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A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors

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A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

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A
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D
E

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A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors had elected early retirement rather than face the threats of lawsuits and the rising costs of malpractice insurance.

(A) had elected early retirement rather than face
(B) had elected early retirement instead of facing
(C) have elected retiring early instead of facing
(D) have elected to retire early rather than facing
(E) have elected to retire early rather than face


Official Guide for GMAT Verbal Review, 2nd Edition, 2009

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 39
Page: 251


Spoiler: :: OE
OG Verbal Review 2, SC#39

Verb form; Parallelism

For action that started in the past and continues into the present, it is correct to use the present perfect tense: have elected. When a choice is presented using the rather than construction-the doctors ha'ue chosen x rather than y-the x and the y must be parallel. In this case, the doctors have chosen to retire rather than (to understood) face. To does not need to be repeated in order to maintain parallelism because it is understood.

(A) Had elected shows an action completed in the past; early retirement is not parallel to face.
(B) Had elected shows an action completed in the past; retirement and facing are not parallel.
(C) Have elected must be followed by an infinitive (to retire).
(D) Facing and to retire early are not parallel.
(E) Correct. In this sentence, have elected shows action continuing into the present; to retire and (to understood) face are parallel.

The correct answer is E.

Originally posted by redferrocene on 25 Oct 2004, 09:56.
Last edited by Bunuel on 20 Dec 2018, 01:55, edited 3 times in total.
Edited the question.
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Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Dec 2010, 07:26
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The verb setting of the main clause (‘has found’) is in present perfect. To avoid shift of tense, one has to maintain present perfect in the subordinate clause also. hence A and B are out. Among C, D and E, C is out because of using instead of. Rather than is the right choice because rather than shows contrast, while instead of just meaning ‘in the place of’ does not effuse contrast.

In D, to retire ….. than facing is not parallel. E is the best choice. To retire, an infinitive, matches face, elliptically meaning to face
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Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Oct 2004, 13:19
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E is better because it is using present perfect tense. The passage is in the present tense so talking about an event that happened prior to another event in the present(and could be still ongoing), we use present perfect.

present perfect: ie I am playing scrabble but note that I have achieved my goal --> I achieved the goal and then, presently, I am playing scrabble
past perfect: ie I played scrabble but I had achieved my goal --> I played scrabble(in the past) but at some point before that, I achieved my goal.

Read on about present and past perfect(and verb tenses in general):
http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/tens ... tm#perfect
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Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Oct 2004, 12:43
2
Here's an attempt at an explanation...

In the sentence given, there isn't really a sequence of events, it's a stating a recent study.

Here's an example of where had will make sense,

The doctors had retired before the lawyers sued them for malpractice.

In this sentence, had is used to indicate that an event occured before another event. First the doctors retired, then the lawyers sued them. "Had" in this sentence establishes that sequence.

Hope this helps...
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Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Feb 2005, 10:11
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You cannot elect early retirement, but you can elect to retire early.
Only (D) and (E) are possible choices.

(E) is the best for parallellism because "elected to retire" is parallel to "face"
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Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Feb 2005, 10:28
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Here I am talking about usage of verbs to maintain the parallelism.

"have elected to retire" is a verb or an action
"face" is also an action or a verb.

If you use "to" before "face" then it looks like the doctors have elected to face something. It looked awkward.

In all the other sentences verb and gerunds/participles are used. Those sentences are least parallel.


Parallellism means you should use similar class of sentence fragment/elements.

Noun/Noun Phrase + Noun/Gerund/Noun Phrase/Gerund Phrase
Verb + Verb

I hope I have clarified my point.
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Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Aug 2005, 06:20
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I have found this material when looking for instead of vs rather than:

The phrase rather than consists of an adverb and a conjunction and often means "and not," as in I decided to skip lunch rather than eat in the cafeteria again. It is grammatically similar to sooner than in that it is used with a "bare" infinitive—an infinitive minus to: I would stay here and eat flies sooner than go with them.

Rather than can also be used with nouns as a compound preposition meaning "instead of": I bought a mountain bike rather than a ten-speed. But some people object to this use, insisting that than should be used only as a conjunction. They therefore object to constructions in which rather than is followed by a gerund, as in Rather than buying a new car, I kept my old one.

In some cases, however, rather than can only be followed by a gerund and not by a bare infinitive. If the main verb of the sentence has a form that does not allow parallel treatment of the verb following rather than, you cannot use a bare infinitive, and you must use a gerund. This is often the case when the main verb is in a past tense or has a participle. Thus, you must say The results of the study, rather than ending (not end or ended) the controversy, only added to it. If the main verb was in the present tense (add), you could use the bare infinitive end.

Curiously, when the rather than construction follows the main verb, it can use other verb forms besides the bare infinitive. Thus you can say The results of the study added to the controversy rather than ended it.

The overriding concern in all of this should be to avoid faulty parallels, as in sentences like Rather than buy a new car, I have kept my old one and Rather than take a cab, she is going on foot.

Clearly, it is grammatically defensible to follow rather than with a gerund, but if you prefer to avoid the controversy, use instead of with gerunds.


Based on what the bolded paragraph says the answer I think is C.
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Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 09 Jul 2009, 05:00
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WhyabloodyMBA wrote:
A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors had elected early retirement rather than face the threats of lawsuits and the rising costs of malpractice insurance.
(A) had elected early retirement rather than face
(B) had elected early retirement instead of facing
(C) have elected retiring early instead of facing
(D) have elected to retire early rather than facing
(E) have elected to retire early rather than face


how do v decide upon usage of 'rather than' and 'instead of'..?


you use 'rather than' to compare clauses and 'instead of' to compare 'nouns/noun phrases'.

But also remember you can use 'rather than' to emphasize priority over something.

in this question to maintain parallelism with 'retire' you have to have 'face' verb. so obviously you go for 'rather than'.

Hope that helps.

Originally posted by ugimba on 08 Jul 2009, 05:38.
Last edited by ugimba on 09 Jul 2009, 05:00, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Sep 2009, 22:42
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asthanap wrote:
A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors had elected early retirement rather than face the threats of lawsuits and the rising costs of malpractice insurance.

(A) had elected early retirement rather than face
(B) had elected early retirement instead of facing
(C) have elected retiring early instead of facing
(D) have elected to retire early rather than facing
(E) have elected to retire early rather than face

I could reach to final two: D & E. Not able to find out which one is correct and why.

Can someone please throw some light?


1. Whenever you have a choice between "instead of" and "rather than" in gmat, select "rather than". That rules out B and C.
2. A is out for wrong tense "had ....." for a recent activity...
3. D is out for not being parallel "retire ... and facing....".

So E remains...
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Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2011, 10:11
5
Quote:
A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors had elected early retirement rather than face the threats of lawsuits and the rising costs of malpractice insurance.

a. had elected early retirement rather than face
b. had elected early retirement instead of facing
c. have elected retiring early instead of facing
d. have elected to retire early rather than facing
e. have elected to retire early rather than face



Answer: E
Subject-verb agreement - 'doctors have' not 'doctors had'. 'had elected' is past perfect tense used only to refer to a non-continuous action in the past, which was already completed by the time another action in the past took place. --> eliminate A and B
Parallelism - 'elected to retire...rather than face...' --> eliminate C and D

------

*Note:
1. Present Perfect Tense
- used to express actions which have already been completed, or perfected, at the time of speaking or writing.
- uses has or have + the past participle; the present perfect continuous tense uses has or have + been (the past participle of BE) + the - ing form of the main verb.
- e.g. I have done the work.
She has answered half the questions.

2. The Present Perfect Continuous Tense
- used to express continuous, ongoing actions which have already been completed at the time of speaking or writing.
- e.g. The bus has been waiting for one hour.

3. The Past Perfect tense

- used to refer to a non-continuous action in the past, which was already completed by the time another action in the past took place.
- e.g. She had heard the news before I saw her.
I had finished my work by the time the clock struck twelve.

4. Past-perfect continuous tense

- used to refer to a continuous, ongoing action in the past which was already completed by the time another action in the past took place.
- e.g. I had been waiting for two months by the time I received the reply.
He had been thinking about his friends shortly before they called.



Type of Tense

Simple
- actions occurring at regular intervals
- general truths, or situations existing for a period of time
- non-continuous actions

Continuous
- continuous, ongoing actions

Perfect
- non-continuous actions completed before a certain time

Perfect Continuous
- continuous, ongoing actions completed before a certain time
Attachments

File comment: Summary of Tenses
Screen shot 2011-09-09 at AM 02.02.38.png
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Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jun 2012, 07:04
1) When do we know that 'to' and be understood and can be omitted?
I eliminated E because I thought 2 structures are not parallel because you dont have a 'to' before face

2) What is wrong with C :shock:
retiring and facing are parallel.
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Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jun 2012, 19:45
Maulikgmat wrote:
24. e 25.B

24. A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors had elected early retirement rather than face the threats of lawsuits and the rising costs of malpractice insurance.
(A) had elected early retirement rather than face
(B) had elected early retirement instead of facing
(C) have elected retiring early instead of facing
(D) have elected to retire early rather than facing
(E) have elected to retire early rather than face

Hi,

I am confused between (D) & (E), could anyone please explain?

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Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jun 2012, 06:58
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cyberjadugar wrote:
Hi,

I am confused between (D) & (E), could anyone please explain?

Regards,


Hi there,

This is the sentence with choice D:

A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors have elected to retire early rather than facing the threats of lawsuits and the rising costs of malpractice insurance.

The original sentence means that according to a recent study, in the last few years many doctors have chosen to do X rather than Y. Here, X and Y should be parallel. Per this choice (D),
X = to retire early
Y = facing the threats of…
These two entities are not parallel because X is “to verb” while Y is written in verb-ing form. Hence, we have parallelism error in this sentence.

Choice E corrects this error. This is the sentence with choice E:

A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors have elected to retire early rather than face the threats of lawsuits and the rising costs of malpractice insurance.

X = to retire early
Y = (to) face the threats of…
The two entities are parallel here, and hence choice E is the correct answer.

Hope this helps.
Thanks.
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Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Dec 2012, 12:59
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Sachin9 wrote:


1) When do we know that 'to' and be understood and can be omitted?
I eliminated E because I thought 2 structures are not parallel because you dont have a 'to' before face

2) What is wrong with C :shock:
retiring and facing are parallel.


Hi Sachin,

Whenever we have a list, the common items in the first entity of the list may not be repeated before all the entities in the list. OG questions are inundated with such parallel construction. For example the first question of OGV2:

Like ants, termites have an elaborate social structure in which a few individuals reproduce and the rest serve the colony by tending juveniles, gathering food, building the nest, or battling intruders.

This is the sentence with correct answer choice E. Notice the entities in the sub-list. Termites serve the colony by:
a. tending juveniles,
b. gathering food,
c. building the nest, or
d. battling intruders.

In the sentence, only the first entity is preceded by “by”. It is understood before other entities. This is a very common structure. Here comes the need to identify the correct entities that are intended to make the correct intended parallel list. Try out this official question:

The computer software being designed for a project studying Native American access to higher education will not only meet the needs of that study, but also has the versatility and power of facilitating similar research endeavors.

(A) but also has the versatility and power of facilitating
(B) but also have the versatility and power to facilitate
C) but it also has the versatility and power to facilitate
(D) and also have the versatility and power of facilitating
(E) and it also has such versatility and power that it can facilitate

Now let’s analyze, why choice C is incorrect.

C) have elected retiring early instead of facing: Notice the use of “elected” here. The way it has been used in this choice and the original sentence as well, it seems to suggest that the doctors have cast their votes for an entity named “retiring” instead of another entity “facing”. This is the incorrect use of the word. The intended meaning is that they have elected to – chose to – do one thing rather than the other. This incorrect use of “elected” makes this choice incorrect.

Hope this helps. :)
Thanks.
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Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jan 2013, 03:24
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Tip : Usage of "Rather than" means preference of one over another and Usage of "instead of" means replacing one thing with another.Moreover instead of can only be used in case of Noun and verbs or actions so in below only

A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors had elected early retirement rather than face the threats of lawsuits and the rising costs of malpractice insurance.

(A) had elected early retirement rather than face --- no two actions are there so usage of had not correct.
(B) had elected early retirement instead of facing --- out instead of is used
(C) have elected retiring early instead of facing --- Out instead of is used
(D) have elected to retire early rather than facing --- to retire not parallel with facing
(E) have elected to retire early rather than face --- correct construction.

had to think between A and E which one is better got confused went with the gut feeling more then logical approach
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Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Aug 2013, 01:15
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A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors had elected early retirement rather than face the threats of lawsuits and the rising costs of malpractice insurance.

(A) had elected early retirement rather than face

had is not correct

(B) had elected early retirement instead of facing

had is not correct

(C) have elected retiring early instead of facing

"have elected retiring" does not sound right to me, also there is incorrect parallelism of "have elected" and "facing"

(D) have elected to retire early rather than facing

there is incorrect parallelism of "have elected" and "facing"

(E) have elected to retire early rather than face

correct. parallelism of elected and face is also correct, hence the OA.


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Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Aug 2013, 01:18
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ziyavutdinov wrote:
What is the difference between C and E i.e. 'instead of' and rather than?


This might help:

1. http://www.manhattangmat.com/forums/instead-of-vs-rather-than-t7242.html
2. http://gmatclub.com/forum/instead-of-vs-rather-than-vs-oppose-to-104503.html
3. http://gmatclub.com/forum/instead-of-vs-rather-than-102935.html
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Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Aug 2014, 07:43
A recent study has found that
within the past few years,
many doctors had elected early retirement rather than face the threats of lawsuits and the rising costs of malpractice insurance.

(A) had elected early retirement rather than face
(B) had elected early retirement instead of facing
(C) have elected retiring early instead of facing
(D) have elected to retire early rather than facing
(E) have elected to retire early rather than face

1. X rather than Y=> X and Y shall be ||. A & D are out.
2.Within the past few years means from past few year which means its still continuing hence A and B out.
3. elected to Vs elected => I elected to do something -> opted to do something.
People elected president. Here doctors opted so elected to is correct usage here. Hence C is out.

E is correct.
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Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Dec 2016, 12:41
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Celestial09 wrote:
Hi
An OG question, so it calls for an analysis, calling all experts please. Daagh chetan4u egmat magoosh veritas plz
Kindly explain what's wrong with C
Thanks

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"Instead of" can be used only for nouns; "rather than" can be used for nouns or verbs. Here "retiring" and "facing" are gerunds (i.e. nouns), and hence both "instead of" and "rather than" are acceptable.

The problem with C is the incorrect idiom elect + gerund (verb-ing) . The correct idiom is elect + infinitive (to -verb).
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Re: A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Dec 2016, 21:47
sayantanc2k wrote:
Celestial09 wrote:
Hi
An OG question, so it calls for an analysis, calling all experts please. Daagh chetan4u egmat magoosh veritas plz
Kindly explain what's wrong with C
Thanks

Image Posted from GMAT ToolKit


"Instead of" can be used only for nouns; "rather than" can be used for nouns or verbs. Here "retiring" and "facing" are gerunds (i.e. nouns), and hence both "instead of" and "rather than" are acceptable.

The problem with C is the incorrect idiom elect + gerund (verb-ing) . The correct idiom is elect + infinitive (to -verb).



Can we mark E on the grounds that since phrase after "rather than" marks present tense so the verb should be in simple form?

Construction for Present Tense:

would rather <verb in simple form> than <verb in simple form>
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