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Handwriting analysis has recently been boosted by the

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Handwriting analysis has recently been boosted by the  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Aug 2005, 01:31
5
25
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A
B
C
D
E

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Question Stats:

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Handwriting analysis has recently been boosted by the invention of 3D micro-profilometry, which can be used to calculate the pressure used at a crossover point such as the center of a figure eight, and to detect the starting and ending points of strokes not detectable via conventional 2D analysis.

(A) the starting and ending points of strokes
(B) the locations of starting and ending points of strokes that are
(C) where starting and ending points are located, which are
(D) where starting and ending points are located
(E) where the starting and ending points are located, which are
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Re: Handwriting analysis has recently been boosted by the  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jan 2016, 23:29
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Handwriting analysis has recently been boosted by the invention of 3D micro-profilometry, which can be used
    to calculate the pressure used at a crossover point such as the center of a figure eight, and
    to detect the starting and ending points of strokes not detectable via conventional 2D analysis.

(A) the starting and ending points of strokes
(B) the locations of starting and ending points of strokes that are
(C) where starting and ending points are located, which are
(D) where starting and ending points are located
(E) where the starting and ending points are located, which are

Use of Where is absolutely meaningless since there is no location here and is also not parallel otherwise.
C, D and E can be eliminated.

(C), (D), and (E) all use the non-parallel "to calculate the pressure . . . and to detect where X and Y are located". Parallel structure would be either "to calculate the pressure . . . and to detect X and Y" or "to calculate how much pressure . . . and to detect where X and Y . . ."


(A) the starting and ending points of strokes
(B) the locations of starting and ending points of strokes that are


I felt the verb are is required to connect the strokes to not detectable phrase and selected B.
Please explain why B is wrong and A is correct with no such verb.
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New post 13 Aug 2005, 03:11
i will take c on this one.
In E there is extra the which makes it unparallel.
IMO B is parallel
to calculate pressure
to detect locations.
however, i am not sure what does that refer to. I guess it should refer to points but it is refering to strokes. can somebody calrify this.
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Re: Handwriting analysis has recently been boosted by the  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Aug 2005, 05:55
I'll take B on this one.

(B) the locations of starting and ending points of strokes that are

'the locations of starting and ending points' is modified by 'to detect' and 'that are' modifies strokes.
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New post 13 Aug 2005, 06:09
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My answer is A. It is concise, uses the correct ellipses and has a parallel construction.

The original sentence talks of detecting the points not their location. By this logic, all other choices are out.

One thing that I have noticed is that the use of a pronoun modifier such as "which" or "that" is usually awkward when you have possessive nouns or noun phrases such as "the wings of birds" etc.

For instance, to me the "that" in the choice B does not clearly indicate if it modifies the strokes or the locations.
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Re: Handwriting analysis has recently been boosted by the  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Aug 2005, 06:43
Handwriting analysis has recently been boosted by the invention of 3D micro-profilometry, which can be used to calculate the pressure used at a crossover point such as the center of a figure eight, and to detect the starting and ending points of strokes not detectable via conventional 2D analysis.

I hate questions like this one! All the choices are wrong and you somehow have to figure out, which is the "least wrong" according to the twisted mind of the writer! :arh


(A) the starting and ending points of strokes - it is not clear whether the points or the strokes are not detectable.

(B) the locations of starting and ending points of strokes that are - even worse: the locations, the points, or the strokes? "That are" is a bit out of place.

(C) where starting and ending points are located, which are - Lack of "the" before "starting" implies that a single stroke may have more than a pair of starting and ending points. I think "which are" should be replaced by "which is", so that the "is" can refer to the "where".

(D) where starting and ending points are located - "not detectable" after "are located" sucks. It just does and you know it.

(E) where the starting and ending points are located, which are - I'd put a "which is" instead of "which are" at the end. Wouldn't make it right though.


I choose (A) from what we have to work with. I am very probably wrong.
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New post 13 Aug 2005, 10:00
A and B are close.

It took me almost 4 minutes..

I will go with B..

But OE will help....
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New post 14 Aug 2005, 18:28
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Pokhran II wrote:
Handwriting analysis has recently been boosted by the invention of 3D micro-profilometry, which can be used to calculate the pressure used at a crossover point such as the center of a figure eight, and to detect the starting and ending points of strokes not detectable via conventional 2D analysis.

(A) the starting and ending points of strokes
(B) the locations of starting and ending points of strokes that are


I prefer A over B because "that" in B refers to strokes, which are not the sentence talking about not detectable via conventional 2D analysis but the starting and ending points of the strokes are not detectable via conventional 2D analysis.
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New post 15 Aug 2005, 07:13
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AJB77 wrote:
My answer is A. It is concise, uses the correct ellipses and has a parallel construction.

The original sentence talks of detecting the points not their location. By this logic, all other choices are out.

One thing that I have noticed is that the use of a pronoun modifier such as "which" or "that" is usually awkward when you have possessive nouns or noun phrases such as "the wings of birds" etc.

For instance, to me the "that" in the choice B does not clearly indicate if it modifies the strokes or the locations.


Excellent point.

I think A makes more sense, because the restrictive clause is directly modifying the stokes. Whereas the verb phrase modifies the locations.

Moreover, A has a parallelism between 2 things
to calculate the pressure used
and
to detect the starting and ending points of strokes not detectable.

OE will definetly shed more light.
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New post 17 Aug 2005, 12:30
B?
I think it's parallel but A is shorter and more concise.

I'll stick with B and wait for the OA.
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New post 14 Sep 2015, 19:00
choose, a
"which" which jum over verb is not prefered though can be appear in oa

C, D and E are out

betwen A and B, A look more consise

pls help
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Re: Handwriting analysis has recently been boosted by the  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Mar 2016, 18:25
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Nevernevergiveup wrote:
Handwriting analysis has recently been boosted by the invention of 3D micro-profilometry, which can be used
    to calculate the pressure used at a crossover point such as the center of a figure eight, and
    to detect the starting and ending points of strokes not detectable via conventional 2D analysis.

(A) the starting and ending points of strokes
(B) the locations of starting and ending points of strokes that are
(C) where starting and ending points are located, which are
(D) where starting and ending points are located
(E) where the starting and ending points are located, which are

Use of Where is absolutely meaningless since there is no location here and is also not parallel otherwise.
C, D and E can be eliminated.

(C), (D), and (E) all use the non-parallel "to calculate the pressure . . . and to detect where X and Y are located". Parallel structure would be either "to calculate the pressure . . . and to detect X and Y" or "to calculate how much pressure . . . and to detect where X and Y . . ."


(A) the starting and ending points of strokes
(B) the locations of starting and ending points of strokes that are


I felt the verb are is required to connect the strokes to not detectable phrase and selected B.
Please explain why B is wrong and A is correct with no such verb.


I understand your take on parallelism.
But I wanted to bring people's attention one thing on modification.
to detect the starting and ending points of strokes not detectable via conventional 2D analysis.
where do you guys think "not detectable via conventional 2D analysis" modifies? Is it modifying strokes or the points?
I think there is a slight shift of meaning between the two.
C and E make pretty unattractive options, but at least they they don't generate a confusion over whether points or strokes are not detectable.
What do you guys think?
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New post 15 Mar 2016, 22:04
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I do agree that this is not an error- free question.
There are grave doubts about choice A and for that matter even about B.
1. Addition of a verb ‘are’ isn’t going to be helpful since it is not the strokes that are not detectable but indeed the starting and ending points that are not detectable. But a modifier, not preceded by a comma has to modify its proximate noun, strokes in this case.
A verb is not going to serve any purpose in an infinitive phrase as we have in this example.
B is also wrong, since the inclusion of the locations adds to further muddle as it is now claimable that it is logically the locations that are not detectable rather than the points or the strokes. Of course the puritans will strongly plead that the restrictive pronoun ‘that’ will only have to refer to the ‘strokes’ by virtue of its proximity.
Overall, this question doesn’t seem to give us any take – away at the end. At best, we can tolerate A for its brevity, though with a pinch of salt.
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New post 03 Sep 2016, 06:17
My answer is A.
A is concise and Clear.
Both A & B are close. But in B, "starting" and "ending" points means the locations, hence, locations of starting and..... is redundant.
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Re: Handwriting analysis has recently been boosted by the  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jun 2017, 08:58
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Official Explanation
Read the Original Sentence Carefully, Looking for Errors:

The sentence as written contains no errors. The underlined portion consists of just nouns, which are part of a parallel construction. The sentence describes a new invention that can be used "to calculate the pressure ... and to detect the starting and ending points ...." Note that the two parts of this construction are parallel in form. Expect to choose (A), but check the other choices to make sure nothing was overlooked.

Scan and Group the Answer Choices:

A quick vertical scan of the choices reveals a 3-2 split, with (C), (D), and (E) beginning with "where," while (A) and (B) begin with "the." More analysis needs to be done to determine the significance of this split, however.

Eliminate Wrong Answer Choices:

(B) also demonstrates proper parallelism, but it is unnecessarily wordy. Points are by definition at specific locations, so saying that one can detect the locations of the points offers no more information than saying one can detect the points. The GMAT prefers concise wording whenever possible, and (B)'s wordiness offers no advantage over (A)'s conciseness. Eliminate (B).

(C), (D), and (E) all use the non-parallel "to calculate the pressure ... and to detect where X and Y are located." Parallel structure would be either "to calculate the pressure ... and to detect X and Y," as in (A), or to calculate how much pressure ... and to detect where X and Y .... Eliminate these three choices.

As expected, (A) is correct.

TAKEAWAY: Watch out for two-part constructions that require parallelism. They are common but easy to overlook when there are many words between the two parts of the construction.
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New post 25 Jun 2017, 22:57
"Never use a long word where a short one will do"

George Orwell

I believe it is appropriate to sentences too. So, A
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New post 03 Aug 2017, 01:33
IMO detect and locate are redundant; we can omit one. A does that.
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Re: Handwriting analysis has recently been boosted by the  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jul 2018, 12:09
Nevernevergiveup wrote:
Handwriting analysis has recently been boosted by the invention of 3D micro-profilometry, which can be used
    to calculate the pressure used at a crossover point such as the center of a figure eight, and
    to detect the starting and ending points of strokes not detectable via conventional 2D analysis.

(A) the starting and ending points of strokes
(B) the locations of starting and ending points of strokes that are
(C) where starting and ending points are located, which are
(D) where starting and ending points are located
(E) where the starting and ending points are located, which are

Use of Where is absolutely meaningless since there is no location here and is also not parallel otherwise.
C, D and E can be eliminated.

(C), (D), and (E) all use the non-parallel "to calculate the pressure . . . and to detect where X and Y are located". Parallel structure would be either "to calculate the pressure . . . and to detect X and Y" or "to calculate how much pressure . . . and to detect where X and Y . . ."


(A) the starting and ending points of strokes
(B) the locations of starting and ending points of strokes that are


I felt the verb are is required to connect the strokes to not detectable phrase and selected B.
Please explain why B is wrong and A is correct with no such verb.


I thought locations and points are same.
Furthermore, Not detectable... is a modifier and its correctly modifying these points.

That's how i eliminated B.
I don't know whether my approach is right. Can you point out if i were wrong anywhere.

Hope it helps.
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Re: Handwriting analysis has recently been boosted by the  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2018, 07:21
anupamghosh wrote:
My answer is A.
A is concise and Clear.
Both A & B are close. But in B, "starting" and "ending" points means the locations, hence, locations of starting and..... is redundant.

Yes i agree with this explannation,just to elaborate;
B has proper parallelism, but it is unnecessarily wordy. Points are by definition at specific locations. So A is concise and explains all that B does.So Eliminate (B).
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Re: Handwriting analysis has recently been boosted by the &nbs [#permalink] 21 Jul 2018, 07:21
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