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A television manufacturing plant has a total of 1,000 workers, though

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A television manufacturing plant has a total of 1,000 workers, though  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Dec 2018, 11:21
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A television manufacturing plant has a total of 1,000 workers, though an average of 10 are absent on any given day for various reasons. On days when exactly 10 workers are absent, the plant produces television at its normal rate. Thus, it is reasonable to assume that the plant could fire 10 workers without any loss in production.

The argument is most vulnerable to criticism on the grounds that it

(A) ignores the possibility that if 10 workers were fired, each of the remaining workers would produce more televisions than previously

(B) fails to show that the absentee rate would drop if 10 workers were fired

(C) takes for granted that the normal rate of production can be attained only when no more than the average number of workers are absent

(D) overlooks the possibility that certain workers are crucial to the production of televisions

(E) takes for granted that the rate of production is not affected by the number of workers employed at the plant

Source: LSAT & CR Archive

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Re: A television manufacturing plant has a total of 1,000 workers, though  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Dec 2018, 04:47
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nightblade354 wrote:
A television manufacturing plant has a total of 1,000 workers, though an average of 10 are absent on any given day for various reasons. On days when exactly 10 workers are absent, the plant produces television at its normal rate. Thus, it is reasonable to assume that the plant could fire 10 workers without any loss in production.

The argument is most vulnerable to criticism on the grounds that it

(A) ignores the possibility that if 10 workers were fired, each of the remaining workers would produce more televisions than previously

(B) fails to show that the absentee rate would drop if 10 workers were fired

(C) takes for granted that the normal rate of production can be attained only when no more than the average number of workers are absent

(D) overlooks the possibility that certain workers are crucial to the production of televisions

(E) takes for granted that the rate of production is not affected by the number of workers employed at the plant

Source: LSAT & CR Archive



ParthSanghavi,

The total number is 1000, and on an AVERAGE 10 are absent...
On days when 10 or less are absent that is the strength is 990 and more, the production does not get affected.

The argument therefore suggests that we can cut down 10 employees, meaning 990 becomes the actual strength.
But what has this done ??
So it has brought you to a level where you can't have any absentee as any absentee will take the effective strength less than 990 and this would affect the production.

So, what is the guarantee that there will be 0 absenteeism.

Choice B states exactly this..
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Re: A television manufacturing plant has a total of 1,000 workers, though  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Dec 2018, 04:36
nightblade354 wrote:
A television manufacturing plant has a total of 1,000 workers, though an average of 10 are absent on any given day for various reasons. On days when exactly 10 workers are absent, the plant produces television at its normal rate. Thus, it is reasonable to assume that the plant could fire 10 workers without any loss in production.

The argument is most vulnerable to criticism on the grounds that it

(A) ignores the possibility that if 10 workers were fired, each of the remaining workers would produce more televisions than previously

(B) fails to show that the absentee rate would drop if 10 workers were fired

(C) takes for granted that the normal rate of production can be attained only when no more than the average number of workers are absent

(D) overlooks the possibility that certain workers are crucial to the production of televisions

(E) takes for granted that the rate of production is not affected by the number of workers employed at the plant

Source: LSAT & CR Archive


daagh chetan2u

Please explain this one
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Re: A television manufacturing plant has a total of 1,000 workers, though  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Dec 2018, 04:56
chetan2u wrote:
nightblade354 wrote:
A television manufacturing plant has a total of 1,000 workers, though an average of 10 are absent on any given day for various reasons. On days when exactly 10 workers are absent, the plant produces television at its normal rate. Thus, it is reasonable to assume that the plant could fire 10 workers without any loss in production.

The argument is most vulnerable to criticism on the grounds that it

(A) ignores the possibility that if 10 workers were fired, each of the remaining workers would produce more televisions than previously

(B) fails to show that the absentee rate would drop if 10 workers were fired

(C) takes for granted that the normal rate of production can be attained only when no more than the average number of workers are absent

(D) overlooks the possibility that certain workers are crucial to the production of televisions

(E) takes for granted that the rate of production is not affected by the number of workers employed at the plant

Source: LSAT & CR Archive



ParthSanghavi,

The total number is 1000, and on an AVERAGE 10 are absent...
On days when 10 or less are absent that is the strength is 990 and more, the production does not get affected.

The argument therefore suggests that we can cut down 10 employees, meaning 990 becomes the actual strength.
But what has this done ??
So it has brought you to a level where you can't have any absentee as any absentee will take the effective strength less than 990 and this would affect the production.

So, what is the guarantee that there will be 0 absenteeism.

Choice B states exactly this..


Thanks for a quick response :)
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Re: A television manufacturing plant has a total of 1,000 workers, though  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jan 2019, 07:25
Firing 10 people leaves the factory very exposed each time one of the remaining workers is missing.

Based on the numbers provided it is still likely that 9.9 workers are missing on any given day after the staff reduction.

Sufficient skeleton staff: 990
Average abstentees: ~10

Likely available people on a given day 980
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A television manufacturing plant has a total of 1,000 workers, though  [#permalink]

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New post 04 May 2019, 03:46
nightblade354 wrote:
A television manufacturing plant has a total of 1,000 workers, though an average of 10 are absent on any given day for various reasons. On days when exactly 10 workers are absent, the plant produces television at its normal rate. Thus, it is reasonable to assume that the plant could fire 10 workers without any loss in production.

The argument is most vulnerable to criticism on the grounds that it


Source: LSAT & CR Archive



Let's break down the argument first,

Given: - Plant employees 1,000 workers
- Absent on any given day: Max 10 (with normal production rate)

Argument: - Fire 10 employees; will not lead to loss of production

Criticism: - Not the same 10 employees are absent all the time
- Of the remaining 990, new 10 employees can be absent

Let's examine the options now:

(A) ignores the possibility that if 10 workers were fired, each of the remaining workers would produce more televisions than previously
- May be true but not what we are looking for. In this case, when the new 10 will be absent- that can hamper the production speed again. This statement is outside the scope of the present argument.

(B) fails to show that the absentee rate would drop if 10 workers were fired
- Exactly what we were saying in our criticism above. CORRECT.


(C) takes for granted that the normal rate of production can be attained only when no more than the average number of workers are absent
- The argument is not taking taking this for granted. Rather the premise of the argument is totally different. The premise used is that- 'Since 10 workers are absent; fire the 10 and you will still have the same production rate'. The flaw is in the assumption that the same 10 employees are absent all the time.

(D) overlooks the possibility that certain workers are crucial to the production of televisions
- Nothing in the argument targets crucial or non-crucial workers separately.

(E) takes for granted that the rate of production is not affected by the number of workers employed at the plant
- Same as with 'C'.
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Re: A television manufacturing plant has a total of 1,000 workers, though  [#permalink]

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New post 04 May 2019, 04:54
it actually assumes that everyone is doing same job.
What if some of those 10 are the ones doing the most important stuff.
I think D is the answer.
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A television manufacturing plant has a total of 1,000 workers, though  [#permalink]

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New post 08 May 2019, 18:01
Sneha333 wrote:
it actually assumes that everyone is doing same job.
What if some of those 10 are the ones doing the most important stuff.
I think D is the answer.


Let's try negating this,

D. Does not overlook the possibility that certain workers are crucial to the production of televisions

If this is true then the author acknowledges that certain workers are crucial to the production

Even then, it is not equal to saying that the workers being fired are the crucial ones.

Hope it helps.
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A television manufacturing plant has a total of 1,000 workers, though   [#permalink] 08 May 2019, 18:01
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