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Re: Many computer databases impose formatting requirements, such [#permalink]
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What's the difference between using ";" and "--"?
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Re: Many computer databases impose formatting requirements, such [#permalink]
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The difference between a semi-colon and a dash, as far as I know, is that the dash is more of a multipurpose grammar tool. A dash can be used in place of a comma, colon, or semi-colon. A semi-colon is more specific, and it separates two independent clauses in the same sentence without a conjunction.
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Re: Many computer databases impose formatting requirements, such [#permalink]
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sudi03 wrote:
Many computer databases impose formatting requirements, such as minimum numbers of capital letters or numerals, on users’ passwords in an attempt to enhance security; ironically, these measures often make the passwords easier to guess, as users are more likely to select the simplest possible password that conforms to all the rules.






A. security; ironically, these measures often make the passwords easier to guess, as users are - perfect meaning and clarity with a semi colon .

B.security; these measures, ironically, often result in users creating passwords that are easier to guess and - not parallel + misplaced ironically

C.security – ironic measures that often cause passwords to be easier to guess because they are - "they" - pronoun ambiguity

D.security – measures that, ironically, often make passwords that are easier to guess, with users - with users - wrong

E.security – often, ironically, making the passwords easier to guess and making users- "often" + making - not required
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Many computer databases impose formatting requirements, such [#permalink]
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Many computer databases impose formatting requirements, such as minimum numbers of capital letters or numerals, on users’ passwords in an attempt to enhance security; ironically, these measures often make the passwords easier to guess, as users are more likely to select the simplest possible password that conforms to all the rules.

security; ironically, these measures often make the passwords easier to guess, as users are
security; these measures, ironically, often result in users creating passwords that are easier to guess and
security – ironic measures that often cause passwords to be easier to guess because they are
security – measures that, ironically, often make passwords that are easier to guess, with users
security – often, ironically, making the passwords easier to guess and making users


I know the right answer to this, but could someone please explain the useage of 'as' in this?

What new information I realize about the usage of 'as' from this is that before and after as doesn't have to be parallel in terms of the verbs used but simply from the grammatical structure of the two clauses and tenses within used. Am I correct in this deduction?
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Re: Many computer databases impose formatting requirements, such [#permalink]
manimgoindowndown wrote:
Many computer databases impose formatting requirements, such as minimum numbers of capital letters or numerals, on users’ passwords in an attempt to enhance security; ironically, these measures often make the passwords easier to guess, as users are more likely to select the simplest possible password that conforms to all the rules.

security; ironically, these measures often make the passwords easier to guess, as users are
security; these measures, ironically, often result in users creating passwords that are easier to guess and
security – ironic measures that often cause passwords to be easier to guess because they are
security – measures that, ironically, often make passwords that are easier to guess, with users
security – often, ironically, making the passwords easier to guess and making users


I know the right answer to this, but could someone please explain the useage of 'as' in this?

What new information I realize about the usage of 'as' from this is that before and after as doesn't have to be parallel in terms of the verbs used but simply from the grammatical structure of the two clauses and tenses within used. Am I correct in this deduction?


Correct Answer is A

Please carefully understand the meaning and the sequence of the statement.
All other choices are distorting the intended meaning completely.

Choice B - these measures dont result in .......
Choice C - these measures are not ironic
Choice D - measures that, ironically, often make passwords that are easier to guess, with users (these measures dont ironically often make passwords/as intended they make the passwords easier to guess)
Choice E - uses present participle "making"

Not very clear on your specific question, if you can please re phrase
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Re: Many computer databases impose formatting requirements, such [#permalink]
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manimgoindowndown wrote:
Many computer databases impose formatting requirements, such as minimum numbers of capital letters or numerals, on users’ passwords in an attempt to enhance security; ironically, these measures often make the passwords easier to guess, as users are more likely to select the simplest possible password that conforms to all the rules.

security; ironically, these measures often make the passwords easier to guess, as users are
security; these measures, ironically, often result in users creating passwords that are easier to guess and
security – ironic measures that often cause passwords to be easier to guess because they are
security – measures that, ironically, often make passwords that are easier to guess, with users
security – often, ironically, making the passwords easier to guess and making users


I know the right answer to this, but could someone please explain the useage of 'as' in this?

What new information I realize about the usage of 'as' from this is that before and after as doesn't have to be parallel in terms of the verbs used but simply from the grammatical structure of the two clauses and tenses within used. Am I correct in this deduction?


Hi manimgoindowndown,

Many computer databases impose formatting requirements, such as minimum numbers of capital letters or numerals, on users’ passwords in an attempt to enhance security; ironically, these measures often make the passwords easier to guess, as users are more likely to select the simplest possible password that conforms to all the rules.

(A) security; ironically, these measures often make the passwords easier to guess, as users are

In this sentence "as" is used as a replacement of "because". In other words "as" is used for causation; other usages of "as" could be in comparisons(The apples are as sweet as oranges are.), in expressing duration(As he picked up the stick, he heard his mother screaming) and as a preposition(As the CEO of the company, you are responsible for all the layoffs).

Consider the following example:

I am going to bed, as I am tired from a hectic meeting at work.

The sentence is similar to the below one, with "as" replaced with "because"

I am going to bed because I am tired from a hectic meeting at work.

In this case you do not have to look for parallelism because "as" is not comparing anything. If "as" is used for comparison then the compared structures should be logically and grammatically parallel.

Hope this helps,

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Re: Many computer databases impose formatting requirements, such [#permalink]
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Hi,

I eliminated A and B, considering the use of semi-colon. For me the second clause, the semi-colon is separating, is not an independent clause.
What's wrong with that logic?
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Re: Many computer databases impose formatting requirements, such [#permalink]
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+1 for A. Very Interesting question.

Many computer databases impose formatting requirements, such as minimum numbers of capital letters or numerals, on users’ passwords in an attempt to enhance security; ironically, these measures often make the passwords easier to guess, as users are more likely to select the simplest possible password that conforms to all the rules.


A. security; ironically, these measures often make the passwords easier to guess, as users are.

B.security; these measures, ironically, often result in users creating passwords that are easier to guess and (Doesn't not establish the cause and Effect relationship )

C.security – ironic measures that often cause passwords to be easier to guess because they are (Measures are not ironic)

D.security – measures that, ironically, often make passwords that are easier to guess, with users (Same as B)

E.security – often, ironically, making the passwords easier to guess and making users (Same as B)
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Re: Many computer databases impose formatting requirements, such [#permalink]
sudi03 wrote:
Many computer databases impose formatting requirements, such as minimum numbers of capital letters or numerals, on users’ passwords in an attempt to enhance security; ironically, these measures often make the passwords easier to guess, as users are more likely to select the simplest possible password that conforms to all the rules.


A. security; ironically, these measures often make the passwords easier to guess, as users are

B.security; these measures, ironically, often result in users creating passwords that are easier to guess and

C.security – ironic measures that often cause passwords to be easier to guess because they are

D.security – measures that, ironically, often make passwords that are easier to guess, with users

E.security – often, ironically, making the passwords easier to guess and making users


This sentence describes an ironic result of certain password security measures: in systems with such requirements, people generally create passwords that are much more predictable, and thus easier for intruders to guess, than in systems with no such restrictions on password formation. The sentence should correctly express the irony of the situation, and should also correctly indicate the sequence of causation: users create simpler passwords because of the security measures, and so the passwords are easier to guess because they are simpler.

(A) CORRECT. In this sentence, the word ironically is correctly placed in front of the actual irony (namely, that the resulting passwords are easier to guess). The transition as properly introduces an explanation for why the passwords are easier to guess.

(B) The construction result in users… illogically suggests that the result of the password security measures is the users themselves, rather than the users’ resultant actions. In addition, the parallelism of easier to guess and more likely… implies that both of these descriptions apply to the passwords—illogically suggesting that the passwords are able to choose themselves.

(C) The construction ironic measures is illogical: what is ironic is not the measures themselves, but users’ reaction to them. In addition, the pronoun they is clearly intended to refer to the users, but the noun users is not actually present.

(D) The construction measures that … often make passwords illogically suggests that the passwords are created (perhaps automatically) by the security measures themselves, rather than by system users in response to those measures.

(E) The construction making the passwords easier to guess and making users more likely… illogically suggests that these are two separate and independent effects of the security measures. The sentence does not properly convey the idea that the passwords are easier to guess because of the way in which users select them.

The correct answer is A.
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Re: Many computer databases impose formatting requirements, such [#permalink]
Hi, I have same query, can anyone please explain ?




jgnorero wrote:
Hi,

I eliminated A and B, considering the use of semi-colon. For me the second clause, the semi-colon is separating, is not an independent clause.
What's wrong with that logic?
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Re: Many computer databases impose formatting requirements, such [#permalink]
A-correct
B -parallelism issue
C - they - not clear
D & E - meaning issue

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Re: Many computer databases impose formatting requirements, such [#permalink]
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