GMAT Question of the Day: Daily via email | Daily via Instagram New to GMAT Club? Watch this Video

It is currently 30 May 2020, 08:22

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Retired Moderator
User avatar
S
Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 2819
Location: Germany
Schools: German MBA
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V47
WE: Corporate Finance (Pharmaceuticals and Biotech)
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Dec 2016, 03:33
warriorguy wrote:
sayantanc2k wrote:
Celestial09 wrote:
Hi
An OG question, so it calls for an analysis, calling all experts please. Daagh chetan4u egmat magoosh veritas plz
Kindly explain what's wrong with C
Thanks

Image Posted from GMAT ToolKit


"Instead of" can be used only for nouns; "rather than" can be used for nouns or verbs. Here "retiring" and "facing" are gerunds (i.e. nouns), and hence both "instead of" and "rather than" are acceptable.

The problem with C is the incorrect idiom elect + gerund (verb-ing) . The correct idiom is elect + infinitive (to -verb).



Can we mark E on the grounds that since phrase after "rather than" marks present tense so the verb should be in simple form?

Construction for Present Tense:

would rather <verb in simple form> than <verb in simple form>


I am not sure what you mean by simple form - do you mean simple present?
Please note that in option E, the parallelism is between two infinitives (not between two verbs in simple present tense): to retire and to face - it is alright to omit "to" in the second element. ...to retire rather than to face....
Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 04 Oct 2016
Posts: 57
Location: China
Concentration: Healthcare, Entrepreneurship
WE: Sales (Health Care)
Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Jan 2017, 20:58
if parallelism is the deciding factor, why not add a "to" after the "rather than", this can be true parallel
_________________
LSAT CR is driving me mad
Board of Directors
User avatar
V
Status: Emory Goizueta Alum
Joined: 18 Jul 2015
Posts: 3588
Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Mar 2017, 00:14
1
YangYichen wrote:
if parallelism is the deciding factor, why not add a "to" after the "rather than", this can be true parallel


We are not repeating to because we have a rule 'Once outside or Twice Inside".

So, both ways the sentence should be correct.
_________________
My LinkedIn abhimahna. | My GMAT Story: From V21 to V40 | My MBA Journey: My 10 years long MBA Dream
My Secret Hacks: Best way to use GMATClub | Importance of an Error Log!
Verbal Resources: All SC Resources at one place | All CR Resources at one place
GMAT Club Inbuilt Error Log Functionality - View More | Best Reply Functionality on GMAT Club!
New Visa Forum - Ask all your Visa Related Questions - here | Have OPT questions? - Post them here.
Find a bug in the new email templates and get rewarded with 2 weeks of GMATClub Tests for free
Check our new About Us Page here. | Blog: Subscribe to Question of the Day Blog
New! Executive Assessment (EA) Exam - All you need to know!
Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 04 Oct 2016
Posts: 57
Location: China
Concentration: Healthcare, Entrepreneurship
WE: Sales (Health Care)
Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Mar 2017, 02:07
abhimahna wrote:
YangYichen wrote:
if parallelism is the deciding factor, why not add a "to" after the "rather than", this can be true parallel


We are not repeating to because we have a rule 'Once outside or Twice Inside".

So, both ways the sentence should be correct.

could you please elaborate on 'Once outside or Twice Inside" rule?
_________________
LSAT CR is driving me mad
Board of Directors
User avatar
V
Status: Emory Goizueta Alum
Joined: 18 Jul 2015
Posts: 3588
Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Mar 2017, 02:25
1
YangYichen wrote:
could you please elaborate on 'Once outside or Twice Inside" rule?


Sure.

As per this rule, we can have either "to both X and Y" or "both to X and to Y".

Notice, in the first one I kept to outside once and this would be used for both X and Y while in the second one, I used to with both X and Y. Hence, in the letter part we have Twice Inside.

Here are the great questions that work on the same principle.

https://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-para ... ce-inside/
_________________
My LinkedIn abhimahna. | My GMAT Story: From V21 to V40 | My MBA Journey: My 10 years long MBA Dream
My Secret Hacks: Best way to use GMATClub | Importance of an Error Log!
Verbal Resources: All SC Resources at one place | All CR Resources at one place
GMAT Club Inbuilt Error Log Functionality - View More | Best Reply Functionality on GMAT Club!
New Visa Forum - Ask all your Visa Related Questions - here | Have OPT questions? - Post them here.
Find a bug in the new email templates and get rewarded with 2 weeks of GMATClub Tests for free
Check our new About Us Page here. | Blog: Subscribe to Question of the Day Blog
New! Executive Assessment (EA) Exam - All you need to know!
Verbal Forum Moderator
User avatar
V
Status: Greatness begins beyond your comfort zone
Joined: 08 Dec 2013
Posts: 2446
Location: India
Concentration: General Management, Strategy
Schools: Kelley '20, ISB '19
GPA: 3.2
WE: Information Technology (Consulting)
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Feb 2018, 06:46
A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors had elected early retirement rather than face the threats of lawsuits and the rising costs of malpractice insurance.

(A) had elected early retirement rather than face - past perfect had elected is incorrect
(B) had elected early retirement instead of facing - same as A
(C) have elected retiring early instead of facing - instead of is used to show a preference
(D) have elected to retire early rather than facing - to retire is not parallel to facing
(E) have elected to retire early rather than face - Correct

Answer E
If in option A, had elected is changed to have elected, then we have
(A)' have elected early retirement rather than face -- is there a parallelism error here?
why can't the parallel structures be - many doctors have elected early retirement
rather than face -- in this case have elected and face are both verbs and can't they be parallel?

AjiteshArun , GMATNinja ,egmat , mikemcgarry , daagh , sayantanc2k - please help .
_________________
When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it. - Henry Ford
The Moment You Think About Giving Up, Think Of The Reason Why You Held On So Long
CEO
CEO
User avatar
V
Joined: 15 Jul 2015
Posts: 3274
Location: India
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V169
Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Feb 2018, 22:31
1
Skywalker18 wrote:
Answer E
If in option A, had elected is changed to have elected, then we have
(A)' have elected early retirement rather than face -- is there a parallelism error here?
why can't the parallel structures be - many doctors have elected early retirement
rather than face -- in this case have elected and face are both verbs and can't they be parallel?

AjiteshArun , GMATNinja ,egmat , mikemcgarry , daagh , sayantanc2k - please help .
Face is not a (full) verb. It's an infinitive. It's slightly hard to see that because the to in to face has been assumed away, leaving only face.

In other words, in the correct option, it is to retire and (to) face that are parallel.
have elected to retire early rather than face
_________________
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
D
Joined: 17 Mar 2014
Posts: 451
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Dec 2018, 09:19
My bad, i thought "the facing" and "the raising" are in parallel so i chose E.
VP
VP
User avatar
V
Joined: 11 Feb 2015
Posts: 1138
Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Feb 2019, 07:48
A & B are out because the present prefect tense is broken. C is out because it is unidiomatic & D is out because of parallelism.

Option E is the correct ans!!
_________________
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 27 Nov 2015
Posts: 120
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 May 2019, 04:12
why is past perfect "had" in option a incorrect?
IIMA, IIMC School Moderator
User avatar
V
Joined: 04 Sep 2016
Posts: 1427
Location: India
WE: Engineering (Other)
CAT Tests
Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 May 2019, 04:28
2
rnn

Quote:
why is past perfect "had" in option a incorrect?


Here is A again:

A recent study has found
that
within the past few years, many doctors had elected
early retirement rather than face the threats of lawsuits and the rising costs of malpractice insurance.

Pay special attention to: within the past few years,
It suggests an action started in past and is continuing in present.

Past perfect tense is used to denote earlier of two actions.
Hope this helps. :)
_________________
It's the journey that brings us happiness not the destination.

Feeling stressed, you are not alone!!
VP
VP
avatar
P
Joined: 29 Jun 2017
Posts: 1031
Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 May 2019, 01:00
choice c is wrong because instead of is a preposition, but not a conjunction, which connect to similar entities.
this point is tested in og 2020 already. look at the GOOD dictionary for the use of instead of. normal dictionary do not explain instead of.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 25 Sep 2016
Posts: 29
Concentration: Finance, Accounting
GPA: 4
Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Feb 2020, 22:10
dont we use had as the action already took place in past and they are telling that now,means doctor already resigned in last few years as mentioned
CrackVerbal Representative
User avatar
S
Joined: 01 Mar 2019
Posts: 211
Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Feb 2020, 01:00
1
Aman1012 wrote:
dont we use had as the action already took place in past and they are telling that now,means doctor already resigned in last few years as mentioned


Hi Aman

In this case, the sentence tells us about something that has happened over the last few years. It is an ongoing event - there is nothing in the sentence to suggest that this has now stopped. Therefore the correct tense to use would be present perfect. We use the present perfect in two situations:

a) Used to talk about actions that started in the past and are continuous up till now:

eg: I have been a teacher for more than ten years. → I became a teacher ten years ago and I am still one.

b) A past action that has a result in the present:

eg: I have lost my wallet. → I don't have it now.

As you can see, the teachers resigning is an ongoing event which started in the past few years. Hence we must use the present perfect tense.

A past perfect tense (had + past participle) is used when we want to talk about two events in the past and show the chronology between them ie; which happened first. As you can see, there is no second even in the past being referred to in this sentence. Hence a past perfect tense would be incorrect.

Hope this helps.
_________________
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 28 Sep 2018
Posts: 76
Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Apr 2020, 06:04
egmat wrote:
Sachin9 wrote:


1) When do we know that 'to' and be understood and can be omitted?
I eliminated E because I thought 2 structures are not parallel because you dont have a 'to' before face

2) What is wrong with C :shock:
retiring and facing are parallel.


Hi Sachin,

Whenever we have a list, the common items in the first entity of the list may not be repeated before all the entities in the list. OG questions are inundated with such parallel construction. For example the first question of OGV2:

Like ants, termites have an elaborate social structure in which a few individuals reproduce and the rest serve the colony by tending juveniles, gathering food, building the nest, or battling intruders.

This is the sentence with correct answer choice E. Notice the entities in the sub-list. Termites serve the colony by:
a. tending juveniles,
b. gathering food,
c. building the nest, or
d. battling intruders.

In the sentence, only the first entity is preceded by “by”. It is understood before other entities. This is a very common structure. Here comes the need to identify the correct entities that are intended to make the correct intended parallel list. Try out this official question:

The computer software being designed for a project studying Native American access to higher education will not only meet the needs of that study, but also has the versatility and power of facilitating similar research endeavors.

(A) but also has the versatility and power of facilitating
(B) but also have the versatility and power to facilitate
C) but it also has the versatility and power to facilitate
(D) and also have the versatility and power of facilitating
(E) and it also has such versatility and power that it can facilitate

Now let’s analyze, why choice C is incorrect.

C) have elected retiring early instead of facing: Notice the use of “elected” here. The way it has been used in this choice and the original sentence as well, it seems to suggest that the doctors have cast their votes for an entity named “retiring” instead of another entity “facing”. This is the incorrect use of the word. The intended meaning is that they have elected to – chose to – do one thing rather than the other. This incorrect use of “elected” makes this choice incorrect.

Hope this helps. :)
Thanks.
Shraddha


(A) but also has the versatility and power of facilitating
(B) but also have the versatility and power to facilitate
C) but it also has the versatility and power to facilitate
(D) and also have the versatility and power of facilitating
(E) and it also has such versatility and power that it can facilitate


I am confused with (B) and (C)

(B) but also have the versatility and power to facilitate
C) but it also has the versatility and power to facilitate

On one hand in (C) I believe there is an idiom error --> Not only X but it also Y is incorrect
On the other hand in (B) the verb "have" is plural for the singular subject "computer software.

If I had to chose, I'll go for (C) because (B) is a SV error, which according to me is a deterministic error as compared to the idiom error in (C)
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 08 May 2019
Posts: 159
Location: India
WE: Manufacturing and Production (Manufacturing)
CAT Tests
Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 May 2020, 01:32
Quote:
A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors had elected early retirement rather than face the threats of lawsuits and the rising costs of malpractice insurance.

(A) had elected early retirement rather than face
(B) had elected early retirement instead of facing
(C) have elected retiring early instead of facing
(D) have elected to retire early rather than facing
(E) have elected to retire early rather than face


GMATNinja AjiteshArun VeritasKarishma

"and" is the parallelism trigger here.
Phrases before and after "and" seem parallel.
"facing the threats of lawsuits" is parallel to "rising costs of malpractice insurance".
Hence option D should be correct.
Where am I wrong here ?
GMAT Club Bot
Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors   [#permalink] 30 May 2020, 01:32

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 36 posts ] 

A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne