes are happening that will have the most significant effect on the future of the world.

ACCEPTED: What is your favorite thing about that program? Is there anything you’d change?

Jesse: My favorite thing about the program is how international it is. I’m one of only a few Americans. So you are exposed to many different ideas and perspectives, and you are always working with a very multicultural team.

If there is one thing I would change it is the air quality. That is probably something most MBA applicants from the United States do not think about, but in China and in many places around the world the air you breath, the water you drink, and the food you eat are all a cause for concern. That is the reality of high growth markets, it is not just the big GDP growth numbers you see on a screen.

ACCEPTED: Can you share some tips for international students?

Jesse: Don’t think you can learn a little about China and then just waltz into a job here. Deep knowledge of business in China is a prerequisite, it gets you onto the field where you can compete. But to get a job here you really need other experience and skills to differentiate yourself, and the competition is fierce.

One way international students here are differentiating themselves is with expert knowledge of their own home country. 2016 has been a record year for Chinese investment abroad, and the international students at CEIBS can definitely feel it. A lot of international students have received offers from Chinese companies going abroad. For example I have a classmate who previously worked in India’s e-commerce sector and received an offer from a Chinese company looking to expand into that area, and a European classmate with a background in law who received an offer from a Chinese firm doing overseas M&A deals. That is the sort of differentiation you need.

Also, learning Chinese before coming here is of course highly recommended, not only for those who want to work in China, but also to get the most out of the CEIBS experience.

ACCEPTED: [b]What inspired you to become fluent in Mandarin?[/b]

Jesse: Working in Chenyang, Shangdong for 3 years. I was the only foreigner in the office so it was all Mandarin all day.

ACCEPTED: Where are you currently working?

Jesse: Currently I am doing a summer internship at a firm called Clean Energy Associates in Shanghai. They provide quality assurance, supply chain management, and engineering services to clean energy project developers around the world.

Next semester I will go for study abroad at the Indian School of Business. I am still pretty open about what I will do after graduation, I have some ideas but I don’t want to say anything too soon.

ACCEPTED: You recently organized a sustainability conference on campus. Can you tell us how that came about?

Jesse: We organized the Sustainable Energy Conference in order to bring guests and alumni to CEIBS from two industries that are booming in China – renewable energy and new energy vehicles. In 2015 China invested more in renewable energy than the US and Europe combined. China was also the world’s number 1 market for electric vehicle sales.

There is huge demand for clean energy and sustainable business in China. No one wants major air pollution and environmental degradation, but at the same time high growth countries are not willing to sacrifice their economic growth rate which is raising the standards of living for millions. This is a major challenge of our times, and the business leaders of our generation are looking for ways to deliver economic growth in a clean sustainable way. This is an area that is of interest to many CEIBS students, not only because clean energy is a booming market in China, but also because it directly relates to quality of life at home.

Bringing guests and alumni from the clean energy sector to our conference helped us to learn about careers in this dynamic and fast changing sector.

You can follow Jesse by checking out his LinkedIn profile. Thank you Jesse for sharing your story with us – we wish you loads of luck!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.

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Related Resources:

2016 Financial Times MBA Global MBA Rankings

Making International Student Loans a Prime Investment

• 3 Ways to Determine Which B-Schools are a Good Fit for You

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post A Brooklynite in Shanghai: Jesse Miller’s CEIBS Experience appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Understanding Stanford GSB’s Interest in Personal Qualities and Contri  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jul 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Understanding Stanford GSB’s Interest in Personal Qualities and Contributions
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What are the qualities that Stanford GSB is looking for as they build their class? How do successful applicants stand out from the crowd? At a school as competitive as Stanford, it’s a fact that many smart, accomplished applicants won’t get in—so how can you demonstrate that you have that “it” factor? Let us walk you through Stanford’s evaluation criteria and give you some advice.

In an MBA essay on a meaningful personal experience:

• Applicant A describes his ascent of Machu Picchu; we learn that it was awe-inspiring, challenging, required excellent teamwork, and that he was moved on a deep level.

• Applicant B takes us on a walk around her block. We learn about the struggles of her neighbors in the face of gentrification and her mixed feelings as one of the gentrifiers; how she informally refereed an argument among residents about the stop-and-frisk policy; the diversity of canine life on the block and the particular friendship between her pug and a neighbor’s Rottweiler.

We conclude from these essays that Applicant A spends a lot of money on personal fulfillment, lacks imagination, relies on banalities, and relishes physical challenges; and that Applicant B is alive to the richness of daily life, addresses ambiguity head-on, has humor, is compassionate, is attentive and alert, and cares about meaningful issues.

Point: Our personal qualities flow from and mirror our character. And when it comes to personal qualities, be assured, Stanford will prefer those of Applicant B – even though Applicant A’s topic is superficially more dramatic – because of the quality of character they reflect. There’s not anything different or mind-blowing about Applicant B’s personal qualities – they simply represent an engaged, thoughtful person. And there’s nothing wrong with climbing Machu Picchu – but it’s not the fact of doing it that will impress; rather, what you have to say about it, arising from your personal qualities and reflecting your unique perspective that will catch the thoughtful admissions reader’s eye.

• Don’t struggle and strain for “unique” things to say.

• Rather, for Stanford, share your life. Open it up, let it dance or swagger or sashay or skip or march or cartwheel, whatever your style is.

Now the contribution part. Because Applicant B is attentive to and cares about her surroundings, she can respond and contribute to the daily life of her neighborhood. Again, nothing particularly dramatic or unique; mainly interactions with neighbors. But they’re quality interactions. She cares. She has specific questions and concerns and feelings and insights – which become her offering. She can bring this abundance, this world, this humanity “to the table.” You just know this person will be a big contributor wherever she is. She doesn’t have to explain that fact – it’s obvious! Follow her example. Let your personal qualities come alive by sharing what’s meaningful to you in your essays (and elsewhere if/as possible in the application). Don’t explain that you will contribute; show that you do contribute, as a result of these qualities. It’s simply who you are.

Check out the rest of the What Stanford GSB is Looking For series!

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By Cindy Tokumitsu, author of numerous ebooks, articles, and special reports. Cindy has advised hundreds of successful applicants in her fifteen years with Accepted. She can help you assess your strengths and weaknesses and develop a winning MBA admissions strategy. She is a member of the Association of International Graduate Application Consultants.

Related Resources:

Stanford School of Business Zone

Stanford GSB 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

• Proving Character Traits in Your Application Essay

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Understanding Stanford GSB’s Interest in Personal Qualities and Contributions appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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UC Berkeley Haas 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2016, 09:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: UC Berkeley Haas 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
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The supplemental information that Haas requests is unchanged. Essay 2 and 3 are somewhat different from last years questions. There is a new option replacing what was the second option for question #2. #3 is a clarification of last year’s #3. #1 is unchanged.  Haas also is a little less encouraging in terms of using the optional this year, but it’s still there and pretty open-ended.

Haas has not increased or decreased its word limits. It does provide more helpful guidance regarding its questions than it has in the past.

My tips are in blue below.

Essays:

Essays help us learn about who you are as a person and how you will fit with our community. We seek candidates from a broad range of cultures, backgrounds, and industries who demonstrate a strong cultural fit with our program and defining principles. Our distinctive culture is defined by four key principles – Question the Status Quo, Confidence Without Attitude, Students Always, and Beyond Yourself. We encourage you to reflect on your experiences, values, and passions so that you may craft a thoughtful and authentic response.

Below are the required essays, supplemental essays, and optional essays for Fall 2017.

As you are answering the following four questions really think about Haas’ defining principles and when possible tie your answer and experiences to those principles. As I frequently do, I want to warn you against simply repeating the principles or stuffing them into your essays. That’s a waste of time and space. Use your essays to reveal that you share those values and have those qualities. Your actions speak far louder than words.

Essay 1.

If you could choose one song that expresses who you are, what is it and why? (250 word maximum)

Your song can be in any language, from any culture, and does not need to contain lyrics. The strongest responses will focus on answering why this song expresses who you are.

If it’s heavy metal, go for it. And if it’s a Beethoven Sonata, let it sing forth. And if it’s a classic folk song that you learned as a child in a non-Western country, don’t hesitate to share that information too. The “what” isn’t nearly as important as the “why.” Be authentic and tell them which song best expresses your essence, whatever it is. And then tell them why you believe it reflects the true you.

Essay 2.

Please respond to one of the following prompts: (250 word max)

• Describe an experience that has fundamentally changed the way you see the world and how it transformed you.

• Describe a time when you were challenged by perspectives different from your own and how you responded.

• Describe a difficult decision you have made and why it was challenging.

In your response, clearly indicate to which prompt (1, 2, or 3) you are responding. We do not have a preference among the prompts and suggest that you select the one for which you can share a specific experience, professional or personal.

The second prompt this year replaces “Describe a significant accomplishment and why it makes you proud.” from last year.  The new prompt is more in line with the other two prompts and all address your ability to deal with difference and challenge. Your response will be a great way to assess your ability to grow.

First question: Which to choose? Select the one that you can answer most easily and enthusiastically and that complements the other essays and information found elsewhere.

Please note that each option is asking for one experience or one time or one difficult decision. Haas seeks an example that you find meaningful and illustrative of how you approach situations and events. They want a window into how you act and think. Whatever option you choose, don’t omit answering what comes after the “and.”

Try to choose an event that illustrates you identifying with at least one of Haas’ 4 Principles.

Essay 3.

Tell us about your career plans. How have your past experiences prepared you to achieve these goals? How will Berkeley-Haas help you? (500 words maximum)

You are encouraged to reflect on what it is you want to do after business school, including the types of roles, responsibilities, and organizations that are of interest. Through this essay we hope to learn about your professional journey to date and how an MBA will facilitate your success – broadly defined – in the future.

Although this question has different wording than last year’s question, it’s quite similar, just clearer. This prompt is asking to map out how your past when combined with a Haas MBA will enable you to achieve your career goals.

It is a connect-the-dots goals question.  What do you want to do after you earn your MBA? How has what you have done in the past prepared you for this path? How will the Haas MBA experience build on what you have done to day so that you can realize your post-MBA goals?

Obviously to answer this question you have to have a clear post-MBA goal.  You also need clarity regarding what Haas offers and what intend to take advantage of;  you must thoroughly understand Haas’ program and culture.  They put it all together in a coherent essay. In “mathematical” terms, it’s Your Past + Haas MBA = Your Career Goal.

Supplemental Information:

1.  If you have not provided a letter of recommendation from your current supervisor, please explain. If not applicable, enter N/A.

Keep it short and sweet. This is primarily for those of you who don’t want to tell your boss yet that you plan to leave.

2. List in order of importance all community and professional organizations and extracurricular activities in which you have been involved during or after university studies. Include the following information for each organization or activity using the format below:

• Name of organization or activity

• Nature of organization or activity

• Size of organization

• Dates of involvement

• Offices held

• Average number of hours spent per month

Whenever possible, quantify your impact or contribution. Please note that Haas is not interested in high school grades or activities. Note also that they want the list not in chronological order, but in order of importance — however you define “importance.”

3. List full-time and part-time jobs held during undergraduate or graduate studies, indicating the employer, job title, employment dates, location, and the number of hours worked per week for each position held prior to the completion of your degree.

Again, quantify as much as possible your responsibilities and impact. Focus on achievements. Avoid  job descriptions that are obvious from your job title.

4. If you have ever been subject to academic discipline, placed on probation, suspended, or required to withdraw from any college or university, please explain. If not, please enter N/A. (An affirmative response to this question does not automatically disqualify you from admission.)

Please, please, please don’t “forget” to answer this question if it applies to you. It’s far worse to ignore it than to answer it.

Optional Essay.

Use this essay to share information that is not presented elsewhere in the application, for example:

  • Explanation of employment gaps or academic aberrations
  • Quantitative abilities
  • For re-applicants, improvements to your candidacy
Haas isn’t restrictive in terms of its optional question, but its example suggests that they are not seeking info about an unusual hobby or personal challenge overcome. They seem to prefer context for possible issues in your application. If you want to go beyond that to the unusual hobby, distinctive achievement  or personal challenge not discussed elsewhere, it’s a judgment call.

If you would like professional guidance with your UC Berkeley Haas MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Haas MBA application. 

UC Berkeley Haas 2016-17 MBA Application Deadlines:

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted and co-author of the definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools2017 MBA Application Essay Tips

• UC Berkeley Haas Zone Page

Why MBA? [Free Guide]

Tags: MBA Admissions

The post UC Berkeley Haas 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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Applying to Stanford GSB? Register ASAP!  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2016, 10:00
FROM Accepted.com Blog: Applying to Stanford GSB? Register ASAP!
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Are you applying to Stanford GSB? Our webinar THIS Wednesday will give you the tools to create a strong application that will get you accepted. You don’t want to miss this!

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Sign up now for Get Accepted to Stanford Graduate School of Business, and join us live on Wednesday, July 13, at 10am PT/1pm ET or at 5pm PT/8pm ET.

The tips you’ll hear in this one-hour webinar can change the direction of your future!

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Applying to Stanford GSB? Register ASAP! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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How Will You Pay for Your International MBA in the U.S.?  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jul 2016, 10:01
FROM Accepted.com Blog: How Will You Pay for Your International MBA in the U.S.?
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Are you applying to American MBA programs as an international student? Not sure how you’re going to pay those massive tuition bills? Sounds like you could use some expert tips on how to make your business school experience more affordable!

REGISTER FOR OUR UPCOMING WEBINAR: How to Fund Your International MBA in the U.S.

We called in an expert to provide the answers you need – MBA funding guru Zack Hirschfeld, of Prodigy Finance. Zack has years of experience helping international students pave the financial road to b-school.

What you will learn:

• How to plan your budget

• Resources for funding your studies in the U.S.

• How to understand interest rates and loan terms

• The benefits of international student loans with Prodigy Finance

LIVE WEBINAR: Wednesday, July 27, 2016 at 10am PT/1pm ET

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Tags: MBA Admissions

The post How Will You Pay for Your International MBA in the U.S.? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Consulting Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

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Accepted ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy
310-815-9553

Co-Author of: MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools

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How Will You Pay for Your International MBA in the U.S.? &nbs [#permalink] 12 Jul 2016, 10:01

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