It is currently 20 Apr 2018, 11:23

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 12 Apr 2017
Posts: 1
Re: It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Apr 2017, 12:35
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
victory47 wrote:
ChrisLele wrote:
I received a PM on this one, so I am replying (though it is a good one and I would have replied anyways had I seen it first :)).

In the original sentence, 'Earth' should not be modified by a phrase that is clearly intended to modify the Caspian Sea (I mean lake :)). Thus, we can get rid of (A) and (B). Get rid of 'E' because of the wordy 'being.'

Now, I can tackle the original question addressed in the PM: the difference between (C) and (D).

(C) is awkward because of the 'but it.' This awkwardness can also be attributed to the fact that we are separating 'though called a sea' and the Caspian by an intervening phrase that is itself awkward.

(D) on the other is succinct. What is commonly called a sea? The Caspian, which follows, 'though called a sea.' We no longer have the unnecessary 'it'. Typically, when an answer choice adds an 'it' this should clue you in that the answer choice is becoming less succinct, and thus likely to be favored on the GMAT.

Hope that helps :).


whay A and B are wrong?

"which relative clause " can modify slightly far noun. e gmat write an article on this point. so, A and B are correct

for the article


the use of 'which clause" is legitimate but is NOT PREFERED.

is that right? pls


Many people had pointed out that the usage of which is wrong in option A & B, however, they all didn't have a convincing reason for it.

After doing several researches online, the word "which" in option A & B do not necessary refer to Earth, they can refer to lake as well which would have been correct.

(here I'm quoting Ron from Manhattan Gmat the usage of "which": which can modify 1.the noun that precedes the comma and 2. the noun+prepositional phrase immediately precedes the comma. Therefore in the case "...largest lake on earth, which..." on earth is a prep phrase and lake is a noun, "which" can modify either earth or lake+on earth.)

Noted that the explanation OG gives for A is that "the usage of which is unclear". What that means is that the usage of which CAN BE CORRECT, however, since which can refer to earth as well as lake, we don't know exactly what which refers to.

This is the reason why the word "which" is wrong in option A & B. IT IS NOT JUST BECAUSE THAT "which refers to earth thus its wrong".
Manhattan GMAT Discount CodesVeritas Prep GMAT Discount CodesEMPOWERgmat Discount Codes
2 KUDOS received
Director
Director
User avatar
G
Joined: 27 Mar 2010
Posts: 872
Location: Bangalore, India
Re: It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Apr 2017, 22:16
2
This post received
KUDOS
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
brightandamen wrote:
Can somebody explain why we use "covering" instead of "covers"?

Hi brightandamen, are you referring to option C?

In option C, if covers had been used, at the very least there should have been an and before covers. So, the structure of C in that case would have been:

the landlocked Caspian is.... and covers...

Parallelism is between two verbs: is and covers. While this would have been a grammatically correct sentence, it would have suggested that landlocked Caspian has two distinct properties (1. landlocked Caspian is the largest lake on Earth. 2. landlocked Caspian covers more than four times the surface area of its closest rival in size).

However, the ideal meaning is represented by option C. The fact that landlocked Caspian covers more than four times the surface area of its closest rival in size, is actually a description/manifestation of the fact that the landlocked Caspian is the largest lake on Earth.

In such cases, present participles (covering....) are an ideal usage.

p.s. Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana discusses Present participles, their application and examples in significant detail. If someone is interested, PM me your email-id; I can mail the corresponding section
_________________

Thanks,
Ashish
EducationAisle, Bangalore

Sentence Correction Nirvana available at Amazon.in and Flipkart

Now! Preview the entire Grammar Section of Sentence Correction Nirvana at pothi.com

Intern
Intern
User avatar
B
Joined: 16 Jun 2016
Posts: 23
Location: Indonesia
Concentration: Strategy, Technology
GMAT 1: 540 Q42 V20
GPA: 2.9
Re: It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Apr 2017, 23:26
Hi Ashish, thank you for your detailed explanations. Kudos to you!
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 23 Dec 2013
Posts: 208
Location: United States (CA)
GMAT 1: 710 Q45 V41
GMAT 2: 760 Q49 V44
GPA: 3.76
Reviews Badge
Re: It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 May 2017, 09:18
ashdah wrote:
It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually the largest lake on Earth, which covers more than four times the surface area of its closest rival in size, North America's Lake Superior.

A. It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually the largest lake on Earth, which covers
B. Although it is called a sea, actually the landlocked Caspian is the largest lake on Earth, which covers
C. Though called a sea, the landlocked Caspian is actually the largest lake on Earth, covering
D. Though called a sea but it actually is the largest lake on Earth, the landlocked Caspian covers
E. Despite being called a sea, the largest lake on Earth is actually the landlocked Caspian, covering


Please explain C & D along with the preference with reasons thanks in advance


A "Which" modifies either "Earth" or "lake," but in this case it should modify "Caspian."
B "Which" modifies either "Earth" or "lake," but in this case it should modify "Caspian."
C Correct.
D An independent clause cannot be the opening modifier of a sentence. A correct version would read, "Though called a sea but actually the largest lake on Earth..."
E "The largest lake" is not "being called a sea"; the "Caspian" is.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 04 Mar 2017
Posts: 16
Re: It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jun 2017, 11:20
ChrisLele wrote:
I received a PM on this one, so I am replying (though it is a good one and I would have replied anyways had I seen it first :)).

In the original sentence, 'Earth' should not be modified by a phrase that is clearly intended to modify the Caspian Sea (I mean lake :)). Thus, we can get rid of (A) and (B). Get rid of 'E' because of the wordy 'being.'

Now, I can tackle the original question addressed in the PM: the difference between (C) and (D).

(C) is awkward because of the 'but it.' This awkwardness can also be attributed to the fact that we are separating 'though called a sea' and the Caspian by an intervening phrase that is itself awkward.

(D) on the other is succinct. What is commonly called a sea? The Caspian, which follows, 'though called a sea.' We no longer have the unnecessary 'it'. Typically, when an answer choice adds an 'it' this should clue you in that the answer choice is becoming less succinct, and thus likely to be favored on the GMAT.

Hope that helps :).


It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually the largest lake on Earth, which covers more than four times the surface area of its closest rival in size, North America's Lake Superior.

A. It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually the largest lake on Earth, which covers
B. Although it is called a sea, actually the landlocked Caspian is the largest lake on Earth, which covers
C. Though called a sea, the landlocked Caspian is actually the largest lake on Earth, covering
D. Though called a sea but it actually is the largest lake on Earth, the landlocked Caspian covers
E. Despite being called a sea, the largest lake on Earth is actually the landlocked Caspian, covering


In options A and B, doesn't 'which' correctly modify 'the largest lake' since 'on Earth' is a vital noun modifier?
_________________

"You can help me achieve my goal by sharing your knowledge"

Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 24 May 2017
Posts: 64
Re: It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Jun 2017, 03:51
It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually the largest lake on Earth, which covers more than four times the surface area of its closest rival in size, North America's Lake Superior.

A. It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually the largest lake on Earth, which covers - "which" incorrectly refers to "Earth"
B. Although it is called a sea, actually the landlocked Caspian is the largest lake on Earth, which covers - "which" incorrectly refers to "Earth" + sounds a mess
C. Though called a sea, the landlocked Caspian is actually the largest lake on Earth, covering - CORRECT, importantly "covering" is verb+ing that modifies the full clause preceding it + "landlocked caspian" placed correct after "called a sea"
D. Though called a sea but it actually is the largest lake on Earth, the landlocked Caspian covers - "though" and "but" cannot be used together as they mean the same & therefore redundancy + "it" is referring to sea based on where it is placed, however "it" should refer to "the landlocked Caspian" + "landlocked caspian" should be placed right after "called a sea" as in Option C + 2 independent clauses separated by a comma is of course incorrect (lot going wrong here but a good learning)
E. Despite being called a sea, the largest lake on Earth is actually the landlocked Caspian, covering - "landlocked caspian" should be after "called a sea" + sounds very awkward & "being" almost always is in the wrong sentence
_________________

NOTE: I am not an expert, therefore my analysis answering the questions may be incorrect and may not be relied upon. However I will appreciate if you can correct the mistakes I may have made in my analysis.

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 07 Aug 2016
Posts: 15
Location: Brazil
Concentration: Economics, Marketing
WE: Project Management (Energy and Utilities)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Aug 2017, 14:53
Wouldn't it be possible for "Covering" to be incorrectly modifying earth as well?

tks!
Verbal Forum Moderator
User avatar
P
Joined: 19 Mar 2014
Posts: 977
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, Entrepreneurship
GPA: 3.5
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Sep 2017, 08:19
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
zzarur wrote:
Wouldn't it be possible for "Covering" to be incorrectly modifying earth as well?

tks!


Hello zzarur - "Covering" here cannot refer to "Earth" and the reason is the previous clause has a primary noun as "Caspian" also most importantly this clause is separated by a "Comma". Hence, the word "covering" can only modify "Caspian" here.

Hope this is clear
_________________

"Nothing in this world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not: nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not: the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent."

Best AWA Template: https://gmatclub.com/forum/how-to-get-6-0-awa-my-guide-64327.html#p470475

Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 06 Sep 2016
Posts: 140
Location: Italy
Schools: EDHEC (A)
GMAT 1: 650 Q43 V37
GPA: 3.2
WE: General Management (Human Resources)
Premium Member
Re: It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Sep 2017, 10:09
Hello friends of GMAT CLUB,
I can't understand why C is correct: I know that the ",+ verb-ing" clause is used to express "result" or "how the thing in the preceding clause was done" and it's not the case... can you please help me?
Verbal Forum Moderator
User avatar
P
Joined: 19 Mar 2014
Posts: 977
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, Entrepreneurship
GPA: 3.5
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Oct 2017, 14:50
MvArrow wrote:
Hello friends of GMAT CLUB,
I can't understand why C is correct: I know that the ",+ verb-ing" clause is used to express "result" or "how the thing in the preceding clause was done" and it's not the case... can you please help me?


Hello MvArrow - In this case, the verb-ing form covering ................ is modifying the word landlocked Caspian and this usage is correct here.

Cause and effect relationship is not applicable for this question. Hope this helps!
_________________

"Nothing in this world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not: nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not: the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent."

Best AWA Template: https://gmatclub.com/forum/how-to-get-6-0-awa-my-guide-64327.html#p470475

Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 30 Apr 2013
Posts: 90
Re: It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Oct 2017, 17:54
can someone explain why "which" cannot modify "landlocked caspian"
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 04 Oct 2015
Posts: 355
Location: Viet Nam
Concentration: Finance, Economics
GMAT 1: 730 Q51 V36
GPA: 3.56
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Nov 2017, 03:35
in A, can "on Earth" be a mission-critical modifier (so "which" can jump over "on Earth" to modify "lake") ?

Many thanks ^^
_________________

Do not pray for an easy life, pray for the strength to endure a difficult one - Bruce Lee

Expert Post
e-GMAT Representative
User avatar
S
Joined: 02 Nov 2011
Posts: 2499
Re: It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Nov 2017, 13:49
santro789 wrote:
can someone explain why "which" cannot modify "landlocked caspian"




Hello santro789,

I will be glad to help you out with this one. :-)

I analyze the original sentence in two ways:

1. We can rewrite the sentence as on Earth, the landlocked Caspian is actually the largest lake. Hence, the modifier on Earth is an action modifier and modifies the verb is. It does not modify the noun the landlocked Caspian.

Hence, which cannot jump over this modifier to refer to the slightly far-away noun the landlocked Caspian.



2. The noun modifier which is followed by the singular verb covers that agrees in number with both the landlocked Caspian and on Earth. Hence, there is a slight scope of confusion whether which refers to singular Earth and the landlocked Caspian.



Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
_________________












| '4 out of Top 5' Instructors on gmatclub | 70 point improvement guarantee | www.e-gmat.com

Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 18 Feb 2017
Posts: 67
Location: India
Schools: ISB '20, IIMA , IIMC
GMAT 1: 650 Q45 V30
GPA: 3.35
Re: It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Jan 2018, 00:38
egmat wrote:
JarvisR wrote:
Hi,
I request the members to review below analysis and share their inputs.I appreciate the support on this.
Regards.

Question:
It is called a sea, but
the landlocked Caspian is actually the largest lake on Earth,
which covers more than four times the surface area of its closest rival in size, North America's Lake Superior.

I read the OG explanation for this but it's not very clear to me.

Q1) Is there any ambiguity in the usage of which in option A?
Here which link/modify Earth or the largest lake on Earth to compare it against "North America's Lake Superior".
IMO the latter, largest lake on Earth (which is Caspian), wld be the right choice as saying "Earth, which covers more than four times the surface area of its closest rival in size, North America's" wld be illogical.So usage of which is grammatically correct here without any ambiguity.

Now, if we look the argument we would see that it says "Caspian is actually the largest lake on Earth, which covers more than four times the surface area of its closest rival in size, North America's Lake Superior."
So I believe an elegant/clean construction would be the one where "Caspian" is compared directly with NA's lake instead of the largest lake on earth.
1)the landlocked Caspian is actually the largest lake on Earth and covers more than four times the surface area of its closest rival in size, North America's Lake Superior.
OR,
2)the landlocked Caspian is actually the largest lake on Earth, covering more than four times the surface area of its closest rival in size, North America's Lake Superior.

Q2)Also what's wrong with option B apart from which issue similar to A. Is usage of actually correct here?


Hi JarvisaR,

Thanks for posting your doubt here. :-)

I completely agree with you that "which" in Choice A and B "logically" CAN ONLY refer to "the largest lake on Earth" and not just "Earth". However, the problem that we face in these choices is that both these entities "the largest lake" and "Earth" are singular noun entities and agree in number with the singular verb "covers". hence, usage of "which" leaves that little room for grammatical ambiguity as to what does "which" refer to.

Choice C completely does away with that little possible grammatical ambiguity by using "comma + verb-ing modifier covering". Now, there is no doubt that "covering" refers to Caspian.

Now regarding the usage of "actually" in choice B, is it incorrect? IMHO, it is not, but it is certainly not needed in the sentence.

hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
SJ


Ma'am
although/though/even though +clause is thr right syntax
but in option C,although+modifier,the landlocked caspian
hence i opted for option B
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 06 Feb 2018
Posts: 1
Re: It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Mar 2018, 13:26
It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually the largest lake on Earth, which covers more than four times the surface area of its closest rival in size, North America's Lake Superior.

A. It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually the largest lake on Earth, which covers
B. Although it is called a sea, actually the landlocked Caspian is the largest lake on Earth, which covers
C. Though called a sea, the landlocked Caspian is actually the largest lake on Earth, covering
D. Though called a sea but it actually is the largest lake on Earth, the landlocked Caspian covers
E. Despite being called a sea, the largest lake on Earth is actually the landlocked Caspian, covering

Hello I have a question about the use of though
As I learned before, we use Though/ although/ even though with a clause (Subject + Verb).
1 – If I see though/even though/although, MUST they be followed by a Subject, a Verb, or a Subject and a verb (Both)?
2- In case we need both a Subject and a Verb. How is the form of the verb that you consider a clause? The verb should be conjugated? Not in the Ving or V3(participle)?
If this is the case that though/even though/although MUST be followed by a subject and a verb, and this verb must be conjugated (unconjugated forms such as participle or Ving are wrong), then, can anyone explain me why “Though called a sea” is correct? Because for me called is a participle form (V3) and no subject. I believe that if I had seen “although called a sea” probably it would have been incorrect and someone would have said that is missing the subject and a conjugated verb. So what is the rule for Though? As the answer choice C is correct, where can I find this rule for “though”?

Thank you
Director
Director
User avatar
G
Joined: 27 Mar 2010
Posts: 872
Location: Bangalore, India
Re: It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Mar 2018, 21:10
jdrury wrote:
I believe that if I had seen “although called a sea” probably it would have been incorrect and someone would have said that is missing the subject and a conjugated verb. So what is the rule for Though? As the answer choice C is correct, where can I find this rule for “though”?

Hi jdrury, you're correct. Though is a subordinating conjunction and marks the start of a Dependent clause.

Option C however, represents a case that many people refer to as verbless clause. Basically the verb is implied.

So, C actually implies: Though (the landlocked Caspian is) called a sea,....

where is is the verb.
_________________

Thanks,
Ashish
EducationAisle, Bangalore

Sentence Correction Nirvana available at Amazon.in and Flipkart

Now! Preview the entire Grammar Section of Sentence Correction Nirvana at pothi.com

Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 14 Feb 2018
Posts: 120
Re: It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Mar 2018, 22:18
ashdah wrote:
It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually the largest lake on Earth, which covers more than four times the surface area of its closest rival in size, North America's Lake Superior.

A. It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually the largest lake on Earth, which covers
B. Although it is called a sea, actually the landlocked Caspian is the largest lake on Earth, which covers
C. Though called a sea, the landlocked Caspian is actually the largest lake on Earth, covering
D. Though called a sea but it actually is the largest lake on Earth, the landlocked Caspian covers
E. Despite being called a sea, the largest lake on Earth is actually the landlocked Caspian, covering


[Reveal] Spoiler:
Please explain C & D along with the preference with reasons thanks in advance

Hi,

C is the correct option.

D is incorrect because ' though ' is never followed or I should say does not require a ' but '. Thus, D is incorrect.

'but' is required only with 'although' . In option B 'but' is absent , thus, B is also incorrect.

Kudos if you like the answer. [SMILING FACE WITH SMILING EYES]

Sent from my Lenovo K53a48 using GMAT Club Forum mobile app
Re: It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually   [#permalink] 13 Mar 2018, 22:18

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 37 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

It is called a sea, but the landlocked Caspian is actually

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.