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Re: The sound of guitar feels less enchanting to Jimmy than the sound of [#permalink]
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ramyasree0299 wrote:
The question asks what can be properly inferred in support of the conclusion:

A and B can't be inferred from the conclusion - Incorrect
C: This could be an obvious inference since the conclusion states that Jimmy's OTHER family members have received flawed music training. The conclusion doesn't address Jimmy's training. If jimmy doesn't feel the same way as his other family members that means there's a difference in the training he received from the rest - CORRECT
D and E: Yes, these could be good inferences too. Although if you observe there's ALWAYS (usage of extreme words) which basically claims that these inferences are UNIVERSALLY TRUE derived from the premises. You don't necessarily have to "not" appreciate the guitar just because you received flawed music training - INCORRECT

Hence the answer is C.

Please let me know if I missed considering any additional points.


C+1. Since Jimmy and his other family members feel the same about the sound of guitar, but the conclusion only says his other family members’ training is flawed, and never says Jimmy’s training is flawed, so their training should be different.
While in D and E, the word ALWAYS is not necessarily true, since we donot know whether they have the same feel each time if they listen to guitar sounds many times.
Where is the OE?
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Re: The sound of guitar feels less enchanting to Jimmy than the sound of [#permalink]
this question answer seems wrong as c should be the answer , why e should be i know but it is an extreme option
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Re: The sound of guitar feels less enchanting to Jimmy than the sound of [#permalink]
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Bunuel wrote:
The sound of guitar feels less enchanting to Jimmy than the sound of any other type of string instrument. While all members of Jimmy’s family are trained in music, none of his family members feels significant charm for guitars. Mr Briggs, who is considered the local authority on string instruments, believes that guitar is one of the central pieces of contemporary music and its sound is sweeter than that of most other string instruments. Hence, the music training received by Jimmy’s other family members must be flawed.

From the information presented in support of the conclusion, it can be properly inferred that

(A) none of Jimmy’s family members have a thorough knowledge of music
(B) Jimmy prefers listening to guitar than listening to any non-string instrument
(C) the training in music received by Jimmy is not the same as that received by his other family members
(D) flawed music training always leads to the lack of appreciation for guitar
(E) unflawed music training always leads to an appreciation for guitar


This is a CR Butler Question



Experts' Global Video Explanation:

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Re: The sound of guitar feels less enchanting to Jimmy than the sound of [#permalink]
KarishmaB MartyMurray
Would you like to explain this question ?

Posted from my mobile device
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Re: The sound of guitar feels less enchanting to Jimmy than the sound of [#permalink]
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­The sound of guitar feels less enchanting to Jimmy than the sound of any other type of string instrument. While all members of Jimmy’s family are trained in music, none of his family members feels significant charm for guitars. Mr Briggs, who is considered the local authority on string instruments, believes that guitar is one of the central pieces of contemporary music and its sound is sweeter than that of most other string instruments. Hence, the music training received by Jimmy’s other family members must be flawed.

The passage presents four main pieces of information:

- Jimmy and his family members are not very enchanted by or do not feel significant charm for the guitar.

- All members of Jimmy's family are trained in music.

- Mr Briggs, who is considered the local authority on string instruments, believes that guitar is one of the central pieces of contemporary music and its sound is sweeter than that of most other string instruments.

- The conclusion: The music training received by Jimmy’s other family members must be flawed.

It doesn't really make sense that only "Jimmy's other family members" are mentioned in the conclusion because Jimmy doesn't find the guitar particularly enchanting either, but anyway, to get the question correct, we probably have to go with what the passage says rather than with what makes sense.

From the information presented in support of the conclusion, it can be properly inferred that

This is an Inference question, and the correct answer will be a statement that must be true given what the passage says.

(A) none of Jimmy’s family members have a thorough knowledge of music

This choice probably isn't correct since the stated conclusion is that their training is "flawed" rather than that their knowledge is not "thorough."

At the same time, this choice could conceivably be correct if the question is a little loosely constructed. After all, if their training is flawed, then perhaps we can conclude that their knowledge must not be thorough.

So, we can keep this choice for now, even though it's probably not going to turn out to be the correct answer.

Keep for now.

(B) Jimmy prefers listening to guitar than listening to any non-string instrument

This is an opposite trap that states basically the opposite of what we can infer from the first sentence of the passage, "­The sound of guitar feels less enchanting to Jimmy than the sound of any other type of string instrument."

So, this choice is clearly not supported by the passage.

Eliminate.

(C) the training in music received by Jimmy is not the same as that received by his other family members

Given that what's said about Jimmy's opinion of the guitar and what's said about his family members' opinion of the guitar are similar, this choice states basically the opposite of what the statements in the passage indicate. After all, the fact that their opinions on a musical topic are similar tends to indicate that their training IS the same.

Eliminate.

(D) flawed music training always leads to the lack of appreciation for guitar

This choice is tricky. So, we need to notice what exactly the passage says to avoid choosing this choice.

The passage says basically the following:

Jimmy's family members do not "feel significant charm for guitars," and therefore "the music training received by Jimmy’s other family members must be flawed."

We see that passage implies that someone's not liking guitar is sufficient to prove that that person's music training is flawed.

This choice says something else, which is basically the following:

Flawed training is always sufficient for not liking guitar.

The two are not the same.

After all, given what the passage says, we know only that not liking the guitar means flawed training. So, given what the passage says, it could be the case that someone with flawed training still likes the guitar.

Thus, given what the passage says, we cannot conclude that flawed training always means not liking the guitar.

So, this choice is not supported.

Eliminate.

(E) unflawed music training always leads to an appreciation for guitar

Unlike choice (D), this choice is supported by the passage, though it's not supported by information presented "in support of the conclusion," as the question stem suggests. It's supported by the conclusion itself, along with the information that supports the conclusion.

The conclusion of the passage is "the music training received by Jimmy’s other family members must be flawed."

The support for the conclusion is that Jimmy's family members do not "feel significant charm for guitars."

Thinking about the logic of that argument, we see the following.

If we know that their music training MUST be flawed from the simple fact that they do not feel charm for guitars, then it must be the case that the ONLY possible reason for these musically trained people's not feeling charm for guitars is that their training is flawed. Otherwise, there could be another reason why they don't like guitars, in which case, we could not conclude that their music training must be flawed. After all, in that case they could not like guitars for some other reason even if their music training is not flawed.

So, if the only reason why people trained in music do not like guitar is that their training is flawed, then if their training were not flawed, they would like guitar. In that case, a person with unflawed music training would always like guitar, as this choice says.

Keep.

Since (E) is clearly correct, we can safely choose (E) over (A), which doesn't quite follow from the passage since (A) is about not having "thorough" rather than having "flawed" music training.

Correct answer: E­
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Re: The sound of guitar feels less enchanting to Jimmy than the sound of [#permalink]
MartyMurray So do you think this a flawed question based on the highlighed part ? The question stem requires additional information ( the conclusion also). KarishmaB
MartyMurray wrote:
­The sound of guitar feels less enchanting to Jimmy than the sound of any other type of string instrument. While all members of Jimmy’s family are trained in music, none of his family members feels significant charm for guitars. Mr Briggs, who is considered the local authority on string instruments, believes that guitar is one of the central pieces of contemporary music and its sound is sweeter than that of most other string instruments. Hence, the music training received by Jimmy’s other family members must be flawed.

The passage presents four main pieces of information:

- Jimmy and his family members are not very enchanted by or do not feel significant charm for the guitar.

- All members of Jimmy's family are trained in music.

- Mr Briggs, who is considered the local authority on string instruments, believes that guitar is one of the central pieces of contemporary music and its sound is sweeter than that of most other string instruments.

- The conclusion: The music training received by Jimmy’s other family members must be flawed.

It doesn't really make sense that only "Jimmy's other family members" are mentioned in the conclusion because Jimmy doesn't find the guitar particularly enchanting either, but anyway, to get the question correct, we probably have to go with what the passage says rather than with what makes sense.

From the information presented in support of the conclusion, it can be properly inferred that

This is an Inference question, and the correct answer will be a statement that must be true given what the passage says.

(A) none of Jimmy’s family members have a thorough knowledge of music

This choice probably isn't correct since the stated conclusion is that their training is "flawed" rather than that their knowledge is not "thorough."

At the same time, this choice could conceivably be correct if the question is a little loosely constructed. After all, if their training is flawed, then perhaps we can conclude that their knowledge must not be thorough.

So, we can keep this choice for now, even though it's probably not going to turn out to be the correct answer.

Keep for now.

(B) Jimmy prefers listening to guitar than listening to any non-string instrument

This is an opposite trap that states basically the opposite of what we can infer from the first sentence of the passage, "­The sound of guitar feels less enchanting to Jimmy than the sound of any other type of string instrument."

So, this choice is clearly not supported by the passage.

Eliminate.

(C) the training in music received by Jimmy is not the same as that received by his other family members

Given that what's said about Jimmy's opinion of the guitar and what's said about his family members' opinion of the guitar are similar, this choice states basically the opposite of what the statements in the passage indicate. After all, the fact that their opinions on a musical topic are similar tends to indicate that their training IS the same.

Eliminate.

(D) flawed music training always leads to the lack of appreciation for guitar

This choice is tricky. So, we need to notice what exactly the passage says to avoid choosing this choice.

The passage says basically the following:

Jimmy's family members do not "feel significant charm for guitars," and therefore "the music training received by Jimmy’s other family members must be flawed."

We see that passage implies that someone's not liking guitar is sufficient to prove that that person's music training is flawed.

This choice says something else, which is basically the following:

Flawed training is always sufficient for not liking guitar.

The two are not the same.

After all, given what the passage says, we know only that not liking the guitar means flawed training. So, given what the passage says, it could be the case that someone with flawed training still likes the guitar.

Thus, given what the passage says, we cannot conclude that flawed training always means not liking the guitar.

So, this choice is not supported.

Eliminate.

(E) unflawed music training always leads to an appreciation for guitar

Unlike choice (D), this choice is supported by the passage, though it's not supported by information presented "in support of the conclusion," as the question stem suggests. It's supported by the conclusion itself, along with the information that supports the conclusion.

The conclusion of the passage is "the music training received by Jimmy’s other family members must be flawed."

The support for the conclusion is that Jimmy's family members do not "feel significant charm for guitars."

Thinking about the logic of that argument, we see the following.

If we know that their music training MUST be flawed from the simple fact that they do not feel charm for guitars, then it must be the case that the ONLY possible reason for these musically trained people's not feeling charm for guitars is that their training is flawed. Otherwise, there could be another reason why they don't like guitars, in which case, we could not conclude that their music training must be flawed. After all, in that case they could not like guitars for some other reason even if their music training is not flawed.

So, if the only reason why people trained in music do not like guitar is that their training is flawed, then if their training were not flawed, they would like guitar. In that case, a person with unflawed music training would always like guitar, as this choice says.

Keep.

Since (E) is clearly correct, we can safely choose (E) over (A), which doesn't quite follow from the passage since (A) is about not having "thorough" rather than having "flawed" music training.

Correct answer: E­

­
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The sound of guitar feels less enchanting to Jimmy than the sound of [#permalink]
Expert Reply
sayan640 wrote:
MartyMurray So do you think this a flawed question based on the highlighed part ? The question stem requires additional information ( the conclusion also). KarishmaB
MartyMurray wrote:
­The sound of guitar feels less enchanting to Jimmy than the sound of any other type of string instrument. While all members of Jimmy’s family are trained in music, none of his family members feels significant charm for guitars. Mr Briggs, who is considered the local authority on string instruments, believes that guitar is one of the central pieces of contemporary music and its sound is sweeter than that of most other string instruments. Hence, the music training received by Jimmy’s other family members must be flawed.

The passage presents four main pieces of information:

- Jimmy and his family members are not very enchanted by or do not feel significant charm for the guitar.

- All members of Jimmy's family are trained in music.

- Mr Briggs, who is considered the local authority on string instruments, believes that guitar is one of the central pieces of contemporary music and its sound is sweeter than that of most other string instruments.

- The conclusion: The music training received by Jimmy’s other family members must be flawed.

It doesn't really make sense that only "Jimmy's other family members" are mentioned in the conclusion because Jimmy doesn't find the guitar particularly enchanting either, but anyway, to get the question correct, we probably have to go with what the passage says rather than with what makes sense.

From the information presented in support of the conclusion, it can be properly inferred that

This is an Inference question, and the correct answer will be a statement that must be true given what the passage says.

(A) none of Jimmy’s family members have a thorough knowledge of music

This choice probably isn't correct since the stated conclusion is that their training is "flawed" rather than that their knowledge is not "thorough."

At the same time, this choice could conceivably be correct if the question is a little loosely constructed. After all, if their training is flawed, then perhaps we can conclude that their knowledge must not be thorough.

So, we can keep this choice for now, even though it's probably not going to turn out to be the correct answer.

Keep for now.

(B) Jimmy prefers listening to guitar than listening to any non-string instrument

This is an opposite trap that states basically the opposite of what we can infer from the first sentence of the passage, "­The sound of guitar feels less enchanting to Jimmy than the sound of any other type of string instrument."

So, this choice is clearly not supported by the passage.

Eliminate.

(C) the training in music received by Jimmy is not the same as that received by his other family members

Given that what's said about Jimmy's opinion of the guitar and what's said about his family members' opinion of the guitar are similar, this choice states basically the opposite of what the statements in the passage indicate. After all, the fact that their opinions on a musical topic are similar tends to indicate that their training IS the same.

Eliminate.

(D) flawed music training always leads to the lack of appreciation for guitar

This choice is tricky. So, we need to notice what exactly the passage says to avoid choosing this choice.

The passage says basically the following:

Jimmy's family members do not "feel significant charm for guitars," and therefore "the music training received by Jimmy’s other family members must be flawed."

We see that passage implies that someone's not liking guitar is sufficient to prove that that person's music training is flawed.

This choice says something else, which is basically the following:

Flawed training is always sufficient for not liking guitar.

The two are not the same.

After all, given what the passage says, we know only that not liking the guitar means flawed training. So, given what the passage says, it could be the case that someone with flawed training still likes the guitar.

Thus, given what the passage says, we cannot conclude that flawed training always means not liking the guitar.

So, this choice is not supported.

Eliminate.

(E) unflawed music training always leads to an appreciation for guitar

Unlike choice (D), this choice is supported by the passage, though it's not supported by information presented "in support of the conclusion," as the question stem suggests. It's supported by the conclusion itself, along with the information that supports the conclusion.

The conclusion of the passage is "the music training received by Jimmy’s other family members must be flawed."

The support for the conclusion is that Jimmy's family members do not "feel significant charm for guitars."

Thinking about the logic of that argument, we see the following.

If we know that their music training MUST be flawed from the simple fact that they do not feel charm for guitars, then it must be the case that the ONLY possible reason for these musically trained people's not feeling charm for guitars is that their training is flawed. Otherwise, there could be another reason why they don't like guitars, in which case, we could not conclude that their music training must be flawed. After all, in that case they could not like guitars for some other reason even if their music training is not flawed.

So, if the only reason why people trained in music do not like guitar is that their training is flawed, then if their training were not flawed, they would like guitar. In that case, a person with unflawed music training would always like guitar, as this choice says.

Keep.

Since (E) is clearly correct, we can safely choose (E) over (A), which doesn't quite follow from the passage since (A) is about not having "thorough" rather than having "flawed" music training.

Correct answer: E­
­

­Yes, the question is somewhat flawed.

It's still gettable though. So, it's not a completely busted question.­
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