GMAT Question of the Day: Daily via email | Daily via Instagram New to GMAT Club? Watch this Video

It is currently 07 Jul 2020, 08:06

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Tuck Dartmouth MBA Admissions & Related Blogs

  new topic post reply Update application status  
Author Message
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 401
QuaranTuck Initiative Connects Tuck Community Around the World  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Apr 2020, 11:00
1
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: QuaranTuck Initiative Connects Tuck Community Around the World
Image
Nicole Ferraro is a T20 from Dallas, TX and serves on the Student Board as a Social Chair and a member of the QuaranTuck Initiative Council. After Tuck, she will be in Los Angeles working for Deloitte.

By Nicole Ferraro T'20

Image

There’s no hiding that things are a little bit different these days, which is a tough pill to swallow when our time at Tuck is already so short. I remember in the fall hearing about how second year will fly by, and we’ll be at Investiture before we know it. Now time seems to be passing by at a snail’s pace as my self-quarantined days consist of Zoom classrooms, socially distant walks, wasting hours figuring out TikTok, and jumping around my house doing online workouts.

I long for the days of working in Stell Hall, being physically near my impressive classmates, ordering lunch from theBOX, dancing the night away at a band party, and grabbing drinks with friends at Murphy’s. Tuck thrives on its community and the experiences we have here. As a member of the Student Board and a social co-chair, I am constantly thinking about how to uphold Tuck traditions while working with my classmates to make our experience even better.  

In the last month, we’ve faced a new challenge: how can we maintain the special Tuck connection we all share when things aren’t exactly normal? While I am still grieving the loss of time spent physically with my classmates this spring term, I have found great joy in working with fellow student leaders to make the most out of this pandemic through the QuaranTuck Initiative (QTI).

The QuaranTuck Initiative

QTI was created in response to social distancing guidelines which have uprooted our everyday life, including our Tuck life. As student leaders, we wanted to figure out how to continue strengthen the Tuck Fabric and keep the Tuck community connected in our new virtual world.  At the beginning of this effort, we connected with student leaders across various business schools to learn about their solutions. While we typically like to poke fun at each other’s schools, this crisis has given us the opportunity to work together to bring the best programming to our respective schools. That’s really exciting!

Image
At Tuck, we are creating a calendar of various types of events that people can join via Zoom. We have called upon the Tuckie and TP community to bring the events to life, sharing their talents and passions with the entire school. What is so great about these virtual events is I get to learn new things and meet new people, which may have never happened if things were “normal.” For example, T’20 Suzy Wang taught us how to make her mom’s traditional Chinese dumplings. While we’re close friends, I am not so sure we would have ever done that together. Since I have been quarantining at my parents’ house in Texas, I was even able to share the dumpling making experience with my family. They tasted better than they looked!

I have done group workouts, yoga, drank martinis, and cooked with my fellow classmates all through the power of Zoom. One of my favorite QTI events is trivia night hosted by Tuck Games Club every Friday. Over 100 Tuck students participate in this! QTI events are bringing current Tuckies together no matter where they are in the world. Tuckies are teaching others how to cook their favorite meal, make their favorite cocktail, meditate, develop a stand-up routine, and craft together. We have even maintained the tradition of TuckTails through a weekly virtual event.

Image

No matter the event, QTI has created an amazing opportunity for current Tuckies to continue to connect and be in community with each other. Here’s a look at some of the ways we’ve been staying connected:

  • Teo Gonzalez T’21 and Corine Alvarez T’20 taught us how to make a traditional Puerto Rican dish, mofongo.
  • Mixed up some martinis to enjoy a “Quaran-tini” Night together.
  • T’20s came together for a Zoom brunch. 
  • Jessie Chen T’21 hosted a surprise birthday bash on Zoom for his wife Kari Chen TP’21.
  • The Croatia pre-Tuck trip group hosted their weekly ReZOOMion

Our initiative continues to grow and adapt week-to-week. We send out a weekly wrap-up email that includes screenshots of silly things that happen in Zoom classes. We recently created an Instagram (@quarantuck) for people to stay updated on what everyone’s up to. We implemented “Theme Day” every Wednesday where you are encouraged to dress-up or set your virtual background for class according to the week’s theme. We kicked it off with “rep your undergrad.” We are starting to develop some photo challenges, which includes the Tuck Travel Photo Competition where you’re asked to recreate a photo from any trip while at Tuck using whatever you have in your place of quarantine.

Community Service

In addition to the efforts of QTI to foster our special Tuck community, Tuckies have been giving back to the Upper Valley community we are so fortunate to live in. A group of Tuckies put together a guide that outlines ways to help in the Upper Valley by taking actions like donating money, volunteering at food pantries, sewing masks, and shopping locally. Natalie Triedman T’20 has created Hanover Helpers to coordinate weekly grocery shopping and delivery for seniors and vulnerable individuals living in the Upper Valley, which many students have gotten involved with. To help Murphy’s with paying their employees while they’re temporarily shut down, Chris Banks T’21 reached out to the class requesting donations. Lauren Farrar TP’21 (photo, top) has been sewing masks for health care workers, family, and friends. The list could go on and on, but it is clear that Tuck “nice” is something we take seriously!

It is easy to dwell on the negatives of the COVID-19 pandemic, but being connected to such a strong, caring community has helped me persevere. I’m impressed with the resilience that the entire Tuck community has exhibited. The QuaranTuck Initiative has helped keep our community together through this crisis and the positive spirit of Tuckies from all walks of life reaffirms the strength of this network. Today may not look at all like what we had imagined just before going off for spring break, but we are learning to make the most of “these unprecedented times.”
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 401
Tuck Admissions COVID-19 FAQ  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 May 2020, 05:00
1
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck Admissions COVID-19 FAQ
Image
Image

By Luke Anthony Peña

Executive Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

Hello and Happy April, friends. I hope you’re staying safe and healthy as we all do our part to overcome the COVID-19 pandemic. Last month I answered several admissions questions just days before Tuck started its remote spring term. That term is now more than halfway complete, with encouraging reviews from faculty and students alike.  As we look ahead to our summer and the start of the fall term, my colleagues and I are continuing to listen to you and hear your good questions.

 

What are the plans for the fall term?

We plan to welcome the Class of 2022 with Tuck Launch in August, as scheduled. If, for whatever reason, an incoming student is unable to join us in person this August, we will have a plan in place to allow students to begin their Tuck education remotely. This plan will cover all curricular, co-curricular, and career-related aspects of the MBA experience. As the success of our virtual learning environment this spring is showing, we have the capabilities, resources, and—importantly—the community to achieve this.

 

When will more decisions about the fall term be announced?

Given the continued public health uncertainty, Tuck’s senior leaders are exploring all options for how we can best achieve our mission in the upcoming academic year. Our Deans, along with an advisory committee comprised of members of the Tuck faculty, are meeting regularly and actively considering possible scenarios and contingencies. While the situation remains dynamic, we intend to resume in-person learning at Tuck as soon as it is safe for our community to do so, consistent with public health guidelines. We will continue to update you on this work as it progresses, and to inform you of plans as we make decisions.

 

Will Tuck offer deferrals to admitted students?

We consider all requests to defer on a case-by-case basis.  We believe each personal and individual request deserves a personal response based on individual circumstances. Given that we will have a plan in place for all admitted students to join us, either in person or remotely, we do not expect to offer many deferrals.  We empathize with those who choose not to enroll this year, and we will work personally with these admitted students to encourage their reapplications.

 

Why not offer more deferrals?

We at Tuck strive to consider and appreciate the perspectives of all of our applicants and admitted students. Even in these historic times, many applicants and admitted students express continued enthusiasm about joining the Class of 2022 – but only if we maintain our commitment to building a strong, diverse global class. Given Tuck’s distinct scale, granting mass deferrals significantly changes our class composition, more so than if our community was larger. Mass deferrals also dramatically reduce our available seats next year, and make applying for our Class of 2023 more artificially competitive.  We want to ensure this year’s class is strong and next year’s seats are attainable.

 

Is Tuck modifying or waiving application requirements for Round 4 applicants?

We remain committed to both our criteria for a great Tuck candidate and the application materials where these criteria emerge. We continue to require a complete application, including in-person or online/at-home test scores, for Round 4 applicants to be considered for admission. Fairness and equity are paramount to the integrity of our evaluation efforts. We required a complete application for all applicants in our first three rounds, and we made admissions decisions accordingly. Changing or waiving application requirements now would introduce unfairness and inequity for candidates who applied earlier in this application year.

 

Will Tuck reconsider applicants who were not offered admission?

We stand by our admissions decisions made earlier in this cycle. We do not intend to reconsider or reverse decisions. We have asked a number of Round 1 and Round 2 applicants from our earlier rounds to remain on our waitlist, many of whom remain enthusiastic about enrolling in the Class of 2022. My colleagues and I empathize with those whom we have asked to wait -- the hardest decision to receive – and we will consider these applicants alongside our Round 3 and Round 4 applicants to fill our final seats in the class.

 

How are remote classes going?


We’ve used remote learning to deliver hybrid online/on-campus programs, such as Dartmouth’s Master of Health Care Delivery Science, for over nine years now. Leveraging that online teaching expertise, Tuck faculty jumped right into a remote-only format for the spring term and are keeping classroom discussions as interactive and engaging as possible for students. The feedback thus far from faculty and students: this new and different form of learning, while temporary, is going quite well. 

 

How is the famously close-knit Tuck community staying connected?

The flexibility and commitment of students, faculty, and staff in co-creating a new and different learning experience has been essential and inspiring. We have encouraged students to honor and express feelings of loss or disappointment, but to also find empowerment in their resolve. Students responded by launching the Quarantuck Initiative, a series of social events and volunteer efforts to stay connected and strengthen our Tuck fabric. Students also continue to partner with Career Services on virtual recruiting efforts, attend faculty research chats, welcome visiting executives in remote discussions, and engage with our renowned alumni network.

 

How is recruiting going currently?

As of today, more T’20s have accepted a full-time offer than the T’17s or T’18s had at graduation. At this time, all companies plan to honor accepted offers for full-time employment. The number of first-year students who are finalizing internships remains typical for this point in the term, and Tuck Career Services continues to communicate with our recruiting partners. For summer 2020, some companies are rethinking what MBA internships look like in practice because of remote work conditions related to coronavirus.

 

Last week, Career Services reported a strong number of new internship postings and accepted offers for Tuck first-year students relative to last year. We’re encouraged to see T’21s successfully pitching project opportunities to career contacts and Tuck alumni.  Finally, building on the infrastructure and expertise of the OnSite Consulting Team, Tuck is also creating a new project opportunity for the summer in which we will source projects with well-known companies to help them consider the ramifications of the COVID-19 crisis.

 

Given the pace of change, how can I stay informed on Tuck’s response to COVID-19?

You can see all of our community updates in one place on our website.  You can also keep an open dialogue with me and my colleagues. We are personally leading recurring virtual chats for admitted students and applicants, multiple times per week, which will continue all throughout our summer months ahead. All of us on our team will gladly connect with you by phone and email, and I will continue to be active on social media. Finally, you can reach out at any time to our student ambassadors, all of whom are committed to representing Tuck amidst this historic time. Good communication matters more than ever in moments of uncertainty and ambiguity, so we want to hear from you!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 401
Going “All-in” with a Tuck MBA  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 May 2020, 10:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Going “All-in” with a Tuck MBA
Image
Image

This blog originally appeared on MBAschooled.com

After working in management consulting, Teodoro Gonzalez (T’21) decided to get an MBA to develop personally and professionally in his career. He chose Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business because he felt it was a school where he could fully immerse himself in the MBA experience. During this interview, Gonzalez spoke about his reasons for choosing Tuck and how he has been able to go all-in during his Tuck MBA Experience.

MBASchooled: What did you do before business school, and why did you choose to come to business school?

I was working in management consulting at Accenture, where I focused on large-scale implementations in the Health & Public Service practice. Although I loved my time at the firm, I wanted to go to business school for two main reasons. First, I wanted the opportunity to take two years to fully focus on developing myself professionally, academically, and personally while developing my business skills toolkit. Second, I wanted to be in a position where I could integrate myself into a tight-knit community whose members have a wide range of backgrounds, interests, and ambitions, but share a unique common experience.

MBASchooled: What were your big questions coming into making your decision on which school to attend?

The reality is you can unpack so many different factors for any school and analyze them from multiple angles. Do you want a school that does quarters vs. semesters? Does timing for international travel matter? Do I prefer having a core curriculum or electives? These are just some questions that are all super valid and can serve as data points.

For me though, it came down to my most important criteria in considering a school: how immersive is the experience? I felt confident that at all these top schools I’d get a great job, learn a lot, and meet phenomenal people. But I found that the immersive nature of the MBA experience is not the same at all schools. I needed to understand how immersive the experience would be at all the schools I was considering.

MBASchooled: Why did you choose to attend Tuck? 

The opportunity to be “all in” and totally immersed in my experience was my top priority. Here you are a part of a community that is filled with people who are totally focused on the Tuck experience. Professors know you, they know your other professors, and they share a lot of your common interests in the Upper Valley from skiing to stopping by for a beer at Murphy’s. As for your classmates?

There are few times in my life when I’ve spent this much time with the same group of people. Classmates are always together because we live and breathe our experience all the time. You’re likely to find us together with incredible regularity, whether we’re bouncing ideas off each other in class, participating in Tripod hockey, or partaking in any of the social events we put together for ourselves (Pro Tip: never miss a Band Party).

MBASchooled: What about the culture and classmates stood out to you about Tuck?

Amidst the diversity of classmates, there is also a significant consistency: a deep commitment to the Tuck experience and each other. Regardless of where you’re from or what are your interests, our memories of Tuck center on experiences that are relevant to everyone. Whether you have a business background or not, you are going to look back and remember when you worked hard with your classmates to survive Fall A and Fall B. If you’ve never played Tripod Hockey at Tuck, odds are you’ll still find yourself at the arena to catch a game or cheer on classmates. These types of experiences serve as a common denominator for everyone, and, interestingly enough, that goes beyond just the people in your class. Often when I talk to alumni, these experiences are the first things they ask about or bring up.

MBASchooled: What resources, programs or information were helpful to you in making your decision?

I was fortunate enough to be a part of Management Leadership for Tomorrow’s MBA Prep Program. The opportunities to have a coach who had guided so many people through their decisions and to be part of a community that was so supportive and engaging were such a blessing.

MBASchooled: How has Tuck helped you work toward your own career goals and aspirations?

Tuck’s core curriculum has been critical in helping me prepare to take on my summer internship in P&G’s brand management program. Additionally, it’s helped expose me to areas of interest I had never expected, like venture capital. I’m enrolled in an incredible Venture Capital Workshop with the Executive Director for our Center for Private Equity & Venture Capital. I’ve learned significant details about this space and have realized that my passion for developing brands and connecting with the people we serve will evolve throughout my career.

I am so excited for P&G and to soak in as much learning as possible as I contribute to the organization from the traditional brand management perspective, but Tuck has inspired me to bring my learnings from a space like VC to hopefully add value in unique, innovative ways.

MBASchooled: What parts or aspects of the academic experience attracted you to Tuck?

The interconnectedness that a smaller community brings to academia was hugely important to me. This interconnectedness manifests itself in the opportunity to hang out with professors outside of the classroom (whether we’re at the local bar or even playing soccer) and ensures that professors know all of their students well, including the details related to our various academic and professional journeys.

MBASchooled: What has been a surprise, or an unexpected element of your experience at Tuck?

The barrier to entry in terms of building relationships is incredibly low. You will get to know many people, really fast, whether that’s your priority or not. My perspective on it is that if you went to a larger institution and worked extremely diligently at building relationships with a broad array of people, you could successfully meet around 300 people. At Tuck due to the nature of our program, I think knowing that many people is almost a base expectation.

MBASchooled: What’s something you wish you knew more about before starting your MBA at Tuck?

Everyone says this but business school comes at you fast. You always have something going on and something you should be doing. When people talk about the need to understand your priorities, I think there needs to be a follow-up emphasizing that you will have to let things drop that are important to you. It’s not like you’re going to have all your interests in front of you and it’s going to be a clear decision of what’s important and what’s not. There will be a lot of things that matter to you, and the reality is some just won’t be able to get your attention like you wish.

MBASchooled: What advice do you have for those who are evaluating where they want to attend business school?

Be really intentional about what you’re looking for and lock-in on what is most important to you. It’s incredibly easy to get distracted by what you hear from students at schools you’ve been admitted to, alumni, friends, family, and more. While you should definitely do the work to hear a lot of perspectives, you shouldn’t let others’ criteria automatically become yours. You know what you want, whether that’s an experience, a brand, or something else, so go after it.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 401
From Media & Entertainment to Management Consulting Through the Power   [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 May 2020, 06:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: From Media & Entertainment to Management Consulting Through the Power of the Tuck Community
Image
Image

This blog originally appeared on MBAschooled.com

After building a career in Media and Entertainment, Keri Yildirim (Tuck, ‘21) decided to pursue her MBA to transition into a career in management consulting. Through her own research and analysis, Yildirim selected Tuck for the “Tuck fabric” and its ability to help her pivot into the consulting. In this interview, Yildrim shared her reasons for selecting Tuck for her MBA, her thoughts on the characteristics of the Tuck culture, and her advice for selecting the right MBA program.

MBASchooled: What did you do before business school, and why did you choose to come to business school?

I was working at Fox Networks Group (recently acquired by The Walt Disney Company) in Istanbul, Turkey, managing Fox’s local strategy in the country. I had worked in LA for one year, before moving to Istanbul, where I lived for eight years. I chose to come to business school because I wanted professional training outside of my media-centric experiences and sought change outside of my comfort zone, once again.

MBASchooled: What were your big questions coming into making your decision on which school to attend?

I had many questions when deciding which school to attend. However, they revolved around: opportunity, location, and people.

Ever since I learned about consulting, I wanted to explore that career path. When I was looking at the employment reports for different schools, I noticed that Tuck ranked very high for consulting and was probably due to its general management program versus a more specialized curriculum.

I’ve lived in cities my entire life: Istanbul and LA. When could I have the opportunity to live in the middle of the woods and entirely focus on my studies, alongside new friends in a new “city”. Then, when I went to Admitted Students Weekend in April 2019 and met my potential classmates, I could not have imagined a better place and group of people to spend the next two years with.

MBASchooled: Why did you choose to attend Tuck? 

Tuck stood out to me because of the people. I wanted to be acquainted with most people in my class and create lasting friendships, in a competitive, yet incredibly supportive, environment. I wanted to know the professors and ask my long list of questions in a safe environment. I wanted to interact with visiting executives, such as Stuart Weitzman, and have meaningful conversations with them. When I reflected on what I wanted in a business school, Tuck was the only place that aligned with my personal and professional objectives.

MBASchooled: What about the culture and classmates stood out to you about Tuck?

Tuck has a distinct culture, one that I am proud to be a part of. As a prospective student, I had many calls with different students. I remember speaking with a couple of T’19s and one T’17, and those conversations felt as if I was talking to a close friend. As a first-year student, I’m having those same conversations with prospective and admitted students. The Tuck fabric is real. Although we are physically separated due to COVID, I am still continually amazed at the level of support of my classmates.

MBASchooled: What resources, programs or information were helpful to you in making your decision?

Blogs, such as this one, and talking to current students and alumni were beneficial in making my decision. Every program has a different culture, and I wasn’t able to understand that by reading the school’s websites.

MBASchooled: How has Tuck helped you work toward your own career goals and aspirations?

Tuck has allowed me to pursue a consulting internship with my dream company. I’m now able to focus on some of my growth areas with the various centers at Tuck, career services, and clubs. Most recently, Tuck supported four other classmates and me in the Paramount Case Competition, which we won.

MBASchooled: How has Tuck helped you work toward your own career goals and aspirations?

Tuck has allowed me to pursue a consulting internship with my dream company. I’m now able to focus on some of my growth areas with the various centers at Tuck, career services, and clubs. Most recently, Tuck supported four other classmates and me in the Paramount Case Competition, which we won.

MBASchooled: What has been a surprise, or an unexpected element of your experience at Tuck?

Not so much a surprise, but I am thankful for my classmates and the unexpectedly amazing conversations we have, which is probably due to the Tuck fabric. I see parts of myself in most of my classmates, which has never really happened to me, especially in such a diverse environment.

MBASchooled: What’s something you wish you knew more about before starting your MBA at Tuck?

The countless opportunities at Tuck, and that I would consistently choose them over sleeping or reading “fun” books. I did not think that I would ever diverge from my 8-hour per night schedule to socialize with classmates, study for classes, prep for recruiting, and pursue extracurriculars. The Tuck website highlights the depth and breadth of opportunities; however, I urge everyone to reach out to current students to understand their perspective and distinct experience.

MBASchooled: What advice do you have for those who are evaluating where they want to attend business school?

Deciding where and which school is an incredibly personal decision. Dean Slaughter always reminds us to reflect, and I would echo his sentiments. Choose a school that aligns with your goals. Choose to be among people that push you to be better and towards your dreams. Choose a location that you enjoy spending time in, such as in the middle of the woods during this pandemic. Reflect on your aspirations, and hopefully, one business school will align.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 401
Revolutionizing the Way We Eat  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 May 2020, 05:00
1
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Revolutionizing the Way We Eat
Image
By Kristin Ng T’21

Last week, Tuck's Center for Private Equity and Venture Capital and the Tuck Food and Agriculture Club hosted one of the world’s largest conferences on agtech. We had over 900 attendees from over 40 countries listening to over 65 speakers who are changing how the world eats and produces food. Thethree-day virtual conference yielded over 20 hours of content and sparked fascinating conversation and dialogue.

Why should I care about agtech?

In conversations leading up to the event, what I found most striking was that many people did not initially think agtech was important to them. They usually understood that it had something to do with improving farming and using technology. The word “agtech” sounds similar to agriculture, a topic that doesn’t sound particularly glamorous or innovative. However, this could not be further from the truth: agtech is the way that we are going to improve every step in the food production process. In fact, you are already a consumer of the agtech ecosystem and you may not even know it.

Agri-food technology is generally split into three sections1: upstream, midstream, and downstream. Upstream refers to inputs to agriculture, closer to the farmer and before retail. In this arena, we’re seeing companies that are building robots that can harvest crops, creating autonomous tractors, and using artificial intelligence to determine when and how to fertilize plants.  Midstream is the food processing area. Here, we’re seeing improvements in food safety, developments in traceability technologies, and advancements in new proteins, my personal passion. The downstream branch is likely what you’re most familiar with. It includes online restaurants, meal kits, and food delivery. The Virtual Summit on AgTech focused mostly on the upstream and midstream areas of this field.

Agtech and COVID

As you can infer from the name, the Virtual Summit on AgTech is a virtual summit and it was always planned that way. However, it’s undeniable that the summit was coming at a particularly historic time in human history, in the midst of the COVID-19 outbreak. COVID-19 is a zoonotic disease, passed from animals to humans, and is believed to have originated in humans at a market where animals were being sold for food.

It is undeniable that the way humans eat today is a major risk factor for pandemics. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, “livestock health is the weakest link in our global health chain” and “preserving access to save food and nutrition is an essential part of the health response… we need to collaborate with every actor in the supply chain, build public-private partnerships, and promote innovation.” I believe that agtech will be integral to addressing these issues, and to helping us cope with and prevent future outbreaks. COVID-19 was a topic on everyone’s mind during the summit, and more broadly, we saw speakers continually making the connection between human diet and health, both physical and neurological, particularly at day two’s panel on Innovative CPG.

The Virtual Summit on AgTech

We split the three-day summit into three topics. Day one was dedicated to the next-generation agriculture and food economy. Topics on this day included investing in agtech, with talks by several venture capital firms and accelerators, alternative proteins and dairies, and the intersection of fintech and agtech. Day two was dedicated to innovations in agriculture. The day kicked off with presentations and panels by companies who are changing the way food is made, followed by talks on traceability and food safety, robotics, analytics, and marketplace solutions. The summit ended on day three, which examined international agtech developments and featured talks on agtech in India, Latin America, Asia-Pacific, and developing countries.

The Virtual Summit on AgTech was designed to be an accessible conference: we purposely kept the charge low, with funds going to charity, and videos are available anywhere there’s a Wi-Fi connection. This high accessibility meant we had people all over the world joining, with attendees from 47 countries and from every continent (except Antarctica). I was particularly inspired to see that about 27 percent of our attendees were students, representing 46 different educational institutions, who may not otherwise have had the ability to see all these speakers in one place.

Final Reflections

What’s made me the proudest after this event is hearing from people who said, “I never thought I was interested in this industry but hearing some of the speakers inspired me to learn more.” Agtech is so broad and touches so many areas of human life that it’s impossible to think of anyone that this industry doesn’t affect. I have friends interested in fintech who particularly enjoyed day one’s keynote: Where AgTech Meets FinTech, friends interested in biochemistry who asked some decidedly scientific questions to our three food scientists at day one’s panel: Breakthroughs in Proteins, and friends who just love to eat and wanted to hear pitches from startups that are creating delicious food. (Yes, some of us placed an order for gelato immediately after one pitch was over – we just had to try some!)

I enjoyed reconnecting with a member of my analyst class from my first job out of undergrad, who is now the CEO of AgVend, an online marketplace for agriculture professionals. I loved watching presentations and panels by leaders in the next generation food industry, whose companies are creating healthy food in a more sustainable manner, particularly presentations by Karana, my First-Year Project (FYP) company, and New Age Meats, where I’ll be interning this summer.

Observing the summit and listening to the various panels and presentations helped me formulate some thoughts on where this industry is going. I believe it is only going to get bigger and more important in the world of business: in 2019 alone, the agri-foodtech startup industry raised nearly $20 billion, a 250 percent increase over five years. Food safety will increasingly be top of mind for consumers as we grapple with outbreaks and pandemics. Alternative-proteins and healthier, more environmentally-friendly food products will continue to gain market-share and attract investments. Upstream areas will continue to grow, including ag-biotechnology, agribusiness marketplaces, farm management software, farm robotics, new farming systems, and fintech for farmers.

I decided to join the organization committee only a few weeks before the conference, encouraged by one of my FYP teammates who knew I was passionate about this topic. Between recruiting and coursework, I wasn’t sure I had the bandwidth to take on another project, so I agreed to assist in marketing for the event. However, the conference only got bigger and I began to take on more responsibilities, which ultimately led to me giving the opening remarks, along with organizer Alberto Ariztía Tagle T’20, and hosting the final keynote presentation of the conference with Impossible Foods. I’m excited to join two fellow T21s, Elizabeth Lenczowski Holmes and Robert Sewell, as chairs of the Tuck Food and Agriculture Club next year, where we hope you’ll join us for VSAT 2021.Learn more about the Virtual Summit on AgTech and watch replays
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 401
Be Intentional & Challenge Your Inner Critic: My Tuck Journey  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 May 2020, 08:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Be Intentional & Challenge Your Inner Critic: My Tuck Journey
Image
By Vivian Guo T'20

Image

Two years flew by fast at Tuck. I felt that not long ago I was sailing down the coast of Maine with my fellow classmates, and now in a little less than two weeks, we will graduate. The memories of how it started are still very fresh, yet the finishing line is already in sight.

Reflecting on my last two years at Tuck, I first remembered the last day from Outward Bound: the day was fresh and bright, the clouds were light, the wind was right, and we were cruising across the ocean with ease, like a bunch of pros, working seamlessly as a team and tacking the sails into the winds again and again effortlessly. I could hardly believe that just three days ago we were struggling with even telling which side is starboard. I was so amazed by and proud of what we had achieved in just a few days.

Now writing this post, I am having the same feeling as I had the last day on the boat. Looking back at where I was before Tuck and where I am now, I am proud of how far I have come and excited to take the next step in my career. Of course, it’s not always smooth sailing. During these two years, there were days I felt I was beaten down (more often in fall B) and there were days I felt I was invincible. Those highs and lows and the learnings from those moments are what made my time at Tuck so tangible and precious to me. For those who are ready to embark on an MBA at Tuck, here are key takeaways from my journey at Tuck, which I hope are useful to your own Tuck experience.

1. Figure out your career goal, early.

Try to reflect early on what you really want to do after Tuck, not from the perspective of the admission, but genuinely from your own career planning perspective. Having a clear idea on what you want to do in the long-term will save you a lot of time and struggle during recruiting, as the overwhelming amount of job options are likely to disorient you or drag you to group thinking, and to reflect on what you really want to do then during the intense fall B will put another layer of pressure on you and take up the time and mental capacity that you could otherwise use on academic or recruiting efforts, so reflect early!

2. Face and challenge your inner critic.

This is one of my biggest takeaways from my Communicating with Presence course (one of the best classes at Tuck). What does your inner critic tell you? Write it down and argue your case. Not until I wrote mine down and challenged every single one of them, did I realize just how unreasonable and harsh I was on myself for no good reason. Thinking back, on some

occasions I let my inner critic talk me out of trying out opportunities at Tuck that could further enrich my experience and stretch my capabilities. If this sounds remotely like something you would do to yourself as well, then try this practice and don’t let your inner critic be the reason for not trying out new things or not letting yourself take risks. I am very much aware that this is easier said than done and this requires continuous effort. I am still battling with my own critics, but I take the comfort in being more aware of them now than I was before.

Image

3. Be intentional and prioritize.

Time is the scarcest resource in these two years, so accept the fact that you simply do not have time for everything. From the first day of your MBA, your calendar will be filled months out with classes, social events, club activities, visiting executive talks, class reviews, study group meetings, company briefings and networking events, often many of which will be happening at the same time, so how do you prioritize?

That is the first and the most important lesson I learned at Tuck, in a hard way. At the beginning, I tried to do everything, and I failed miserably. In the first month, I found myself running from activity to activity, meeting to meeting, and social event to small group dinner, afraid of missing out on these rewarding experiences Tuck offers. Well, I guess you wouldn’t be surprised if I tell you the first month stretched me thin in energy, mental capacity, and even words. I wasn’t able to fully immerse myself in any of those activities I participated in and I didn’t get much out of those efforts. If setting priorities is the first course at Tuck, I would have been given an LP (low pass)—Tuck equivalent of an F.

Tuck challenged me to think hard about my priorities. To prioritize, I had to step back and think about what I wanted to get out of Tuck and be intentional about what I will spend my time on and what not. Coming into Tuck with a non-business background, I was eager to learn business knowledge and its application to real world problems, so I devoted a big chunk of my time to academics, case competitions, and global First-Year Projects (FYPGO) work. The teachings and real project experiences taught me how to think about business problems, what matters, and why—which is a big part of what I wanted to get out of Tuck.

Two years can pass quickly. Make the most out of your time at Tuck and have fun!

Best of luck!

Vivian Guo is a student/soon-to-be-alumna of the 2020 class and a Center for Digital Strategies fellow. She is from Xinjiang, China. Prior to Tuck, she had a career in law, working as Asia general counsel for a multinational media and advertising company in Shanghai. Post MBA, she will join Bain’s Chicago office as a consultant.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 401
The Unique Privilege of the Tuck Community  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 May 2020, 11:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: The Unique Privilege of the Tuck Community
Image
By Marianne Poh T'20

Image

In about a month’s time, I will be graduating as part of the Tuck Class of 2020. It’s been very hard to believe, especially in the wake of COVID-19 and our last two months of classes being held in a virtual environment. Yet, in a weird way, seeing the Tuck community rally together in the face of quarantine – be it via virtual yoga classes or the weekly trivia nights attended by literally hundreds of students – has been an unexpected, yet fitting capstone to my two years at Tuck.

The first five months at Tuck was a blur of activity and experiences. I didn’t have time to grapple with the notion that I was in my late 20s, and yet also a first-year student living in dormitories for the first time. I was torn in a myriad of directions the instant I set foot on campus. Besides the expected classes, homework, and networking and case interview preparation, I had to decide who I wanted to be within this intimate community in the middle of the woods. In the spirit of true FOMO, I tried everything. On the one hand, there was your typical Upper Valley agenda – numerous camping and cabin night trips and hikes, canoeing and swimming in the Connecticut river, and even cross-country skiing and hiking in the snow. But on the other hand, it also felt like I was constantly leaving campus and travelling somewhere with my fellow classmates – trips to Chicago to network and interview with consulting companies, an educational trek focusing on Environmental, Social and Corporate Governance in New York City, personal trips to Belize, Guatemala, Mexico, and Sri Lanka, and a capstone First Year Project in India.

Image

As great as the first five months seem on paper, I think that the true Tuck experience happens after the nerves have shaken off, in the calm after the storm. It was only then when you realize the incredible and unique value of the personal nature of the Tuck MBA. Be it the open-door policy for the Tuck deans and professors, popular Tuck traditions like Tuck Talks and Small Group Dinners, or the intimate nature of classes such as Communicating with Presence or Leadership Development and Self Awareness Skills, Tuck constantly gives individuals the opportunity to be heard by an audience that has a willingness to listen. In our busy, urban lives mindlessly moving from activity to activity, we seem to most frequently approach others for validation, rather than genuine connection. This was not the case at Tuck. I have seen students sign up in droves for Small Group Dinners, forget self-interest in helping each other in their recruiting efforts, and professors going above and beyond in making themselves available for students by hosting daily virtual lunches (shoutout to Professor Kopalle). I was welcomed into my classmates’ homes for their family Thanksgivings and Christmases, chased the Northern Lights in my pajamas with fellow students in Iceland, and transformed from a person who refused to sing in public to singing on stage (thanks to my supportive bandmates) in front of hundreds of people at Tuck Winter Carnival.

In about a month’s time, I will attend what will be the first “virtual” Tuck ceremony. Although it may be a while until we can be physically together, I feel truly excited and privileged to have shared such a personal and transformative journey with my community: the class of 2020. Thank you to everyone! 

Marianne Poh is a recent Tuck MBA graduate from Auckland, New Zealand. Prior to Tuck, she was a Brand Manager for Mondelez International based in Melbourne, Australia. After Tuck, she will be joining Innosight, LLC in Boston as an innovation strategy consultant.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 401
In Between Two Cycles: An Update on the Classes of 2022 and 2023  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 May 2020, 12:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: In Between Two Cycles: An Update on the Classes of 2022 and 2023
Image
Image

By Luke Anthony Peña

Executive Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

Hello and Happy May, friends.  Whether you live in a community that is gradually reopening or are still in lockdown, I hope you are staying safe and healthy.  In Hanover, the beautiful warm spring has arrived, the spring term is winding down, and we’re preparing for Tuck’s first-ever virtual Investiture celebration.  Meanwhile, my Admissions and Financial Aid colleagues and I find ourselves working across two application cycles; we’re continuing to work closely with those of you looking to join us this August, while also preparing to get to know those of you applying to join us in 2021.  I’m here on our blog this month to share a few updates for each group.

 

Class of 2022

To our admitted students: my colleagues and I are more excited each day to welcome you to Tuck!  We appreciate your decision to say yes to Tuck, begin your studies in this historic moment, and forge ahead with your journey as a wise, decisive leader.  Now that we’ve confirmed our on-time, online start for the Fall 2020 term, my MBA Program Office colleagues are your primary contacts as you prepare to enroll.  That said, please continue reaching out to Admissions with enrollment questions and Financial Aid for guidance around financing your MBA.  Do also keep up with our Fall 2020 FAQ, and take full advantage of opportunities to connect remotely with your new classmates in the weeks and months ahead.

To our waitlisted applicants: my colleagues and I appreciate your continued enthusiasm and periodic check-ins affirming your interest in joining us this year.  Our class is nearly but not entirely full, and I expect we will make several dozen more admissions offers before the fall term starts.  Keep in touch, and watch for outreach from us -- we may email or call you, either as a group or individually, to verify that you remain interested in joining us.

To our Round 4 applicants: my colleagues and I commend you for taking advantage of our new admission round, created for those of you whose Round 3 applications were impacted by COVID-19.  We’re reviewing, interviewing, and releasing decisions on a rolling basis; we released several dozen decisions in May, and we’ll release many more throughout June.  All of you will receive an admission decision no later than July 1.  Given the late date in our cycle, we don’t plan to place many of you on a waitlist, although there may be a few exceptions.  We also don’t plan to extend the June 1 application deadline - we need to close this year’s application and prepare to launch next year’s.

To those of you who were denied admission this year: my colleagues and I thank you for the privilege of getting to know you better through your application.  We do not intend to reconsider or reverse decisions; we will fill our final seats in the class by admitting from the waitlist and from Round 4.  If you intend to reapply, then keep reading… the section below is for you!

Class of 2023

To those of you looking to join us in 2021: my colleagues and I are delighted you’re considering Tuck!  We’re currently reviewing our admissions criteria, our application materials, our evaluation process, and our application dates, all with an eye towards opening our application in late June or early July.  While there may be a few edits and updates here and there, I don’t anticipate significant changes in any of these important components for the 2020-2021 application.  So start tentatively planning now, and we’ll update you throughout June with more details.

Many of you have asked about visiting campus.  Per the current public health guidance, we cannot offer campus visits.  This also means applicant-initiated interviews and in-person class visits are currently paused.  We recognize there is no perfect substitute for experiencing the vibrancy of Tuck in person, but you have alternative options to better get to know our community.  You can tour campus virtually, and see the physical beauty of Tuck and the Upper Valley on our YouTube channel.  We expect to offer additional interactive tours in the months ahead, and you will be able to see faculty and students interact live in online class visits in the forthcoming fall term. 

You can also engage with our Admissions and Financial Aid team, our students, and our alumni at live online events.  For the coming months, we invite you to connect with Tuck representatives and ambassadors online at a variety of events, including Tuesdays with Tuck, coffee chats with me, and an array of small group events tailored to specific geographies, industries, and affinity groups.  These events will be offered at varying times to acknowledge time zone differences, and will be mostly small in size -- that’s the Tuck way, so you can connect and engage with others on the chat.  We won’t be traveling the world this summer, so we’re excited that these online events will accommodate all of you, including those outside the cities we typically visit.

Finally, we’ve worked closely with our student ambassadors to simplify your ability to connect with one (or more!) of our students.  Our Tuck Ambassadors page lists the name, class year, contact information, and profile of over 130 Tuck students -- all filtered by region, activity and club, career path, and Center involvement.  Use this resource to hear directly from students about Tuck, and how we are navigating these historic times together as a community.  And although our interviews are committee-initiated for now, do know that our Tuck Admissions Associates -- our second-year student interviewers -- will continue to conduct almost all interviews so you can have yet another touch point with a Tuck student.

I expect to be back on this blog in late June to preview our 2020-2021 application in more detail.  Until then, keep safe, keep healthy, and keep in touch with our student ambassadors, with our Admissions and Financial Aid colleagues, and with me.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 401
Returning to Hanover for a Tuck MBA  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Jun 2020, 07:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Returning to Hanover for a Tuck MBA
Image
By Matthew Ginsburg T'21

Image
When I decided to attend Tuck after spending four years in Hanover as an undergrad, many of my non-Dartmouth friends asked, “Why?” and, “How could the rural, Upper Valley be a good location for a business school? Haven’t you had enough of New Hampshire?”

So, beyond the sentimentality of returning to quaint, beautiful Hanover and being able to get my daily fill of Dirt Cowboy coffee and Lou’s breakfasts, I’m here to shed light on why returning to Hanover was the best decision for me.

When deciding on where I wanted to spend the next two years of my life, I knew I wanted the full MBA experience. For me, this translated to the community I wanted to be a part of. In my various phone calls with friends at other business schools, I was surprised by the number of people who had their established friend group but felt somewhat distant from the rest of their MBA class. With every person I spoke to at Tuck, the opposite was true: there was such an incredibly vibrant and strong community at Tuck. One student even noted that “you have to actively try not to be a part of the Tuck community.” As a New York native and Dartmouth undergrad, I’m well aware that Hanover is a small town in rural America. But for an engaging two years of my life, being able to focus on forming connections with peers (or rather, friends-to-be) and on my own personal, transformative journey without the distractions of city life, Hanover seemed like the ideal place for my MBA experience. And as you will likely hear and experience firsthand, Tuck students really are #TuckNice.

I’d be remiss not to pre-empt concerns prospective students may have about Hanover being in New Hampshire and yes, it does indeed snow here. But snow is great! Many of my fellow T’21s learned to ski or play hockey this past winter, so there are some major perks to having a longer winter season! And overall, the winters are not too bad. Even if you hate cold weather, Tuck is completely connected indoors so first-year students living in the dorms can stay inside all day if desired.

My last main rationale for Tuck is why most people get an MBA: to launch their career. Sure, people at most MBA programs graduate and get great jobs, but given my interest in consulting, an industry that Tuck is a major feeder school for, Tuck was a great fit for me. Beyond the percent of students landing consulting jobs after school, the strength of the alumni network at Tuck was a major selling point. As a Dartmouth undergrad, I already recognized the value of the greater Dartmouth community, but it became clear very quickly that the Tuck alumni network was even more passionate and tight knit. In many ways, Tuckies seem to share a common bond—a shared set of values, appreciation for the Tuck community, or perhaps simply it’s the shared experience of two years in Hanover, NH.

Everyone says college is the best years of your life, but I’m beyond thankful to have one more year with the Tuck family and many more years as an alumnus. If you want to get the most out of a two-year MBA experience, I can think of no place I’d rather be than at Tuck.

Matthew Ginsberg is a Tuck MBA student and a member of the class of 2021. Matt earned his bachelor's degree from Dartmouth College in 2016 and worked in economic consulting in Boston prior to returning to Hanover for business school. 
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 401
A Letter from Black Students at Tuck and the Consortium Student Group  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Jun 2020, 06:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: A Letter from Black Students at Tuck and the Consortium Student Group
Image
Disclaimer: The following message was sent from the leadership of the Black Students at Tuck (BSAT) and the Consortium Student Group on Tuesday, June 2, 2020 in response to the national discourse concerning racial injustice, police brutality, and the murders of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd.

Tuck Community,

As you spend today supporting #blackouttuesday, please take the time to do more than simply post on social media. Use this time to educate both yourself and others on the history of racial injustice and police brutality in America. To help you in this effort, BSAT and Consortium have compiled a list of resources to assist you in learning more and taking actionable steps to be an ally.  Because this is not an exhaustive list of all available resources, we have included links to more comprehensive resource guides in the Additional Resources section.

This cannot and should not be an issue that only the black community fights against.

Background & Context


Developing Empathy


Understanding White Privilege/Fragility


What Can You Do As An Ally?


Additional Resources 


 

Best,

BSAT and Consortium

 

BSAT Co-Chairs

Sonovia Wint

Leah Jack

Erukana Kazibwe

Ikechukwu Amakiri

Consortium Liaisons

Jessica Ahn

Shervin Stoney

Pedro Dutra
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 401
Together We Will Rise: A Message to the Tuck Student Body  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Jun 2020, 08:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Together We Will Rise: A Message to the Tuck Student Body
Image
Tuck Community & Friends,

Last week with the murder of George Floyd and the racist actions towards Christian Cooper, I was reminded yet again that our society in the US is still far from where it needs to be. In this country our black brothers and sisters are persecuted in a way that should anger and incite us all. The injustices they suffer send a message that there are still places where you can be at a disadvantage from the day you are born. Silence sends a message that as fellow human beings in this society we are both advocates for the inequitable status quo and enemies of progress. I am writing to end this silence.

At Tuck, injustice and an idle attitude in the face of this injustice are directly contrary to everything we believe in. We are an institution that prides itself on developing decisive, wise leaders who will better the world through business. Our expectation is that we are creating leaders whose ambitions and success will be set by themselves, not by the limits of an unfair society that confines you to a box based on the color of your skin or any other characteristic that is your birthright. As incoming President of the Student Body at the Tuck School of Business I am writing to say that not only are we standing in support with our black brothers and sisters, we are moving to take action and be at the forefront to bear the weight of this fight for justice. Beginning immediately, we are exploring new opportunities to facilitate greater cultural competence within our community and to cultivate an understanding for how we can seize our powerful voices for civic engagement.

Roderick Milligan T’21, the Diversity and Inclusion Chair of the Tuck Student Body, and I have held many meetings over the past two weeks to analyze where we are as a community and where we need to be. Additionally, we have participated in an initial check-in discussion regarding these recent events at a joint meeting with BSAT and Tuck Africa club leaders, hosted by Dean Slaughter and Dean Jaeger. Beyond the programming we have had in the past, such as Controversial Conversations, we will now have panels and workshops where students and members of the community can learn about effective allyship, understand what is institutionalized racism, and more. Roderick will also be linking arm in arm with the leaders of TADA (Tuck Association of Diverse Alumni), Joyce Cadesca T’13 and Lisha Davis T’10, to coordinate aligned offerings.

Outside of Student Board, I also want to point out the power of individual efforts, which we will also be supporting. Leah Jack T’21 and Renée Hirschberg, Director of Alumni Engagement & Operations, are spearheading a civic engagement series that will promote community involvement and civic leadership among students and alumni. I cannot wait to support and participate in these and other initiatives, and as members of our community, I expect to feel your presence and participation throughout.

As these opportunities are finalized, I challenge each of us to become informed on the injustices that exist within our communities and thoughtful of the kind of society we want for ourselves and future generations. If you are an ally and feel like you are doing so much already, I still challenge you to continue moving this cause forward. Every moment that you think you are exhausted, remember there are others who live with that exhaustion every single day and that there are others who we wish were still with us to bear that exhaustion.

Pursuing justice is a matter of our humanity, not just a black, brown, or people of color issue, so we all have a role to play. This will be a struggle, but we will march this path together and I welcome you to share your thoughts or emotions with myself and Roderick. In times like these, our community needs to move together — supporting each other, learning and sharing from each other, listening and problem solving together. The people I have met during my year at Tuck are some of the most incredible, talented, and empathetic people I have ever met. As such, I firmly believe we are a group that can unite and lead our society in achieving sustainable, positive change.

Together We Will Rise,

Teo Gonzalez T’21

Student Body President

Roderick Milligan T’21

Diversity & Inclusion Chair
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 401
Stand United: A Message from the Tuck Association of Diverse Alumni  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Jun 2020, 10:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Stand United: A Message from the Tuck Association of Diverse Alumni
Image
The following message was sent from the Tuck Association of Diverse Alumni on Monday, June 1, 2020 in response to the national discourse concerning racial injustice, police brutality, and the murders of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd.

 

To the TADA Community: 

In light of recent tragedies in this country that have exposed racism and prejudice in the most disgusting and tragic ways, we as your TADA Co-Chairs are reaching out to condemn these acts and share a message of solidarity and compassion with you. More importantly, we want to let you know that we are dedicated, now more than ever, to bring our group together in support of one another, and to push forward in our quest to end injustice for people of color, particularly black and brown communities everywhere. 

One week ago, George Floyd was brutally murdered in Minneapolis by a police officer, and many of us watched the horrific footage lasting nearly nine minutes of his gruesome death. This unfortunate event is the tip of the iceberg of a series of occurrences, which include recent racial profiling event involving Christian Cooper in New York City, the deaths of Ahmaud Arbery in Glynn County, Georgia, and Breonna Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky, and hundreds of people of color in this country being abused, racially profiled, wrongfully incarcerated, and murdered. Black and brown people have become mere hashtags on social media as we all become desensitized to devastating crimes. I’m sure we all agree that something must be done. We hear you and we grieve with you. 

As alumni members of the Tuck community and leaders within our communities and workplaces, we have a responsibility to speak out against these injustices and share our viewpoints with those around us, in an effort to not only grieve these lives, but also to further tolerance and justice for all people. TADA has been in conversations with the Tuck administration, the student body President Teo Gonzalez, T’21, D&I Chair Roderick Milligan, T’21, and Black Students at Tuck (BSAT) Co-Chair Leah Jack, T’21 to show our support and align on our diversity and inclusion-related objectives, in an effort to make an even stronger impact within the greater Tuck community. Current students have hosted events such as ‘Controversial Conversations’ and ‘Ahmaud Arbery Ask Me Anything’ to facilitate the discussion on institutionalized racism, become effective allies, and learn from each other. 

As TADA looks ahead to revitalizing our mission, objectives, and programming for the year ahead, you will continue to hear from us regarding panel discussions, career opportunities, and social events that create a sense of community, support our professional growth, and activate the next generation of diverse leaders within the Tuck network. Gearing up for the months ahead, let’s remain focused by calling out inequity and promoting kindness and fairness. Despite our frustration, fatigue, and outright anger with the state of affairs in this country, let us practice empathy and compassion, and unite as leaders that will strengthen our communities for a more just and tolerant society. 

We'd like to hear from you. In times like these, let’s remember to stand united, learn from each other, and tackle these challenges together. 

In unity, 

Your TADA Leadership Team 

Joyce Cadesca, T’13 

Lisha Davis, T’10 
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 401
Career Services: How We Transformed the Spring Term into the Best One   [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jun 2020, 04:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Career Services: How We Transformed the Spring Term into the Best One Yet
Image
This March the Career Services team was gearing up for its usual springtime activities: conducting debrief calls with corporate partners, beginning to lay out the recruiting calendar for next year, and carefully matching student profiles to alums’ current geographies and/or industries in preparation of a targeted outreach for those still seeking jobs. But this spring was different for everyone.

Amidst the backdrop of the COVID-19 pandemic, these tasks took on new significance, as news of companies rescinding offers and canceling internships began to break. Despite the seemingly grim outlook for the job market, the Career Services team acted quickly, leveraging its personal relationships and connections with students, alumni, and corporate partners to transform the spring term into the best one yet. This personal, connected, transformative approach is at the heart of how we operate in Career Services.

Personal

With eight career advisers dedicated solely to working with students and Tuck’s intentionally smaller class size, the Career Services team is able to get to know each student on a personal level. Even through the transition to an entirely remote working (and learning) environment, advisers doubled-down on communicating with students. Maintaining close contact meant they were able to provide targeted help and support when needed, and report back to the team with updates on a daily (and sometimes even hourly) basis about which students were interviewing where, who had received offers, and importantly, who had accepted. Before long, #goodnews was trending in the Career Services virtual war room as the team shared news of offers received and accepted, with each prompting a cascade of ‘likes,’ heart emojis, and happy-dance GIFs.

Connected

It’s well established that Tuck has one of the most engaged and supportive alumni networks in the world. Our alums “bleed green,” continually surprising us with their dedication to the school and passion for paying it forward that extends long after their departure from campus. The response from alumni to this year’s targeted career outreach was nothing short of astonishing, breaking previous years’ records in both numbers of responses received and opportunities generated. Even those that had nothing concrete to offer were eager to help, offering to shop student resumes around to their own networks, expanding our reach farther than ever before. One alum at Google established a mentorship program, pairing students with Tuck alums at Google for increased support.

In addition to alumni support, the team doubled-down on outreach to corporate partners, leveraging debrief calls and LinkedIn connections to pinpoint which companies were still hiring. Associate Director of Business Development Sarah Van Orman worked tirelessly, sleuthing out each lead that team members shared and providing a constant stream of opportunities to students. Her cultivation of these company relationships blossomed into a plethora of opportunities. What started as a single full-time hire of a T’20 at Kanopy, a media company, resulted in the creation of an additional nine internship roles. Similarly, Allbirds hired one intern, but once word go out, everyone wanted a Tuck student for the summer resulting in additional internship postings.

Transformative

Relying on wisdom from previous years of economic difficulty, the Career Services and First-Year Project offices collaborated to create even more opportunities. There are always a number of FYP companies whose projects are not ‘staffed’ by student teams for course credit. Instead of letting these potential opportunities fall by the wayside, the two offices banded together to approach the companies with the possibility of transforming these into project-based summer internship offerings instead. Indeed several organizations were receptive to the idea, and five companies ended up extending more than 10 internship offers. Perhaps unsurprisingly, job posting numbers last week were up compared to the same time last year—a testament to the efforts of the Career Services team and the caliber of Tuck students, creating demand for their talent even in a market flush with layoffs and hiring freezes. In the end, there were more opportunities available than Tuck students seeking jobs, which seems like a pretty big win at any time, but especially now. Tuck Career Services is committed to providing a personal, connected, and transformative experience for students as they take the next step in their career. Our career advisers are industry experts—many of whom have worked at the same leading organizations our students seek to join. The generous size of our advising team ensures we have the time and ability to get to know each student individually and to work with them side by side. Get to know our team.

Tuck Career Services is committed to providing a personal, connected, and transformative experience for students as they take the next step in their career. Our career advisers are industry experts—many of whom have worked at the same leading organizations our students seek to join. The generous size of our advising team ensures we have the time and ability to get to know each student individually and to work with them side by side. Get to know our team.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 401
Career Services: How Students, Alumni, and Recruiters Collaborated to   [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jun 2020, 09:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Career Services: How Students, Alumni, and Recruiters Collaborated to Turn Crisis into Opportunity
Image
By Tuck Career Services

This March the Career Services team was gearing up for its usual springtime activities: conducting debrief calls with corporate partners, beginning to lay out the recruiting calendar for next year, and carefully matching student profiles to alums’ current geographies and/or industries in preparation of a targeted outreach for those still seeking jobs. But this spring was different for everyone.

Amidst the backdrop of the COVID-19 pandemic, these tasks took on new significance, as news of companies rescinding offers and canceling internships began to break. Despite the seemingly grim outlook for the job market, the Career Services team acted quickly, leveraging its personal relationships and connections with students, alumni, and corporate partners to transform the spring term into one of opportunity for our students. This personal, connected, transformative approach is at the heart of how we operate in Career Services.

Personal

With eight career advisers dedicated solely to working with students and Tuck’s intentionally smaller class size, the Career Services team is able to get to know each student on a personal level. Even through the transition to an entirely remote working (and learning) environment, advisers doubled-down on communicating with students. Maintaining close contact meant they were able to provide targeted help and support when needed, and report back to the team with updates on a daily (and sometimes even hourly) basis about which students were interviewing where, who had received offers, and importantly, who had accepted. Before long, #goodnews was trending in the Career Services virtual team room as the team shared news of offers received and accepted, with each prompting a cascade of ‘likes,’ heart emojis, and happy-dance GIFs.

Connected

It’s well established that Tuck has one of the most engaged and supportive alumni networks in the world. Our alums “bleed green,” continually surprising us with their dedication to the school and passion for paying it forward that extends long after their departure from campus. The response from alumni to this year’s targeted career outreach was nothing short of astonishing, breaking previous years’ records in both numbers of responses received and opportunities generated. Even those that had nothing concrete to offer were eager to help, offering to shop student resumes around to their own networks, expanding our reach farther than ever before. One alum at Google established a mentorship program, pairing students with Tuck alums at Google for increased support.

In addition to alumni support, the team doubled-down on outreach to corporate partners, leveraging debrief calls and LinkedIn connections to pinpoint which companies were still hiring. Associate Director of Employer Relations Sarah Van Orman worked tirelessly, sleuthing out each lead that team members shared and providing a constant stream of opportunities to students. Her cultivation of these company relationships blossomed into a plethora of opportunities. What started as a single full-time hire of a T’20 at Kanopy, a media company, resulted in the creation of an additional nine internship roles. Similarly, Allbirds hired one intern, but once word got out, everyone wanted a Tuck student for the summer resulting in additional internship postings.

Transformative

Relying on experience from previous years of economic difficulty, Career Services and the First-Year Project team collaborated to create even more opportunities. There are always a number of FYP companies whose projects are not ‘staffed’ by student teams for course credit. Instead of letting these potential opportunities fall by the wayside, the two offices banded together to approach the companies with the possibility of transforming these into project-based summer internship offerings instead. Indeed several organizations were receptive to the idea, and five companies ended up extending more than 10 internship offers. As a result of these efforts, intern job posting numbers last week were up compared to the same time last year—a testament to the efforts of the Career Services team and the caliber of Tuck students, creating demand for their talent even in a market hit by layoffs and hiring freezes. In the end, there were more intern opportunities available than Tuck students seeking positions, which seems like a pretty big win at any time, but especially now. 

Tuck Career Services is committed to providing a personal, connected, and transformative experience for students as they take the next step in their career. Our career advisers are industry experts—many of whom have worked at the same leading organizations our students seek to join. The generous size of our advising team ensures we have the time and ability to get to know each student individually and to work with them side by side. Get to know our team.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 401
Driving Towards the Future - Starting a New Club at Tuck  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jun 2020, 07:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Driving Towards the Future - Starting a New Club at Tuck
Image
By Sammer Richi T’21

“Wow! Bryan, Doug, this was great. This was absolutely awesome!” Professor Ramon Lecuona wrapped our first-ever Future of Automotive Mobility Club event, thanking our guest speakers for their time and for the incredibly lively discussion. The Zoom chat and GroupMe was blowing up with thank yous and “great talk!” It was crazy to think that several months prior, our club was just a bunch of ideas on a PowerPoint slide.

Starting the Engine

Image

As we wrap our first year at Tuck, I’ve been reflecting on the incredible experience I’ve shared with my fellow T’21s. A clear highlight has been founding Tuck’s newest career-focused club, the Future of Automotive Mobility (FAM) Club. The “automotive” part is easy enough. But what about “Future of Mobility”? According to Deloitte, the future of mobility means “frictionless, automated, personalized travel on demand.” Simply put, this encompasses the radical new technologies that will transport us from A to B in the not too distant future. This includes autonomous vehicles, aerial ride-sharing, and micro-mobility, as well as all the technologies linking them together.

Just recently, I dug up my application to Tuck and found what I wrote for the “Career Goals” section. Without any paraphrasing: “Automobiles have always been my passion, and I identify with the strong connection people build with their cars … The mobility industry is undergoing an unprecedented transformation, creating an environment that cultivates learning and growth. I believe it is the perfect opportunity to align personal passions with professional goals.”

Sounds reasonable enough.

What I did not realize at the time was that I would find Tuckies with ambitions similar to my own. I was fortunate enough to meet Sarthak Vaish and Saachi Shah, both T’21s, early on in Fall A. Sarthak and Saachi both had automotive experience before coming to Tuck, and we found that we are all interested in pursuing careers in the industry after graduation. We also noticed Tuck was missing a club aligned to the mobility industry. And so, began our journey to creating the Future of Mobility Club. Along the way, we learned two of our classmates, Ben Simon T‘21 and Stephen Wittmann T‘21, were seeking to tap into their passion for the automotive industry, mainly Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) or rather, traditional automakers like Ford, GM, Porsche, and BMW. We collectively decided to merge our ideas into what is now known as the Tuck Future of Automotive Mobility Club.

The momentum didn’t stop there. Once we formed our core group, we started socializing our idea to form the club with the wider Tuck Community. We met with students, faculty, alumni, and Tuck’s Industry Centers to share our ideas behind the club and gather feedback, ideas, and support for future events. From faculty car enthusiasts, like the aforementioned Professor Ramon Lecuona, to students interested in learning more about self-driving cars, the excitement we met with was palpable. The Revers Center, in particular, has been incredibly helpful in marketing our club to the Tuck Community, providing logistical support, and introducing us to members of the wider Dartmouth community that are passionate about what our club is pursuing. Leveraging all the knowledge, people, and ideas we had pulled together, Saachi, Ben, Sarthak, Stephen, and I pitched our club proposal to Tuck’s Student Board in February of 2020. A few days later, we were given the green light to start the Future of Automotive Mobility Club.

Image
Having All the Right Parts


Our club is built around three “pillars”: learning, career, and events. Each pillar is designed to help our fellow students learn about, interact with, and hopefully gain employment in the automotive and mobility industries. The learning pillar focuses on educating Tuckies about the automotive industry and about revolutionary new technologies, such as self-driving cars, through a series of talks created and led by our team of co-chairs. These will be interactive sessions with the aim of providing insight into key industry topics to help Tuck students get exposure to automotive mobility and build the right set of knowledge to aid in networking, interviews, and more. In addition to learning series, our club will help in sourcing First-Year Project opportunities. This year, our club sourced an FYP with Agero, a white-label digital roadside assistance network. The FYP was a great success and led to Agero seeking to hire a Tuck intern to take the FYP project recommendation forward.

The career pillar seeks to provide Tuckies with the resources to find an internship or full-time opportunity in the automotive and mobility industries. Career Services already does a great job sourcing internships and full-time opportunities from the likes of Waymo, Uber, Via, and more. We plan to leverage Tuck’s network and our own professional experience to source additional opportunities at unique industry start-ups and other nascent players. Furthermore, our club is planning two sets of career treks (once it is safe to travel!). The first trek will be focused on mobility technology and will take Tuckies out to the San Francisco Bay Area to meet with established tech companies and start-ups alike. The second trek will be OEM focused and will provide the opportunity to interact with many traditional automakers with manufacturing facilities in the U.S., including Ford, GM, Porsche, BMW, Toyota, Tesla, and more. As the mobility industry undergoes an epochal transformation, our hope is to empower Tuckies to join the fray and help lead the future of automotive technology.

Finally, our events pillar is focused on allowing Tuck students to interact with industry leaders directly. With support from the Revers Center for Energy, we plan to host panel events with speakers from all parts of the industry, including automotive, energy, insurance, technology, research, and more. Through such events, we seek to excite our classmates about the fascinating topics the industry is focused on and hopefully encourage a few to pursue careers in automotive. In the past, Tuck has hosted a case competition sponsored by Tesla. We hope to bring that back. Additionally, we wouldn’t be true to our roots if we did not tap into the passion that fuels automotive culture. Our events will also include trips to the New York International Auto Show, “cars and coffee” meetups, and even a classic car exhibition on Tuck’s campus.

Image
Getting a Flying Start


In May, with the FAM Club now official, we turned our sights on hosting our first-ever club event. Two of our co-chairs, Saachi Shah and Ben Simon, did a spectacular job pulling together our first-ever industry panel event. On May 8th, the FAM Club was joined by Bryan Reimer, a researcher at MIT, and Doug DeMuro, a famous YouTuber and automotive journalist. The discussion was moderated by Tuck’s own Professor Ramon Lecuona and focused on what the future holds in store for autonomous vehicles, and we can expect as consumers. With sponsorship support from The Revers Center for Energy, we had 114 participants join the virtual panel, and the conversation was high-energy, fun, and incredibly engaging. Bryan and Doug had a lot of great insight to share with our group, and we received a ton of great feedback from the Tuck community. Hats off to Ben and Saachi for putting on a great event. Talk about a strong start!

Looking to the Road Ahead

Our team is excited to continue providing opportunities for the Tuck community to learn about and engage with the automotive and mobility industry. As we think about next year and welcoming a new class of Tuckies, we look forward to putting on more great events and providing opportunities to help build the next generation of leaders building the future of automotive mobility.

Sammer Richi is a T’21 who worked for Deloitte Consulting and General Electric prior to coming to Tuck. He is the co-founder of the Future of Automotive Mobility Club at Tuck and will be interning with Google this summer.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 401
Three Reasons Why Tuck Is the Best Place to Recruit for Investment Ban  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jun 2020, 12:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Three Reasons Why Tuck Is the Best Place to Recruit for Investment Banking
Image
By Franco Coria T’21

Unlike many of my colleagues, I did not decide to recruit for investment banking until September of Fall A. I knew I wanted to experience the financial world, but investment banking was not on my radar for many reasons. My biggest concern was making such a major career pivot: would any bank hire a 32-year-old guy with nine years of experience in only one company within the oil and gas industry? Would it be possible to go from not knowing what EBITDA was (not a joke!) to becoming an attractive candidate in only two months? Thanks to Tuck, I got an internship that I never thought I could get.

Among many, there are three main reasons why I was able to land an internship at Bank of America this summer, and why I believe Tuck is the best place for whoever wants to recruit for investment banking.

1. Small and Tight-knit Family

I know you are probably tired of hearing the “tight-knit community” phrase everywhere. And honestly, you can probably find it in many places when it comes to social events, academics, fun activities, etc. But when it comes to such an intense process like IB recruiting, that’s when you really know how “tight-knit” your community is. Some may think this is a competitive process in which only some succeed, but I can assure you that this is not the spirit at Tuck. We helped each other succeed as a team. Full transparency and genuine support were the trademarks of our group, and it made an incredible difference for career-switchers like me.

The size of the group recruiting for IB allowed us to connect and share experiences in a way that it would not be possible in a bigger school. Very quickly after the process started, we became a family sharing our experiences and carpooling to NYC together. We shared successes as well as failures, and we tried to make the stressful process as fun as possible. Throughout the entire process, I had the opportunity to interact with many students from other schools recruiting for IB. They could not believe when I told them we were a group of friends helping each other out. Some of them were even surprised that we all knew each other!

2. Recruiters Are Tuck Nice

One thing you should know is that most of the interactions, networking, and recruiting are conducted by school alumni working at those banks. This is typically the same for all the schools, however, not all of them are Tuck Nice and proud alumni! Let me lay it out for you:

Imagine 100+ students interacting with a handful of bankers from their schools (the circle of death ratio is 20:1). The bankers are probably all living in the same city or close enough so they can host their recruiting event for a few hours and then go back to work. Now imagine 35 students interacting with a handful of bankers (circle of death ratio is 5:1). These bankers traveled to their remote school campus just for recruiting and they could not be more excited about it! These bankers have to stay the night in the small town of Hanover which means they get to skip that night at the office and can have a drink at Murphy’s with the students. Which scenario would you say is most favorable for you to get to know all your recruiters, and for all of the recruiters to get to know you? On top of this, Tuck alumni are like an “oasis of niceness” in an industry in which being nice and amicable is not necessarily a trademark.

 

Image

Franco with his wife, Sol, and dog, Lupita.

3. Available Resources

You will not find a bigger resources-to-students ratio anywhere else. This applies to any industry you want to recruit for. We had the support from all the second-year students who interned in IB, one-on-one mentors, and an amazing career services advisor with over 25 years of experience in the industry. We all had high-quality advice and personalized guidance from industry experts. For someone like me who had no previous experience and needed extra support, Tuck was a perfect fit. I will join Bank of America this summer and, what’s most important, the T’21 class will be present in all the top firms at Wall Street, showing that Tuck is a unique place for Investment Banking recruiting. Even before getting an internship offer, I knew Tuck was the right choice for my career goals.

Franco Coria T’21 is from Argentina and, prior to Tuck, worked in the oil and gas industry both in his home country and Houston, TX. He is a Latin American (LATAM) ambassador and incoming co-chair of Hispanic American Student Association (HASA) at Tuck. This summer, he will be interning at Bank of America Securities (TMT group).
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 401
A Closer Look at Tuck’s Admissions Criteria  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Jun 2020, 11:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: A Closer Look at Tuck’s Admissions Criteria
Image

Part III: Encouraging

 

Image

By Luke Anthony Peña

Executive Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

Happy June, friends! Recruitment season is here, which means we’re looking ahead to the Tuck Class of 2023. My Admissions colleagues and I are excited to get to know you, and give you the opportunity to get to know Tuck. For the coming months, we invite you to connect with Tuck representatives and ambassadors online at a variety of events, including Tuesdays with Tuck, coffee chats with me, and an array of small group events tailored to specific geographies, industries, and affinity groups. I look forward to meeting many of you! 

We at Tuck care a lot about reducing stress and anxiety in the application. This includes being transparent about the four criteria we look for in strong Tuck applicants.

Tuck students are smart, curious, and engaged.

Tuck students are accomplished, impactful, and principled.

Tuck students are aware, ambitious, and purposeful.

Tuck students are encouraging, collaborative, and empathetic.

I’ve written elsewhere on the blog about smart, accomplished, and aware, so I’m writing here about what it means at Tuck to be encouraging. Being encouraging, collaborative, and empathetic is quintessential Tuck, where you actively celebrate and support others. We’ve evolved this criterion from “nice” to better describe about how Tuck students conduct themselves.

At Tuck, being encouraging, collaborative, and empathetic means you invest both in your own success and also in the success of others. There are two components to investing in others. On one hand, this means making a habit of supporting others. You encourage, celebrate, and support others with kindness, compassion, and empathy. On the other hand, this also means demonstrating the courage to challenge others. Investing in others goes far beyond being pleasant and agreeable. When you value the relationships you’ve built, you’re willing to constructively disagree and push back in service of a stronger shared understanding. Rather than avoiding difficult conversations, you respectfully encourage them when necessary and appropriate. Being truly encouraging, collaborative, and empathetic requires real commitment, emotional intelligence, and a sustained willingness to make ongoing investments into meaningful trust-based relationships. 

I am often asked how we evaluate this criterion, given its seeming subjectivity, and how you can demonstrate it in your application. Much like our other criteria, the clear and concrete evidence lies in your patterns of behavior over time. As a point of comparison, consider our accomplished criterion. Your prior achievements do not transfer with you to business school, and you are not accomplished simply because of the lines on your resume; it is the behaviors that led you to achieve good outcomes that suggest you will be accomplished at Tuck and beyond. The same is true for encouraging; the outcomes of your investments in others matter less than the behaviors you practice in service of these good relationships. When we read your application, we’re looking for these patterns of behavior. 

You have three opportunities in your application to demonstrate the encouraging criterion. The first is the third application essay, which prompts you to tell us about a time when you invested in another’s success. The second is your interview, in which your student interviewer will be asking questions to surface all four criteria, including encouraging. My encouragement here is to resist the urge to try to craft a perfect “encouraging” story and instead help your interviewer see that you are in the habit of both supporting and challenging others. Finally, we read your reference letters seeking evidence of all four criteria, including encouraging. Your references can provide powerful data points; they can confirm that others recognize the investments you’ve made in relationships. To this end, encourage your references to include stories not just outlining what you did, but also with whom you did it and how you partnered with them. 

Let me briefly dispel one myth about the encouraging criterion and extracurricular activities. I’ve heard some say that listing certain extracurricular activities, such as coaching, mentoring, volunteering, etc., automatically qualifies you as encouraging. Not necessarily! Applicants can demonstrate an investment in others in an environment that is purely for profit. Likewise, they can volunteer for a noble cause yet still demonstrate behaviors that do not reflect a true investment in others. Just as it’s possible to stumble into a great accomplishment with poor behaviors, it is possible to contribute poorly to a good cause. How you act matters far more than what you do. Involvement with philanthropic causes is commendable, but on its own does not satisfy the criterion. If you have meaningfully engaged in extracurricular activities in ways that do reflect our criteria, highlight your behaviors therein rather than assuming the line on the resume speaks for itself. And if you have not had the opportunity to be involved in philanthropic causes, don’t worry—there are many other opportunities in the application to demonstrate this criterion. 

My colleagues and I look forward to hearing from you, your references, and our student interviewers about how you invest in others, and we’re happy to answer any questions to help you navigate our application with confidence. We invite you to connect with the Tuck community via online events and keep up with me and Tuck on social media. I look forward to seeing you virtually and learning more about you in your application! 
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 401
Tuck Admissions Insights: Your Short-Term and Long-Term Goals  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Jun 2020, 08:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck Admissions Insights: Your Short-Term and Long-Term Goals
Image
Image

By Luke Anthony Peña

Executive Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

Hello, friends! We at Tuck are looking ahead to the Tuck Class of 2023. My Admissions colleagues and I are excited to get to know you, and give you the opportunity to get to know Tuck. We invite you to connect with Tuck representatives and ambassadors online at a variety of events, including Tuesdays with Tuck, coffee chats with me, and an array of small group events tailored to specific geographies, industries, and affinity groups. We look forward to meeting you soon!

I recently shared thoughts about our three required essays, each of which map directly to our criteria. In this blog, I’d like to share thoughts on our prompts that ask about your goals. There are many sources of advice and guidance from various influencers and websites, so my colleagues and I want you to hear insights directly from those of us who are reading, evaluating, and assessing your application.

Word Limit

Our goals prompts have word limits that are… limited. Many of you have told me that they’re really brief. This is by design. There’s no room, literally or figuratively, for elaborate storytelling here. We want your responses to be crisp, clear, concise, and matter-of-fact. My advice to those of you trying hard to shoehorn in a supporting narrative: save the additional details for your essays or your interview, and trust that we really, truly do want you to be factual and direct.

The responses may be short, but I assure you that they matter to us. As we map your application to our criteria, your goals reflect your awareness. As articulated in our criteria, aware Tuck candidates craft a compelling vision for the future and identify coherent goals, audacious in scope yet grounded in reality.

Question One: Share your short term goals.

While your first essay highlights why an MBA and why Tuck, your goals convey what you expect to accomplish thereafter. This distinction helps frame the scope of the first prompt which asks you to share your short-term goals. Some of you have asked for clarification on the short-term time horizon. This question is not asking about your goals while at Tuck. In this prompt, we’re keen to learn your goals immediately after graduating from Tuck. We stopped short of explicitly specifying that the goals must be professional, as some of you have goals that are both professional and personal. That said, I expect most of you will tell us about the job and the impact you expect to have after you graduate.

Question Two: Share your long term goals.

If the first prompt is meant to capture your first stop on your post-MBA trajectory, the second is meant to capture your last. What is your dream job? What role and impact do you want to have 20, 30, 40, 50 years from now? What legacy do you want to leave? What is your compelling vision for the future? My colleagues and I are especially excited to read your response here, as this reflects how you aspire to better the world through business.

Our Awareness Criterion

Let me take a moment to return to a key phrase in our awareness criterion: strong candidates will have coherent goals that are both audacious in scope yet grounded in reality. I can’t overstate the importance of this balance. On one hand, the Tuck School and the world of business need wise, decisive leaders who dream big. You don’t better the world through low ambition, so share your highest aspirations with us. At the same time, remember that judgment is an essential aptitude of wise leadership. You need that good judgment to identify the right steps on the path to your goals, and to assess whether the Tuck MBA makes sense as one of those steps.

Both your short- and long-term goals should be ambitious and realistic, though on the margin, we will expect your long-term goals to tilt towards the former and your short-term goals to tilt towards the latter. This balance will be the hallmark of strong responses to these prompts. We’re not taking an opinion on the industry, the function, the geography, or the ideology of what you aspire to do. Instead, we’re assessing that your goals are coherent, ambitious, and purposeful.

As always, my Admissions colleagues and I are happy to be accessible, responsive, and helpful if you have any questions about writing your goals or any other part of your Tuck application. Happy writing – we look forward to getting to know more about you and the impact you plan to achieve!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
GMAT Club Bot
Tuck Admissions Insights: Your Short-Term and Long-Term Goals   [#permalink] 30 Jun 2020, 08:00

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   [ 198 posts ] 

Tuck Dartmouth MBA Admissions & Related Blogs

  new topic post reply Update application status  

Moderators: BingingOnNetflix, texas101






Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne