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Tuck Dartmouth MBA Admissions & Related Blogs

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Senior Manager
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5 Questions with NextEra Energy’s Henry Karongo T’15  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Dec 2018, 06:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: 5 Questions with NextEra Energy’s Henry Karongo T’15
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Henry Karongo is a director of business management at NextEra Energy Resources at Juno Beach, Florida.

1. What was the most important part of your Tuck experience that you’ve taken with you to your job and/or life?

Tuck taught me the value of the general management toolkit. In my roles since graduation, both in consulting and in industry, I continue to find incredible value in considering the multiple dimensions of business problems such as the strategic implications of pursuing various actions, the operational and financial impact of business decisions, as well as the human factors required for implementation and sustained impact over time.

2. What are some of the biggest challenges that the power and utilities industry faces and how are you working to solve those?

 There are tremendous changes occurring in the power and utilities industry. Shifts in technology, customer requirements, the policy environment and the competitive landscape require utilities to consider how their value proposition to customers will change in the future, and how they need to organize themselves to meet these needs sustainably over time. In my role, I spend much of my time thinking about how to use automation and advanced analytics tools to increase productivity and reduce operating costs. I’m also interested in understanding how the industry can organize and equip its people to fully embrace the uncertainties inherent in the operating environment to exploit new opportunities and uncover innovative ways of doing business.

3. How do you expect the type of transactions to change, if at all, in the energy space?

Investor-owned utilities will likely continue looking for attractive integrated assets which promise significant merger synergies, in addition to one-off asset deals to meet their customer demand requirements. In addition, I’d expect to see other investments in emerging technologies (e.g. electric vehicles, digital analytics platforms with energy applications, distributed generation, storage, etc.) as toeholds for potential future growth.

4. What advice would you give to current students interested in working in energy?

The problem-solving, interpersonal and leadership skills you’ll pick up from the Tuck experience will form a strong basis for pursuing lots of different paths within the energy industry. I’d suggest spending time on understanding how value is created within the parts of the industry that you’re most interested in, as well as current industry trends. For power and utilities, I’d also recommend learning at a high level how the industry is regulated, how this has influenced the development of different players in North America, and the future strategic implications of regulatory policy for the industry.

5. What do you miss most about being at Tuck?

I miss the camaraderie among classmates, playing with the T’15 band, the non-winter months, cocktails at Pine at the Hanover Inn, lots of unexpected thought-provoking conversations with faculty in the hallway, and the great dining options all over the Upper Valley. So, tons! 
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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Tuck Admissions Insights: Scholarships  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Dec 2018, 11:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck Admissions Insights: Scholarships
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Happy December, friends! Winter has arrived at Tuck. Following the Thanksgiving holiday, many of our second-year students have been traveling the world together during a well-earned break. And just last week we toasted to our first-year students for completing Fall A and Fall B—their first semester at Tuck. The Admissions and Financial Aid team is still hard at work—we’re congratulating those of you admitted in Round 1 and encouraging and supporting those of you working on your Round 2 applications due January 7.

Whether you’re already in or getting ready to submit, many of you have finances on your mind. You’re not alone! We think and talk a lot about how we can help you finance your Tuck MBA. We care a great deal about eliminating the financial barriers that might keep you from enrolling at Tuck which is why our ongoing $250 million capital campaign includes an emphasis on scholarship support.

Scholarship Selection

Many of you ask me how we determine scholarship recipients and award amounts at Tuck. Like admissions, this is a human process; there’s no formula or algorithm that makes the final decision. We convene a Scholarship Committee that reviews the entire pool of admitted students and makes discretionary calls about how to allocate resources. We’re using lots of available data, including your applications, to inform our decision-making.

Given our emphasis on eliminating barriers, we strive to offer scholarships to enroll those of you who, absent funding, might not attend Tuck. For some of you, we anticipate that you may have attractive scholarship awards elsewhere, and we strive to compete financially. For others, we see evidence in your application—experience or career goals in lower-paying industries, family expenses, currency devaluations, etc.—that compel us to reduce your cost of attending Tuck. We really want each of you whom we admit to come to Tuck, and while our resources are finite, we award as many scholarships as we can with that goal in mind.

While we would love to enroll everyone we admit, we know some admitted students will accept other great offers from other great schools, even after we’ve awarded scholarships. So we “over-award” at the beginning of each round, offering scholarship awards well in excess of our budget. This explains why we’re not in the habit of “negotiating” scholarship awards after admission—we’re typically running a scholarship deficit. As admitted students update their decisions throughout the cycle, sometimes we end up with additional scholarship funds to deploy and sometimes we don’t. When we do, the Scholarship Committee uses discretion and judgment to reallocate.

A Meaningful Investment

Some of you are fortunate to be in a position where finances are not a barrier to a Tuck MBA. But for many of you, I know that finances are a big factor. I personally understand; finances were a significant factor for me when I applied for my MBA. There are some who might advise you to ignore the price tag and set aside the cost of this considerable investment. I know first-hand that it’s not that easy or simple. The cost matters.

I also know that, like all meaningful investments, the cost must be weighed against the return on the investment. The best MBAs are not commodities, and the rewards are not uniform. Each of you has an MBA program that best positions you to contribute, thrive, and better the world of business. And the financial and personal rewards of choosing the right MBA for you—a choice you only get once—endure for life and grow stronger as you advance in your career.

If Tuck is the right MBA for you, then the rewards are worth the cost, and you belong here. And if the cost is all that’s keeping you from applying or enrolling, then let us help! Our financial aid team is accessible, helpful, and responsive, and they welcome the opportunity to help you build a plan to finance your Tuck MBA. Call us, email us, stop by and see us—let us do all we can to help you invest in your wise leadership, and your ability to better the world of business.

If you have questions for me, don’t hesitate to write me by email or on Twitter. See you in 2019!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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Tuck Takes Third at 2018 National Energy Finance Challenge  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Dec 2018, 09:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck Takes Third at 2018 National Energy Finance Challenge
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By Matt Weems T’20

What do a French coal trader, a Canadian civil engineer, a Singaporean oil trader, an American chemical engineer, and an Argentinian solar power adviser have in common?

They all recently took third place at the 2018 National Energy Finance Challenge at UT Austin. The team of five T’20s, Team Frackin’ Amazing, returned from Austin ready to take the energy industry by storm with new knowledge, new connections, and a $3,000 novelty-sized check.

The case competition centered around Rio Grande Resources (RGR), a hypothetical integrated oil and gas company with upstream assets in the Permian, DJ, and Gulf of Mexico; downstream assets in Louisiana, Utah, and Denver; and retail stations from Mississippi to Utah. RGR was evaluating upstream, midstream, and downstream opportunities to enter Mexico’s newly-opened oil and gas industry.

As a team of first-year students without much experience in upstream oil and gas or finance, there was definitely some head-scratching going on. But fueled by some pre-Halloween candy, we quickly dove into the case, assigned roles, and started our work.

Junyang, Ilexa, and Manuel tackled the mid and downstream portions and made quick work of evaluating the options. By Friday night, they had working models for the different mechanisms by which to enter Mexico. Meanwhile, Max and Matt were learning all about upstream oil assets (what are “producers,” really?). After spending Friday morning learning how to speak beginner’s upstream, they got to work on the models in the afternoon and night. On Saturday, both teams optimized the different cases and performed sensitivity analyses around the most predominant risks, namely price and currency volatility and geopolitical risks. On Sunday, we put together the final deck, using a template of slides and the silky smooth RGR logo you see above.

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We left Hanover on Wednesday afternoon, Houston-bound to visit consulting and banking firms on Thursday morning (BCG, McKinsey, Simmons, and Goldman Sachs). Wednesday night, Matt shut down Pappasito’s, eating half-price Wednesday fajitas and drinking a Grand Gold Margarita. Altogether, our team came away with a great impression of the Houston offices for these firms and the amazing people.

Thursday afternoon, we left for Austin in the truck that Ilexa was forced to rent because the rental car company had “run out of cars.” On the way, they stopped at another renowned Texas establishment, Buc-ee’s, to grab some world-famous beef jerky.

Thursday night, we networked with some of the other teams and the judges at the UT football stadium. Also, Matt learned that “ExxonMobil business casual” (khakis, button down) isn’t the same as “finance business casual” (suit without the tie).

Finally, the big day came, and we rolled into McCombs looking fresh-to-death. The teams were put into groups of three and the top team from each group would advance to the final round. Frackin’ Amazing would be the last group to present (blessing or a curse?). That gave us some time to practice, work on some accounting homework, and dance (in that order). While we were confident about our first-round presentation, we were still surprised when the judges announced we would move on to the final round. In the final round, the judges threw a wrench into the case by giving each team an hour to re-evaluate their recommendations. The judges were significantly tougher in the final round, but Team Frackin’ Amazing survived and placed third—no small achievement.

To celebrate on Friday night, Frackin’ Amazing went out for margs and tacos at Torchy’s and then met up with some other folks from the competition on Sixth Street. On Saturday, we proudly carried the novelty-size check through airport security, at one point getting asked by a young child “Why is your check so big?” Because we’re winners.

A special thanks to April Salas, Madeleine Bothe, Angel Sevilla, Constantine Triantafyllides, and Owen Jones! Without them, this amazing opportunity would not have been possible.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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Joined: 13 Nov 2013
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Tuck Takes Third at Ross Renewable Energy Case Competition  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jan 2019, 11:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck Takes Third at Ross Renewable Energy Case Competition
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By Ryan Ganong T’20

In late November 2018, a team of students, with sponsorship from the Revers Center for Energy, traveled to the equally cold and snowy Ann Arbor, MI to compete in the Ross Renewable Case Competition. The team, consisting of Pete Cahill, Greg Koch, Gavin Loudfoot, Kevin Yuan, and myself were selected from a large group of first-year students interested in representing Tuck at an energy case competition. With a former energy consultant, two former engineers, and two people with energy finance experience, the team had a solid background in energy. This, along with the large number of applicants to the case competition teams, demonstrates the continued interest in the energy space at Tuck.

The Ross competition is unique in that it is focused solely on renewable energy. This year’s case focused on the California energy market as the state recently passed ambitious legislature mandating that 100 percent of its electricity come from clean energy sources by 2045. Teams were tasked with identifying a company active in the California energy market that will help the state achieve its renewable energy goals, and then analyze potential returns on an investment in the company. The team received the prompt in the last week of October—while already busy with midterms and an energy-trek to Boston—and set to work researching companies, ultimately deciding on Proterra, an electric-bus manufacturer. Electric Bus adoption is set to increase exponentially over the next decade, and Proterra is well positioned to capture that growth with a 50 percent market share in the North American e-bus market. Furthermore, Proterra provides a unique “vehicle-to-grid” opportunity for California to balance its renewable supply and demand, which our team identified as a key issue in the case. After a week of hard work, we sent off our presentations and hoped for the best.

The Tuck team, now dubbed the “California Gold Bus,” was one of 16 teams selected out of 32 applicants from top tier business schools internationally to travel to Ross for the second round. Friday morning started early, and soon it was time for our 15 minute presentation to a panel of four judges, with five minutes of Q&A. The judges were professionals from across the energy space, including Marathon Capital, EDF Renewables, Deloitte Consulting, and the Ross Energy Institute. A nice component of the Ross competition is that it builds in time to receive feedback from the judges. Overall, they were impressed with our presentation, but had multiple areas of improvement. We left the room proud of our work, but felt the judges had brought up too many areas of improvement to advance us to the next round.

You can imagine our surprise when we were announced at the end of lunch as one of four finalists! We were given an hour to quickly incorporate the judges’ feedback into our longer second presentation, and then we were whisked into a large auditorium for the final presentations. Because we presented last, we were able to watch the other teams and were thoroughly impressed. Finally, it was our turn. We presented strongly, and defended our thesis well during 10 minutes of Q&A. The judges took longer than scheduled to deliberate—as it turns out, each judge supported a different team to be the winner. Ultimately, the “California Gold Bus” was awarded third place and a $2,000 check. We ended the day not only happy with our achievement but also honored to represent Tuck and the Revers Center on the final stage. (Although the highlight of the trip may have been carrying a giant check around Ann Arbor and back home!)
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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Tuck at COP24  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jan 2019, 08:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck at COP24
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By Tayo Odusanya T’19

As a Tuck student, Dean Slaughter’s charge to demonstrate wise leadership and to better the world of business is one that becomes intimately familiar and comes to life early and all through the Tuck experience. Outside of the required ethics and social responsibility curricula, Tuck students have several opportunities to reflect on the responsibility that business leaders share in solving society’s most difficult problems. For me, one of such experiences was the opportunity to represent Tuck and Dartmouth College as a delegate at the 24th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, known more commonly as COP24. The goal of the conference was to determine the rules for implementing the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement and to clarify the role of represented countries in mitigating climate change through reduction in emissions.

Sponsored by two centers at Tuck, the Revers Center for Energy and the Center for Business, Government and Society, five representatives from Tuck arrived in Katowice, Poland in December 2018, to join the conversation alongside tens of thousands of other delegates from around the world. Over the course of the two weeks, delegates discussed ways to address the pressing issue of climate change during panel discussions, breakout sessions, negotiation talks, and other events. I had the opportunity to listen to top United Nations officials, scientists, environmental ministers, and heads of states, including United Nations Secretary General, Antonio Guterres; Prime Minister of Poland, Mateusz Morawiecki; first African American woman astronaut in space Dr. Mae Jemison; and former Governor of California, Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Over and over again, we heard the argument for why increased investment in clean technologies and a commitment to improving sustainability was not only the right thing for businesses to do from a moral standpoint, but also from an economic perspective. The adverse effects of human behavior on the environment have become all too familiar as the news cycle seems to be in constant supply of the resulting catastrophes. All around the world, food shortages, droughts, rising sea levels, and extreme weather events are significantly impacting lives of people with a reach that moves closer to home year after year. The urgency in addressing the issue of climate change is one that current and future business leaders need to respond to immediately.

From Katowice to Barcelona, where I am currently on a term abroad at IESE Business School, I reflect on how truly personal, connected and transformative my Tuck MBA journey has been. The opportunity to attend COP24 has left an impact on my mental framework as a future business leader with a pressing charge to improve the world at large by improving the world of business.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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Tuck Admissions Insights: What Makes Tuck Distinct  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jan 2019, 16:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck Admissions Insights: What Makes Tuck Distinct
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Tuck’s Executive Director of Admissions and Financial aid, Luke Anthony Peña shares insight in to the student experience in this video interview with Menlo Coaching. Luke shares insight into what makes the community at Tuck distinctive, the academic experience, and the student career journey. Watch the video for:

[*]A view into what makes Tuck’s community is distinctive[/*]
[*]Stories demonstrating how far Tuck students will go to support each other[/*]
[*]The relationships that students are able to build with their professors[/*]
[*]Information on electives and opportunities for independent study[/*]
[*]Highlights of recruiting opportunities from Tuck[/*]
[*]A glimpse into how alumni and Career Services support you with recruiting[/*]
[/list]

 

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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Tuck Admissions Insights: What Makes Tuck Distinct &nbs [#permalink] 15 Jan 2019, 16:00

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