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Vantage Point Admissions Consultant
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How To Stand Out In The Wharton TBD  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Feb 2020, 22:02
FROM Vantage Point MBA Admissions Blog: How To Stand Out In The Wharton TBD
First of all, if you were invited to interview with Wharton, congrats! You’re one step closer to getting accepted. You might wonder what your odds are from here. Well, Wharton interviews roughly half of all applicants, but only accepts one in five. So, they’re looking to cut the interview pool by slightly more than half.

You have probably read about the unique interview format – the Team Based Discussion.  For 35 minutes, you and 4-5 other applicants will be observed discussing a case study that has been provided to you in advance. Each interviewee gives a one-minute ‘pitch’, the group discusses the best path forward, and then presents its solution to the observers (typically two second-year students). After the Team Based Discussion, you will have a fairly straightforward one-on-one interview, roughly 10 minutes in length, with one of the two observers. You’ll be asked fairly standard questions such as “why Wharton?” and “why MBA?”.

Aside from drafting and practicing your one-minute pitch, preparing for this interview is tough, as you won’t know the group dynamics in advance and will have to adapt as the dialogue progresses. Our clients have shared a range of experiences, from ones that are very collaborative to others that are more competitive and combative.

Begin by thinking about what the admissions committee is looking to assess: (1) are your ideas logical, (2) can you communicate them articulately, and (3) do you ‘play well with others’ and move the discussion to a better place than it would have been if you were not part of the group. With that in mind, consider the following:

  • Practice, practice, practice.
Your opening ‘pitch’ is the one element of the Team Based Discussion over which you have control. Really think through the ideas you’d like to present and practice verbalizing them. Focus on the “why” behind your ideas vs. getting hung up on too many specifics. One minute is short. Don’t get cut off simply because you didn’t run through your pitch in advance. Practice it, then practice it again – out loud.

[*]Think ahead.[/list]
Think back to meetings or team settings that have been particularly successful, why were they this way and how can you replicate the dynamic? If there is a leader in your workplace that always seems to drive the group to a solution, how does he/she do this? On the contrary, what counter-productive behaviors have you witnessed in these settings? Don’t exhibit them!

In addition, take note of how you would like to act and react in various scenarios during the group discussion. What should you do if the group gets too far off topic? Would you like to be the one to bring everyone back to the task at hand? Or how will you react if one participant is taking over the discussion? Remember, the goal is for the group to arrive at a solid (note that I did not say perfect) solution and look good doing it.

[*]Be open and adaptable.[/list]
Unfortunately, you don’t have control over how the discussion plays out. You can demonstrate teamwork and collaboration in a number of ways: draw ideas out of someone who has been quiet, ask thought-provoking questions about a proposed solution, synthesize multiple viewpoints to help the group reach a conclusion. These are tools in your toolbox and the key to success is using them at the right time (and doing so tactfully). This is far more important than having the group choose your idea / pitch.

Lastly, as you’re going through the discussion, jot down an observation or two about how the group worked together. Candidates are often asked how they thought it went in the one-on-one portion. You want to share something more insightful than ‘I thought it went well’ and this can be tough to do on the spot.

Prepare, be yourself, and relax! As always, we are here if you need more targeted coaching or advice! Simply request an initial consultation and we’ll reach out to schedule a call.

The post How To Stand Out In The Wharton TBD appeared first on Vantage Point MBA.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Your Personal MBA Application Experts
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Networking For Your MBA Applications  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Feb 2020, 19:02
FROM Vantage Point MBA Admissions Blog: Networking For Your MBA Applications


Last week, Vantage Point MBA Senior Consultant, Katie M., hosted a webinar on GMAT Club’s YouTube channel on a very timely topic: [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AjwPfa5Hd6k]networking for your MBA applications[/url]. In the already subjective application process, “networking” can seem particularly abstract or can be simply another “thing” on your long [url=https://vantagepointmba.com/2020/02/10/five-things-you-can-be-doing-right-now/]MBA application to-do list[/url]. What is it exactly? Do you really need to do it? How will it help you get into your dream school? How do you get started? These are all questions that Katie answered in her session, which I’ve summarized below.

Networking is a critical part of the MBA application process and now’s the perfect time to get started – before the essay questions are released and you’re managing a busy work schedule, summer vacations, and your apps.



[b]WHAT IS NETWORKING?[/b]

Let’s start there. It’s easy to be confused about what “networking” even means. (I was certainly unsure about what it was when I first started with my MBA applications.) Some folks think it’s very transactional or artificial (i.e. schmoozing), where you reach out to someone to “get something” like a favor, information, or introduction to another person. While that may be true for some people, that’s not the approach or attitude that we recommend. Instead, simply put, networking is building relationships. In the case of your MBA applications, it’s building relationships with a variety of folks who are connected to the application process in some way. It’s a two-way street, where you get to know people and they get to know you. Usually, the relationship is initiated because you have something in common – a friend, an interest, a hobby, an employer, etc. – but the relationship is nurtured because you invest in it and because both parties enjoy it and benefit from it.

Oh so “networking” is just a fancy way of saying “meeting new people”, right? Well, yes and no. Yes, because that’s often true but no, because it’s mostly about what happens after the initial meeting and more importantly, you want to be strategic in your approach. By that I mean that you want to invest your efforts in building relationships with folks who can help guide, mentor, and inform your MBA application process and avoid those who will be detractors. For example, your disgruntled colleague who doesn’t feel like the company “rewards” her for having an MBA may not be the best person to ask about the long-term value of the degree. However, reaching out to a former classmate from undergrad in February who’s a first year student at HBS and scheduling a phone chat with her, later meeting her for coffee when you visit campus in April, and then re-connecting with her a few weeks before you submit your application is a perfect example of networking. You’re sure to gain some valuable insights and advice about the school, its culture, essay tips, etc. through those interactions. And who knows, maybe she’s recruiting at your company for a post-MBA role and you can share your experience with her in return.

It’s ultimately up to you to find your own personal style of networking that makes you feel comfortable and authentic but rest assured that doing this right will only contribute to stronger applications.



[b]WHY IS NETWORKING IMPORTANT?[/b]

Now you understand that networking is an important part of the application process but why exactly? You can look at this in a couple of different ways. If your competition (i.e. other applicants) is networking and leveraging all of the resources at their disposal to help inform and strengthen their applications and you’re not, you risk losing out. For an even better reason that doesn’t involve “because everyone else is doing it”, networking can help you put together a more cohesive and compelling application, which in turn increases your chances of admission to your dream MBA program. Let’s dig into how that can be.

First and foremost, networking is an opportunity to discover new things about a school, a career path, a company, etc. that can help you solidify your fit and “reasons why” for any of them. And most of the time, that kind of information can’t be found on a website. For example, providing a thoughtful and well-researched answer to “why school X is the right fit for you and your goals” can be the difference that gets you admitted.

Networking is also a tremendous opportunity to get valuable advice from folks who have been in your shoes. Learn about the unexpected benefits of an MBA from a recent graduate, learn from past MBA students’ mistakes, and get admissions “tips” from folks who have insight into the process. The advice you get along the way can help make the process more efficient, straight-forward, or at least slightly less stressful for you.

Lastly, the MBA application process can seem like a long, lonely journey and it’s nice to feel supported along the way. My clients are usually blown away (I know I definitely was) by how supportive and helpful current students, alums, colleagues with MBAs, etc. are once they find out you’re pursuing an MBA. MBA’s love to pay-it-forward so let them! Just be sure to be appreciative and stay in touch with them once you have news about decisions so they can remain invested in your journey.



[b]WHAT NOT TO DO[/b]

It should go without saying that all social etiquette rules apply in MBA application networking but just as a quick refresher, here are a few key “DON’Ts”.

DON’T wait until the last minute: networking is not an on-off switch and should be approached like a marathon, not a sprint. Building relationships, scheduling coffee chats, etc. takes time. So start early – like now! Give yourself space to follow-up with your new contacts and keep in touch with them throughout the process. Waiting until two days before the deadline to reach out to a current student with a list of questions whose answers you will plug into your “why school X” essay will not do you any favors.

DON’T ask basic or shallow questions: when you’ve finally nailed down that coffee with an alum from your dream school, don’t waste their time asking questions whose answers you could easily find on your own. Instead, do your homework before the meeting and come with thoughtful questions whose answers will truly further your understanding of how the school fits with your goals and objectives. (Here’s a more comprehensive [url=https://vantagepointmba.com/2019/04/16/which-mba-program-is-right-for-you-use-our-mba-fit-tool-to-find-out/]school selection tool[/url] if you’re just getting started.) You want the other person to be impressed with your level of research because who knows, they may end up being an advocate for your candidacy if they also feel like you’re the right fit for their school!

DON’T be disrespectful or ungrateful for the other person’s time: MBA students, alums, representatives from admissions, etc. are all very busy and while they’re happy to help, it takes effort on their part. So be sure to express your gratitude for their time and input. If they tell you they can only spare 20 minutes, remain vigilant of the time and say your thank-you’s and goodbye’s when it’s up. Those manners will go a long way in leaving a good impression.



[b]HOW TO GET STARTED[/b]

With all that said, there’s really no wrong way to start building your network. In thinking about what the ideal network looks like, it’s comprised of current students and/or alums from your target schools, colleagues/former classmates/mentors, etc. with MBAs, and people in your target post-MBA industry/function. (Note that these three categories are not mutually exclusive – most likely one person will fall into more than one bucket.)

An easy place to start is with your existing network – people from work, your undergrad, personal circles, etc. who have MBA’s or are somehow connected to an MBA program. Make a list of these individuals and start reaching out to them for a coffee chat, after-work cocktail, or phone date. Be present during these conversations and take mental note of what you discussed. If you chatted about a particular current event or recent trend in your industry, for example, send that person an article on the relevant topic a couple of weeks later to show that you give as well as receive. After each meeting, be sure to ask that person to connect you with someone else from his/her network who could be helpful in your application process. Then repeat. Here’s a great [url=https://vantagepointmba.com/webinar-download/]worksheet[/url] we’ve created to help you get organized.

Even if the some of the folks above are current students or graduates from your target schools, you should also make a plan to engage with the schools directly. A great way to do this is through a campus visit, ideally coordinated through the school so you have a chance to sit in on a class and meet current students in addition to sitting through a presentation from admissions. If a school visit isn’t possible, plan to attend an in-person information session (the schools host multiple info sessions in major cities around the world so look out for the dates when they’ll be visiting your city) and at the very least, a live webinar hosted by admissions. These are great opportunities to hear what the schools believe are their selling points while giving you a chance to ask questions. In the case of live info sessions, local alumni as well as representatives from admissions typically attend these events so it’s a great time to initiate a dialogue with a few of those folks. Those conversations could even turn into a follow-up meeting or call, depending on how well you connect with them. Not only will engaging with the schools in as many ways as possible help you determine which programs are the right fit for you and why, but it indicates to the adcom that you’re serious about their program and have made the effort to get to know them. Some schools make this a critical part of their admissions decisions so it’s worth putting in the time (i.e. more is more!).

Lastly, you can take advantage of third party platforms and events to further build out your network. LinkedIn, MBA forums (reddit, GMAT Club, Beat the GMAT, etc.), and formal networking events (Poets & Quants is hosting a couple this year, for example) are all great places to engage if you feel like your network is still a bit sparse.

If this seems like a lot of work, it is! But it should be fun. After all, one of the most valuable benefits of an MBA is the network so getting started during your applications will only give you a head start once you arrive on campus in the fall. Best of luck!

*******************

Did you know that we include a networking component in all of our Comprehensive Packages? That’s how important it is! Your consultant will help you create a networking plan for your applications and will even facilitate introductions to a post-MBA professional (in your desired career path) and/or a current student or alum of your dream school to supplement your independent efforts. Request an [url=https://vantagepointmba.com/free-consultation/]initial consultation[/url] to learn more about how we can help you in your application process!



The post [url=https://vantagepointmba.com/2020/02/25/networking-for-your-mba-applications/]Networking For Your MBA Applications[/url] appeared first on [url=https://vantagepointmba.com]Vantage Point MBA[/url].
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Vantage Point MBA Admissions Consulting
https://vantagepointmba.com/
Your Personal MBA Application Experts
Contact us for a Free Consultation!
Vantage Point Admissions Consultant
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Status: Admissions Consultant
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Joined: 17 Mar 2016
Posts: 218
Location: United States
How to Position Your Career for the Current Uncertainty: You Need Opt  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Mar 2020, 19:02
FROM Vantage Point MBA Admissions Blog: How to Position Your Career for the Current Uncertainty: You Need Options
Melody and I have held off on sending out advice over the last week as the right “advice” has seemed like a moving target. However, it looks like uncertainty will be the new “situation normal” for a while; and as two banker girls who lived through the 2008-2009 financial crisis, we have some advice for how to handle the bumpy ride that likely lies ahead and come out on the other side successfully.

On top of washing your hands, cleaning and disinfecting, and for goodness sake, STAYING HOME, it’s a good time to take a look at the market if you haven’t already and connect the dots on what this situation means for your job, your career, and your options over the next few years. Yes, I said that:  “years”.

We don’t know what the global economy will be like tomorrow, much less in a year or three years. If you’re at a vital intersection in your career, which many who receive our emails are, we have a few recommendations on how to game plan for uncertainty and emerge from this as an even better team player and leader.

[b]Assess Your Internal Options:  [/b]The first thing you need to do is get a handle on what your options are at your current company.  Start talking to people and figuring out what parts of the business will be growing and declining. Melody and I were both bankers at a bank that eventually failed during the financial crisis. Whole divisions were shed, while others stayed intact.

[b]Consider Your Skillset:  [/b]Maybe you’ve been working mostly in marketing for the last two years, but as part of your job you also do a lot of PR or strategy. Are there other ways you can market yourself? Are there other roles you can work in? Now is a good time to start thinking about which of your skills are “portable,” and leverage online classes to brush up on any new ones.

[b]Network, Network, Network – Internally and Externally:[/b]  Now is not the time to put your head down and just keep doing your job. Get out there and act like you’re recruiting. Talk to people within your company and at other companies. Make yourself known. Make sure people know who you are, what you can do, what you’ve achieved, etc. so that they have you in mind if decisions are being made. I’m not saying you need to shamelessly self-promote, but you can bet others will be, so in your own tactful way make sure that you’re out there too.

[b]Step-Up to The Plate:[/b] Some people say that in times of uncertainty it’s important to make yourself indispensable. This isn’t very easy to do as a junior person at a company, but you can show your value. Senior leadership will be distracted with lots of unexpected and challenging, strategic planning. What can you take over from them? What can you do to help that process? Now would be a good time to speak up and provide your ideas, proactively undertake work that you know needs to be done, and generally be a good leader.

[b]Be a Positive Leader:[/b] The day I sat at a Bloomberg station watching the stock price of the bank I worked at sink into the ground, one of the senior people on my team said “how you act now will really show who you are.” And he was right. Some people panicked. Some people shut down. Some people were downright reckless. And some people, like him, kept moving forward and trying to bring positivity to the team when possible. You can’t organize a happy hour, but you can organize a contest for who has the funniest work from home space. You can host a “virtual” happy hour with trivia on Zoom. You can check-in and call people who you know are worried. Stay connected, visible and positive. This is a very important time and we need people who can really stand up and bring people together.

[b]Don’t Slack:[/b] Resist the urge to binge Netflix between meetings. Just because you’re working in your pjs doesn’t mean that your work is any less necessary. Your team and your boss need you to keep working and getting things done so they can focus on urgent projects the current environment is creating. Check your work an extra time before sending it up the chain, research even more broadly, and generally go the extra mile. People are counting on you.

[b]Educate Yourself: [/b]If you’re saving 1-2 hours per day on a commute now, and hopefully your social life has come to a halt, then you have extra time each day. Maybe it’s a good time to study for the CFA or the GMAT. Maybe it’s a good time to take an online class. Don’t spend all of your time watching the news and hoarding toilet paper. Build in a mental break that you know will also help you in the future. Imagine how impressive it’ll be to a future employer that during this time you took it upon yourself to learn how to code (just because)?

[b]Apply to Grad School:[/b] As an MBA admissions consulting firm, I’m clearly biased when I say that you should consider applying to business school. But I can also say from personal experience that going to business school during a recession is a fabulous use of time. I scrambled to apply as the financial sector was crumbling in 2008 and I was grateful to get a spot during a very competitive year. Being in school during a recession was fascinating – our syllabi sometimes changed mid-course as new regulations or global events changed things. And I basically got to wait out two of the worst years of the recession by developing myself and learning. I highly recommend that approach. That said, it’s never been so important to apply in round 1. There will be a race to apply as soon as we see what the full impact on the job market is. Our guess is that after first quarter and definitely after second quarter earnings reports are released, there will be massive upticks in people making the decision to apply. Start now – give yourself the option. If you wait until July, it’ll be more of a scramble, and this is not the year to try and get by on a sub-par application.

If you decide applying to business school is the right step for you, we’d love to help! Take advantage of our [url=https://vantagepointmba.com/free-consultation/]initial consultation[/url] to learn more about how we can improve your chances of admission to a top program!

The post [url=https://vantagepointmba.com/2020/03/25/how-to-position-your-career-for-the-current-uncertainty-you-need-options/]How to Position Your Career for the Current Uncertainty: You Need Options[/url] appeared first on [url=https://vantagepointmba.com]Vantage Point MBA[/url].
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Vantage Point MBA Admissions Consulting
https://vantagepointmba.com/
Your Personal MBA Application Experts
Contact us for a Free Consultation!
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How to Be a Leader at Work, Even When You’re Not “At Work”  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Apr 2020, 14:01
FROM Vantage Point MBA Admissions Blog: How to Be a Leader at Work, Even When You’re Not “At Work”
Every MBA hopeful is, or should be, considering how he or she can step-up and lead at work, no matter your title or even role. This has been an essential differentiator for those hoping to demonstrate what many b-schools call a “habit of leadership”. But in the current work from home environment, some of the traditional ways that early career professionals used to find those coveted leadership opportunities are harder to come by. Right now it’s not as easy to get pulled into a meeting, be at the right place at the right time, or use your elevator pitch (in an actual elevator) to network, share your opinions and get that opportunity to “take a crack at” something (ok I’ll stop with the business jargon).

But, with applications to the top MBA programs likely increasing dramatically this fall and winter given the state of the economy, for MBA hopefuls, this is not the time to wait for things to go back to normal. Whether you are applying or not, likely, this is a time that your teams and organizations need people to step-up more than ever, and sometimes senior leadership doesn’t even have time to ask. So, here are a few ways that you can potentially step-up as a leader at work…from home.

[list]
[b]Raise Your Hand[/b]. I had a boss once who said that if you’re a junior person at your firm then you shouldn’t leave work until you’ve gone around and asked each senior person if they need anything else. Maybe that system is antiquated now (I’m not that old, by the way), but it’s a good practice in the current environment. A director on your team can’t step outside of his or her office and physically see you to remember that you do good work, so you should be reaching out to them. Ask if there’s anything you can do to help. Ask if there are special projects you can lead a part of or help with. [/*]
[b]Be Visible and Vocal[/b]. Most likely, the senior leaders on your team are in Zoom meetings all…day…long. Stay in front of them with status updates, which means frequently sending emails giving overviews of what you’re doing and where it stands. Make sure the senior people on your team are hearing from you every day, as long as that’s appropriate for your team’s culture. For example, if you’re in an industry that’s impacted by the current economic shock in some way (which nearly all of us are, unfortunately), continue to stay on top of current events and developments and share those with your team as appropriate. And, continue to offer to take on more and be proactive. Be specific if you have a recommendation for something you can do proactively like “I saw that we’ll need x analysis – I was going to start working on that – does that work for you?” Emails like that are gold to a senior leader right now:  you can be a hero.[/*]
[b]Be Positive[/b]. I know it’s been a hard few weeks and months for many. If you are finding yourself starting every meeting with “did you read the news last night about…”, then you need to find a way to hit pause on that; and try not to enable others to go down dark paths either. Be someone who listens to others – let them vent and genuinely listen to what they have to say. And then bring light to the conversation. Whether that’s comic relief in the form of a joke or offering to “host” a happy hour for the team and get everyone to play Pictionary, be the person who helps redirect people into a positive space as often as possible. The people who can do this well are truly the team players and leaders that everyone wants and needs, in a crisis or otherwise.[/*]
[b]Be a Do-er.[/b] Maybe you’re the youngest, most junior person on your team and you’re not used to making decisions or running with an idea. Well, this is your moment because there are a lot of seemingly little ways you can act right now that may help everyone around you. If appropriate, this a good time to decide to do something that you know is productive, even if no one told you to. Create a trivia question of the week, send your hilarious jokes every Monday to your team, create a Google sheet to help people get organized:  whatever you see that could be helpful, if appropriate within your organization and team (or with appropriate approval if needed), make your bias towards action. A lot of people are panicking right now – we need do-ers who are putting one foot in front of the other and acting.[/*]
[b]Focus People on What They Can Control.[/b] There are a number of ways to support those in need right now. Most cities are organizing meal drives to feed healthcare workers and other similar things that you can do from home at your computer. Find and share those opportunities with your colleagues – help give people a feeling of power, even if small, to make a difference in this time. [/*]
[/list]


Of course these suggestions aren’t isolated to those applying to b-school, but for those MBA hopefuls who are reading this, being able to describe how you acted and led during this time will be very important to your applications. Consider what you’d be proud to tell the admissions committee you were doing to lead and step-up during this time, and make that a reality.

Times are turbulent right now, but turbulent times and how you navigate them are where real leaders emerge.

[url=http://www.vantagepointmba.com]www.vantagepointmba.com[/url]

The post [url=https://vantagepointmba.com/2020/04/07/how-to-be-a-leader-at-work-even-when-youre-not-at-work/]How to Be a Leader at Work, Even When You’re Not “At Work”[/url] appeared first on [url=https://vantagepointmba.com]Vantage Point MBA[/url].
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
Vantage Point MBA Admissions Consulting
https://vantagepointmba.com/
Your Personal MBA Application Experts
Contact us for a Free Consultation!
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Researching MBA Programs When You Can’t Visit  [#permalink]

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New post 01 May 2020, 06:01
FROM Vantage Point MBA Admissions Blog: Researching MBA Programs When You Can’t Visit
A big part of putting together a winning MBA application is demonstrating that you are the perfect “fit” for the school you are applying to, and that you are excited about that specific program and school. The schools’ websites only get you so far; they start to blur together as the top schools all offer cutting edge courses, acclaimed professors, legacies of recruiting power at sought after companies, and best in class experiential learning and networking. So, researching which schools are the best “fit” for you comes down to something much more subjective:  the school’s culture and your personality. 

This is the time of year when you should be doing this type of analysis:  researching schools, determining which schools you want to apply to, and creating your talking points for how each school is a great fit for you, and you for it. Historically, the best way to assess fit was simply to visit. Sit in a classroom, see how everyone engages, and determine if it’s a place where you’d like to spend two years. You can’t do that right now, but you can still learn about the schools – it may just take a little more effort and creativity.

Here are our suggestions for learning about the MBA programs virtually:

[b]1. Talk to People. [/b]Next to sitting in on a class, talking to current students and recent alums is hands down the best way to get a sense for the culture of a school. You’re probably really skilled at Zoom right now, so I recommend setting up a few virtual “coffee chats” with at least two alums or current students from each school you are considering.

[b]2. Ask the Right Questions.[/b] If you ask someone “why did you choose” a particular school, they will likely cite all of the stuff you already know (rankings, location, jobs etc). So we recommend that you ask questions about their experience instead. Here are a few ideas to get you started. 

“What was orientation like?”

“What surprised you about your MBA experience? What didn’t you expect?”

“What was the most popular thing to do at your school? Event, class, club activity etc?”

“What stands out as the most impactful experience you had in b-school?”

“What did you wish was different about your experience?”

“What would you do differently if you went back?”

“How do you engage with your classmates now (if an alum)?”

“What advice do you have for an applicant to your school?”

“Based on your experience, how would you describe the culture of your program?”

[b]3. Video Content >  Written Content[/b]. The schools publish blogs that we find helpful for information and facts. But to get a sense for the culture of the school, the video content and webinars are way more helpful. In lieu of being able to do their usual city tours, schools will being going virtual, so look for these events in the near term. They generally fill up fast when offered live, so we expect the same to be true virtually.

[b]4. Call Them.[/b]  If you don’t know current students or alums, call the schools and ask to be put in touch with a current student. All of the top schools offer something like this and it’s a great way for you to ask your questions and get to know the program. Make sure they take your name when you call the school and ask for this (they might keep track).

[b]5. Forums & Guides (with a grain of salt)[/b].  There are a number of sites dedicated to providing MBA advice. The problem is that a lot of it is crowdsourced (eg. forums). The school guides that many offer for free can be very useful as starting points and helping you parse out some subtle differences in programs. But remember that someone’s view of a schools’ culture and feel may be different than how it feels for you. So, use others’ opinions as a starting point and data collection, not as a way of classifying schools.

In a year where we expect the competition to be high, it’s important to stay focused; and right now is the time to be nailing down your story, resume and of course “fit” with your target schools. If you need a good starting point for your school research, you can take the fit quiz on our site located here: [url=https://vantagepointmba.com/2019/04/16/which-mba-program-is-right-for-you-use-our-mba-fit-tool-to-find-out/]School Selection Quiz[/url]. Remember, this is just a starting point.

We hope everyone is staying safe and hanging in there! Reach out if you have any questions.

[url=http://www.vantagepointmba.com]www.vantagepointmba.com[/url]



The post [url=https://vantagepointmba.com/2020/05/01/researching-mba-programs-when-you-cant-visit/]Researching MBA Programs When You Can’t Visit[/url] appeared first on [url=https://vantagepointmba.com]Vantage Point MBA[/url].
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Be The Mosquito!  [#permalink]

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New post 04 May 2020, 20:01
FROM Vantage Point MBA Admissions Blog: Be The Mosquito!
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“If you think you are too small to be effective, you have never been in bed with a mosquito.” – Betty Reese

In the current environment, as the days slowly tick by and
an underlying sense of fear seems unavoidable, it is easy to feel helpless and
yearn for the recent past when things were ‘normal’. I know I often do!
Inevitably, however, as my thoughts spiral towards negativity, I come across a
story of kindness and hope which reminds me that we are resilient – we will get
through this (and dare I say, be a stronger society as a result).

A few such stories have even come from our clients! One
client just signed up via TapRoot to help two small businesses navigate the
cumbersome process of applying for CARES financing. I love how he tapped into
his finance skill set and found a creative way to give back, all from the
comfort of his couch! In addition to being the right thing to do, it will add a
valuable talking point to his applications, which are otherwise light on
extracurricular involvement.

Another client recently became a volunteer with Meals On
Wheels, delivering food to homebound people in his local community. While the
need for this service always existed, demand has exploded lately, as you can
imagine. Further, I think we all have a newfound appreciation for how isolation
can wreak havoc on the spirit and how a warm smile or kind gesture can truly
make one’s day. This client’s act of service tapped into his passion for health
and wellness, while serving as a valuable update for Kellogg, where he is
waitlisted.

A third client, who works at a company in the consumer
finance space, jumped on the opportunity to join a team working to defer customers’
payment obligations. She leveraged her strong communication and team building
skills to unite a virtual group around this common goal, providing needed
relief in a time when so many are struggling to make ends meet. She shared the
story of the team’s success (they rolled out a deferral program in less than a
month!) in an update to HBS, where she is waitlisted, and further connected how
she plans to leverage the learnings from this experience in a
potentially-virtual learning environment next year.

So while it is easy to feel overwhelmed by the scale of the
challenges we currently face, remember that we all have skills that can be put
to use. We may even find that one of the greatest beneficiaries of our good
work is ourselves, whether that be emotionally or in the realization of our
goals. Be that mosquito and leave your mark – it may be small in the grand scheme
of things, but (at least) one person will take note and that is enough. Stay
safe everyone.    

The post Be The Mosquito! appeared first on Vantage Point MBA.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
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https://vantagepointmba.com/
Your Personal MBA Application Experts
Contact us for a Free Consultation!
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Be The Mosquito!   [#permalink] 04 May 2020, 20:01

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