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Vantage Point Admissions Consultant
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When To Retake The GMAT – And When Not To [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2017, 02:02
FROM Vantage Point MBA Admissions Blog: When To Retake The GMAT – And When Not To
“Do I need to retake the GMAT?”
That’s a question plaguing hundreds, if not thousands, of MBA applicants this time of year. By now, many MBA hopefuls have taken the GMAT at least once but aren’t sure if their score is “enough” to get them accepted to their dream programs. While the GMAT is only one data point in a holistic application process, it packs a big punch, especially if you’re part of an over-represented applicant pool (finance, consulting, Indian IT/engineering, etc.) With essentially no downside to re-taking the test and then canceling your score if you’re not happy with it (except for the time and money spent, of course), it’s an option worth considering. And if you’re applying to the top MBA programs, you want to ensure you’re putting your best foot forward at every opportunity. So if you’re doubting whether or not you should give the GMAT another go, here are a few guidelines and questions to consider in your decision.
- Is your score below average for your target schools? If so, by how much? And how does that fit in with the relative strengths and weaknesses of your profile? Now it doesn’t mean that a below average GMAT is a deal-breaker, just like an above average GMAT isn’t a golden ticket to admission, but if your GMAT score is 30+ points below your target schools’ average, you’re part of an over-represented applicant pool, and your undergrad GPA is also below average, it’s probably worth taking a long, hard look at what you can do to bring your score up. If, on the other hand, everything else about your application wows, including some incredibly unique work experience, background, or some other achievement, and your undergrad GPA is stellar, then you may feel more comfortable applying with a so-so GMAT score. For the folks in the middle who are right at the average for their target schools but wonder if they need to do better in order to be noticed by the adcom, keep reading :)
- How many times have you taken the GMAT and how far have you come since your first attempt? If you took the GMAT once and were disappointed by your score, it may very well make sense for you to retake it. Most applicants take the GMAT more than once – our clients have typically taken it at least 2-3 times. However, if you’ve taken it 4+ times and still haven’t achieved your target score, it’s probably worth sticking with your best of 4 and focusing on the other areas of the application you can impact such as the essays, networking, and adjusting your school list so that you’re hedging your bets. Another thing to note with multiple retakes is how far you’ve progressed with each one. If you’ve experienced 20+ point bumps every time, then you may still have a ways to go and you should probably try again. However, if you’ve gotten the same score in your last two retakes, for example, it’s probably not realistic to expect further significant improvement, assuming you’ve really given it your all in terms of prep.
- How hard did you study for the GMAT? In other words, did you really give it your all? This is basically asking yourself if you think you have upside left in your score. If you took a reputable course, did all the homework, drilled incessantly on your weak areas, took real practice tests, etc. and then still got what you got come test day, assuming nothing went wrong that day, then there may not be a lot left you can do to keep improving. You could retake the test and possibly squeeze out another 10 points but it’s arguably not worth it for that little movement. If, on the other hand, you took the test after minimal studying, or at least no structure or strategy in your studying, then you may have the opportunity to improve quite significantly. In that case, take the time to prep properly and then schedule a retake. Whether your best score so far has been a 620 or 720, if you have this kind of upside left, why not capture it?!
- How does your score compare to your practice test performance? This is another way to determine if you might have upside in your score. If you took real, simulated, full practice tests and scored quite a bit better than you did on your actual test day, that’s often a good indication that you could easily score better with your next attempt. Sometimes test day jitters or simply not knowing what to expect when you show up at the test center are much less of a factor the second time around. If, however, your score reflects your practice test performance and you were simply hoping to get lucky and do better, then it’s probably not worth planning a retake based on a hope and a prayer.
- How much time do you have left before the deadlines? Finally, time may be a deciding factor in whether or not you retake the GMAT. If you have limited time before the deadlines, say less than 2 months, and you still have a lot of work left to do on your applications, trying to squeeze in another GMAT retake may be unrealistic. Your time will be better spent on higher-return efforts, such writing killer essays. You could consider postponing your applications to round 2 if you’re committed to improving your GMAT score and you don’t have time to do it all, but that’s not an option for everyone (those wanting to take advantage of early decision tracks offered by certain programs, for example). However, if you’re reading this in June or earlier, you still have a good 3 months before the earliest round 1 deadlines, so we say go for it!
Other factors, such as an uneven Q/V breakdown and low IR or AWA scores, may also lead you to consider re-taking the GMAT, and the questions above can help with that as well. In general, when in doubt, it’s always good to get a few different opinions to ensure you’re considering all angles. If the GMAT really isn’t working out for you, the GRE is always an option. It’s continuing to grow in popularity across the top schools, with programs such as Yale SOM admitting upwards of 20% of its class with GRE scores. The GRE is a particularly appealing alternative for applicants who are struggling with the quant portion of the GMAT. If you’re considering the GRE, we recommend taking a diagnostic test and seeing how you do as a baseline. You may be pleasantly surprised!
The decision to retake the GMAT or stick with the score you have is ultimately an individual one, based on the nuances of your particular situation and application profile. If you have any further questions about what the right decision is for you, our team is happy to help! You can sign up for a Free Consultation with an experienced admissions expert who can weigh in on your decision and provide a helpful evaluation of your profile. We look forward to hearing from you!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Vantage Point MBA Admissions Consulting
https://vantagepointmba.com/
Your Personal MBA Application Experts
Contact us for a Free Consultation!

Expert Post
Vantage Point Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Status: Admissions Consultant
Affiliations: Vantage Point MBA Admissions Consulting
Joined: 17 Mar 2016
Posts: 128
Location: United States
How You Can Demonstrate Leadership in your MBA Applications [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2017, 18:01
FROM Vantage Point MBA Admissions Blog: How You Can Demonstrate Leadership in your MBA Applications
More often than not, when I bring-up the topic of how to demonstrate “leadership experience” in an MBA application, the response is “but I’m not in a management position”. Truly, that’s OK. The average age of most entering classes hovers around 26-28, so it’s not a surprise if you haven’t yet started managing a team. The truth is that many, if not most, applicants (and admitted applicants) to the the top business schools in the world have never had a direct report.

However, almost all of those admitted to the top MBA programs are able to demonstrate two things:

1) their inherent leadership qualities; and

2) their inherent leadership potential.

In the May issue of the Harvard Business Review, there is an intriguing article about the four leadership qualities that were found among the highest performing CEOs during a 10-year study. (On a side note, HBR is a GREAT publication if you’re interested in business school – I highly recommend that you subscribe or at least peruse the articles online from time to time).

The four things that HBR cited could be great thought starters for you as you consider how you’ll describe your leadership aptitude in your upcoming application essays. These are qualities that you can probably point to as either areas where you currently excel or areas where you want to excel (eg. why you are applying to business school):

  • Decisiveness
  • Ability to Engage Others (eg. Motivate)
  • Ability to Adapt Well to Change
  • Reliability (in Producing Results)
Even if you’ve only been working for a few years, chances are that you can give examples of how you’ve exhibited some of these leadership qualities. For example, if you work on a team, you should be able to point to a time when you’ve engaged others. Last year, I worked with a private equity associate who’d had to convince the leadership of one of his portfolio companies that they needed to renegotiate with their largest customer (even though that was culturally not the norm). I also worked with a consultant who’d needed to convince his team that on-the-ground research (literally door-to-door) was the way to go. Both of these examples ended in great successes but the real success (to the adcom) was the fact that these people were able to motivate those around them.

Similarly, stories about adapting to change lend themselves to describing how great your problem solving skills are. Perhaps your company was blindsided by Brexit and there was suddenly an unexpected need for reanalyzing your business unit’s sales strategy or the data that you use. Or maybe you worked in a company that was acquired. For example, I worked with a woman this past year who had amazing stories of how she’d worked with an acquiring company’s management team to ensure a smooth integration as they took over her firm. It not only showcased her ability to change but it also showcased her ability to get right in there and help solve the issues that would inevitably pop-up in any merger (even though this was far from her day job).

Many people cite their extracurriculars for leadership qualities and potential as well. Maybe you’ve been tutoring for an organization for several years and realized that the student drop-out rate was pretty high. And perhaps you were proactive in considering what the issues may be and submitted a proposal to the executive director; even though this was far outside of your volunteer scope within the organization. Being a reliable contributor who goes above and beyond when the situation arises is a great quality to demonstrate on your applications.

Remember, the key is showing that you are inherently a leader, not inherently an “order-taker”.

Many of the top programs have started releasing their essay topics for this year. Now is the time to get started if you haven’t already. Give yourself enough time to ensure that you are able to write winning essays that showcase all of your inherent leadership abilities and potential!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Vantage Point MBA Admissions Consulting
https://vantagepointmba.com/
Your Personal MBA Application Experts
Contact us for a Free Consultation!

Expert Post
Vantage Point Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Status: Admissions Consultant
Affiliations: Vantage Point MBA Admissions Consulting
Joined: 17 Mar 2016
Posts: 128
Location: United States
When To Retake The GMAT – And When Not To [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2017, 18:01
FROM Vantage Point MBA Admissions Blog: When To Retake The GMAT – And When Not To
“Do I need to retake the GMAT?”

That’s a question plaguing hundreds, if not thousands, of MBA applicants this time of year. By now, many MBA hopefuls have taken the GMAT at least once but aren’t sure if their score is “enough” to get them accepted to their dream programs. While the GMAT is only one data point in a holistic application process, it packs a big punch, especially if you’re part of an over-represented applicant pool (finance, consulting, Indian IT/engineering, etc.) With essentially no downside to re-taking the test and then canceling your score if you’re not happy with it (except for the time and money spent, of course), it’s an option worth considering. And if you’re applying to the top MBA programs, you want to ensure you’re putting your best foot forward at every opportunity. So if you’re doubting whether or not you should give the GMAT another go, here are a few guidelines and questions to consider in your decision.

  • Is your score below average for your target schools? If so, by how much? And how does that fit in with the relative strengths and weaknesses of your profile? Now it doesn’t mean that a below average GMAT is a deal-breaker, just like an above average GMAT isn’t a golden ticket to admission, but if your GMAT score is 30+ points below your target schools’ average, you’re part of an over-represented applicant pool, and your undergrad GPA is also below average, it’s probably worth taking a long, hard look at what you can do to bring your score up. If, on the other hand, everything else about your application wows, including some incredibly unique work experience, background, or some other achievement, and your undergrad GPA is stellar, then you may feel more comfortable applying with a so-so GMAT score. For the folks in the middle who are right at the average for their target schools but wonder if they need to do better in order to be noticed by the adcom, keep reading Image
  • How many times have you taken the GMAT and how far have you come since your first attempt? If you took the GMAT once and were disappointed by your score, it may very well make sense for you to retake it. Most applicants take the GMAT more than once – our clients have typically taken it at least 2-3 times. However, if you’ve taken it 4+ times and still haven’t achieved your target score, it’s probably worth sticking with your best of 4 and focusing on the other areas of the application you can impact such as the essays, networking, and adjusting your school list so that you’re hedging your bets. Another thing to note with multiple retakes is how far you’ve progressed with each one. If you’ve experienced 20+ point bumps every time, then you may still have a ways to go and you should probably try again. However, if you’ve gotten the same score in your last two retakes, for example, it’s probably not realistic to expect further significant improvement, assuming you’ve really given it your all in terms of prep.
  • How hard did you study for the GMAT? In other words, did you really give it your all? This is basically asking yourself if you think you have upside left in your score. If you took a reputable course, did all the homework, drilled incessantly on your weak areas, took real practice tests, etc. and then still got what you got come test day, assuming nothing went wrong that day, then there may not be a lot left you can do to keep improving. You could retake the test and possibly squeeze out another 10 points but it’s arguably not worth it for that little movement. If, on the other hand, you took the test after minimal studying, or at least no structure or strategy in your studying, then you may have the opportunity to improve quite significantly. In that case, take the time to prep properly and then schedule a retake. Whether your best score so far has been a 620 or 720, if you have this kind of upside left, why not capture it?!
  • How does your score compare to your practice test performance? This is another way to determine if you might have upside in your score. If you took real, simulated, full practice tests and scored quite a bit better than you did on your actual test day, that’s often a good indication that you could easily score better with your next attempt. Sometimes test day jitters or simply not knowing what to expect when you show up at the test center are much less of a factor the second time around. If, however, your score reflects your practice test performance and you were simply hoping to get lucky and do better, then it’s probably not worth planning a retake based on a hope and a prayer.
  • How much time do you have left before the deadlines? Finally, time may be a deciding factor in whether or not you retake the GMAT. If you have limited time before the deadlines, say less than 2 months, and you still have a lot of work left to do on your applications, trying to squeeze in another GMAT retake may be unrealistic. Your time will be better spent on higher-return efforts, such writing killer essays. You could consider postponing your applications to round 2 if you’re committed to improving your GMAT score and you don’t have time to do it all, but that’s not an option for everyone (those wanting to take advantage of early decision tracks offered by certain programs, for example). However, if you’re reading this in June or earlier, you still have a good 3 months before the earliest round 1 deadlines, so we say go for it!
Other factors, such as an uneven Q/V breakdown and low IR or AWA scores, may also lead you to consider re-taking the GMAT, and the questions above can help with that as well. In general, when in doubt, it’s always good to get a few different opinions to ensure you’re considering all angles. If the GMAT really isn’t working out for you, the GRE is always an option. It’s continuing to grow in popularity across the top schools, with programs such as Yale SOM admitting upwards of 20% of its class with GRE scores. The GRE is a particularly appealing alternative for applicants who are struggling with the quant portion of the GMAT. If you’re considering the GRE, we recommend taking a diagnostic test and seeing how you do as a baseline. You may be pleasantly surprised!

The decision to retake the GMAT or stick with the score you have is ultimately an individual one, based on the nuances of your particular situation and application profile. If you have any further questions about what the right decision is for you, our team is happy to help! You can sign up for a Free Consultation with an experienced admissions expert who can weigh in on your decision and provide a helpful evaluation of your profile. We look forward to hearing from you!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Vantage Point MBA Admissions Consulting
https://vantagepointmba.com/
Your Personal MBA Application Experts
Contact us for a Free Consultation!

Expert Post
Vantage Point Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Status: Admissions Consultant
Affiliations: Vantage Point MBA Admissions Consulting
Joined: 17 Mar 2016
Posts: 128
Location: United States
How You Can Demonstrate Leadership in your MBA Applications [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Aug 2017, 23:01
FROM Vantage Point MBA Admissions Blog: How You Can Demonstrate Leadership in your MBA Applications
More often than not, when I bring-up the topic of how to demonstrate “leadership experience” in an MBA application, the response is “but I’m not in a management position”. Truly, that’s OK. The average age of most entering classes hovers around 26-28, so it’s not a surprise if you haven’t yet started managing a team. The truth is that many, if not most, applicants (and admitted applicants) to the the top business schools in the world have never had a direct report.

However, almost all of those admitted to the top MBA programs are able to demonstrate two things:

1) their inherent leadership qualities; and

2) their inherent leadership potential.

In the May issue of the Harvard Business Review, there is an intriguing article about the four leadership qualities that were found among the highest performing CEOs during a 10-year study. (On a side note, HBR is a GREAT publication if you’re interested in business school – I highly recommend that you subscribe or at least peruse the articles online from time to time).

The four things that HBR cited could be great thought starters for you as you consider how you’ll describe your leadership aptitude in your upcoming application essays. These are qualities that you can probably point to as either areas where you currently excel or areas where you want to excel (eg. why you are applying to business school):

  • Decisiveness
  • Ability to Engage Others (eg. Motivate)
  • Ability to Adapt Well to Change
  • Reliability (in Producing Results)
Even if you’ve only been working for a few years, chances are that you can give examples of how you’ve exhibited some of these leadership qualities. For example, if you work on a team, you should be able to point to a time when you’ve engaged others. Last year, I worked with a private equity associate who’d had to convince the leadership of one of his portfolio companies that they needed to renegotiate with their largest customer (even though that was culturally not the norm). I also worked with a consultant who’d needed to convince his team that on-the-ground research (literally door-to-door) was the way to go. Both of these examples ended in great successes but the real success (to the adcom) was the fact that these people were able to motivate those around them.

Similarly, stories about adapting to change lend themselves to describing how great your problem solving skills are. Perhaps your company was blindsided by Brexit and there was suddenly an unexpected need for reanalyzing your business unit’s sales strategy or the data that you use. Or maybe you worked in a company that was acquired. For example, I worked with a woman this past year who had amazing stories of how she’d worked with an acquiring company’s management team to ensure a smooth integration as they took over her firm. It not only showcased her ability to change but it also showcased her ability to get right in there and help solve the issues that would inevitably pop-up in any merger (even though this was far from her day job).

Many people cite their extracurriculars for leadership qualities and potential as well. Maybe you’ve been tutoring for an organization for several years and realized that the student drop-out rate was pretty high. And perhaps you were proactive in considering what the issues may be and submitted a proposal to the executive director; even though this was far outside of your volunteer scope within the organization. Being a reliable contributor who goes above and beyond when the situation arises is a great quality to demonstrate on your applications.

Remember, the key is showing that you are inherently a leader, not inherently an “order-taker”.

Many of the top programs have started releasing their essay topics for this year. Now is the time to get started if you haven’t already. Give yourself enough time to ensure that you are able to write winning essays that showcase all of your inherent leadership abilities and potential!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Vantage Point MBA Admissions Consulting
https://vantagepointmba.com/
Your Personal MBA Application Experts
Contact us for a Free Consultation!

Expert Post
Vantage Point Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Status: Admissions Consultant
Affiliations: Vantage Point MBA Admissions Consulting
Joined: 17 Mar 2016
Posts: 128
Location: United States
When To Retake The GMAT – And When Not To [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Aug 2017, 23:01
FROM Vantage Point MBA Admissions Blog: When To Retake The GMAT – And When Not To
“Do I need to retake the GMAT?”

That’s a question plaguing hundreds, if not thousands, of MBA applicants this time of year. By now, many MBA hopefuls have taken the GMAT at least once but aren’t sure if their score is “enough” to get them accepted to their dream programs. While the GMAT is only one data point in a holistic application process, it packs a big punch, especially if you’re part of an over-represented applicant pool (finance, consulting, Indian IT/engineering, etc.) With essentially no downside to re-taking the test and then canceling your score if you’re not happy with it (except for the time and money spent, of course), it’s an option worth considering. And if you’re applying to the top MBA programs, you want to ensure you’re putting your best foot forward at every opportunity. So if you’re doubting whether or not you should give the GMAT another go, here are a few guidelines and questions to consider in your decision.

  • Is your score below average for your target schools? If so, by how much? And how does that fit in with the relative strengths and weaknesses of your profile? Now it doesn’t mean that a below average GMAT is a deal-breaker, just like an above average GMAT isn’t a golden ticket to admission, but if your GMAT score is 30+ points below your target schools’ average, you’re part of an over-represented applicant pool, and your undergrad GPA is also below average, it’s probably worth taking a long, hard look at what you can do to bring your score up. If, on the other hand, everything else about your application wows, including some incredibly unique work experience, background, or some other achievement, and your undergrad GPA is stellar, then you may feel more comfortable applying with a so-so GMAT score. For the folks in the middle who are right at the average for their target schools but wonder if they need to do better in order to be noticed by the adcom, keep reading Image
  • How many times have you taken the GMAT and how far have you come since your first attempt? If you took the GMAT once and were disappointed by your score, it may very well make sense for you to retake it. Most applicants take the GMAT more than once – our clients have typically taken it at least 2-3 times. However, if you’ve taken it 4+ times and still haven’t achieved your target score, it’s probably worth sticking with your best of 4 and focusing on the other areas of the application you can impact such as the essays, networking, and adjusting your school list so that you’re hedging your bets. Another thing to note with multiple retakes is how far you’ve progressed with each one. If you’ve experienced 20+ point bumps every time, then you may still have a ways to go and you should probably try again. However, if you’ve gotten the same score in your last two retakes, for example, it’s probably not realistic to expect further significant improvement, assuming you’ve really given it your all in terms of prep.
  • How hard did you study for the GMAT? In other words, did you really give it your all? This is basically asking yourself if you think you have upside left in your score. If you took a reputable course, did all the homework, drilled incessantly on your weak areas, took real practice tests, etc. and then still got what you got come test day, assuming nothing went wrong that day, then there may not be a lot left you can do to keep improving. You could retake the test and possibly squeeze out another 10 points but it’s arguably not worth it for that little movement. If, on the other hand, you took the test after minimal studying, or at least no structure or strategy in your studying, then you may have the opportunity to improve quite significantly. In that case, take the time to prep properly and then schedule a retake. Whether your best score so far has been a 620 or 720, if you have this kind of upside left, why not capture it?!
  • How does your score compare to your practice test performance? This is another way to determine if you might have upside in your score. If you took real, simulated, full practice tests and scored quite a bit better than you did on your actual test day, that’s often a good indication that you could easily score better with your next attempt. Sometimes test day jitters or simply not knowing what to expect when you show up at the test center are much less of a factor the second time around. If, however, your score reflects your practice test performance and you were simply hoping to get lucky and do better, then it’s probably not worth planning a retake based on a hope and a prayer.
  • How much time do you have left before the deadlines? Finally, time may be a deciding factor in whether or not you retake the GMAT. If you have limited time before the deadlines, say less than 2 months, and you still have a lot of work left to do on your applications, trying to squeeze in another GMAT retake may be unrealistic. Your time will be better spent on higher-return efforts, such writing killer essays. You could consider postponing your applications to round 2 if you’re committed to improving your GMAT score and you don’t have time to do it all, but that’s not an option for everyone (those wanting to take advantage of early decision tracks offered by certain programs, for example). However, if you’re reading this in June or earlier, you still have a good 3 months before the earliest round 1 deadlines, so we say go for it!
Other factors, such as an uneven Q/V breakdown and low IR or AWA scores, may also lead you to consider re-taking the GMAT, and the questions above can help with that as well. In general, when in doubt, it’s always good to get a few different opinions to ensure you’re considering all angles. If the GMAT really isn’t working out for you, the GRE is always an option. It’s continuing to grow in popularity across the top schools, with programs such as Yale SOM admitting upwards of 20% of its class with GRE scores. The GRE is a particularly appealing alternative for applicants who are struggling with the quant portion of the GMAT. If you’re considering the GRE, we recommend taking a diagnostic test and seeing how you do as a baseline. You may be pleasantly surprised!

The decision to retake the GMAT or stick with the score you have is ultimately an individual one, based on the nuances of your particular situation and application profile. If you have any further questions about what the right decision is for you, our team is happy to help! You can sign up for a Free Consultation with an experienced admissions expert who can weigh in on your decision and provide a helpful evaluation of your profile. We look forward to hearing from you!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Vantage Point MBA Admissions Consulting
https://vantagepointmba.com/
Your Personal MBA Application Experts
Contact us for a Free Consultation!

Expert Post
Vantage Point Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Status: Admissions Consultant
Affiliations: Vantage Point MBA Admissions Consulting
Joined: 17 Mar 2016
Posts: 128
Location: United States
Can you Negotiate with a Top Business School? [#permalink]

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New post 21 Feb 2018, 14:01
FROM Vantage Point MBA Admissions Blog: Can you Negotiate with a Top Business School?
The short answer is “it never hurts to ask”. Over the years, many of our clients have gotten the amazing news that they have been selected for a scholarship from at least one of their desired MBA programs. Sometimes, however, the money comes from a second or third choice instead of that coveted first choice school. So, the question we often get is “can I leverage one scholarship offer to get others?”

The scholarship process overall is fairly opaque and generally more of a black box than the rest of the MBA application process. It’s often a tool used by the schools as a way to entice candidates who they feel especially strongly about for one reason or another.

Since it’s hard to know exactly where you stand on that highly-subjective spectrum, we always recommend going for it: there’s no harm in telling a particular school that you have a scholarship offer from another program and see if they’re willing to match it. No, they will not rescind your offer just because you ask and express that you’ve been admitted to another school. In fact, negotiating and being savvy about this process is demonstrative of maturity and real consideration of this huge decision!

More often than not, your request will result in a polite “no but thanks for asking” from the schools. However, there are ample examples to prove that it’s worth your time to try. Take Andy, a client I worked with last year who had his heart set on Fuqua but also applied to several other programs to hedge his bets. Andy ended-up being admitted to almost all of the schools that he applied to, including Fuqua as well as Ross. However, Ross offered him a very significant scholarship, stating that they were offering him the money because they wanted more entrepreneurs and felt like their program could help him launch his idea after graduation. Though Andy liked Ross’s program and felt he could do well there, his gut was telling him that Fuqua was still the better choice for him.

As such, Andy decided to talk to Fuqua about his conundrum. He sent an email to admissions explaining that he’d been offered a significant scholarship from Ross but that Fuqua remained his top choice. He then asked if Fuqua would match Ross’s offer. Fuqua’s response was to request that Andy simply write a quick paragraph on why, based on merit, he should be awarded a scholarship. As such, he described advancements he’d made in his start-up launch plan and fundraising; and of course he also reiterated the level of the Ross scholarship.

This tactic led Fuqua to not only match Ross’s offer for Andy, but also increase it by a small amount!

The moral of the story once again is that it doesn’t hurt to ask. We recommend reaching out directly to the admissions teams for the schools you’re negotiating with and having a discussion about the best way to submit this request. Every school is different and frequently these situations are approached on a case-by-case basis. Best of luck!

www.vantagepointmba.com

The post Can you Negotiate with a Top Business School? appeared first on Vantage Point Admissions.
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Can you Negotiate with a Top Business School? [#permalink]

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New post 21 Feb 2018, 15:02
FROM Vantage Point MBA Admissions Blog: Can you Negotiate with a Top Business School?
The short answer is “it never hurts to ask”. Over the years, many of our clients have gotten the amazing news that they have been selected for a scholarship from at least one of their desired MBA programs. Sometimes, however, the money comes from a second or third choice instead of that coveted first choice school. So, the question we often get is “can I leverage one scholarship offer to get others?”

The scholarship process overall is fairly opaque and generally more of a black box than the rest of the MBA application process. It’s often a tool used by the schools as a way to entice candidates who they feel especially strongly about for one reason or another.

Since it’s hard to know exactly where you stand on that highly-subjective spectrum, we always recommend going for it: there’s no harm in telling a particular school that you have a scholarship offer from another program and see if they’re willing to match it. No, they will not rescind your offer just because you ask and express that you’ve been admitted to another school. In fact, negotiating and being savvy about this process is demonstrative of maturity and real consideration of this huge decision!

More often than not, your request will result in a polite “no but thanks for asking” from the schools. However, there are ample examples to prove that it’s worth your time to try. Take Andy, a client I worked with last year who had his heart set on Fuqua but also applied to several other programs to hedge his bets. Andy ended-up being admitted to almost all of the schools that he applied to, including Fuqua as well as Ross. However, Ross offered him a very significant scholarship, stating that they were offering him the money because they wanted more entrepreneurs and felt like their program could help him launch his idea after graduation. Though Andy liked Ross’s program and felt he could do well there, his gut was telling him that Fuqua was still the better choice for him.

As such, Andy decided to talk to Fuqua about his conundrum. He sent an email to admissions explaining that he’d been offered a significant scholarship from Ross but that Fuqua remained his top choice. He then asked if Fuqua would match Ross’s offer. Fuqua’s response was to request that Andy simply write a quick paragraph on why, based on merit, he should be awarded a scholarship. As such, he described advancements he’d made in his start-up launch plan and fundraising; and of course he also reiterated the level of the Ross scholarship.

This tactic led Fuqua to not only match Ross’s offer for Andy, but also increase it by a small amount!

The moral of the story once again is that it doesn’t hurt to ask. We recommend reaching out directly to the admissions teams for the schools you’re negotiating with and having a discussion about the best way to submit this request. Every school is different and frequently these situations are approached on a case-by-case basis. Best of luck!

www.vantagepointmba.com

The post Can you Negotiate with a Top Business School? appeared first on Vantage Point Admissions.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Vantage Point MBA Admissions Consulting
https://vantagepointmba.com/
Your Personal MBA Application Experts
Contact us for a Free Consultation!

Can you Negotiate with a Top Business School?   [#permalink] 21 Feb 2018, 15:02

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