GMAT Question of the Day: Daily via email | Daily via Instagram New to GMAT Club? Watch this Video

It is currently 19 Jan 2020, 03:14

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Tuck Dartmouth MBA Admissions & Related Blogs

  new topic post reply Update application status  
Author Message
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 369
Tuck Students “Venture” to Boston  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Dec 2019, 10:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck Students “Venture” to Boston
Image
By Claire Dalman T’21 and Ross Klosterman T’20

In early November a group of Tuck students interested in venture capital and entrepreneurship traveled to Boston for a packed schedule of meetings with a variety of firms. In addition to networking, the goal of the trip was to expose students keen on entering venture or on a path to starting companies to the different models of venture capital—from early stage to growth, generalist to industry specific. We began with an evening of drinks, appetizers, and networking between students and Tuck alumni, graciously hosted at State Street Provisions by Liam Donohue T’95 and So-June Min T’95 from .406 Ventures.

Thanks to the initiative of Center for Private Equity and Venture Capital Executive Director, Jim Feuille D’79, who called everyone to attention from the dining booth seat, Brodie Stone T’20 and Ross Klosterman T’20 pitched their company, UnifiHealth, which is focusing on reimagining health benefits for small businesses. After an evening of socializing, we had a full Friday of scheduled stops at Bain Capital Ventures, Boston Millennia Partners, Charles River Ventures, Openview Venture Partners, Flare Capital, and Green D Ventures.

Image

Jim Feuille D’79 (right) called everyone to attention from a dining booth seat giving Brodie Stone T’20 and Ross Klosterman T’20 (left) an opportuity to ptich their company, UnifiHealth, which is focusing on reimagining health benefits for small businesses.

Tuckies in attendance on this trek were a mix of first- and second-year students, each of whom brought a unique perspective to each meeting given the group’s diverse background experiences and varying areas of interest within the venture capital industry. This contributed to dynamic discussions with each of the firms we met. After an obligatory coffee stop, we kicked off our jam-packed day with a conversational dialogue at Bain Capital Ventures. We discussed the firm’s position within the industry, its industry focus on SaaS companies, and its diligence processes, but we also had the chance to discuss general trends in the greater VC industry. Getting candid insights from venture professionals into where VC is today, as well as where it is heading, was a fortunate reoccurrence at every stop we made.

Millennia Partners, a firm focused on growth equity in healthcare, pharma, medical devices, and life sciences was our next stop. At only our second meeting of the day, we learned important ways in which VC firms can differ from one another, both in terms of investment approach and industry focus. Millennia Partners shared an internship opportunity with the team that first year students would be eligible to apply for, adding value to this already widely insightful trip. Charles River Ventures, or CRV, was up next where we were provided with a generous lunch spread. Here, we had the opportunity to meet with Izhar Armony, a seasoned industry professional who is a four time "unicorn" investor and has been involved with four +$1bn IPOs.

Our afternoon visits kicked off at Openview, an expansionary stage software-focused fund. We were able to speak with two Tuckies that work at the firm—John McCullough T’10 and Caitlin Bolnick T’19—who described how Openview’s advisory in corporate development, pricing and packaging and executive networks, as well as other areas gives them a competitive advantage when sourcing deals. After re-elevating our caffeine levels, we continued to our next meeting with Flare Capital Partners. Flare invests in primarily early-stage healthcare technology. This was an especially exciting meeting for our entrepreneurs mentioned above given the interest level overlap. Finally, we concluded our busy day at Green D Ventures where we met with Laura Rippy D’89 and Lacey Johnson T’13. Green D Ventures invests in early-stage companies connected to Dartmouth and Tuck alums. Ending our nonstop day at a firm connected to Tuck was a welcome grounding in the ever-evolving world of venture capital.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 369
Inside Tuck’s Ecosystem Deep Dive  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Dec 2019, 12:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Inside Tuck’s Ecosystem Deep Dive
Image
By Hugo Naulot T'21 and Robert Sewell T'21

In early October, nine first-year students participated in Tuck’s Center for Entrepreneurship and Center for Private Equity and Venture Capital Ecosystem Deep Dive, a content-and career-focused program in the Bay Area exploring entrepreneurship and venture capital. Visiting ten VC funds and venture-backed companies over the course of two days, this program was an incredible opportunity for students to learn about the relationship between early-stage investors and entrepreneurs – the kind of opportunity Tuck provides with its close-knit community. The company visits ranged from learning how a leading biotech VC is using genetic modifiers to identify new treatment options, to participating with the CEO of a VR startup in a live demonstration of his company’s newest product.

Many students come to Tuck with a precise idea of where they would like to work after graduating. However, a significant number of Tuckies embark on their MBA journey with the objective of finding the type of company they would like to work for and build the skillset they will need to be successful there. The Ecosystem Deep Dive was a perfect opportunity for both categories. Several participants signed up for the program because they had already launched a start-up, or had a venture idea, and wanted to receive advice from successful founders. Others had a broad notion that they would like to work in technology, but without knowing precisely at which type of company. By meeting investors and start-ups at all growth stages – from seed to late-stage – and in various sectors, such as virtual reality, music and online banking, participants were able to get a glimpse of what it would be like to work for each of them, and pinpoint which ones might suit them best and fulfill their career aspirations.

Image

The learning didn’t stop there. A highlight of the Ecosystem Deep Dive was the opportunity for students to ask questions – without any filters – to successful entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. At Homebrew, a seed-stage VC fund, students learned about the skills needed to become a seed investor after working several years in an operational role at a technology company. At Chime, a Series D online bank, students had the privilege of sitting down with the two cofounders, who explained how despite the company’s exponential growth, its beginnings hadn’t always been easy. Finally, the founder of Feed.fm, a SaaS audio platform, shared insights on fundraising and managing a company’s cash flows. Overall, students were painted a full picture of the Bay Area Ecosystem, from raising capital, to growing a company, and becoming an investor who will support the next generation of start-ups.

The Ecosystem Deep Dive was led by Eileen O’Toole, assistant director of the Center for Entrepreneurship, and Jim Feuille, executive director of the Center for Private Equity and Venture Capital. The expansive resources and connections of these two Tuck Centers across the entrepreneurship ecosystem made this trip possible. The companies that students visited during this program included: Maze Therapeutics, Third Rock Ventures, Volta Charging, Crushroom, High Fidelity, Chime, Feed.FM, Silicon Valley Bank, HomeBrew, and Norwest Ventures.

Learn more about the Center for Entrepreneurship and the Center for Private Equity & Venture Capital.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 369
Diverse Start-up Founders and Funders on the Rise  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Dec 2019, 14:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Diverse Start-up Founders and Funders on the Rise
Image
By Claire Shaw T’20

In November, with generous support from the Center for Private Equity and Venture Capital, I attended the Founders + Funders Conference presented by Seneca VC, Women 2.0, and SheWorx. The event was a convening of several hundred women and other underrepresented groups within the New York start-up ecosystem. Throughout a series of lightning round panels and start-up pitches, expert entrepreneurs and venture capitalists spoke on the essentiality of investing in enterprises catering outside the white male consumer archetype. Their unique stories underscored and demonstrated real traction in the current movement to make the industry more accessible.

One such speaker was KJ Miller, co-founder and CEO of Mented Cosmetics. Miller shared her and her co-founder’s frustration to find makeup that suited their skin tones when products marketed as “nude” were typically only available in lighter shades. Marrying their personal experience with a significant market opportunity (women of color spend 80% more on beauty products than the average consumer), they taught themselves how to make and market lipsticks themselves. By religiously capturing customer input through surveys and social media, Mented’s strategy has evolved to rapidly satisfy consumers, who now expect a full range of products from Mented and new releases every season.

Image

Photography by Founders + Funders NYC

Another successful entrepreneur, Lindsay Kaplan, spoke of her experience growing her business and fundraising while pregnant. Kaplan opened up about pitching her latest venture to prospective investors on Sand Hill Road while experiencing a bout of mid-morning sickness (in a word, “worse” than otherwise) and the importance of adding teammates and mentors with different and complementary areas of expertise (“don’t clone yourself”). Kapan’s start-up, Chief, a private network of professional women with VP/C-suite positions or ambitions, closed a $22 million Series A in July, one of the largest rounds raised by a woman-founded company in 2019.

Other featured speakers emphasized the diligence, occasional tedium, and data-based insights required to start a successful new business or investment fund. Catherine Dockery of Vice Ventures sent 500 personalized emails to LPs to secure her first fund, a process that took her 6 months but yielded an impressive 90% response rate. According to Dockery, “writing cold emails might be the only thing I’m superior at.” Dheerja Kaur, Chief Product Officer at theSkimm, noted the importance of concentrating on delighting power users, i.e. “Skimmers”, rather than satisfying passive consumers. Her team jettisoned a focus on growth in metrics like the total number of subscribers in favor of aligning their product roadmap with Skimmers who read their newsletter every single day.

Statistics on diversity within the start-up ecosystem remain sobering: less than 3% of VC funding in the US went to women-led companies in 2019, and just 0.32% went to Latinx women-led startups and .0006% to black women-led start-ups within the last decade. Events like the Founders + Funders Conference serve as important sources of camaraderie and inspiration for those looking to increase those numbers in the years ahead.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 369
Looking Ahead: Essay Tips for Round 2 Applicants  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Dec 2019, 13:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Looking Ahead: Essay Tips for Round 2 Applicants
Image
Image

By Luke Anthony Peña

Executive Director of Admissions and Financial Aid

Happy December, friends! Winter has arrived, the holidays are here, and Tuck looks more beautiful in the snow than ever. My Admissions and Financial Aid colleagues and I are taking these final weeks of 2019 to rest and recharge in between welcoming those of you recently admitted in Round 1 and encouraging those of you applying in Round 2.

Speaking of Round 2, I’ve heard from many of you that you’re working diligently on the refining touches to your Tuck application. The team and I want you to apply with confidence and know exactly what we look for, where we find it, and how we assess it. Earlier this fall, I spoke with Clear Admit about our application process, including how we at Tuck approach application essays. Today I write to reiterate some of the key points I hope you take to heart when writing your essays.

We’ve written at length here on our Tuck 360 blog about responding to each of our three essay prompts. We’re clear and unambiguous about what separates a strong response from an unremarkable one. But in addition to transparency, my colleagues and I also believe in simplicity. The application does not need to be unnecessarily complex. Our essay prompts are written to give you the opportunity to demonstrate our ‘aware’ and ‘nice’ criteria.

I tend not to dwell much on mistakes or pitfalls, because I want to empower you to apply with confidence, and that means focusing on all that can go right rather than all that can go wrong. I do often tell applicants that the best way to stand out is to stop trying so hard to do so. We care a lot at Tuck about your awareness, both of your strengths and your areas for growth and development.

Talking up the former and downplaying the latter might seem like a tempting approach, but it misses the point of pursuing an MBA. Presumably, you’re pursuing this degree to grow, professionally and personally, in ways or at a pace beyond what is currently possible. So lean into this opportunity to tell us with confidence all the strengths you bring to Tuck, and also tell us with humility the ways Tuck can help you grow.

The best advice I can give for the essays: write them, share them with someone whom you know and trust, and ask them not “Is this a good Tuck MBA essay?” but instead “Is this truly me?” If yes, you’ve done good work. If no, keep at it—you’ll get there!

I read every Tuck application in my first two years here, which sums up to about nine thousand essays. I’ve read tens of thousands more at my previous institutions. There is no correlation between a memorable essay and a good essay. The goal of a good application is not to leave a lasting impression on the reader, and if that is your mark, I will encourage you to reconsider your approach. The goal should be to answer the question, obviously, but to do so in a way that reveals who is the applicant behind the application.

I think of the essays as perhaps our best opportunity to get an unvarnished glimpse into the person you are. The reference letters and interview notes give us necessary insight into how others see you; the essays are you in your own words. Straining to make them memorable usually clouds rather than clarifies our understanding of who you are.

So the best essays are not facades but windows into how you think, act, and self-identify. The most effective essays are those that my colleagues and I finish reading and say “I have a clear sense of who that person is.” The most confounding are those where we say “That was interesting—perhaps even memorable—but I have no better idea who this person is than when I started reading.”

Share your essays with someone you trust and ask “do these essays, in content and tone, accurately reflect the person you know?” If you are willing and able to bring your full self to the essays, we have more confidence that you can do the same as a student at Tuck.

No matter where you are and how you celebrate this holiday season, my Tuck colleagues and I wish you peace, joy, and good cheer. We know preparing your application can be stressful, so we hope our insights on this blog and elsewhere help you be more confident and less anxious as you get ready to submit. And while Tuck will officially reopen for your questions on January 2, you can meet our students in dozens of cities around the world until then, and you can always write me via email or social media—I am happy to be accessible and helpful!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 369
Inside Austin’s TimeMachine Conference  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jan 2020, 13:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Inside Austin’s TimeMachine Conference
Image
Image

Vishal is a second-year MBA student from India. He is a fellow at the Revers Center of Energy. Prior to Tuck, he spent 6.5 years with Schlumberger. He holds a BE in Electrical Engineering from Birla Institute of Technology & Science, Pilani, India.

Prior to Tuck, I worked for 6.5 years at Schlumberger, a leader in Oil & Gas. One of my objectives behind pursuing an MBA at Tuck was to deepen my understanding of both the Oil & Gas industry as well as the broader energy sector. The Revers Center of Energy at Tuck actively provides resources and opportunities for co-curricular activities to students who are interested in the energy sector. Last month, as a fellow at Revers Center of Energy, I got an opportunity to attend the TimeMachine conference in Austin.

A futuristic ambience and an impressive lineup of speakers provided a glimpse into the future of application of Artificial Intelligence across various industries, including Oil & Gas. The panelists in the Oil & Gas session represented various parts of the industry, from startups such as SparksCognition & Cognite to Operators such as Hunt Oil as well as PE firms, and gave a wide range of perspectives. They identified data quality as one of the strongest barriers to adoption of Artificial Intelligence in this sector. Vast quantities of data, both below the surface as well as above it, is generated by companies during the exploration, development and production phase of an oil field.

However, the industry has a notorious reputation of working in silos, which makes it quite difficult to integrate data. Currently, the industry has seen numerous Proofs of Concept, but still hasn’t adopted Artificial Intelligence solutions on scale. The panelists foresaw an increase in predictive maintenance applications in near future and were hopeful that the role of Artificial Intelligence in production management would pick up in the long term.

In addition to learning about Artificial Intelligence, it was a joy to hear John Chambers, former CEO of Cisco, speak. According to him, the future of a company heavily depends on figuring out the market transitions correctly. He also emphasized on the importance of the culture of a company, since it can either be an enabler or a problem. This reminded me of similar discussions in the Managing Organizations class during my first year.

I also met Anjali Patel T’17 who works for SparksCognition, an AI startup. She was enthusiastic to implement AI solutions and see the results first-hand. In her own words, “I am excited to be a part of the AI revolution and contribute to the future”. Meeting people who work on real-world applications of AI was enriching and added value to my MBA education. I am grateful to Revers Center of Energy for sponsoring my trip to Austin for this conference. 

Image

ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 369
Tuck Students Begin Thanksgiving by Visiting Midwestern Startups & Inv  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Jan 2020, 14:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck Students Begin Thanksgiving by Visiting Midwestern Startups & Investors
Image
Thanksgiving is a quintessential American holiday – one filled with food, family, travel, more food, and most importantly no school! Late last year an intrepid group of 10 Tuck students and 1 Tuck Partner decided to devote the beginning of their Thanksgiving break to visiting 14 Midwest based startups and investors. As a co-chair of the Entrepreneurship Club and a proud Ohio native, I wanted to organize a trek for fellow students to experience the rich startup ecosystem that’s thriving between the coasts and meet some of the investors helping to make it happen.  The companies we visited ranged in size and scale – from Pittsburgh based Jetpack Workflow, which has raised just over $3M in capital, to Columbus based Root Insurance, recently valued at $3.7B.

We began in Pittsburgh, PA – once deemed the heart of the “rust belt” but now a blossoming ecosystem of AI based companies and offices for tech giants such as Amazon, Google, Facebook, and Uber.  Honeycomb Credit, an early stage fintech company founded by George Cook T’17, hosted us in their temporary office space and we got our first taste of how an early stage company needs to make the most of available resources. 

Christian Bilger, COO of Honeycomb Credit and our host for the morning, then traveled with us to their prior space at Pittsburgh’s preeminent incubator AlphaLab, where he hosted a panel with the founders of Jetpack Workflow, Bossa Nova Robotics, and Fifth Season.  After learning about some of the pros and cons of starting a company in the Midwest, we made the short trip to Duolingo, where we were treated to a delicious lunch (which, along with dinner, is provided for employees every day!) and learned what it was like to scale a global tech organization while being based in Pittsburgh.  We finished our day at the leading school and neighborhood review company, Niche, followed by Forever, a company devoted to organizing, curating, and storing memories (via media) forever.  Of course a trip to Pittsburgh wouldn’t be complete without an enormous sandwich from Primanti Brothers!  

Image

After a 3 hour drive to Columbus, OH and a good night’s rest, we began our Friday at Root Insurance and learned about product management and corporate development roles at one of the region’s fastest growing startups.  We left Root’s facilities for one of the most unlikely startups to find in a place like Columbus – RapChat – which bills itself as the #1 music making app.  Though the space wasn’t large, there was a palpable feeling that the team was really on to something.  Leaving impressed, we traveled to ScriptDrop, a quickly growing drug delivery company that enables independent pharmacies to seamlessly fill a prescription and have it delivered to a patient’s door. 

Our final two stops for the day were Drive Capital and Rev1 Ventures.  Drive has quickly made a name for itself with its success investing in the Midwest: portfolio companies include Fifth Season, Duolingo, and Root Insurance.  Parker MacDonell D’76 hosted us at Rev1, which employs a different business model and describes themselves as a “startup studio” which I’d liken to a mix between incubator, accelerator, traditional seed stage venture firm, and non-profit economic development agency – they are perhaps the most active investor in Ohio by deal volume. 

Once again, we finished our day with some fine food and even better company (especially after a local T’19 joined us!), before experiencing some Columbus nightlife.  We ended our trip on a high note, watching The Ohio State University – my alma mater – beat Penn State, before it was time for everyone to jet off to their nearest Turkey eating destination.   

Image

ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
GMAT Club Bot
Tuck Students Begin Thanksgiving by Visiting Midwestern Startups & Inv   [#permalink] 09 Jan 2020, 14:00

Go to page   Previous    1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   [ 166 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Tuck Dartmouth MBA Admissions & Related Blogs

  new topic post reply Update application status  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne