GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 15 Oct 2019, 19:13

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Though he declared himself eligible for the National Basketball...

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Director
Director
User avatar
V
Joined: 12 Feb 2015
Posts: 917
Though he declared himself eligible for the National Basketball...  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Feb 2019, 11:47
1
14
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  65% (hard)

Question Stats:

39% (01:04) correct 61% (01:01) wrong based on 274 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Though he declared himself eligible for the National Basketball Association draft, the college basketball player avoided hiring an agent so as to retain the option of keeping his amateur status.

A) so as to retain
B) and so could retain
C) to retain
D) so that he could retain
E) in order that he would retain

_________________
________________
Manish :geek:

"Only I can change my life. No one can do it for me"
Intern
Intern
User avatar
B
Status: when you say,"I can or I can't", Both times you are right!
Joined: 26 Nov 2018
Posts: 31
Location: India
Re: Though he declared himself eligible for the National Basketball...  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Mar 2019, 16:27
Options A, C&D are close.

all of them convey the intended meaning. is there any thumb rule to eliminate incorrect options?
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 29 Nov 2018
Posts: 37
Location: India
Schools: ISB '21, Rotman '21
GMAT 1: 690 Q50 V33
GPA: 3.29
Re: Though he declared himself eligible for the National Basketball...  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Mar 2019, 20:07
I am confused between A & D.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 20 Oct 2018
Posts: 66
Re: Though he declared himself eligible for the National Basketball...  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Mar 2019, 21:26
Here "To retain.....status " is a reason why the basketball player avoided hiring
Therefore the use of that is necessary.


I have just started to learn Verbal concepts of GMAT Please correct me if I am wrong. :) :)
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 18 Feb 2018
Posts: 19
Location: India
Concentration: International Business, Economics
GPA: 3
WE: Law (Telecommunications)
Re: Though he declared himself eligible for the National Basketball...  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Mar 2019, 22:51
Why is C wrong? I picked D but I want to know reasoning for C
Manager
Manager
avatar
P
Joined: 01 Feb 2017
Posts: 243
Re: Though he declared himself eligible for the National Basketball...  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Mar 2019, 04:53
A) / C) hiring an agent + so as to retain / to retain: READ PARTIAL, THERE IS A MEANING ERROR
B) and so could retain: TWO RELATED IDEAS CANNOT BE SPLICED AS TWO MAIN CLAUSES
D) so that he could retain: CORRECT
E) in order that he would retain: WORDY
Director
Director
avatar
P
Joined: 29 Jun 2017
Posts: 929
Re: Though he declared himself eligible for the National Basketball...  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 Mar 2019, 01:14
CAMANISHPARMAR wrote:
Though he declared himself eligible for the National Basketball Association draft, the college basketball player avoided hiring an agent so as to retain the option of keeping his amateur status.

A) so as to retain
B) and so could retain
C) to retain
D) so that he could retain
E) in order that he would retain


I do something to do2 something
I do something so that I can do2 something

in the second sentence, the do2 is less likely to happen. so, choice a and c are wrong

choice e use "would" which show a likelihood to happen. this is wrong.
"so" in choice b imply a result not a purpose. so, choice b is wrong
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 29 Nov 2018
Posts: 37
Location: India
Schools: ISB '21, Rotman '21
GMAT 1: 690 Q50 V33
GPA: 3.29
Re: Though he declared himself eligible for the National Basketball...  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 Mar 2019, 21:12
HI

Can someone please explain why A and C are wrong?
Director
Director
User avatar
P
Joined: 20 Sep 2016
Posts: 634
Location: India
Concentration: Strategy, Operations
GPA: 3.95
WE: Operations (Real Estate)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Though he declared himself eligible for the National Basketball...  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Apr 2019, 05:19
generis could you please explain this one???
Senior SC Moderator
avatar
V
Joined: 22 May 2016
Posts: 3545
Though he declared himself eligible for the National Basketball...  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Apr 2019, 16:53
CAMANISHPARMAR wrote:
Though he declared himself eligible for the National Basketball Association draft, the college basketball player avoided hiring an agent so as to retain the option of keeping his amateur status.

A) so as to retain - ambiguous meaning (similar to C)

B) and so could retain - avoided and could retain are not parallel

C) to retain - ambiguous, see analysis below

D) so that he could retain

E) in order that he would retain
-- Unidiomatic - the use of the modal "would" is wrong (too certain - "could" is needed))
-- Not as concise and direct as (D) is

Hi AdityaHongunti , daspri2809 , saarthakkhanna04
vyascd , this question is hard.
It is similar to two official questions, which I discuss.
Sorry for the slight delay. I was unable to be on the forum for a couple of days.

The player is the he.

Both A and C can be read in two ways:

1) if a college player wants to keep his amateur status, he should not hire an agent. Hiring an agent = player loses his amateur status.

1) if a college player wants to keep his amateur status, he [u]should hire an agent "to retain" his amateur status. The agent is the one to retain a status for a player. This player avoids hiring an agent. The player does not care about his amateur status.

• Overview

We need an idiom of purpose. What motivates the player to avoid hiring an agent?
Correct: X so that Y

Correct but perhaps not preferred: X so as to Y

First, please do not confuse the second idiom of purpose with the idiom of emphasis SO X as to Y.**

Second, although that GMAC seems to prefer X so that Y,
X so as to Y is not wrong, and
in two instances in which that idiom was incorrect,
the problem lay in meaning.

So as to is a commonly accepted idiom of purpose.
I worry that GMAC will write a question in which so as to is used corrrectly.

I cannot find one official question announcing that the idiom so as to is wrong. Answers containing that idiom are wrong for other reasons.

In other words, X so as to Y is NOT automatically wrong. GMAC may have a preference. A preference is not a prohibition.

• Eliminate B
Verb tenses are incorrect. AND is a conjunction that signals parallelism. (SO is also a conjunction. The construction is odd.)
In a compound predicate, if one subject (player) is attached to two verbs that are joined by and,
the verbs must be parallel.
college player avoided and could retain are not parallel.

• Eliminate E
--in order that is allowed, but not with would in this case.
Would is too certain.
-- compared to (D), (B) is not nearly as concise

Option A has two meanings, a fact that is easier to see in option (C)

Scenario 1: Let's say that I have legal status ABC. IF I want to keep that status, then:
1) I must hire an attorney [who will help me] to retain my legal status of ABC. ONLY a lawyer can petition the authorities.
2) If I avoid hiring her, I cannot keep my legal status of ABC.
3) Nonetheless, I avoid hiring her. I am forgetful, lazy, or indifferent about keeping my ABC status.

Scenario 2: Now let's say that legal status ABC means that I do not have to pay court fees if I file a lawsuit.
I need to file a lawsuit and cannot afford the court fees.
(I can petition the court myself.)
1) I am eligible to have all fees waived.
2) BUT if I hire a lawyer to help me with the lawsuit, I will my lose my fee waivers.
3) I avoid hiring a lawyer so that I can keep that privilege. (If I can afford an attorney, I can afford court fees.

In the first case, I needed the lawyer so that I could keep status ABC, but I avoided hiring her. I lost my ABC status.
In the second case, I needed NOT to hire the lawyer so that I could keep status ABC.
Options C and A are similar to these scenarios.

• Option C is ambiguous
In Option (C), whom does "to retain" modify? Does to retain modify
-- either the agent [who theoretically gets hired in order to retain a player's status?]
-- or the player? (who must not hire an agent. Hiring an agent = player loses his status.)

Option C in the shortened sentence:
... the college basketball player avoided hiring an agent to retain the option of keeping his amateur status.

Meaning #1 (emphasis on avoided): The college basketball player did not care whether he lost his amateur status.
He avoided hiring an agent who would have helped him keep that status.

Meaning #2 (emphasis on avoided one thing to get another): A college basketball player who hires an agent becomes a "professional" and loses his amateur status.

This college player avoided hiring a person because to do so would strip the athlete of his status.

Option (A) is not much different from (C); (A), too, is ambiguous.
(A) merely emphasizes purpose a little more by using so as.

Both A and C are ambiguous.

What cures the ambiguity? Option (D), in which the pronoun HE is attached to SO THAT. "To retain" refers to the player.

• Option D solves the problem with its usage of that + HE

HE can only be the college player. In the non-underlined portion, the pronoun HE is the college player[/i].

In option D, replace the second HE with "the college player":
... The college player avoided hiring an agent so that the college player could retain the option of amateur status.

The subordinate clause beginning with so that is clear. The agent does not retain the option FOR the player.
"To retain" modifies and belongs to the player (who will lose the option if he hires an agent).

The inclusion of he and the presence of "could retain" after the word THAT clear things up.

The college player avoided X so that [the college player] could keep his amateur status.

The player avoided X so that he could do Y.

Option (D) is better than option A.

This question strongly resembles this official quesiton, here. and this official question, here.
Spoiler alert: I discuss answers to those questions.
So as to is not automatically wrong.

The problem with so as to in the "Congress is debating a bill" question lies in
the construction of so as to.
Short version: Congress ... may provide funds ... so as to care for children.
The government does not directly care for children.
The government provides funds so as to facilitate care for children.

Options A and B contain that error. (B contains another.)

With respect to the first question, mikemcgarry says that the so as to answer is grammatical but not quite
as clear as the so that answer.


Takeaways:
1) GMAC seems to have a preference for so that, but
2) so as to is an acceptable idiom of purpose if the meaning is conveyed correctly, especially in the negative.
: I spoke quietly so as not to disturb the skittish birds.

As far as I can tell, GMAT has not tested so as to in the negative construction.

Answer D is correct.

All, I hope that analysis helps. :)

*Do not confuse two nearly identical idioms.
The idiom of purpose begins with X so
The idiom of emphasis behind with with So X
PURPOSE: X so as to Y
and
EMPHASIS: so X as to Y (this rendition of the emphasis idiom is incorrect)
To emphasize an adjective or adverb, for example, use SO X THAT Y
Wrong:The curry was so spicy as to make my eyes water. (Do not confuse with purpose, e.g. I whispered so as not to wake the sleeping kittens.)

Correct: The curry was so spicy that it made my eyes water.
Again, the second idiom is of emphasis, not of purpose.

_________________
SC Butler has resumed! Get two SC questions to practice, whose links you can find by date, here.




Choose life.
GMAT Club Bot
Though he declared himself eligible for the National Basketball...   [#permalink] 03 Apr 2019, 16:53
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Though he declared himself eligible for the National Basketball...

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne