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Re: Geneticist: Genes, like viruses, have a strong tendency to self-replic [#permalink]
Geneticist: Genes, like viruses, have a strong tendency to self-replicate; this has led some biologists to call genes “selfish.” This term is, in this instance, intended to be defined behaviorally: it describes what genes do without ascribing intentions to them. But even given that genes are ascribed no intentions, the label “selfish” as applied to genes is a misnomer. Selfishness only concerns bringing about the best conditions for oneself; creating replicas of oneself is not selfish.

Which one of the following, if assumed, allows the geneticist’s conclusion to be properly drawn?

Highlighted text is conclusion. Some biologists call genes 'selfish', behaviourally defining it. The other aspect with that definition is 'intentions' which is clearly not the case as genes are ascribed not having. So, only bringing about the best conditions for oneself is left which as per the conclusion creating replicas don't do. One that gives this perspective is our answer.

(A) Bringing about the best conditions for oneself is less important than doing this for others.

(B) Creating replicas of oneself does not help bring about the best conditions for oneself.

(C) The behavioral definition of “selfish” is incompatible with its everyday definition.

(D) To ignore the fact that self-replication is not limited to genes is to misunderstand genetic behavior.

(E) Biologists have insufficient evidence about genetic behavior to determine whether it is best described as selfish.

Only B gives us enough reason to go ahead with such a conclusion.

Answer B.
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Re: Geneticist: Genes, like viruses, have a strong tendency to self-replic [#permalink]
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

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Re: Geneticist: Genes, like viruses, have a strong tendency to self-replic [#permalink]
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