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Charting Unchartered Territories: Inside the Tuck WIBC [#permalink]
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Charting Unchartered Territories: Inside the Tuck WIBC

By Jane Maglaque T’21

This year’s Tuck Women in Business Conference was unlike any other WIB Conference (WIBC) that Tuck has hosted in the past.

I attended the conference as a prospective student, and I was thrilled and honored to return as a co-chair for the conference this year.

"Tuck is family and you show up for family."

– Professor Ella Bell Smith

We had the privilege of hosting over 100 prospective women students virtually for Tuck WIBC. While this year’s conference was delivered virtually, it didn’t diminish the mission the quality or mission of WIBC—my fellow co-chairs and I worked hard to ensure the spirit and community of Tuck was felt by each prospective student, even virtually.

Our conference theme this year was “Charting Uncharted Territories,” inspired by the ever-changing world that we are currently facing.

The weekend was full of opportunities for attendees to connect with each other and members of the Tuck community. We started off with a faculty panel, where different professors spoke about the academic experience at Tuck, including what it is like to teach students virtually. Professors spoke about how the connection between students and faculty hasn’t changed: each student shows up to class each day (there are no pre-recorded sessions in place of class), and professors stimulate the same interactive dialogue that took place in an in-person classroom. One of the most memorable moments of the conference for me was when, during the panel, Professor Ella Bell Smith spoke about the difference that Tuck has made in her life personally. “Tuck is family and you show up for family,” she told participants.



We were lucky enough to have two amazing keynote speakers join us, Elisabeth Hartley T’05 and Cassie Young T’11. A VC, angel investor and business advisor to early-stage startups, venture-backed and high-growth companies, Lis shared the winding road of her successful career and how she charted uncharted territories. The Tuck community, said Hartley, has been a constant support system throughout her career. “I can reach out to a Tuckie and within 24 hours get personalized advice and mentorship from them. The strength of the Tuck network doesn’t stop,” she said.

Partner at Primary Venture Partners, Cassie’s impactful keynote message left us inspired and ready to take on the unknown. “Making your mark is about quick wins and long-term bets,” she told us. “You can’t control everything, so focus on what you can influence and trust the process. Embrace uncomfortable opportunities, go out into the storm. And don’t forget to be human and have a little fun in the process.”

Other activities over the weekend included a mock class, an alumni panel, a Tuck Talks session, and a salary negotiations workshop.

Of course, the attendees had the chance to have a little fun interacting with each other and current students through small group dinners and small group activities (like yoga, bread making classes, virtual scavenger hunts, and dance lessons).

It was an absolute privilege for Tuck to host over 100 prospective students at our annual WIB Conference. We were so happy to have every attendee take a risk with us—the conference had never been held virtually!—and we hope that through this risk they were able to see the strength of the Tuck fabric.



Jane is a second-year student at the Tuck School of Business. She is from San Diego, CA and majored in History at Mount Holyoke College. Prior to Tuck, Jane lived in New York City where she worked at American Express on the Corporate Strategy team. This summer, she is interning at Google on the Platforms & Ecosystems team. In addition to co-chairing the Women In Business Conference, Jane is a Non-Profit Board Fellow, Leadership Fellow, a committee member of TALK (Tuck Allies through Leadership and Knowledge) and co-chair of the Cheesemongers Club.
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My Journey From a U.S. Army Officer to Business Consultant [#permalink]
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: My Journey From a U.S. Army Officer to Business Consultant

By Makena Timmins T’20

In 2017 while stationed in Alaska as an artillery battery commander, I began to yearn for both a lifestyle change and a new professional challenge. As a soon-to-be post-command Captain, I was at a major crossroads: continue my upwards trajectory through the US Army officer ranks for twenty-plus years of service or exit the military to pursue another calling. Although I desired the latter, I had the classic “sunk cost” fear and was apprehensive to leave behind the career I had spent seven years building. Furthermore, I was not convinced the skill set I acquired in the military would translate to a civilian resume, and I didn’t have a strong (or any!) professional network outside of the Army. After briefly exploring a few employment options, I began researching graduate schools and found many programs marketed themselves as veteran-friendly. I studied for the GMAT and put in for two weeks of leave to attend various MBA military admissions days around the country.

When I drove away from Dartmouth’s campus on October 4th, 2017 after attending Tuck’s annual Military Visit Day, I knew I would be submitting my request to leave the Army. As member after member of the Tuck Veterans Club shared their experiences, I found many of their reasons for leaving the service to attend Tuck echoed my own. The presentation by Tuck’s Career Services team introduced me to seemingly endless professional opportunities that a Tuck education affords its graduates. During the application process, Tuck veterans made themselves available to answer my questions and help me prepare for my impending transition from the military. On a cold Alaskan winter morning, Kristen Roth from the admissions office called me to deliver the life-changing news that I had been accepted to Tuck. I’ll remember that morning for the rest of my life, and I still celebrate the anniversary of my Tuck admissions day every year. I departed the Army three months later with excitement and eagerness to begin a new chapter of my life.

"The best decision I ever made in my life was to serve in the US Army. A very close second was to leave the Army after eight years to attend Tuck."

 

When I arrived on campus in August 2018, I found myself surrounded by a uniquely diverse, talented, and supportive group of classmates. From orientation until graduation, my classmates encouraged me daily as I navigated tough and unfamiliar academic topics, recruited for competitive jobs, and adjusted to life outside the military. I found Tuck professors to be second to none and always available outside of the classroom for questions relating to an array of topics from bond yields to Upper Valley running routes. I developed an extensive professional network through my peers and other Tuck alumni, and I made some truly special friendships along the way.

As I write this post from my home in Dallas, TX and reflect on my time at Tuck, I can’t overstate how incredibly transformative those two years were for me. I rediscovered myself outside of the uniform and gained the business skills I needed to be successful in my post-military career. Today, I work for Bain & Company as a consultant, daily utilizing the team problem-solving skills I learned in the Army and the business acumen and refined leadership techniques I developed through Tuck’s challenging academic curriculum. With my eight years of military service slipping further back in the rearview mirror, I become increasingly more thankful every day for the opportunity to have served as an officer in the United States Army leading America’s sons and daughters. I am also immensely grateful to have attended Tuck, a business school that supported me every step of the way as I transitioned from soldier to business leader. I believe Tuck is the absolute best choice for veteran students who want a fully immersive MBA program. I highly encourage all my fellow veterans to check out what Tuck has to offer as they begin to consider what will be the foundation on which they will build their post-military career.



Makena Timmins T’20 hails from Seattle, WA and graduated from The University of the South with a BA in Economics. She served eight years on active duty in the U.S. Army as an artillery officer and was stationed in Oklahoma, South Korea, Tennessee, and Alaska. In 2014, she deployed with her brigade to Afghanistan for ten months in support of OEF. She currently resides in Dallas, TX and works as a consultant for Bain & Company.
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My Journey from a U.S. Army Officer to Business Consultant [#permalink]
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: My Journey from a U.S. Army Officer to Business Consultant

By Makena Timmins T’20

In 2017 while stationed in Alaska as an artillery battery commander, I began to yearn for both a lifestyle change and a new professional challenge. As a soon-to-be post-command Captain, I was at a major crossroads: continue my upwards trajectory through the US Army officer ranks for twenty-plus years of service or exit the military to pursue another calling. Although I desired the latter, I had the classic “sunk cost” fear and was apprehensive to leave behind the career I had spent seven years building. Furthermore, I was not convinced the skill set I acquired in the military would translate to a civilian resume, and I didn’t have a strong (or any!) professional network outside of the Army. After briefly exploring a few employment options, I began researching graduate schools and found many programs marketed themselves as veteran-friendly. I studied for the GMAT and put in for two weeks of leave to attend various MBA military admissions days around the country.

When I drove away from Dartmouth’s campus on October 4th, 2017 after attending Tuck’s annual Military Visit Day, I knew I would be submitting my request to leave the Army. As member after member of the Tuck Veterans Club shared their experiences, I found many of their reasons for leaving the service to attend Tuck echoed my own. The presentation by Tuck’s Career Services team introduced me to seemingly endless professional opportunities that a Tuck education affords its graduates. During the application process, Tuck veterans made themselves available to answer my questions and help me prepare for my impending transition from the military. On a cold Alaskan winter morning, Kristen Roth from the admissions office called me to deliver the life-changing news that I had been accepted to Tuck. I’ll remember that morning for the rest of my life, and I still celebrate the anniversary of my Tuck admissions day every year. I departed the Army three months later with excitement and eagerness to begin a new chapter of my life.

"The best decision I ever made in my life was to serve in the US Army. A very close second was to leave the Army after eight years to attend Tuck."

 

When I arrived on campus in August 2018, I found myself surrounded by a uniquely diverse, talented, and supportive group of classmates. From orientation until graduation, my classmates encouraged me daily as I navigated tough and unfamiliar academic topics, recruited for competitive jobs, and adjusted to life outside the military. I found Tuck professors to be second to none and always available outside of the classroom for questions relating to an array of topics from bond yields to Upper Valley running routes. I developed an extensive professional network through my peers and other Tuck alumni, and I made some truly special friendships along the way.

As I write this post from my home in Dallas, TX and reflect on my time at Tuck, I can’t overstate how incredibly transformative those two years were for me. I rediscovered myself outside of the uniform and gained the business skills I needed to be successful in my post-military career. Today, I work for Bain & Company as a consultant, daily utilizing the team problem-solving skills I learned in the Army and the business acumen and refined leadership techniques I developed through Tuck’s challenging academic curriculum. With my eight years of military service slipping further back in the rearview mirror, I become increasingly more thankful every day for the opportunity to have served as an officer in the United States Army leading America’s sons and daughters. I am also immensely grateful to have attended Tuck, a business school that supported me every step of the way as I transitioned from soldier to business leader. I believe Tuck is the absolute best choice for veteran students who want a fully immersive MBA program. I highly encourage all my fellow veterans to check out what Tuck has to offer as they begin to consider what will be the foundation on which they will build their post-military career.



Makena Timmins T’20 hails from Seattle, WA and graduated from The University of the South with a BA in Economics. She served eight years on active duty in the U.S. Army as an artillery officer and was stationed in Oklahoma, South Korea, Tennessee, and Alaska. In 2014, she deployed with her brigade to Afghanistan for ten months in support of OEF. She currently resides in Dallas, TX and works as a consultant for Bain & Company.
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Dear Tuck Admissions: Your Application Questions, Answered [#permalink]
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Dear Tuck Admissions: Your Application Questions, Answered




By Valeria Wiens

Associate Director of Evaluation, Admissions

Dear Tuck Admissions,

I am mortified. I just hit submit on my application and realized that I accidentally expressed my enthusiasm for another school in one of my essays. I keep pressing undo on my keyboard, but alas, to no avail; no amount of pressing it allows me to un-submit. Is that it for me? Will you hit deny with the same speed and rigor as I’m hitting undo? Any chance of salvaging the situation?

Yours truly,

How did I miss this?

 

Dear How did I miss this?,

Do we rejoice at seeing another school’s name in your essay? No. Is it a disqualifying mistake? Also no. We all know mistakes happen. While we love Tuck, we also know that many applicants apply to more than one school. Our team reads with empathy, and will likely look past your unfortunate mistake if they see your enthusiasm for Tuck and alignment with our four admissions criteria elsewhere in your application.

We would never deny an otherwise strong applicant because of a typo, just as we wouldn’t admit an otherwise weak applicant because of one well-written sentence. Does this mean that it’s ok to not proofread and thoroughly review your application? No – one mistake or typo can be looked past, however more than a couple will make up a pattern and could influence how we evaluate your alignment with our admissions criteria. In the meantime, perhaps you will find this how-to article for the find and replace function helpful.

Sincerely,

Tuck Admissions

Dear Tuck Admissions,

I submitted my application a couple of weeks ago and haven’t yet received an invitation to interview. Is that a bad sign? A good one? Am I reading too much into it? Do you actually read the full application, the essays and all, before deciding yay/nay on the interview? Or do you just glance at my scores and resume and decide that way?

Sincerely,

Pins and needles

 

Dear Pins and needles,

Indeed, before deciding on an interview invitation we do read your entire application, front-to-back, because the information we ask you to provide allows us to get to know you better. We don’t skip parts or cut corners. We know how much effort goes into putting together an application to Tuck and truly enjoy learning more about you. If you took the time to write something, we will absolutely take the time to read it.

You will have often heard us say that the timing of your interview invitation does not indicate our level of interest in your candidacy—we mean this. We don’t “pick” the files we read but are randomly assigned them. For some candidates, this means that their file might be the very first one we will read in an application cycle, while others might have their file read towards the end. The interview invitation timing has little to do with the strength of your application, and a lot to do with this random assignment algorithm. So, take a deep breath, and don’t put too much stock into reading the tea leaves.

Sincerely,

Tuck Admissions

Dear Tuck Admissions,

I LOVE Tuck and want to show you how excited I am about the prospect of attending your program. I already went to several of your events and feel that I know the school so well that, at this point, I could be the one leading your info sessions. Would attending even more events reflect positively on my application? Will it send you the “signal” of my intent?

Best regards,

Zoomed-out

 

Dear Zoomed-out,

We LOVE your excitement about Tuck! We also know that you have a life outside of the Tuck application process. Our intent behind not limiting event attendance is not to create an arms race of who can convince us through sheer enthusiasm that they want to be here. The intent is to allow you to get to know us and our program through whatever type and however many events this may take. For some of you, this might mean attending one or two events, for others this could mean more. There are even some candidates who prefer to learn about Tuck through conversations with our alumni, students, and community members, entirely outside of our formal events.

So keep attending! Or don’t. We encourage whatever approach works best for you! What will show us how you meet the aware criterion is not how many events you’ve attended but what you learned about Tuck from them. It's the difference between loving Tuck and knowing Tuck. Instead of focusing on showing how much you want a Tuck MBA, use the eventsto learn and help articulate how well Tuck aligns with your goals. And while my colleagues and I always appreciate seeing familiar faces at our events, in your case it seems like a foot-off-the-gas approach might be most beneficial to you.

Sincerely,

Tuck Admissions

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Designing Business Solutions for Small Businesses Impacted by COVID-19 [#permalink]
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Designing Business Solutions for Small Businesses Impacted by COVID-19

By Jessica Ahn T'21

     

"[People] built most nobly when limitations were at their greatest.” – Frank Lloyd Wright

 

It is no surprise COVID-19 has upended lives and businesses everywhere, even here in the Upper Valley. Much of life today is out of our control, and both people and organizations are facing extreme limitations. However, while counterintuitive, research shows that innovations are birthed not despite constraints but because of them.

In this spirit, graduate students from the Tuck School of Business and the Thayer School of Engineering joined forces this October to participate in the Small Business School Challenge, a 48-hour hackathon serving small and medium sized businesses impacted by COVID-19. Ten teams of Dartmouth graduate students were paired with businesses around the Upper Valley to design solutions to pandemic-driven challenges. Participating small businesses included local favorites such as Tuck Stuff, Dartmouth Co-op, Piecemeal Pies, Juel Modern Apothecary and Killington Vacation Rentals, and other businesses with exciting ventures, like Merry Go Rounds and Quiet Events.

The hard work and dedication of our Dartmouth teams culminated in a pitch competition where an esteemed panel of Tuck School of Business faculty and alumni judges selected the top three Dartmouth teams. These teams earned cash prizes for their local businesses, and the first place team advanced to a national-level final to compete against more than ten other MBA programs.

Here is a high-level sample of the ideas produced by Dartmouth teams:

Business: Still North Books & Bar

Location: Hanover, NH

Output: Three-pronged approach exploring private events, bundling and menu expansion. Other ideas included website updates and social media marketing and sales.

Business: Juel Modern Apothecary

Location: White River Junction, VT

Output: Solutions focused on increasing takeout order quantity, menu optimization, and increasing brand equity.

Business: Piecemeal Pies

Location: White River Junction, VT

Output: Combination of internal and external recommendations ranging from product and distribution extensions to local partnerships and engagements.

Business: Dan & Whit's

Location: Norwich, VT

Output: Ideas on how employees can contribute to operations when unable to come into the store (i.e. online orders, social media, supplier and customer management, etc.

Business: Positive Tracks

Location: Hanover, NH

Output: Proposal to increase brand equity and public relations (advertising, influencers, etc.), increase traditional revenue streams through innovation, and other ancillary solutions.

Business: Tuck Stuff

Location: Hanover, NH

Output: Short-term recommendations included growing email list, membership program, and collaborations with student clubs. Long-term ideas focused on communications, website and logo redesign and new products.

 



Ten teams of Tuck and Thayer students applied their classroom knowledge to design solutions for pandemic-driven challenges affecting local businesses.

After an extended deliberation session, the judges awarded first place to Gissell Castellon T’22, Gregory Rivers T’22, and Jonathon Chin T’22 who represented Still North Book & Bar, second place to Ashley Jones T’22, Christine Gregory T’22, and Meghan Egan T’22 who served Dan & Whit’s, and third place to Jehlum Vitasta Pandit (Thayer) and Kavya Narayanan T’22 who helped Positive Tracks.

Thank you to all our Dartmouth student participants and local businesses! This event would not have been possible without you. Thanks also to the Tuck School of Business’ MBA Program Office, the Center for Business, Government and Society, the Center for Entrepreneurship, and the Small Business School Challenge for your support throughout the event.

We believe that partnerships and opportunities, such as the Small Business School Challenge, are a silver lining to the challenging times we live in and can be the inspiration we may need to innovate and create our futures.



Jessica Ahn T’21 is a Forte Fellow, Consortium Liaison, and a Center for Business, Government, and Society Fellow. Over the summer, she interned at IDEO’s Purpose Project and Future Work Design and will going into consulting post-Tuck.
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November Update on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion at the Tuck School [#permalink]
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: November Update on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion at the Tuck School

By Dia Draper, Associate Dean for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

 

The intent of this monthly update is to share the latest thinking about DEI at Tuck, actions we are taking to create change, and the many ways that Tuck community members can engage with topics of diversity and inclusion.  Here we will share developments to key initiatives and programs, new curricular and co-curricular offerings, student-led creations and events, and news from faculty, staff and alumni.

DEI is a strategic priority for our school, as evidenced by the creation of the new leadership role, assistant dean for DEI—a position that I am honored to hold and be the first appointment to. I am more excited, inspired, and driven than ever to help Tuck the institution and Tuck the community realize its potential to lead change in the world by starting in our own house. 

Wise leaders build diverse teams and create inclusive environments. They lead high-performing organizations by cultivating a culture that is safe for honest dialogue, respectful debate, and transformative discussion. That work begins here, with us. 

Below are a few things that we’ve been working on and resources I’ve found helpful or thought-provoking recently.  

Wishing you well, 

Dia 

Dia Draper (she/her)

Assistant Dean for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

Many Voices. One Tuck. 

Inspiring Moment of the Month

There is a lot to draw inspiration from in our community. Each month, I’ll share one example of DEI momentum that I find energizing. This month’s example is thanks to our dean, Matt Slaughter. I snuck into the back of Dean Slaughter’s Leadership in the Global Economy (LGE) class on November 5 to observe his session with William “Sandy” Darity. Darity is a distinguished Professor of Public Policy at Duke University and is widely regarded as one of the leading experts on the economic causes and consequences of racism in America. The topic for class that day: reparations for Black Americans. Professor Darity shared his wisdom after Matt and the LGE students lit up the class discussing the case for reparations in a smart, illuminating, tension-filled debate. Watching this class, knowing the courage it took for Matt and the students to broach a sensitive topic made me proud and more convinced than ever that we need this kind of dialogue in business schools.

Recommended Reading

“The business case for diversity in the workplace is now overwhelming,” from the World Economic Forum is a data-packed but super interesting read about the business case for diversity.

Taking a Stand

In October’s joint leadership statement, we articulated Tuck’s commitment to DEI and our aspiration to be an anti-racist institution. We committed to sharing our strategic plan, transparency via an annual DEI report, and monthly updates to share our progress and encourage your ideas and engagement.

Introducing Professor Stacy Blake-Beard

The incredibly smart and talented Stacy Blake-Beard joins Tuck as a Visiting Professor of Business Administration. Professor Blake-Beard will teach Managing Organizations in the spring 2021 term. Her research and expertise bisect the areas of gender, diversity and mentorship. In particular, her work focuses on the challenges and opportunities offered by mentoring relationships, with a focus on how these relationships may be changing as a result of increasing workforce diversity.

Student DEI Leadership

The Student Board DEI Co-Chair team is complete! Lia Parker-Belfer T’22 joins Roderick Milligan T’21 as student leaders focused on advancing DEI initiatives around the student experience. Rod and Lia are bringing opportunities for dialogue and connection to the community such as a live chat event with Dartmouth Professor Shamell Bell and the creative team behind the film, The Hate U Give, a small group dinner co-sponsored with WIB and a facilitated discussion on allyship, and the forthcoming launch of “If You Knew Me,” a grassroots podcast dedicated to deepening student connections and fostering a culture of belonging.



 

History, Heritage, and Honor

As the fall term kicked off in September, we recognized Hispanic and Latinx Heritage Month, and in October LGBTQ History Month, National Coming Out Day, Disability Awareness Month, and Indigenous People’s Day. This November, we honor and celebrate Native American Heritage Month, Veterans Day, Diwali, and “Movember,” the global movement to support men’s health.

In Case You Missed It: Recent Programs and Events

  • TADA Virtual Kickoff and Refresh 2020

    The (re)introduction of the Tuck Association of Diverse Alumni (TADA) as the group celebrates its 10th anniversary.

     
  • Lessons in Leadership: A Conversation with Valerie Jarrett

    Tuck’s Center for Business, Government & Society hosted Valerie Jarrett, the longest-serving senior advisor during the presidency of Barack Obama, to talk about leadership and change. Liz Calby T’21 shared what she learned from Jarrett on the Tuck360 blog.

     
  • Alumni Engagement and the Center for Business, Government & Society partnered with current students to host a civic engagement series, including the student-led session, “The Pursuit of Equitable Justice in Your Community.” Leah Jack T’21 kicked off the conversation and practitioners representing various aspects of the justice system shared the latest updates on their efforts and how everyday citizens can help create a more equitable justice system.

     
  • TADA hosted a program, “Diverse Career Stories,” for Tuck alumni to share lessons learned about navigating career transitions, climbing the corporate ladder, and becoming founders and entrepreneurs. Kacy Gambles T’10, Andrew Olaleye T'13, and Erika Santos T’12 kindly shared reflections on their career journeys.

     
  • 50 Years of Women at Tuck

    Half a century after Dean John Hennessey’s groundbreaking decision to admit women to Tuck, Tuck alumnae are leaders across all walks of life. This inspirational conversation moderated by Lauren Hirsch T’12 featured alumnae Pamela Scott T’75, the first Black woman to attend Tuck and a former financial services executive, and Sarah Blatt T’21, current Tuck student and military intelligence officer for the US Army Reserves.

     
  • Tuck’s annual Women in Business (WIB) Conference and annual Diversity Conference (DivCo) didn’t miss a beat despite the need to go virtual for this year’s events. The student co-chairs, staff, and faculty along with a dedicated group of alumni made sure that prospective students still got a taste of the Tuck magic. Thanks to Elisabeth Hartley T’05, angel investor and advisor; Cassie Young T’11, partner at Primary Venture Partners; Mariana Garavaglia T’08, chief people officer at Peloton, and the ever popular Ramsey Jay, Jr. T'05 of Ares Management for their inspiring keynote speeches.

Inclusion in Action: Bringing Black Hair Care to Hanover 

One of the questions we hear most often from Black and Pan African prospective students is if there are resources for Black hair care in Hanover.  In an effort to create a more inclusive and welcoming community that fosters belonging, we are excited to share that Tuck is partnering with Dartmouth’s Office of Pluralism and Leadership to join the effort to bring Black hair care to Hanover. By supporting a local barber as well as bringing a stylist to town monthly, Tuck and Dartmouth are thinking creatively to solve issues important to students, partners, faculty, staff, and their families who want professionals with experience cutting and styling Black, natural, and curly hair.

A Final Thought

I recently read a great article in The Atlantic about the history, use, and impact of the phrase “Hey, guys.” Related, a Slate article confirmed that one of the most hotly contested contractions in the English language may be the best gender inclusive greeting of all: “Hey, y’all.”

For more on this topic, check out this video which nicely summarizes alternative greetings that are more inclusive.
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Tuck Veterans Club Admissions Liaisons on Their Tuck Experience – Part [#permalink]
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck Veterans Club Admissions Liaisons on Their Tuck Experience – Part I

In honor of Veterans Day, Lesley Nesbitt, associate director of admissions and military liaison, sat down with military veterans T’22 Blair Bloomquist (pictured above, far right), Wen Barker T'21, and Paul Dell’Isola T'21 to discuss their Tuck experiences and advice for military applicants. In Part I of this conversation, Blair, Wen, and Paul explain the impact of the Tuck veterans community, the value of interacting with ambassadors during the application process, the power of Tuck’s study groups and small class size, and more.

Lesley: The Tuck Veterans Club is committed to providing resources and support to veterans at Tuck and their families through integration, recruitment, and veterans’ networking initiatives. What are some of the most impactful or memorable experiences you’ve had as part of the Tuck Veterans Club?

Blair: How helpful second-years Sarah Blatt T'21 and Anna Douglas T'21 have been, and Jen Tietz T’15, former U.S. Navy Officer and current Associate Director of Career Services. Just having that sense that I can call and say, “I'm having a really bad day.” Even only having met once or twice in person. I feel like these connections are a lot stronger than it may have been if I was in a larger program. I think that's really important, and particularly for transitioning (out of the military). Feeling like there is someone that you can lean on either in your own class or above. And I think that continuing to strive for more female representation is really important. The more that we have here in the student body, the more we will get in the future.

Wen: It was clear to me that the admissions office was very interested in creating a truly diverse cohort of 285 students, including people from different services, people from different walks of life, and it's hugely beneficial having female veterans in our class. This is sort of tangentially related, but I think it is relatable: I came here proud of my service but also very adamantly not trying to just silo myself into the (vets) culture. And, for me, coming from the Marine Corps, I definitely wanted to expand beyond that and I think that a lot of my peers share that same sort of worldview.

Blair: I was cognizant of this when looking at business schools because I felt similarly. It's really nice to have a strong veterans’ cohort when you come in and you don't know anyone, and you feel like other people might have connections from the same industry or undergrad experience. Walking into a room of 285 in a “normal” world and not knowing anyone but having at least the veterans’ community to feel like, “Okay, these are people I share something with.” I also think those are the people that are your lens into the programs prior to coming. Once you get here, that's not the only social scene but it’s the core of it, and it’s nice to have that. And it certainly is your first window into the social life at an MBA program.

Lesley: Thinking about what military applicants are considering as they're applying, what would you tell yourself now that you’re here, both Blair as a first-year and Wen/Paul as seasoned second-years?

Blair: What happens is a lot of people will apply to the top 10 programs without giving a lot of thought to how the schools might be similar or different from each other. For example, there are real cultural differences among the top 10 schools. So I would recommend trying to figure out what you actually want and not going to a program because of its ranking or what the external perception is of that school. Obviously, perception is very important, but take the time to figure out whether you are going to have the resources to lean on or are you just going to be one of 400 or 500 or 800. Do your due diligence and have real conversations to make sure you know why you're applying, other than where a school ranks.

Wen: I sympathize with that whole scenario. And that's because that's what I did initially. I was biased because I looked at Dartmouth for undergrad and I'm from the Northeast, but I definitely looked at the top 10. I totally understand why people have the next job in mind. But I think what I would have wanted to know, and what people should think about, is what is intrinsically tied to your experience at the school. So its academics and social life—the two are not mutually exclusive from your professional goals—and it was daunting coming in. I don't know that I would have been as successful if Tuck didn't have a culture where the vets provided a safety net to fall back on. What's more, we had the second-years to share resources with us and coach us through not only professional but academic pieces, too. I’d recommend paying attention to culture and fit and how the community supports you through all of your academic and professional goals.

Another piece of advice regarding things that I wish I'd known, I wish I had talked to more alumni as an applicant. I definitely oriented my conversations with either the admissions team or current students, which I think you absolutely should do. But one of the biggest differentiating factors of Tuck is how strong their alumni network is and I've only been able to see that after having been admitted. And that's the kind of thing that I really wish I'd known because if you're going to talk about professional goals that's where it's really going to matter. Name brand doesn't matter, all the top firms are recruiting here and at the other top schools, so what's really going to make the difference is the responsive network. I've just had tremendous fortune reaching out to Tuckies who are jumping through hoops to help me, which is awesome. Then you can't help but want to pay it forward. That's how the cycle continues.

Paul: I definitely highlight that pretty heavily too because, for me, I used my interactions. And because I know what it was like to apply to other schools and the support I got from other schools. So I usually tell applicants to use that as a piece of data. Did you get along with the people you talked to or did you even get a response? Because for us, we try to contact them within 24 hours and have a phone call within a week. I usually try to impress on applicants to not take that for granted and understand that that's part of your admissions decision and that that reflects on the school.

Lesley: I appreciate you saying that because I have tried to highlight the loyal and responsive network, to have a network around you, to have alumni who will see your email come into their inbox and feel like, “I'm on it. That's my top priority right now.” The power of the network feels really compelling, now more than ever. So I agree that is great advice regarding talking to the alums of a given school when you are deciding where to apply and where to enroll.

Paul: I think the biggest thing for me—it's what I usually try to impress on the vets that are applying—is knowing how special and how helpful the vets club was for me to get a job, to get through first year, to go through that whole process. I didn't realize I was going to lean so heavily on my vet classmates. I was expecting to come to Tuck and to shed the military side of my life and to start fresh and start new, but from the first day of Admitted Students Weekend, I was instantly plugged into the vets network. You get a taste of it when the admissions liaison reaches out to you on notification day, getting a call when you actually get in – that meant a lot to me. I recognized the leadership of the club right away, but during the first year I think it was underscored to me how helpful the second-years were and that wasn't something that was “pitched” during the admissions process. Now when I'm talking with a prospective applicant, I emphasize that aspect because almost all of my case prep, almost all of my interview prep, a lot of deciding what classes to take, I leaned heavily on the second-year vets. It's been nice for my class year because we walked in knowing some second-years, and therefore had a community that we could turn to and that could open some doors. Understanding that as you're applying to a school is really important because I didn't consider how much value-added that would be; I originally would have been much more impressed with the Career Services piece and things like that.

Lesley: The other thing I was thinking about is the community investment in general at Tuck, not just within the Vets Club but throughout the school, especially for recently separated folks or those who are about to leave the service. You're still trying to find your way so the people elements of your business school experience matter a lot: the people, the attitudes, and the ethos, and this is still true during the pandemic when we're not all together in the buildings. You were touching on this, but I think it's worth repeating explicitly: when you're leaving the military and going into the private world, you have these incredible experiences that you leverage, but you're also in this powerful period of transition and change. So having a school around you that “fits” is key. Do you feel like that rings true? Could you speak to how the “soft” aspects have impacted your path, especially as second-year students?

Paul: For me, the approachability and affability of my classmates were a big part of it because I was really interested to learn about my classmates who are in consulting and learn about the industry I wanted to go into after graduation. I wanted to learn directly from them, rather than through some kind of company briefing or cases. The culture of being able to talk to my classmates about that comes a lot faster and earlier on at Tuck than it would at a school that's bigger. I felt like I was able to have those conversations during Tuck Launch in the first couple of weeks. Originally I was thinking of going into banking or general management but three weeks later I felt fully invested in the consulting track; part of that transition came from talking to those recruiters specifically but also to my classmates. It was really easy to tap my friends on the shoulder a week or two into class, and say, “Hey, I'm really interested to know what this industry is like.” I felt really secure being able to explore those different opportunities. Similarly in my study group it was really easy to hash those things out frankly without having to worry about someone judging me.

Wen: I would definitely agree with you on the study group. I think the study group was really an awesome tool to facilitate that. Certainly academically having some people who knew what they were doing up front, but also like what Paul said, Tuck intentionally brings together people from different backgrounds. It was a good way to get a quick sense of what people's backgrounds were and what careers seemed viable or interesting. I think the small class size lends itself to getting to know your classmates, while also enabling you to dive deeper to make more meaningful connections and to get a better sense, maybe more readily than if you were at a much bigger school.

 

Stay tuned to Tuck360 for the second of this conversation!

 



Wen Barker T’21

Wen grew up in Cos Cob, CT and graduated from Bowdoin College with a B.A. in Mathematics in 2014. Upon graduation he commissioned into the U.S. Marine Corps and served for five years as a Logistics Officer with 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment in Kaneohe Bay, HI. During his time with 2/3, he participated in three forward deployments to Okinawa, Japan, first as the Motor Transport Platoon Commander and later as Assistant Logistics Officer and assisted in planning support for bilateral training with regional allies across the Pacific. Wen is married to Morgan Barker of Belleville, IL and enjoys running, hiking and skiing in his free time. Summer Internship: Bain & Company, Inc.



Blair Bloomquist T’22

Blair grew up in Menlo Park, California and graduated from Barnard College of Columbia University in 2014 with a BA in Psychology and Biology and was a member of the Columbia Women’s Swim Team. She then completed the 15-month accelerated BSN program at Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. Blair commissioned as a Naval Nurse Corps Officer in February 2016 and served as an emergency-trauma nurse for 4.5 years at Naval Medical Center San Diego and First Medical Battalion, Camp Pendleton. Blair is passionate about making healthcare more accessible and affordable for all, and continues to serve in the Navy Reserves. Blair is engaged to Scott Rowe, a Naval Aviator, and in her free time she enjoys Peloton cycling, cheering on the Baltimore Ravens, and scuba diving.



Paul Dell’Isola T’21

Paul grew up in Bethesda, MD and graduated from the US Coast Guard Academy with a B.S. in Management in 2014. Upon commissioning, Paul joined the crew of the CGC CYPRESS (WLB 210) as a deck watch officer and law enforcement officer in Pensacola, FL. Subsequently, Paul served as the Executive Officer onboard CGC EDISTO (WPB 1313). Paul completed his final year of service working as the budget officer for 15 major cutters in the Pacific Area. In June of 2019, Paul chose to resign his commission and join Tuck to help his transition into the business world. In his free time, Paul enjoys surfing, skiing, and travel. Summer Internship: Deloitte Consulting and Patagonia
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Tuck Veterans Club Admissions Liaisons on Their Tuck Experience – Part [#permalink]
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck Veterans Club Admissions Liaisons on Their Tuck Experience – Part II

In honor of Veterans Day, Lesley Nesbitt, associate director of admissions and military liaison, sat down with military veterans Wen Barker T'21and Paul Dell’Isola T'21 to discuss their Tuck experiences and advice for military applicants. In Part II of this discussion, Wen and Paul explain the similarities between Tuck and the military, the inclusivity for Tuck partners, being surrounded by similarly value-driven individuals and being valued at Tuck, and more. You can find Part I of this conversation here.

Lesley: Did getting to know your classmates as you discussed change your path?

Wen: Yes, definitely. I wrote my application thinking I was going to do renewable energy and I did that, but I also feel that I took advantage of all of the resources out there. I pivoted and went on the tech track but was also given all the info sessions of GM type jobs. Tuck was really supportive with that. I was really appreciative of the fact that I didn't have to stay on some predetermined track; when I was applying, I had the perception that you had to know what you're going to do post-MBA. So I spent a lot of time on my essays, a little bit worried, frankly, because I believed in the cause, and I still do. Then I got here still thinking, “Man, I really need to know what I'm doing.” But I didn’t know and I came to see that the professors and all the staff here, and certainly the students and the alums, all treat this question very holistically and are open to allow you to learn for yourself.

Paul: Talking about the community and fast friends, I do think it's important to draw the connection to my time at the Coast Guard Academy because it’s almost the exact same size of Tuck. While you go through a pretty grueling initial period at the Academy, and Tuck is definitely not that, I realized that a lot of the things I loved about the Academy and about joining the military, I saw in my first year at Tuck. I think it's important to make those connections, that spirit and the benefit of it. For example, how close I am to my friends that I made during that period in that small environment. Making that connection that I could get that experience at Tuck was really helpful for me.

Wen: One thing I think that's been hugely helpful for me in my role as Admissions liaison is that I can say to anyone with a partner who's coming from a military background or with a family that the similarities to the military are almost uncanny. Living in Sachem Village even looks like military base housing! The whole Sachem community acts like base housing; the safety net is there and makes the transition so smooth. Earlier we talked about veterans coming right off of active duty and trying to negotiate the chasm between military and civilian existence, and now they’re getting hit by recruiting having never really interviewed before and all that comes with your first fall at b-school. Here at Tuck, you’ll know that your partner will be more than okay while you’re getting your footing and that the community around you operates very much like the military, at least the best parts. That was hugely important to me because I felt like I didn't have to really think twice about it. It was just a very natural easy transition for me, finding instant friends

Lesley: Paul, do you want to speak to this too? I'm curious what you think is the parallel in your life.

Paul: The one other thing I would add is that the level of inclusivity for Tuck partners being invited to literally everything is special and truly unique. And it's not like they’re just invited. They are invited, encouraged, and maybe even nagged to show up! There's a Tuck partner in our class band and I’ve played hockey with multiple Tuck partners on each of my teams. That's something that's really special.

Wen: Just to expand on that a little bit. The social scene here is very much characterized by the fact that you're in the middle of New Hampshire. No one has an existing social circle here so everyone's all-in on making friends. When I was applying, I was definitely looking to maximize connections and relationships for the two years, and Tuck really works hard to double down on that. Whereas in another place, especially if you're in the middle of a city, you just can't have that. That's been pretty powerful to have that mindset here.

Lesley: I feel like the military applicants who gravitate to Tuck are the ones, like you said, who are not interested in sharp elbows, people who really prefer teamwork and a feeling of shared purpose.

Paul: For me, that came through big time in the recruiting process. It was amazing to me that I never had this feeling that I'm fighting this person for this job. It was never the case. It was never a “step on you” mentality. As part of this one firm’s interview process, it was me and five other Tuckies in the room which made it so much easier because I knew that we weren’t trying to fight each other for a job. In other schools, it’s usually more hierarchical and you might have to step on someone to get ahead. That was just the opposite of the feeling I had here and it never even crossed my mind.

Wen: It definitely is funny that way. We had five of us interview for the Seattle office over at Bain and everyone was helping each other the night prior; I don't think it even occurred to us what was at stake, like, “Oh, maybe one or two are coming out of this with an offer.” You just don't really think twice about it. With our Career Services Office, you have so much more face time, if an applicant is thinking about return on investment. I just can't imagine that the proportional attention you get is greater elsewhere. When you get to Tuck, you see that they pour their heart and soul into helping us build up the alumni network out there in the real world. I super appreciate it.

paul: It's a very different energy in the room when you're going to a final round interview and you have the other Tuckie walk in, and you see that connection like you just ran into your best friend. Along these lines, I have a punch line that I tell every single applicant because I didn't get it until like 10 people in that I talked to. When you talk to anyone that's graduated from Tuck, unprompted within the first five or ten minutes of your conversation they're going to say it was the best two years of their life. That to me was really telling. You can't fake that, in my mind.

Lesley: That’s a good segue into my next question. Can you both tell me about an experience you’ve had during your time here when you just felt that Tuck synergy and you thought, “This is the place; these are my people here.”

Wen: I definitely felt that very early on and throughout the process while being here. I think a lot of vets joined the service because they have some sense of purpose, like they want to serve their country. They want to do something greater than themselves. That's generally a universal theme that underlies the rationale for joining in the first place. And yet, when you go to business school, I couldn’t help but think that for me there was a little bit of a sense that you're going to build a career and there are some not-so-great perceptions of the business world. There's a yearning for you to connect with people who similarly feel value driven and you get concerned going to business school that these people are driven by money and you hope you’re not losing your way. Then coming to Tuck you realize that there are a lot of offerings and Tuck talks about values and it is a big deal. It's a good sign that they talk about educating wise leaders to better the world of business.

Then it becomes evident when you see your classmates stepping up when COVID hit. They’re starting Hanover Helpers, they're collaborating with other schools to do pro bono consulting work for small businesses that are about to go under. People are scrambling to find opportunities to help the world in such a way that it almost made me feel a little badly for taking the chance to just think about myself for the last year and not 28 or 40 people that I had to take care of and lead in the military. You come to realize that your classmates, like everyone here at Tuck, were selected because they really fit the bill, because they're smart, they're capable, they’re accomplished. And I was a little nervous coming into it. I thought Tuck would be a good fit, but you just don't know coming in and then you see what your classmates are up to and it's pretty evident that you know this is the right place.

Paul: For me, I really enjoyed participating in the Military and Microbrews event because I realized it was the first chance for a lot of people to be educated about what we did in the military. And there was a real thirst for learning about that, a genuine interest. It really spoke to how much it mattered in having Dean Slaughter moderate, he's taking time to ask us questions about our experiences. And our classmates are there during recruiting and everything to listen. That was the first time I thought I was able to really communicate and talk about my military experience because I came in pretty nervous about rolling into a classroom talking about business type decisions that I didn't feel like I had a reason to really answer. I was a little skittish to raise my hand in the beginning and then there was a moment where I said one or two things and I realized that I do have a voice and there's a reason I'm in this room. I think it takes a little while for that to sink in, especially for me, because if you told me when I was in high school that I was going to apply to and get into any Ivy League school, I would have thought, “No chance.” I was very intimidated by going to an Ivy League school and I'm sure a lot of the other vets had the same concern.



Wen Barker T’21

Wen grew up in Cos Cob, CT and graduated from Bowdoin College with a B.A. in Mathematics in 2014. Upon graduation he commissioned into the U.S. Marine Corps and served for five years as a Logistics Officer with 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment in Kaneohe Bay, HI. During his time with 2/3, he participated in three forward deployments to Okinawa, Japan, first as the Motor Transport Platoon Commander and later as Assistant Logistics Officer and assisted in planning support for bilateral training with regional allies across the Pacific. Wen is married to Morgan Barker of Belleville, IL and enjoys running, hiking and skiing in his free time. Summer Internship: Bain & Company, Inc.



Paul Dell’Isola T’21

Paul grew up in Bethesda, MD and graduated from the US Coast Guard Academy with a B.S. in Management in 2014. Upon commissioning, Paul joined the crew of the CGC CYPRESS (WLB 210) as a deck watch officer and law enforcement officer in Pensacola, FL. Subsequently, Paul served as the Executive Officer onboard CGC EDISTO (WPB 1313). Paul completed his final year of service working as the budget officer for 15 major cutters in the Pacific Area. In June of 2019, Paul chose to resign his commission and join Tuck to help his transition into the business world. In his free time, Paul enjoys surfing, skiing, and travel. Summer Internship: Deloitte Consulting and Patagonia
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Tuck Students Provide Food and More to Local Residents with Hanover He [#permalink]
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck Students Provide Food and More to Local Residents with Hanover Helpers

By Natalie (Triedman) King T'20

At the beginning of the pandemic, I found myself quarantined in my apartment off Wheelock Avenue feeling a striking sense of helplessness. I was fortunate to be young and healthy and felt compelled to do something, but the nonprofits I reached out to were all too overwhelmed with operational needs to even onboard volunteers.

Having worked on healthy aging policies prior to Tuck, I frequently thought about our many Upper Valley neighbors who would be hard-pressed to find alternative means for getting food and other essentials. The rural backdrop that drew so many of us here, began to pose a unique threat for many during the outbreak.

I recalibrated, recognizing that searching for the perfect outlet wasn’t a good use of time when people needed support today—and that helping even one or two people would make a difference in those individuals’ lives. The next time I went to the grocery store, I scribbled down my name, number, and a short message offering free shopping and deliveries for anyone in a high-risk category looking for help.

Nobody called me the first week, then only two people called the second week. By week three, we were up to more than 25 trips. I quickly turned to my Tuck classmates for support and they stepped up in droves, without hesitation.

Since then, the Tuck community has completed nearly 1,000 shopping trips, bringing groceries and other items to Upper Valley neighbors in need. And while some of the deliveries are critical, the Hanover Helpers team decided not to limit deliveries to the essentials. During this difficult time, we saw value in helping to bring joy and some sense of normalcy to those who needed it the most. We have made trips to the pet store for special dog food, stopped at the Coop for fresh berries from Edgewater Farm, bought flowers from Garden Supply, swung by Ace Hardware to replace watch batteries, and picked up wine from NH Liquor Outlet so that residents could celebrate birthdays and anniversaries with loved ones.

More than 120 Tuckies and Tuck Partners have stepped up since last March to contribute to, and champion, this effort. Christian Haudenschild TP’20 spent many late nights building a website from scratch to coordinate the pipeline of requests coming in for deliveries. Emily Maine, Alex Wood, and Megan Tervo T’20s joined forces to help manage the initiative and have since handed off duties to Dennis Gallagher T’21, Tyrus House T’21, and Paul Hildebrand TP’21.

This fall, many volunteers have opted into a buddy program, where they have paired up with a local senior who they shop for regularly. Students have built virtual relationships with their buddies—many of whom have their own connections to Tuck. During a time of unrest, uncertainty, and isolation, Hanover Helpers has played a small role in strengthening and bringing together our Upper Valley community.

We are always looking for new volunteers, especially as rates increase and many of our volunteers leave the Upper Valley for the holidays. Those interested in volunteering can email hanoverhelpers@gmail.com.

Hanover Helpers donates all tips to the Listen Center and the Upper Valley Haven, local nonprofit organizations supporting COVID-19 relief efforts.



Natalie with husband Warren King T’21 shopping for Hanover Helpers this summer.

 

Reflections from Hanover Helpers Recipients & Volunteers

“We have treasured the service Tuck students have provided to those of us in our 80s and 90s and cautioned not to shop for ourselves because of COVID-19. It has enabled us safely to obtain groceries, pharmaceuticals, and liquor through the volunteer efforts of these students. A second gift we only learned about in the midst of their service was the way they turned whatever financial tips they received into donations to The Haven, one of the Upper Valley’s most valued services to the homeless and those living on the margins. The Hanover Helpers is a sign of the willingness of these graduate students to give generously of their time and energy to meet the needs of people who are the most vulnerable to this virus. Many thanks!”

—Stew Wood, NH resident

“One of the most positive experiences during the pandemic for me has been helping an older couple in the community by buying and delivering their weekly groceries. We’ve built a great relationship and it’s gratifying to be able to help out the community in such a tangible and personal way.”

— Paul Hildebrand TP’21, co-leader, Hanover Helpers

"When I arrived at Tuck, I knew that I wanted to find a way to get involved in the community. We are all so lucky to have the opportunity to be students here, that I feel like we have a responsibility to give back in some way. The T20s did such a great job standing up the Hanover Helpers organization, and I was happy to be able to help out by doing a few trips a week to help some of the at-risk residents with their groceries. I’ve had a chance to deliver to several Kendal residents and get to know them over the phone when I call to ask questions. I have also been able to build up a friendship with my ‘buddy’ Barbara since I started delivering to her in the spring. Over the summer when some of the restrictions were looser, we stayed in touch via text even though I wasn’t delivering every week. She would check in from time to time to say hello, which I always enjoyed seeing during my internship! Hanover Helpers has been a big part of my Tuck experience and one of the few bright spots of our time in quarantine. It has been so nice to find a way to give back to the community in a simple, but meaningful way.”

—Dennis Gallagher T’21, co-leader, Hanover Helpers

“Prior to Hanover Helpers it was difficult to get the ingredients I like to have on hand in the freezer and in our cupboards. The communication with Hanover Helpers was seamless. Each of the students who worked with us early on provided quick and accurate information and asked good questions. The buddy system definitely increased the level of service. Dennis [Gallagher] is incredibly easy to work with and was wonderful about texting from the Coop and sending pictures if he had questions about a specific product. It was also really convenient to know we could coordinate our schedules for delivery. He is great about letting me know when he will be available.”

—Barbara Freedman, NH resident

“My name is Jan, and I Iive at Kendal at Hanover and am 82. These past 10 months have been a very stressful time for those of us who are older—the COVID-19 crisis has affected us all. However, there have been so many bright spots and so many blessings. One of those is Hanover Helpers. This group of people not only saw a need, but they also stepped up to fill it. It is such a comfort to know that throughout all, they have stepped up each week without fail to do the shopping we can no longer do in person. They are prompt and efficient but also cheery and caring.”

—Jan Chapman, NH resident

 

 

 



Natalie (Triedman) King T'20 received her dual degree from Tuck and the Harvard Kennedy School in 2020. She was the 2020 recipient of Tuck’s Centennial Student Award for outstanding leadership, selflessness, and community involvement. She has spent her career working to improve health policy and healthcare delivery for seniors and other high-risk populations within the nonprofit, government, and private sector.
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Hanover Helpers: Tuck Students Deliver Food and More to Local Resident [#permalink]
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Hanover Helpers: Tuck Students Deliver Food and More to Local Residents in Need

By Natalie (Triedman) King T'20

At the beginning of the pandemic, I found myself quarantined in my apartment off Wheelock Avenue feeling a striking sense of helplessness. I was fortunate to be young and healthy and felt compelled to do something, but the nonprofits I reached out to were all too overwhelmed with operational needs to even onboard volunteers.

Having worked on healthy aging policies prior to Tuck, I frequently thought about our many Upper Valley neighbors who would be hard-pressed to find alternative means for getting food and other essentials. The rural backdrop that drew so many of us here, began to pose a unique threat for many during the outbreak.

I recalibrated, recognizing that searching for the perfect outlet wasn’t a good use of time when people needed support today—and that helping even one or two people would make a difference in those individuals’ lives. The next time I went to the grocery store, I scribbled down my name, number, and a short message offering free shopping and deliveries for anyone in a high-risk category looking for help.

Nobody called me the first week, then only two people called the second week. By week three, we were up to more than 25 trips. I quickly turned to my Tuck classmates for support and they stepped up in droves, without hesitation. Hanover Helpers was born.

Since then, the Tuck community has completed nearly 1,000 shopping trips, bringing groceries and other items to Upper Valley neighbors in need. And while some of the deliveries are critical, the Hanover Helpers team decided not to limit deliveries to the essentials. During this difficult time, we saw value in helping to bring joy and some sense of normalcy to those who needed it the most. We have made trips to the pet store for special dog food, stopped at the Coop for fresh berries from Edgewater Farm, bought flowers from Garden Supply, swung by Ace Hardware to replace watch batteries, and picked up wine from NH Liquor Outlet so that residents could celebrate birthdays and anniversaries with loved ones.



Natalie with husband Warren King T’21 shopping for Hanover Helpers this summer.

More than 120 Tuckies and Tuck Partners have stepped up since last March to contribute to, and champion, this effort. Christian Haudenschild TP’20 spent many late nights building a website from scratch to coordinate the pipeline of requests coming in for deliveries. Emily Maine, Alex Wood, and Megan Tervo T’20s joined forces to help manage the initiative and have since handed off duties to Dennis Gallagher T’21, Tyrus House T’21, and Paul Hildebrand TP’21.

This fall, many volunteers have opted into a buddy program, where they have paired up with a local senior who they shop for regularly. Students have built virtual relationships with their buddies—many of whom have their own connections to Tuck. During a time of unrest, uncertainty, and isolation, Hanover Helpers has played a small role in strengthening and bringing together our Upper Valley community.

We are always looking for new volunteers, especially as rates increase and many of our volunteers leave the Upper Valley for the holidays. Those interested in volunteering can email hanoverhelpers@gmail.com.

Hanover Helpers donates all tips to the Listen Center and the Upper Valley Haven, local nonprofit organizations supporting COVID-19 relief efforts.

 

Reflections from Hanover Helpers Recipients & Volunteers

“We have treasured the service Tuck students have provided to those of us in our 80s and 90s and cautioned not to shop for ourselves because of COVID-19. It has enabled us safely to obtain groceries, pharmaceuticals, and liquor through the volunteer efforts of these students. A second gift we only learned about in the midst of their service was the way they turned whatever financial tips they received into donations to The Haven, one of the Upper Valley’s most valued services to the homeless and those living on the margins. The Hanover Helpers is a sign of the willingness of these graduate students to give generously of their time and energy to meet the needs of people who are the most vulnerable to this virus. Many thanks!”

—Stew Wood, NH resident

“One of the most positive experiences during the pandemic for me has been helping an older couple in the community by buying and delivering their weekly groceries. We’ve built a great relationship and it’s gratifying to be able to help out the community in such a tangible and personal way.”

— Paul Hildebrand TP’21, co-leader, Hanover Helpers

"When I arrived at Tuck, I knew that I wanted to find a way to get involved in the community. We are all so lucky to have the opportunity to be students here, that I feel like we have a responsibility to give back in some way. The T20s did such a great job standing up the Hanover Helpers organization, and I was happy to be able to help out by doing a few trips a week to help some of the at-risk residents with their groceries. I’ve had a chance to deliver to several Kendal residents and get to know them over the phone when I call to ask questions. I have also been able to build up a friendship with my ‘buddy’ Barbara since I started delivering to her in the spring. Over the summer when some of the restrictions were looser, we stayed in touch via text even though I wasn’t delivering every week. She would check in from time to time to say hello, which I always enjoyed seeing during my internship! Hanover Helpers has been a big part of my Tuck experience and one of the few bright spots of our time in quarantine. It has been so nice to find a way to give back to the community in a simple, but meaningful way.”

—Dennis Gallagher T’21, co-leader, Hanover Helpers

“Prior to Hanover Helpers it was difficult to get the ingredients I like to have on hand in the freezer and in our cupboards. The communication with Hanover Helpers was seamless. Each of the students who worked with us early on provided quick and accurate information and asked good questions. The buddy system definitely increased the level of service. Dennis [Gallagher] is incredibly easy to work with and was wonderful about texting from the Coop and sending pictures if he had questions about a specific product. It was also really convenient to know we could coordinate our schedules for delivery. He is great about letting me know when he will be available.”

—Barbara Freedman, NH resident

“My name is Jan, and I Iive at Kendal at Hanover and am 82. These past 10 months have been a very stressful time for those of us who are older—the COVID-19 crisis has affected us all. However, there have been so many bright spots and so many blessings. One of those is Hanover Helpers. This group of people not only saw a need, but they also stepped up to fill it. It is such a comfort to know that throughout all, they have stepped up each week without fail to do the shopping we can no longer do in person. They are prompt and efficient but also cheery and caring.”

—Jan Chapman, NH resident

 

 

 



Natalie (Triedman) King T'20 received her dual degree from Tuck and the Harvard Kennedy School in 2020. She was the 2020 recipient of Tuck’s Centennial Student Award for outstanding leadership, selflessness, and community involvement. She has spent her career working to improve health policy and healthcare delivery for seniors and other high-risk populations within the nonprofit, government, and private sector.
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The Movember Foundation: A Look Behind the Mustaches [#permalink]
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: The Movember Foundation: A Look Behind the Mustaches

By Mikael Clement T’22

The month of November has come and gone, and with it, a lot of overwhelming emotions as another successful Movember campaign wraps up. This year, over 20 Tuck students and Tuck partners signed up to help change the face of men’s health, exceeding our fundraising goal of $2K. The Movember Foundation is the leading charity supporting men’s health, having funded thousands of projects within the areas of prostate cancer, testicular cancer, mental health and suicide prevention. I feel fortunate to have worked closely with the foundation over the past years and seen first-hand the impact of these initiatives. While these projects are ground-breaking and crucial for men around the world, to me, Movember’s impact extends well beyond funded research and initiatives.



Grant Schaller T'21, Jack Denzler T'21, and Taylor Beaton T'21 sporting their Movember mustaches.

Many people ask me why I became involved with Movember nine years ago. The honest answer is that I was a part of a hockey culture that thought growing mustaches as a team would be hilarious and great for locker room camaraderie. A few years later, between my own battles with mental health following concussion issues and losing a close friend to suicide, I began to truly understand its importance. The mustaches grown during the month of Movember remind us of the significant impact having real conversations about mental health can have.

"The reality is that talking about mental health can be uncomfortable. Speaking up and telling someone that you’re struggling is a lot more difficult than keeping it to yourself—but, speaking up saves lives."

 

The reality is that talking about mental health can be uncomfortable. Speaking up and telling someone that you’re struggling is a lot more difficult than keeping it to yourself—but, speaking up saves lives. Statistics surrounding mental health and suicide in the United States were frightening last year. Even more alarming is that these statistics have only gotten worse due to the impact of the pandemic and the many other social issues we have faced, with over 40% of Americans reporting to have struggled with mental health issues this year. Through the most anxiety-inducing year in recent memory, if you’ve struggled with mental health in any way, you are not alone.

My message to those in the Tuck community and beyond is simple: it’s okay to not be okay. While we are a community of highly motivated and driven individuals, we are not immune to the pressures of academics, recruiting, and beyond. Take the proper time to reflect on your mental wellbeing. If you’re struggling, it’s normal, and it’s alright to talk about it. If you decide to have these difficult conversations, you’ll probably find that there are a lot more people struggling around you than you might have first thought. It’s okay to be vulnerable with a classmate, friend, family member, or professional. It doesn’t make you less strong, it makes you courageous. You are surrounded by an amazing network of people at Tuck who are always happy to lend an ear—don’t be afraid to use them.

I have sincerely appreciated the many conversations I’ve had with classmates over the past month about their own struggles with mental health. We are fortunate to be part of an MBA program that prioritizes mental health and initiatives such as the Tuck Peer Support Counselor Program and Dartmouth Counseling. Although we have a long way to go, I’m grateful for the continuously changing perception of mental health and the stigma that surrounds it, and the amazing work that Movember has done to change it.  

Reach out to a friend today to check in. Send a text. Make a call. Have a conversation. Tell those you care about that you love them and that you are there for them. Life is short—don’t be afraid to speak up. You are never alone.  



Prior to Tuck, Mikael Clement T’22 worked within the Strategy & Consulting practice at Accenture where he spent most of his time working on customer strategy projects with some of Canada’s largest banks. Mikael has a passion for mental health and suicide prevention initiatives and research and has spent the past several years working closely with the Movember Foundation in Canada. At Tuck, Mikael is involved with the Mental Health and Wellness Initiative Peer Support Program and hopes to found new and impactful initiatives during his two years in Hanover.
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What’s Up at Tuck: The December Edition [#permalink]
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: What’s Up at Tuck: The December Edition

By Tuck Admissions

Happy December, everyone! We recently saw the first snow of the season, and the Upper Valley is anxiously awaiting the next storm so outdoor winter activities can commence! Here at Tuck, we’ve been busy as ever wrapping up the year and gearing up for 2021.

The Admissions team spent most of December focused on the Round 1 decision release on December 10. We are thrilled to welcome the first members of the Tuck Class of 2023! We can’t wait to connect with you, offer you all the information you need to make the most informed MBA decision, and welcome you officially into the Tuck community!

We are also looking forward to our Round 2 application deadline on January 4 and are ready to review applications from those of you who are applying by this next deadline. Remember, after Round 2 we still have two remaining application rounds! Review our application deadlines and important dates here.

For those of you looking to submit your application on or before January 4, we hope you have taken advantage of the variety of resources that have been available to you throughout the year. If you're still looking for more information about Tuck and the unique MBA experience here, our FAQs page is a great source of information, as is our Tuck360 blog. We also have several more student-led coffee chats and an Information Session coming up in December before the application deadline. Explore upcoming online events here!

Many of you in our various chats and information sessions throughout the year have asked us how employment numbers would look for the Class of 2020. We’re pleased to share our recent employment report which shows that, despite the pandemic, T’20s steadily secured jobs and set new records in median salary and total compensation. This record-breaking feat is a testament to our dedicated team of career services advisers, our loyal alumni network, and our close relationships with corporate recruiting partners. It also serves as a reminder that, during this historic time, wise, decisive leaders like Tuck graduates are highly sought after.

While this year’s holiday season has certainly looked different for the Tuck community, students, faculty, and staff have rallied to keep the festive feeling alive on campus. The MBA Program Office (MBAPO) recently offered grab & go cookie decorating, the annual Tuck holiday tree is shining bright in Stell Hall, and the student Quality of Life Committee’s “Deck the halls” door decorating contest is well underway. Beyond campus, downtown Hanover’s Festival of Lights will continue all month long with Main Street illuminated and shops and restaurant storefronts decorated to celebrate the season.

We in Tuck Admissions are spending the final days of the year looking back in gratitude and looking forward with hope. While this year has been unconventional, unprecedented, and has challenged us all, it has been uplifting to witness this extraordinary community come together in unique ways to keep the community spirit alive. From Tuck faculty who quickly adapted to Zoom teaching and learning, to staff who have pivoted to support a virtual learning environment, and our resilient students who continue to devise creative ways to build and foster connections with one another, we are so grateful for the members of this community.

From all of us in Tuck Admissions, we wish you a happy and healthy holiday season, and a wonderful new year!

 

 

"This Week, I Am Inspired By..."
 

Shared by Patricia Harrison

Co-Executive Director, Admissions and Financial Aid


“Following the release of our Round 1 decisions last week, I am inspired by the care and thought that each candidate put into their application. While 2020 has been an uncertain year in so many ways, reading about the goals our applicants have set for themselves and their ideas on how to better the world through business gives me confidence that the future will be in very good hands."

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What’s Up at Tuck: The December Edition [#permalink]
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: What’s Up at Tuck: The December Edition

By Tuck Admissions

Happy December, everyone! We recently saw the first snow of the season, and the Upper Valley is anxiously awaiting the next storm so outdoor winter activities can commence! Here at Tuck, we’ve been busy as ever wrapping up the year and gearing up for 2021.

The Admissions team spent most of December focused on the Round 1 decision release on December 10. We are thrilled to welcome the first members of the Tuck Class of 2023! We can’t wait to connect with you, offer you all the information you need to make the most informed MBA decision, and welcome you officially into the Tuck community!

We are also looking forward to our Round 2 application deadline on January 4 and are ready to review applications from those of you who are applying by this next deadline. Remember, after Round 2 we still have two remaining application rounds! Review our application deadlines and important dates here.

For those of you looking to submit your application on or before January 4, we hope you have taken advantage of the variety of resources that have been available to you throughout the year. If you're still looking for more information about Tuck and the unique MBA experience here, our FAQs page is a great source of information, as is our Tuck360 blog. We also have several more student-led coffee chats and an Information Session coming up in December before the application deadline. Explore upcoming online events here!

Many of you in our various chats and information sessions throughout the year have asked us how employment numbers would look for the Class of 2020. We’re pleased to share our recent employment report which shows that, despite the pandemic, T’20s steadily secured jobs and set new records in median salary and total compensation. This record-breaking feat is a testament to our dedicated team of career services advisers, our loyal alumni network, and our close relationships with corporate recruiting partners. It also serves as a reminder that, during this historic time, wise, decisive leaders like Tuck graduates are highly sought after.

While this year’s holiday season has certainly looked different for the Tuck community, students, faculty, and staff have rallied to keep the festive feeling alive on campus. The MBA Program Office (MBAPO) recently offered grab & go cookie decorating, the annual Tuck holiday tree is shining bright in Stell Hall, and the student Quality of Life Committee’s “Deck the halls” door decorating contest is well underway. Beyond campus, downtown Hanover’s Festival of Lights will continue all month long with Main Street illuminated and shops and restaurant storefronts decorated to celebrate the season.

We in Tuck Admissions are spending the final days of the year looking back in gratitude and looking forward with hope. While this year has been unconventional, unprecedented, and has challenged us all, it has been uplifting to witness this extraordinary community come together in unique ways to keep the community spirit alive. From Tuck faculty who quickly adapted to Zoom teaching and learning, to staff who have pivoted to support a virtual learning environment, and our resilient students who continue to devise creative ways to build and foster connections with one another, we are so grateful for the members of this community.

From all of us in Tuck Admissions, we wish you a happy and healthy holiday season, and a wonderful new year!

 

 

"This Week, I Am Inspired By..."
 

Shared by Patricia Harrison

Co-Executive Director, Admissions and Financial Aid


“Following the release of our Round 1 decisions last week, I am inspired by the care and thought that each candidate put into their application. While 2020 has been an uncertain year in so many ways, reading about the goals our applicants have set for themselves and their ideas on how to better the world through business gives me confidence that the future will be in very good hands."

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Military Applicants FAQ: Your Questions Answered by a T’22 [#permalink]
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Military Applicants FAQ: Your Questions Answered by a T’22

Military veteran and T’22 Andrew Park addresses FAQs from military applicants.

What resources are there available at Tuck for students who are switching careers?

The career services center provides a great personalized job search experience for veterans switching careers. Equally valuable are second year Tuck students who are always more than willing to sit down with first year students seeking internships.

Tuck participates in the Yellow Ribbon Program (YRP) without limitation on the number of veterans enrolled and at a maximum level of $22,000 in funding for the 2020-21 academic year. Can you speak to the financial aid support you’ve received at Tuck?

Tuck has enabled me to take full advantage of the GI Bill and Yellow Ribbon Program. The school makes the process to receive financial aid support from both programs incredibly seamless. Fall is a busy time as a first year student, and not having to worry about administrative financial aid hurdles due to Tuck’s amazing support was extremely helpful.

The Tuck Veterans Club is committed to providing resources and support to veterans at Tuck and their families through integration, recruitment, and veterans’ networking initiatives. What are some of the most impactful or memorable experiences you’ve had as part of the Tuck Veterans Club?

Getting the chance to speak with prospective students (via Zoom) during the Tuck Veterans Symposium was an exciting opportunity to contribute to the community despite being a first-year student.

Many of our Tuck Vets come with partners and/or families. How has the Tuck community as a whole supported not just you but those who have accompanied you to the Upper Valley? How do partners and families add to the vets community specifically?

The Tuck community, and specifically the Sachem housing community, has been incredibly welcoming. As an example, during our initial 14 day quarantine period, we had multiple offers for grocery runs from other families – many of which we had never actually met in person yet. Because many of the vets move to the Upper Valley with family, partners and family serve as another layer to the network and overall community.

What do you wish you had known as an applicant to business school that you would share with prospective active duty/veteran applicants today?

Do not be afraid to reach out to current students, in particular veterans, for questions and advice. We were all in your shoes at some point and are happy to help.

 



Andrew was born and raised in Seattle, WA and graduated from the University of Washington with a B.S. in Microbiology in 2011. Upon graduation, he worked as a research scientist in a microbiology laboratory. He was commissioned into the U.S. Army through Officer Candidate School in 2013 and served for seven years as a Logistics Officer. Andrew served in several sustainment roles within logistics, infantry, and aviation units. He was last stationed in Camp Humphreys, Korea as a Battalion Logistics Officer. Andrew is married to Youn Hee (Amy) Chong and they have one child.
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An Update from the Tuck Student Board [#permalink]
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: An Update from the Tuck Student Board

Hi Everyone!

Teo Gonzalez T'21 & Hannah Sacchini T'22 tuning in from Hanover and sending our best wishes your way for a great 2021! We serve as presidents of the classes of 2021 and 2022 and wanted to share our reflections on the past year and share our thoughts as we look forward.

Looking Back on 2020: A Year We Didn’t Expect in Every Way

Reflecting on 2020, we probably feel similar to most of you—it wasn’t the year we expected. When we applied to business school, it was easy to get lost daydreaming about upcoming adventures. Just think about it: dynamic classrooms filled with the energy of people sharing ideas in-person and in real-time, travels to foreign lands packed with cultural immersion, and constantly engaging others socially—what wasn’t to love?

The events of this past year meant a lot of those plans had to shift. Almost over night, classrooms were emptied and the traditional academic setting we knew needed to be transitioned into a completely virtual Zoom experience where we tuned into classes in sweatpants while in our respective homes. International travels became longing glances on Instagram or Google Maps. Socializing? Well, that would become more complicated in every way.



Professor Ramon Lecuona makes hybrid learning more interesting in his Strategy in Emerging Markets course.

At Tuck, the experiences you dream about from an MBA aren’t just pros on a pros and cons list—they are core to what we do. In our minds, the Tuck MBA experience is the most immersive and connected available because here in the Upper Valley, all day, every day, and in some capacity, your life centers on what you are doing related to your Tuck experience. When the Coronavirus pandemic struck the U.S., the question on the minds of many people in our community was suddenly, “What is Tuck when you can’t partake in its unique value proposition—forming relationships, learning, pursuing new experiences, and pushing ourselves to new heights in real-time, all together, and in person?” It was a scary time, but there was something surprising that emerged from our challenging circumstance: a strong desire to rise to the occasion and make the most of the situation. We’re proud of our Tuck community because all of us really made the most of this experience—and in some cases, we even elevated it. Here are just a few of our favorite highlights from the year.

Change of Plans? We’ll Make the Most of It

All around us, members of our community went to the drawing board to figure out how we could still facilitate hallmark experiences without having access to our normal tools or circumstances. While classes couldn’t be in-person, professors leveraged their networks to amplify the learnings of class by asking influential figures to join us throughout course discussions.

In Strategy in Emerging Markets with Professor Ramon Lecuona, the main protagonists from our cases frequently visited our virtual discussions to share their perspectives and advice with us. During one class, we were joined by Andre Street, chair and co-founder of Stone, a Brazilian company that services its customers through payment and management tools, among other flexible financial products. Andre was such a hit with students that he was invited back to speak alongside leaders and entrepreneurs Arianna Huffington, David Rubenstein, Bethenny Frankel, and more, who were all featured in a celebrity video congratulating the Tuck classes of 2020 and 2021 on completing the academic year.

Trying to reimagine extracurricular activities was a particular challenge, but students and others rose to the occasion. The Tuck soccer team for example, which is responsible for organizing Tuck’s annual MBA World Cup Soccer Tournament, recognized they couldn’t arrange the popular event in person. Rather than completely cancel, they hosted Tuck’s first ever Virtual FIFA World Cup, a tournament that occurred over both Xbox and PlayStation platforms and was open to anyone who wanted to get involved in the activity.



Tuck Student Board members don their go-to Zoom outfits: business up top, pajamas on the bottom.

Bringing Connections to the Forefront

At Tuck, we talk a lot about our tight-knit community. The unparalleled access we have to the Tuck alumni network; the frequency with which students interact with each other; the close relationships we forge with our professors; and more—connections at Tuck are constant and integral to the MBA experience. During the pandemic, building and maintaining strong connections became even more critical, and Tuck found new and creative ways to keep the community engaged.

The Dean’s Office set up Strolls with Tuck Leadership, an opportunity for students to take socially-distanced walks around campus with the leaders who drive Tuck into the future: Deans Matthew Slaughter, Sally Jaeger, Joe Hall, Brian Tomlin, Dia Draper, and more.

Students were also able to benefit from some awesome uplifting experiences organized by Quality of Life Chairs Tara Nooyi T’21 and Madeline Henderson T’22, including pumpkin painting, cookie decorating, and a holiday door decorating contest.



Social Chairs Caroline Raymond T’21, Elisabeth Sum T’21, Andrew Goldstein T’22, and Takunda Ndoro T’22 took advantage of the fall weather by organizing small group hikes around the Upper Valley and beyond. They also launched new socially-distanced events like the Student Board Socials which bring (masked) students together in a social setting.

And Tuck alumni were more engaged than ever. Whether hosting virtual talks with students, including the Tuck Board Chats, or setting aside time for career advice, alumni have been instrumental in helping to build a valuable and supportive experience for current students during this challenging time. Recently, the Northern California, Germany, Austria, and Switzerland chapters of Tuck Alumni recently invited current students to their virtual happy hours. This is just one example of how students regularly engage with alumni in geographies and industries of interest.

Exploring the World: Local Edition

Like many people in the U.S., Tuckies still found ways to discover adventure in the diverse geographical landscape that exists across the country—specifically in beautiful rural New England. Many of us chose Tuck because we wanted to experience rural Upper Valley life, but the opportunities for hiking, sightseeing, and rewarding outdoor experiences were more than we could have imagined. Small groups explored Acadia National Park, located on the coast of Maine, while others benefited from hiking and camping in the Green Mountains of Vermont. Because Tuck is located on the border of New Hampshire and Vermont, these rewarding natural experiences are just a mere drive away from us. It just goes to show, you can experience something completely new and exciting if you’re willing to open your eyes to what is in front of you.

Looking Ahead to 2021: What We’re Focused On

As we look ahead to the new year, the student board is focused on a few key initiatives. First, we’d love to continue to strengthen our relationship with the local Upper Valley community in a way that is mutually beneficial. Fortunately, we’ve already found some great Upper Valley partners in local business owners and government officials. Some classmates, like Lulu Carter T’22, are working alongside Hanover Town Manager Julia Griffin to determine ways Tuck can be an even more active partner in the local community. Natalie (Triedman) King T’20, for example, created the Hanover Helpers Initiative which delivers groceries and more to Upper Valley neighbors in need.

Second, we want to put in place additional support structures for people to effectively maximize their time at Tuck. We have years and years of knowledge that has to be transferred over from class to class every single year. In our dream world, there’s a way this can be managed successfully so people are liberated from having to recreate the wheel and can pursue new opportunities. It’s the kind of activity that doesn’t necessarily seem super exciting but could have a longstanding positive impact.

Finally, as we enter the spring term, we want to re-read and potentially even re-write the Tuck script. Not since World War II has there been a spring semester at Tuck where the future is so uncertain. Our focus in the coming days is to work closely with the community to discover the most time-honored Tuck traditions and how we can refresh them to make this spring relevant, exciting, and the exact way we’d want it to be as we wrap up this academic year.

Wishing You a Happy and Healthy New Year

2020 was challenging in more ways than we can count. But even as we continue navigating this pandemic, we can’t help but feel hope as we embark on 2021. For this hope, we must thank our classmates, alumni, staff, faculty, administrators, and everyone else in our Tuck community. Serving and working with you is one of the great honors of our lives and you consistently impress us with your abilities to adapt, create, and persevere. You’ve done so much already and we know you’ll continue to play your role in making this world all the better.

To those reading, we hope you channel the Tuck spirit of connecting with your community, striving to innovate in the face of disruption, and doing everything you can to leave your positive impact on the world. Cheers to 2021!

—Hannah & Teo



Teo Gonzalez is a Consortium Fellow, a Tuck Admissions Associate, a Venture Capital Fellow through the Center for Private Equity & Venture Capital, and President of the Student Board. He attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he majored in Health Policy and Management. Prior to Tuck, he was a management consultant at Accenture. Teo enjoys playing soccer, learning about venture capital and emerging markets, and assisting with Tuck’s recruitment/yield efforts.

 

 



Hannah Sacchini T’22 graduated from College of the Holy Cross with a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science. Before coming to Tuck, she was a Marketplace Operations manager at Catalant Technologies in Boston.
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Tuck Alumna and HKS Student Launches Podcast on Women Olympians and Pa [#permalink]
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck Alumna and HKS Student Launches Podcast on Women Olympians and Paralympians


Tune into Flame Bearers: The Women Athletes Carrying Tokyo's Torch, spotlighting women Olympians’ and Paralympians' experiences on their ways to the Games next summer.

By Jamie Mittelman T’19

Last year, I spent six months networking my way to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in the hopes of pitching and landing my dream summer internship: a creative communications position on the ground in Tokyo supporting the IOC’s elevating women in sport efforts. To be clear, no such role existed, but I thought it should and that I was the person for the job given my experiences in digital marketing and passion for women’s sports. Further, I was used to managing large open-ended projects where I was accountable for coming up with an idea, and making it happen.

When COVID-19 hit and the Olympic and Paralympic Games were officially postponed, I realized it was a moment in which a lot of people were really hurting, and there was a void I could help fill. The Games wouldn’t happen for another year, and our world was locked in a state of constant change and chaos. People from all corners of the world were alone and in need of hope. My COVID adaption was to pitch a podcast, called Flame Bearers, championing women Olympians and Paralympians who had either qualified for Tokyo or were still trying to qualify. Our world’s best athletes were struggling, yet adapting on the fly. They were, and continue to be, true masters of resiliency. By illuminating these incredible women athletes who had overcome countless obstacles—civil war, unequal pay, racial inequity amongst others—my goal was to help instill hope in a time of uncertainty and pain.



With the generous support of the Harvard Kennedy School’s Women and Public Policy Program, this reimaged vision became a reality this past summer. This fall, my venture officially became part of the Harvard Innovation Lab, a university-wide incubator and training center for students with entrepreneurial ideas.

This experience has taught me many lessons, two of which I wish I knew when I was pursuing my MBA at Tuck:

Change the path when you don’t like the path you’re on.

Anyone pursuing an MBA is by the vast majority of metrics, very fortunate and has choices—we’re lucky. Most people aren’t in our shoes. Most people don’t adapt because they want to, but rather because they have to. Iranian archery gold medalist Zahra Nemati picked up a bow and arrow only after losing movement in her legs and was unable to continue competing in taekwondo.

In terms of my learning, I needed to first acknowledge my privilege, and second, realize that it comes with choice. All too often, I’m so comfortable on a path, that I fail to continually evaluate if it’s still actually the best path for me.

Instead of taking classes at HKS this past fall, I took a semester off to focus on this venture. I was loving my work, learning something new every day and building relationships with people I greatly admired. I gained digital skills I previously lacked, specifically in audio recording, editing, and podcast narration. I pitched partnership opportunities to both corporate partners such as Dick’s Sporting Goods and nonprofits such as the Women’s Sports Foundation. After Tuck, when I started at HKS the plan was not to take a break mid-way through, but COVID-19 was also not in the plans, so I needed to adapt. Virtual classes, however thoughtfully planned, weren’t doing it for me. I decided to apply for additional grant funding to continue my work outside of the classroom.

During my time at Tuck there were multiple times when I pushed through an experience or project instead of pausing to evaluate why I was involved in the first place. This experience has taught me to be more adaptable, but more importantly proven to me that adaptability is one of the most valuable skillsets anyone can have. As a result, I’ve tried to become more adaptable in all aspects of my life.

Know where and when you thrive but also where and when you don’t. Then, lean into your weaknesses while at Tuck because it’s a safe place to fail.

Tuck’s multiple leadership classes helped me determine who I am as an individual and the situations in which I thrive. COVID-19 and specifically this venture have helped me realize the situations and the tasks with which I really struggle. Most of us—myself included—prefer to focus on our strengths because it feels better than owning our weaknesses. That said, the process of figuring out what I’m really bad at has been one of the most clarifying of my career. This is not to say that I never thought I had weaknesses; as someone with diagnosed obsessive compulsive disorder, I’ve always been a bit too aware of them, but everyday distractions and the ability to rely on teammates pre-pandemic cushioned my ego. Given that I launched an entrepreneurial endeavor on my own in the middle of a pandemic, I was on my own, and therefore, couldn’t hide from the tasks/situations I disliked.

During my time at Tuck, I was often so impressed by my classmates that I was nervous to take on something in which I was less than proficient. Instead, I recommend thinking of Tuck as your sandbox, a playground in which you can explore what you’re truly terrible at. Because it’s a safe learning environment, I’d recommend doing more of what you are worst at. While you may not turn your weakness into a strength, by the time you graduate, your skillsets will be less binary. As a result, post-Tuck you’ll have more arrows in your quiver and you can lean into more areas where you’re proficient.



If you’re interested in tuning in, check out live Flame Bearers’ episodes below, with more coming out every few weeks leading up to the Tokyo Games this summer.

Becky Sauerbrunn, Olympic Soccer (USA)

Profiles her fight for pay equity

Sanda Aldass, Olympic Judo

Follows her escape from the Syrian Civil War and journey into motherhood

Manasi Joshi, Paralympic Badminton (India)

Details how her leg amputation allowed her to become an advocate for disability rights

Lea Davison, Olympic Mountain Biking (US)

Explores her journey to becoming one of the first openly gay professional bikers

Nicky Nieves, Paralympic Volleyball (USA)

Spotlights her identity as an AfroLatina and support for the Black Lives Matter Movement

Ezinne Kalu, Olympic Basketball (Nigeria)

Celebrates her identity as an entrepreneur

Katarina Roxon, Paralympic Swimming (Canada)

Spotlights her family dynamic (her father is also her coach) and her commitment to living a balanced/healthy lifestyle

Ida Jacobsen, Olympic Rowing (Denmark)

Adjusting to the Pandemic

Kym Crosby, Olympic Track & Field (USA)

Running, Marriage, & Albinism

Zahra Nemati Olympic Archery and Para Archery (Iran)

Archery & Hope
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Tuck Alumna Launches Podcast on Women Athletes Headed for Tokyo [#permalink]
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck Alumna Launches Podcast on Women Athletes Headed for Tokyo


Tune into Flame Bearers: The Women Athletes Carrying Tokyo's Torch, spotlighting women Olympians’ and Paralympians' experiences on their ways to the Games next summer.

By Jamie Mittelman T’19

Last year, I spent six months networking my way to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in the hopes of pitching and landing my dream summer internship: a creative communications position on the ground in Tokyo supporting the IOC’s elevating women in sport efforts. To be clear, no such role existed, but I thought it should and that I was the person for the job given my experiences in digital marketing and passion for women’s sports. Further, I was used to managing large open-ended projects where I was accountable for coming up with an idea, and making it happen.

When COVID-19 hit and the Olympic and Paralympic Games were officially postponed, I realized it was a moment in which a lot of people were really hurting, and there was a void I could help fill. The Games wouldn’t happen for another year, and our world was locked in a state of constant change and chaos. People from all corners of the world were alone and in need of hope. My COVID adaption was to pitch a podcast, called Flame Bearers, championing women Olympians and Paralympians who had either qualified for Tokyo or were still trying to qualify. Our world’s best athletes were struggling, yet adapting on the fly. They were, and continue to be, true masters of resiliency. By illuminating these incredible women athletes who had overcome countless obstacles—civil war, unequal pay, racial inequity amongst others—my goal was to help instill hope in a time of uncertainty and pain.



With the generous support of the Harvard Kennedy School’s Women and Public Policy Program, this reimaged vision became a reality this past summer. This fall, my venture officially became part of the Harvard Innovation Lab, a university-wide incubator and training center for students with entrepreneurial ideas.

This experience has taught me many lessons, two of which I wish I knew when I was pursuing my MBA at Tuck:

Change the path when you don’t like the path you’re on.

Anyone pursuing an MBA is by the vast majority of metrics, very fortunate and has choices—we’re lucky. Most people aren’t in our shoes. Most people don’t adapt because they want to, but rather because they have to. Iranian archery gold medalist Zahra Nemati picked up a bow and arrow only after losing movement in her legs and was unable to continue competing in taekwondo.

In terms of my learning, I needed to first acknowledge my privilege, and second, realize that it comes with choice. All too often, I’m so comfortable on a path, that I fail to continually evaluate if it’s still actually the best path for me.

Instead of taking classes at HKS this past fall, I took a semester off to focus on this venture. I was loving my work, learning something new every day and building relationships with people I greatly admired. I gained digital skills I previously lacked, specifically in audio recording, editing, and podcast narration. I pitched partnership opportunities to both corporate partners such as Dick’s Sporting Goods and nonprofits such as the Women’s Sports Foundation. After Tuck, when I started at HKS the plan was not to take a break mid-way through, but COVID-19 was also not in the plans, so I needed to adapt. Virtual classes, however thoughtfully planned, weren’t doing it for me. I decided to apply for additional grant funding to continue my work outside of the classroom.

During my time at Tuck there were multiple times when I pushed through an experience or project instead of pausing to evaluate why I was involved in the first place. This experience has taught me to be more adaptable, but more importantly proven to me that adaptability is one of the most valuable skillsets anyone can have. As a result, I’ve tried to become more adaptable in all aspects of my life.

Know where and when you thrive but also where and when you don’t. Then, lean into your weaknesses while at Tuck because it’s a safe place to fail.

Tuck’s multiple leadership classes helped me determine who I am as an individual and the situations in which I thrive. COVID-19 and specifically this venture have helped me realize the situations and the tasks with which I really struggle. Most of us—myself included—prefer to focus on our strengths because it feels better than owning our weaknesses. That said, the process of figuring out what I’m really bad at has been one of the most clarifying of my career. This is not to say that I never thought I had weaknesses; as someone with diagnosed obsessive compulsive disorder, I’ve always been a bit too aware of them, but everyday distractions and the ability to rely on teammates pre-pandemic cushioned my ego. Given that I launched an entrepreneurial endeavor on my own in the middle of a pandemic, I was on my own, and therefore, couldn’t hide from the tasks/situations I disliked.

During my time at Tuck, I was often so impressed by my classmates that I was nervous to take on something in which I was less than proficient. Instead, I recommend thinking of Tuck as your sandbox, a playground in which you can explore what you’re truly terrible at. Because it’s a safe learning environment, I’d recommend doing more of what you are worst at. While you may not turn your weakness into a strength, by the time you graduate, your skillsets will be less binary. As a result, post-Tuck you’ll have more arrows in your quiver and you can lean into more areas where you’re proficient.



If you’re interested in tuning in, check out live Flame Bearers’ episodes below, with more coming out every few weeks leading up to the Tokyo Games this summer.

Becky Sauerbrunn, Olympic Soccer (USA)

Profiles her fight for pay equity

Sanda Aldass, Olympic Judo

Follows her escape from the Syrian Civil War and journey into motherhood

Manasi Joshi, Paralympic Badminton (India)

Details how her leg amputation allowed her to become an advocate for disability rights

Lea Davison, Olympic Mountain Biking (US)

Explores her journey to becoming one of the first openly gay professional bikers

Nicky Nieves, Paralympic Volleyball (USA)

Spotlights her identity as an AfroLatina and support for the Black Lives Matter Movement

Ezinne Kalu, Olympic Basketball (Nigeria)

Celebrates her identity as an entrepreneur

Katarina Roxon, Paralympic Swimming (Canada)

Spotlights her family dynamic (her father is also her coach) and her commitment to living a balanced/healthy lifestyle

Ida Jacobsen, Olympic Rowing (Denmark)

Adjusting to the Pandemic

Kym Crosby, Paralympic Track & Field (USA)

Running, Marriage, & Albinism

Zahra Nemati Olympic Archery and Para Archery (Iran)

Archery & Hope
This Blog post was imported into the forum automatically. We hope you found it helpful. Please use the Kudos button if you did, or please PM/DM me if you found it disruptive and I will take care of it. -BB
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Tuck Alumna Launches Podcast on Women Athletes Headed for Tokyo [#permalink]
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