Last visit was: 19 Jul 2024, 17:57 It is currently 19 Jul 2024, 17:57
Close
GMAT Club Daily Prep
Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History
Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.
Close
Request Expert Reply
Confirm Cancel
SORT BY:
Date
Tags:
Show Tags
Hide Tags
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
Joined: 26 Aug 2020
Posts: 274
Own Kudos [?]: 413 [19]
Given Kudos: 114
Location: India
Concentration: Entrepreneurship, Entrepreneurship
GPA: 3.15
WE:Accounting (Investment Banking)
Send PM
Senior Moderator - Masters Forum
Joined: 19 Jan 2020
Posts: 3128
Own Kudos [?]: 2814 [4]
Given Kudos: 1511
Location: India
GPA: 4
WE:Analyst (Internet and New Media)
Send PM
LBS Moderator
Joined: 30 Oct 2019
Posts: 830
Own Kudos [?]: 789 [1]
Given Kudos: 1576
Send PM
Current Student
Joined: 05 Nov 2019
Posts: 19
Own Kudos [?]: 4 [0]
Given Kudos: 43
Location: Viet Nam
GMAT 1: 690 Q48 V35
GPA: 2.91
Send PM
Re: The hypothesis of an expanding Earth has never attracted notable suppo [#permalink]
Q1. The passage indicates that one reason why the expansion hypothesis has attracted little support is that it WILL NOT

(A) overcome deficiencies in current geologic hypotheses

I don't see anywhere in the passage that mentions or implies that the expansion hypothesis WILL NOT overcome deficiencies in current geologic hypotheses. He cites the continental drift as an example from the past and "The cases are not precisely analogous." So the expansion hypothesis may or may not overcome current geologic hypotheses. "Will not" is kind of an extreme word. Or did I get the wrong idea here?
Retired Moderator
Joined: 05 May 2016
Posts: 770
Own Kudos [?]: 695 [1]
Given Kudos: 1316
Location: India
Send PM
Re: The hypothesis of an expanding Earth has never attracted notable suppo [#permalink]
1
Kudos
Arielltl wrote:
Q1. The passage indicates that one reason why the expansion hypothesis has attracted little support is that it WILL NOT

(A) overcome deficiencies in current geologic hypotheses

I don't see anywhere in the passage that mentions or implies that the expansion hypothesis WILL NOT overcome deficiencies in current geologic hypotheses. He cites the continental drift as an example from the past and "The cases are not precisely analogous." So the expansion hypothesis may or may not overcome current geologic hypotheses. "Will not" is kind of an extreme word. Or did I get the wrong idea here?



Hi Arielltl,

Agreed that the complete passage is based on ideas, we cannot infer anything explicitly. But, for Question 1, if we look at the 1st para, author mentions that the hypothesis of an expanding Earth has never attracted notable support, and if it were not for the continental drift theory it would still be an improbable concept. Author again mentions that continental drift was also once considered illusory, but the idea was kept alive until evidence from physicists compelled geologists to reinterpret their data. So, interpreting from the same, that since continental drift theory was also considered an illusion, but was later accepted, if something similar could be done for the expanding Earth hypothesis, we might find some support for the same. The same is also mentioned by the author in the last lines of the passage: "If, however, physicists could show that the Earth’s gravitational force has decreased with time, expansion would have to be reconsidered and accommodated."

Though "will not" might seem a little extreme, we have to keep in mind that though it is not mentioned in the passage that the expansion hypothesis has attracted little support because it will not overcome deficiencies in current geologic hypotheses, but still we can that the complete passage is an idea, of what has happened, and similarly if physicists could show that the Earth’s gravitational force has decreased with time, may be the hypothesis could also find support.

Thus A is the best answer.

Hope This Helps.
Thanks.
Manager
Manager
Joined: 01 Feb 2021
Posts: 61
Own Kudos [?]: 7 [0]
Given Kudos: 22
Send PM
Re: The hypothesis of an expanding Earth has never attracted notable suppo [#permalink]
tough one. any suggestion how to tackle these passage.
GRE Forum Moderator
Joined: 02 Nov 2016
Posts: 14065
Own Kudos [?]: 36647 [2]
Given Kudos: 5830
GPA: 3.62
Send PM
Re: The hypothesis of an expanding Earth has never attracted notable suppo [#permalink]
2
Bookmarks
Expert Reply
GAngstA wrote:
tough one. any suggestion how to tackle these passage.


Hi GAngstA

Follow the below links they might help you.

https://gmatclub.com/forum/how-to-read- ... 00886.html

https://gmatclub.com/forum/mod-nightbla ... 01219.html

https://gmatclub.com/forum/reading-comp ... 02904.html

Good luck :)
User avatar
Non-Human User
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 17519
Own Kudos [?]: 869 [0]
Given Kudos: 0
Send PM
Re: The hypothesis of an expanding Earth has never attracted notable suppo [#permalink]
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: The hypothesis of an expanding Earth has never attracted notable suppo [#permalink]
Moderators:
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
6984 posts
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
236 posts
GRE Forum Moderator
14065 posts